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In a move to join a more compassionate 21st century, the city of Montréal in Québec, Canada, has moved to ban all horse-drawn carriages!

© iStock.com/SashaFoxWalters

The calèche industry has been a longtime stain on Montréal’s tourism industry, but the city’s new bylaw will eliminate the cruel, archaic spectacle as of December 21, 2019. Advocates of the ban cited the industry’s notorious record of cruelty to animals as the reason for spearheading this monumental decision.

“Montreal is saying it’s time to move past the calèche industry,” Craig Sauvé, the city councilor responsible for animal issues, explained to The Globe and Mail. “When I see [the calèche horses] after a long time and they’re struggling and they don’t look particularly happy, I feel sorry for them. I say, ‘Is this where we are as a society?'”

During a presentation of the new bylaw, city officials noted that since 2014, horses were involved in four accidents and hundreds of complaints. In addition, officials stated that 14 tickets had been issued based on violations related to these horses’ welfare or the conditions of the carriages.

While Montréal is successfully moving past this distasteful and outdated spectacle, horses continue to escape, collapse, or die on city streets in other cities in Canada and across the U.S.

If you’re a tourist and find yourself choosing transportation in your yet-to-be-explored city, choose a human-powered pedicab, rent a bike from a bike-share service, or simply walk. A carriage ride may be a fleeting moment of entertainment for you, but it supports a lifetime of torment for horses.

We’ve seen everything from pools of blood left by a horse forced to pull a carriage while injured to a runaway horse who drowned in an icy river while attached to a sinking vehicle. Horse-drawn carriages are simply accidents waiting to happen.

They keep horses in upper floors of buildings?!

9 Terrifying Horse-Drawn Carriage Photos: http://t.co/IgXEiB5s1G pic.twitter.com/ucmr8a6NN4

— PETA (@peta) March 26, 2015

Many accidents, injuries, and even deaths—involving both horses and humans—have occurred after the animals became spooked in traffic. In a split second, a horse can go from appearing calm and sedate to crashing blindly through busy streets in a panic.

In addition to accidents, the industry has been under fire for violation after violation of animal-welfare and other laws. Drivers have been caught working horses in 90-degree weather despite a mandatory heat suspension, drinking on duty, and forcing a horse to work for four days with a serious leg injury.

Don’t Be Taken for a Ride

Horse-drawn carriages are hazards on 21st century streets. No amount of regulation can protect the public from the danger caused by horses who become frightened and bolt. Let’s follow Montréal’s lead and work together to ban these cruel relics of the past.

The post Montréal Moves to Ban Archaic Horse-Drawn Carriages appeared first on PETA.

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Please see the following statement from PETA Foundation Director of Captive Animal Law Enforcement Brittany Peet regarding Washington County’s newly passed exotic-animal ordinance, which will ban exotic animals as well as direct contact between members of the public and exotic animals:

 

It’s a kinder place for animals in Washington County, where shoddy roadside zoos like A Walk on the Wild Side will no longer be able to use sensitive big-cat cubs for photo ops with the public. PETA supported this ordinance at every stage, and its longstanding offer to transfer the animals from this facility to reputable sanctuaries still stands.

 

PETA’s motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment,” and more information about A Walk on the Wild Side is available here.

The post PETA Statement on New Exotic-Animal Ban appeared first on PETA.

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With high temperatures forecast for the upcoming months and a recent report that a dog had to be rescued from Pinnacle Mountain after suffering from heat exhaustion in Little Rock over the weekend, animals—who can quickly succumb to heatstroke if left outdoors—are at risk. Already this year, there have been at least 16 hot weather–related animal deaths—and these are just the ones that have been reported. Most aren’t.

Anyone who leaves animals outside to suffer in severe weather may be prosecuted for cruelty.

