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We all know that a regular exercise regime helps us lose or maintain weight, boosts happiness and improves our heart health, but recent research suggests it has further benefits. Here’s why upping your activity can help your brain and gut:

Your brain…

We’ve long known that brain (cognitive) training can be a good way of protecting the memory, but new research suggests that the effects are even greater when combined with intense exercise. A study published in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience found that people who combined brain training with exercise over a six-week period did better in subsequent memory tests than those who only completed cognitive training or exercise programmes.

Your gut…

Our gut microbiome is a hot topic these days, as scientists and experts agree its composition is crucial to good health – and we can improve ours through exercise, says a new study. Research from the University of Illinois found exercise can improve your microbiome even if your eating habits remain the same. The study suggests that the more active we are, the more our levels of butyrate (a fatty acid with anti-inflammatory properties) increases. This is good news, as butyrate has a role in the prevention of auto-immune illnesses and some cancers. You’re not off the hook if you have unhealthy eating habits, however: the most improved microbiomes were seen in the participants who were already classified as ‘lean’ and took exercise.

The post Why extra exercise benefits your brain and your gut appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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By Izzy Brimeau

Travelling the UK as a vegetarian or vegan can sometimes prove limiting. Thankfully, visiting Brighton is not.  Hands up – I’m not vegetarian or vegan myself,  but I do find myself eating a mainly meat-free diet. During my time away with my partner Nick, I was pleasantly surprised by the ample options available for those following a primarily plant-based diet. Here are my favourite veggie and vegan-appropriate places to eat in this quirky seaside town…

Breakfast
Trading Post Coffee Roasters
Nestled into the one of Brighton’s many lanes is this wonderful-smelling cafe and roastery. Serving up sustainable, fair trade coffee and an impressive selection of breakfast and brunch dishes, it’s always humming with activity.

We started our morning with iced coffees and a plate of sourdough, smashed avocado, roasted vine tomatoes, poached eggs and halloumi. The coffee was strong, the avocado ripe and the eggs perfectly cooked.

The menu also included a lovely selection of vegan-friendly breakfasts along with an abundance of vegetarian dishes.

Lunch
Smorl’s Houmous Falafel & Salad Bar
Located in the well-known Open Market, Smorl’s is a vegan’s dream. It’s a family-run business that specialises in falafel and houmous. Various types of houmous at that. Their original, fresh chilli, extra garlic and thunder garlic are all made using organic, hand-peeled chickpeas and sealed with a layer of olive oil.

The garlic is a mixture of fresh and roasted to ensure you don’t get that dreaded acidic burn.

The falafel is based on a traditional Middle-Eastern recipe that has been adapted by Smorl herself. We were lucky enough to sample all the houmous, dips and falafel. My personal favourite was the thunder garlic – wickedly strong and providing you with a great dose of vitamin C. I didn’t have room for a filled pita but they looked incredible, overflowing with salad, seeds and lined with houmous.

Happy Maki
The idea for these sushi wraps was born after Anna, founder and full-time vegan, spent two months living and working at a pearl farm in Tahiti. She wanted to raise awareness of the ongoing marine issues while still providing people with tasty, sustainable sushi.

We tried the Thai sweet potato, hoisin ‘duck’ and avocado kiss wraps. Each had as much flavour and satisfaction as non-vegan sushi. I usually opt for an avocado maki roll so naturally avocado kiss was my top choice.

If eating this vegan sushi doesn’t already make you feel like you’re making a good change, then perhaps knowing that 7p from every wrap is donated to Mary’s Meals, to help feed a child will help.

That’s not all. Another 8p from every wrap is donated to Eden Reforestation Projects. I don’t know about you, but that makes me feel like a pretty good human!

Dinner
Terre à Terre
Vegetarians and vegans rejoice – Terre à Terre have nailed plant-based dining. Now, my boyfriend loves a good steak. I mean really enjoys it. But he raves about this restaurant. And so do I.

We went on a Saturday night – the lights were low, candles lit and the general ambience was romantic. The floor staff were friendly and efficient and the food was sensational.

Our starter, and without a doubt the highlight of the meal, consisted of four steamed bao buns filled with marinated halloumi and bok choy. This was served alongside a plate of kimchi, pickled cucumber and sauces. I could have just had that and been happy. The vegan option is made with tofu rather than halloumi.