The following tips will help keep animal companions safe in hot weather:

  • Keep animals indoors. Unlike humans, dogs can sweat only through their footpads and cool themselves by panting, so even brief sun exposure can have life-threatening consequences. Anyone who sees animals in distress and is unable to help should note their locations and alert authorities immediately.
  • Never leave an animal inside a hot vehicle. Temperatures can quickly soar in parked cars, and a dog trapped inside can die from heatstroke within minutes—even if the car is in the shade with the windows slightly open.
  • Avoid hot pavement. When outdoor temperatures reach the 80s, asphalt temperatures can climb to 140 degrees, causing pain, burns, and permanent damage to dogs’ paws after just a few minutes of contact. Walk dogs on grass whenever possible, and avoid walking in the middle of the day. Never run with dogs in hot weather—they’ll collapse before giving up, at which point, it may be too late to save them.

PETA has released a warm-weather public service announcement featuring Mckenna Grace. For more information, visit PETA.org.

The post Urgent From PETA: Hot-Weather Survival Tips for Animals appeared first on PETA.

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Following recent reports that a 6-week-old baby had to be rescued after being left in a hot car in Springfield on Sunday, PETA is issuing an urgent warning: Vulnerable individuals are at risk and should never be left in a vehicle on a hot day. Animals, children, and elderly people are the most susceptible to the heat, and one mistake can cost someone’s life.

Already this summer, there have been at least 16 hot weather–related animal deaths—and these are just the ones that have been reported. Most aren’t. PETA suggests doing the following in order to safeguard humans and animals:

  • Never leave anyone inside a hot vehicle. On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to 100 degrees in just minutes, and on a 90-degree day, the interior temperature can reach as high as 109 degrees in less than 10 minutes. Dogs, who don’t sweat and can cool themselves only by panting, can rapidly succumb to heatstroke, even if a vehicle is parked in the shade with the windows slightly open.
  • If you see an animal left alone inside a car, call local humane authorities or 911 immediately and remain on the scene until the situation has been resolved. If authorities are unresponsive or too slow and the animal’s life appears to be in imminent danger, find a witness who will back up your assessment before carefully removing the animal from the car and carrying him or her into the shade.Wrap a cool, wet towel around the head and neck without covering the eyes, nose, or mouth, and wring out, resoak, and reapply it every few minutes. Pour lukewarm water over the animal’s body, and wipe excess water away, especially from the abdomen and between the hind legs. When authorities arrive, ensure that the animal is taken to a veterinarian for further care.

Law-enforcement officials across the country are also warning people of the dangers of hot weather. “Every year, we alert people to the danger of leaving children or pets inside cars in the summer,” says Chief of Police James R. Kruger Jr. from Oak Brook, Illinois. “The temperature inside a vehicle climbs approximately 43 degrees in just an hour. The loss of a defenseless animal in this manner is avoidable and should never happen. There is no reason to take your pet out in extreme heat without adequate air conditioning and water.”

Anyone who leaves a child or an animal to bake to death in a vehicle could face felony charges.

PETA has released a hot-car public service announcement featuring Mckenna Grace. For more information, visit PETA.org.

The post Urgent Message From PETA: How to Keep Kids, Dogs, and Others Safe During Hot Weather appeared first on PETA.

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After learning from PETA about Loomis Bros. Circus’ use of elephants and big cats from exhibitor Brian Franzen—who’s been cited for beating an elephant, caging tigers outside in the rain without shelter, and failing to provide animals with veterinary care—the University of South Carolina–Aiken agreed never again to host an animal circus at its Convocation Center! The university’s compassionate decision is yet another sign to animal-abusing circuses everywhere that they need to drop the cruelty if they want to keep attracting audiences.

The post The University of South Carolina–Aiken Pledges No More Animal Circuses appeared first on PETA.

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PETA has submitted formal comments to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) in opposition to an application from Sonora-based canned-hunting ranch Dub Wallace Ranch in Sonora, which is seeking permits to breed and kill endangered antelope.

The Endangered Species Act prohibits killing protected animals and makes exceptions only in extremely rare circumstances that will directly help the species in the wild—but under its much-criticized “pay-to-play” scheme, the FWS has issued permits in exchange for trivial donations to pseudo-conservation organizations. Dub Wallace Ranch seeks these permits on the basis of donating 10 percent of the profits from each animal’s death to Conservation Force, a group that lobbies to protect hunters and helps them obtain the permits needed to breed and kill endangered animals—i.e., the permits Dub Wallace Ranch is seeking.

“Gunning down confined, terrified animals might give hunters sick kicks, but it doesn’t help imperiled wild animals,” says PETA Foundation Vice President and Deputy General Counsel Delcianna Winders. “PETA is calling on federal authorities not to allow Dub Wallace Ranch to kill endangered antelope on the basis of paltry donations to any organization, let alone one that exists only to keep hunters in business.”

Late last year, the FWS came under fire for using “pay-to-play” to reauthorize the imports of elephant “trophies” from Zimbabwe and Zambia, but for years, the agency has been using it to allow the exploitation and slaughter of the very animals it’s charged with protecting, including at dozens of canned-hunting facilities in Texas.

PETA’s motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment or abuse in any other way.” For more information, please visit PETA.org.

The post Dub Wallace Ranch Wants to Kill Endangered Animals: PETA Says No Way appeared first on PETA.

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After learning of a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB)—which is very contagious and transmissible from elephants to humans—among elephants forced to give rides at Amber Fort in Jaipur, India, PETA is issuing a travel advisory urging tourists not to make any contact with elephants, to stay away from the area, and to avoid all elephant rides. PETA India has also sent a letter calling on India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to direct the Rajasthan government to quarantine the infected elephants, provide them with urgent veterinary care, and screen all untested elephants forced to interact with the public for TB immediately.

The travel advisory follows an Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) report obtained through the Right to Information Act, 2005, which reveals that in addition to the 10 elephants working at Amber Fort who tested positive for TB, many were found to be older than 50 years old and 19 were observed to be visually impaired, endangering both themselves and the public. All were found to be suffering from various foot problems, including overgrown toenails and bruised footpads, and many displayed stereotypical behavior patterns indicating mental distress, such as repetitive swaying and head-bobbing. Additionally, the tusks of 47 elephants appeared to have been cut in violation of the Indian Wildlife Protection Act, 1972, and likely have entered the illegal wildlife trade. And all the 102 “working” elephants AWBI inspected were seen carrying loads heavier than the legal maximum of 440 pounds.

“Explosive reports of blind, contagious elephants forced to carry back-breaking loads day in and day out are exactly why these rides must stop,” says PETA Executive Vice President Tracy Reiman. “PETA’s urgent travel advisory is meant to protect both travelers and the sick, suffering elephants who are being denied much-needed veterinary care, putting everyone at risk.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment or abuse in any other way”—notes that just last year, an elephant used in India’s tourism trade was beaten so badly that the animal’s leg broke. And in June 2017, a group of American tourists at Amber Fort contacted PETA to report witnessing ride operators beating an elephant continuously for 10 minutes.

PETA has recently persuaded dozens of travel companies—including smarTours, STA Travel, and TripAdvisor—to stop promoting elephant rides.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

The post Travel Advisory: Tourists at Risk of Contracting Tuberculosis From Elephant Rides appeared first on PETA.

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A box of delicious elephant-shaped vegan chocolates is on its way from PETA to the chancellor of the University of South Carolina (USC)–Aiken, which has committed to never again hosting a circus that uses animals at the Convocation Center after the notorious Loomis Bros. Circus performed there last weekend.

“By banning animal circuses, USC–Aiken is recognizing that there’s nothing entertaining about beating and intimidating elephants, big cats, or other animals into performing tricks,” says PETA Foundation Associate Director of Captive Animal Law Enforcement Rachel Mathews. “PETA is calling on audiences everywhere to skip circuses that use animals and choose wonderful animal-free ones, such as Cirque Italia, Circus Vargas, and Kelly Miller Circus.”

As PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to use for entertainment”—pointed out to the school, Brian Franzen, the current elephant and big-cat exhibitor for Loomis Bros., has been cited for numerous violations of the federal Animal Welfare Act. Franzen was recently caught on video striking an elephant in the jaw with a bullhook—a weapon that resembles a fireplace poker with a sharp hook on one end—and a recent expert report notes that the animals exhibited by him were taught and are managed using “painful handling techniques.”