For a main we were recommended the vegan Terre à Terre sharing plate. The KFC (Korean fried cauliflower) and aubergine slow-baked with tahini and miso were both standout dishes. Next time I’m in Brighton I’ll be having the bao buns as a main (so that I don’t have to share).

Looking for somewhere to stay?
My boyfriend and I stayed at The White House in Kemptown. Located about a 15-20 minute walk from The Lanes, this quaint guest house was quiet, homely and only hop, skip and a jump away from the sea.

Vegetarian breakfast options include a veggie breakfast (scrambled eggs, toast, grilled mushrooms, vine tomatoes and beans) or wild mushrooms on toasted brioche. The kitchen are happy to cater to dietary requirements so a vegan option should be available on request.

Smorl’s and Happy Maki were both stops on the Very Independent Brighton Food Tour. This tour is a great way to experience some of the best quirky foodie places Brighton has to offer. Check out visitbrighton.com for more things to do, eat and see.

The post A vegetarian and vegan guide to eating out in Brighton appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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Healthy Food Guide by Amanda Ursell, Nutrition Editor - 2w ago

By nutrition editor Amanda Ursell

With another two weeks of intense summer sun coming our way, your skin is at risk of taking an extra battering from damaging UV rays. Check out our top foods to protect and nourish your body’s largest organ from the inside out.

Fresh orange bowl

Start the day with this powerful citrus fruit – on its own or in a refreshing fruit salad. It’s packed with super nutrients naringin and hesperidin, which have been shown to slow down glycation, a reaction in the skin that weakens collagen – and, in combination with sun damage, leads to wrinkles.

Carrot and coriander salad

Carrots are bursting with the orange pigment beta-carotene, which collects under our skin and acts as an internal SPF by deflecting some of the sun’s damaging rays. Have them steamed, in salads, roasted with other root vegetables, in soups or simply as carrot juice to help give your skin an internal SPF3. Other beta-carotene-rich vegetables include dark cabbage and sprouts.

Gazpacho

Tomato juice – or tomatoes in any form, whether canned, fresh, cooked or in a tomato-based gazpacho soup – are packed with lycopene, a red-coloured antioxidant, which has been shown in Italian research to reduce the formation of fine lines during sun exposure.

Kale smoothie

Great for the yellow super-nutrient lutein, which (although it’s disguised in kale by the green pigment chlorophyll) collects in the skin as well as the macula lutea of the eye, helping to protect not only your skin but also your eyesight from sun damage and blindness in later life.

Tropical fruit salad

Chop up papaya, which has almost as much beta-carotene as carrots and mix in some mango and diced kiwi. This is loaded with zeaxanthin, another yellow pigment that helps to protect your skin and eyes from sun damage by absorbing blue light that otherwise damages the macula lutea.

Watermelon slice

As well as topping up lycopene, watermelon is 93% water, which means tucking into a 260g slice gives you 240ml water – that’s almost equivalent to drinking half a 500ml bottle of water! Being dehydrated quickly shows in your skin, accentuating lines, which can then get deeper through sun damage.

Cashew and walnut snack pack

Along with blueberries, grapes and mango, these nuts have good levels of the plant compound gallic acid. This super nutrient is a powerful antioxidant, potentially helping sun damage leading to cancerous changes in the body, and it also dampens down inflammation, one of the side-effects of sun exposure in the skin.

Grapefruit juice

Rich in the fascinating super nutrients called liminoids, these compounds have been shown in test tube experiments to detoxify carcinogens and to cause cancerous cells to self-destruct; it’s a potentially useful weapon against free radical damage triggered by UV rays.

Soya milk

This gives us isoflavones, the plant version of human oestrogen, a hormone we need to help keep our skin moist and supple. Regular soya in our diets may help in part to counter the drying effects of sun exposure on our skin.

Strawberries

Great for vitamin C, which our bodies need for a wide range of roles, including wound healing and strong gums, not to mention having a vital role in making and maintaining good quality collagen, which helps to keep your skin youthful and resilient.

The post 10 quick hacks for boosting summer skin appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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July has arrived with the promise of warmer weather, colourful produce and most importantly, a brand spanking new issue of Healthy Food Guide.

Pick up your copy today and enjoy the height of summer with a healthy barbecue guide, meals from the Mediterranean, fruity and frozen ice lollies and many feel-good recipes bursting with seasonal fruit and veg.