USC–Aiken now joins more than 620 venues and dozens of communities nationwide that prohibit or restrict animal acts.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

The post USC–Aiken Bans Animal Circuses After PETA Appeal appeared first on PETA.

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On Friday, the winners of the 2018 Biodesign Challenge will be announced at New York’s Museum of Modern Art—and three student design teams are also competing to win the PETA Prize for Animal-Free Wool, which includes a one- to two-week-long learning experience at Stella McCartney‘s London headquarters. The following innovative materials are contenders for the prize:

  • From the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, Woocoa is a vegan wool created from hemp and coconut fibers treated with enzymes extracted from the oyster mushroom.
  • Kerasynth, from the Maryland Institute College of Art, is a microfluidic vegan skin with an array of follicles producing wool—and students have already projected the company’s stages of development.
  • The Fashion Institute of Technology team has created Werewool, a fiber mimicking the properties of wool, by isolating and expressing a protein from their own DNA and combining it with a bonding enzyme.

“The next generation of designers knows that animal-free, eco-friendly materials are the future of fashion,” says PETA Director of Corporate Affairs Anne Brainard. “PETA’s Animal-Free Wool Prize will help aspiring designers develop a sustainable material that will keep sheep from being shorn bloody for wool sweaters and scarves.”

PETA—whose motto reads, in part, that “animals are not ours to wear”—has released seven exposés recorded at 44 wool-producing facilities on three continents that have all revealed that sheep are mutilated, abused, and skinned alive in the international wool industry. Shearers are typically paid by volume, not by the hour, which encourages fast, violent work. The wool industry also produces massive amounts of methane, erodes soil, and contaminates waterways.

The PETA Prize for Animal-Free Wool—which is sponsored by PETA, designer Stella McCartney, and Stray Dog Capital—is part of the Biodesign Challenge, which partners design students with biotech professionals to help them develop new inventions that push biotechnology forward.

For more information, please visit PETA.org.

The post Student Design Teams Compete for PETA’s Animal-Free Wool Prize appeared first on PETA.

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Late last month, an injured dog named Lexi was found in the Lilly Grove subdivision of Princeton, West Virginia. She had a stab wound on her side, a tooth and claws missing, and road rash all over her body. While taking her to the animal shelter, a Mercer County animal advocate found another dog’s body, also with road rash, on Thornton Avenue. A necropsy revealed that this dog had been stabbed to death through the heart before a portion of her body was skinned.

Mercer County Humane Society looking for suspects in animal abuse case - YouTube

Lexi, who had escaped from her yard during a recent storm, has since been claimed by her guardians and is expected to recover—but law-enforcement officials have yet to determine who is responsible for abusing her and for killing the other dog. That’s why PETA is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction on cruelty charges of the person or persons responsible for either or both of these crimes. PETA’s contribution joins an existing $3,000 reward, bringing the total amount to $8,000.

PRINCETON — PETA is offering a $5,000 reward to join an existing $3,000 reward from the Mercer County Humane Society to find those… https://t.co/SoxB1YBhhG

— Take Action (@chrisntoovi) June 17, 2018

Repeat offences are the rule rather than the exception among animal abusers, who often go on to harm humans. We’re urging anyone with information about these violent crimes to come forward immediately so that whoever tormented the dogs can be found and prevented from hurting anyone else.

“It sickened me,” said Kim Bay with the Mercer County Humane Society. “I was literally sick to my stomach. The deceased dog was stabbed through the heart.”
https://t.co/PGnknGlID3

— WVVA News (@WVVA) June 13, 2018

Anyone with information is urged to call the Mercer County Humane Society at 304-460-8626 or the Mercer County Sheriff’s Department at 304-487-8364.

Remember: Always keep an eye on animal companions when they’re outside, and never leave them unattended in the yard.

The post Two Dogs Stabbed, Dragged Along Pavement—PETA Joins Search for Culprits appeared first on PETA.

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