Need more temptation? Read our 11 reasons to buy…

1. Why you should create a home for friendly bacteria (and how to do it)
According to research scientists, the secret to good health may live in your gut. We look into resetting your gut, how your gut can affect your mind, and 20 foods to boost your gut health.

2. The no-hangover guide to summer drinking
The warm weather can encourage us to head outside and, more often than not, grab an ice-cold alcoholic drink. We’ve complied an expert guide to enjoying that glass of wine, beer or cocktail, including safer drinking tips, debunking myths and even a cooling non-alcoholic virgin mojito recipe.

3. Summer smoothie bowl
We mentioned the importance of gut health earlier, so it’d only be fitting that we provide a good-for-your-gut recipe. Our favourite summer recipe is a fruity smoothie bowl, also known as this month’s cover recipe.

4. Demand a lunchtime rise
Move over sarnies, there are new lunch recipes in town. This month we’re taking lunchtime up a notch with six healthy, vibrant and easy-to-make options. From sashimi don (pictured below) to chilli avo toast, you’ll never want to buy your lunch again.

5. Healthy makeover: chicken enchiladas
Who doesn’t love a plate of spicy, cheesy, soured cream-smothered enchiladas. Well, you know what you’ll love more? All the flavours for less calories. We’ve made this Mexican dish healthier by switching to lower-fat cheese and soured cream and making some subtle changes. This has resulted in reduced fat, almost half the salt and adding more veg so the meal includes four of your five-a-day.

6. Pops of colour
When the sun is out there’s only one dessert desired by adults and children alike – ice lollies. Our July issue has three very fruity, easy-to-make pops to ensure you keep cool this summer. These mango and vanilla macadamia pops are at the top of our list.

7. How to make the Med diet work
Contrary to popular belief, one doesn’t need to be in Greece, France or Italy to enjoy the benefits of the Mediterranean diet. When followed correctly the diet may lower obesity risk and associated health conditions. Our pull-out-and-keep guide provides you with everything you need to eat this way at home – recipes, portion sizes and smart swaps from chefs. Want more? Find five more Med recipes on pages 46-51.

8. The meat-lover’s healthy barbecue guide
According to National Barbecue Week, the average Brit attends nine barbecues a year. As grills are fired up nation-wide, Juliette Kellow provides the lowdown on which meat is the healthiest, the pros and cons of eating meat, and the ultimate cooked meat portion guide.

9. Identify your eating style and lose weight for good
Personality types aren’t just for understanding how your brain works, they also apply to the way you eat. Dr Meg Aroll and Louise Atkinson, authors of The Shrinkology Solution, have devised six eating personality types – and you’re sure to relate to one. They provide us with six ways to work with that type, to ensure weight loss.

10. Fighting the 21st century slump
Slumping in front of a computer or checking your phone as you walk could be harming your health. Pick up your July copy of Healthy Food Guide for your guide to better posture – after all good posture is free!

11. Take the plunge
Dive into fitness with Hannah Ebelthite’s top 10 ways to get fit in the water this summer. Find five pages with water activities, workouts and a wonderful in-the-water kit.

The post 11 reasons to buy our wonderful July 2018 issue appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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Healthy Food Guide by The Healthy Food Guide Team - 1M ago

By Ameera Chowdhury

Ramadan is an important month for Muslims. Every day, from dawn till dusk, it is obligatory for healthy and able adults to refrain from eating and drinking. The aim is to become closer to Allah (God), feel what the less fortunate feel and to practise religion more actively.

Due to the Islamic lunar calendar, the month doesn’t occur at the same time every year. When Ramadan occurs during the summer months – where the daylight hours are a lot longer than they are in winter – of course, the fast is a lot longer and more difficult to cope with. Although the intention should be religious and not health related, health should still be kept in mind.

Here are six snippets of advice:

Save time to digest
Waking up before dawn and topping up with food before the start of the fasting day (called Sehri or Suhoor) can be a struggle. The rushed food consumption in order to hurry back to bed is not ideal and can give rise to abdominal pains. Try to finish eating about an hour before you return to sleep to allow the body plenty of time for digestion.

Be productive during the day
When fasting, the body will have a presence of increased levels of the hunger hormone ghrelin, due to the prolonged periods of an unfilled stomach. This is a physiological trigger that can’t be avoided. However, keeping yourself occupied throughout the day is a great way to forget about the hungry feeling.

Don’t forget physical activity
A difficulty often experienced during the month is finding a good time to exercise without risking dehydration. With the combination of an empty stomach and a warm summer’s day, it’s best to put off your physical activity until near the end of the day. Perhaps carry out light exercise such as a slow walk just before breaking the fast. This way, you’ll be able to restock soon after.

Slow down
When the sun sets and it’s time to break the fast (called iftar), food can often be swallowed at a very fast rate. You’re aiming to eat a full day’s worth of food within a few hours (which is tough), so make sure to take your time and use the whole evening rather than eating everything in one sitting. In the book Be Good To Your Gut (Piatkus, £20), Eve Kalinik recommends chewing 30 times per bite whenever you eat!

Keep to a healthy diet
The food you eat is just as significant as the timing. Continue with a balanced diet as you would normally, including plenty of variety. You’ll need carbohydrates – which break down into glucose for energy – plus fibre to feel fuller for longer. Also, take care with cooking methods as cultural traditions can often lead to more deep-frying than grilling or baking.

Drink plenty of water and refrain from caffeine. Caffeine is a diuretic so causes more water to remain in urine rather than being reabsorbed into the bloodstream.

Make sure you rest
Fasting will cause the body to lack energy, although this will be worse if you aren’t getting enough sleep overnight. Aim to retire for the day as soon as you’ve completed the evening prayer (called Taraweeh) to make up for sleep lost during the pre-dawn meal.

The post Six tips to a healthier Ramadan appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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We can now (safely…?) say summer is on its way.  A couple of hot spells, the forecast for June is looking hopeful and our June 2018 issue is filled with flavoursome recipes and interesting reads.

So, what better way to enjoy the sunshine than buying a copy of the latest Healthy Food Guide and reading it in your fave sunny spot?

Need encouragement? Here are 10 more reasons…

1.Calorie countdown
Want to lose a few pounds before you go away? Healthy Food Guide nutritionist  Amanda Ursell provides us with easy swaps to help cut out 500 calories a day from our usual diets.

2. Migraine: new ways to beat the pain
Spot the more unusual signs of a migraine attack with our expert guide, and learn about the very latest treatments to help relieve your symptoms.

3. Your breast health and you
Checking for lumps is an important part of breast health. But did you know there are few other things you should look out for? Dr Dawn explains…

4. Healthy tonight!
This month’s Healthy Tonight is all about simple dishes with maximum flavour. From a flavour-packed Moroccan beef pilaf to a three-step tuna frittata – you’re sure to find a recipe that excites your tastebuds.

5. High-fibre your breakfast
Avoid the morning sugar rush with our healthy granola recipe… Even better, it has three flavour variations to ensure that your mornings are never dull.

6. The new veggie squad
You can’t go wrong with a good veggie burger and we’ve got three  meat-free burgers that are not only healthier, but so delicious that even meat lovers will crave them.

7. Free-from choccy delights
Not only are these chocolate mousses lighter on fat and sugar, they’re also dairy and gluten-free, and downright scrumptious.

8. Win a 12-session transformation package with isoshealth
Enter our competition and you could win a fab health package! The package will connect you to your own group of health experts, for one-on-one video consultations concentrating on your areas of concern. Find out more about isoshealth, too.

9. Let’s milk it
Whether you’re trying the vegan diet, lactose intolerant or want to try something different, there’s a nutritious milk out there for you.

10.Sun, Sea and protection
There may be no better feeling than the warm sun on your skin, but there’s a fine line between a safe amount of sun and an amount that could have long-lasting effects…

The post 10 reasons to buy our June 2018 issue appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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By Ellie Donnell

The team at Healthy Food Guide headed to Somerset, along with 15 lucky competition winners and their plus ones, to tour the organic Yeo Valley farm.

With half my family hailing from a dairy farming background, I know my way around a country field. But Yeo Valley isn’t your average farm. For starters, they’re deeply committed to sustainable farming – working with nature, not fighting it – and have long been certified organic by The Soil Association.

You can happily spend a relaxing day trip there. Sign on to a walking tour of the farm and enjoy the stunning Somerset scenery, before tucking into a hearty and, of course, organic lunch at their canteen. Or, simply ogle at the country views with a homely tea and cake at the garden café.

Our winners’ day began with a tour of the organic gardens, lead by head gardener, Andi. We were guided around the beautiful beds and borders, as well as a greenhouse filled with jungle-like plants, while Andi shared her gardening tips.

Next, we headed off into the surrounding fields of Yeo’s two farms, Holt and Yoxter, home to 400 happy British Friesian cows who graze away on grass and clover. They also enjoy a diet of organic silage – effectively pickled grass, crimped wheat and other cereals. This ensures that they produce the highest quality, best tasting organic milk, which is used to make Yeo Valley’s yoghurt, butters and ice creams.

It’s been 50 years since Yeo Valley first began and second-generation owners, Tim and Sarah, continue to practice the sustainable values that the farm has always adhered to. Their soil is free from chemical fertilizers, their cows enjoy extra room to roam around and 50 acres of their farm is devoted purely to homing wildlife. The company also thinks long term and has invested in solar energy panels to power the farm.

To ensure our readers truly benefitted from the unwavering sunshine, Yeo Valley’s on-site fitness instructor, Lynne, took us through a quick Pilates class in a field. Our tour finished by meeting the latest additions to the herd – three utterly adorable new-born calves. Like all the others cows on the farm, they are each given a name.

Next stop: the canteen. And, much like everything at Yeo Valley, this was not your average canteen. With the restaurant taking bookings up to 3 months in advance, you need to plan ahead. With stunning views overlooking Blagdon Lake and a bright yet rustic interior, it wasn’t difficult to see why the restaurant is so popular.

The menu offers an array of dishes that make the most of local produce while championing the humble vegetable. We tucked into a nourishing bowl of green spelt risotto, garnished with feta and pea shoots, followed by a yoghurt (of course) pannacotta. It was all delicious, wonderfully comforting and nice to know that the ingredients hadn’t come much further than a field away – literally.

Click here to find the recipe for green spelt risotto and yoghurt pannacotta.

Lunch was followed by a cooking masterclass, lead by chef Paul, where we learned how to make beetroot burgers, Pimms jelly and two-ingredient linseed crackers, to name a few. Again, the focus was on vegetables and using local and seasonal ingredients. Paul managed to whip up six different dishes in the space of 30 minutes, proving just how easy healthy cooking can be.

Finally, we were all given an opportunity to taste a range of Yeo Valley yoghurt, from their thick and creamy Greek varieties to their slightly lighter natural and 0% fat yoghurts. Healthy Food Guide nutritionist, Amanda Ursell, was on-hand to explain the health benefits of yoghurt, including their varying fat and sugar content. Luckily, I’m already an avid yoghurt-lover and you don’t need to tell me twice to eat the creamy stuff!

Yeo Valley’s attitude to farming is exactly what you want, and expect, from a food producer. From their zero waste mentality – see their left-Yeovers yoghurt for proof! – to the way they look after their plants, land and animals, we could all learn a thing or two from Yeo Valley’s family farm.

The post Yoghurt, pilates and a field trip to Yeo Valley appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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By Ellie Donnell

The team at Healthy Food Guide headed to Somerset, along with 15 lucky competition winners and their plus ones, to tour the organic Yeo Valley farm.

With half my family hailing from a dairy farming background, I know my way around a country field. But Yeo Valley isn’t your average farm. For starters, they’re deeply committed to sustainable farming – working with nature, not fighting it – and have long been certified organic by The Soil Association.

You can happily spend a relaxing day trip there. Sign on to a walking tour of the farm and enjoy the stunning Somerset scenery, before tucking into a hearty and, of course, organic lunch at their canteen. Or, simply ogle at the country views with a homely tea and cake at the garden café.

Our winners’ day began with a tour of the organic gardens, lead by head gardener, Andi. We were guided around the beautiful beds and borders, as well as a greenhouse filled with jungle-like plants, while Andi shared her gardening tips.

Next, we headed off into the surrounding fields of Yeo’s two farms, Holt and Yoxter, home to 400 happy British Friesian cows who graze away on grass and clover. They also enjoy a diet of organic silage – effectively pickled grass, crimped wheat and other cereals. This ensures that they produce the highest quality, best tasting organic milk, which is used to make Yeo Valley’s yoghurt, butters and ice creams.

It’s been 50 years since Yeo Valley first began and second-generation owners, Tim and Sarah, continue to practice the sustainable values that the farm has always adhered to. Their soil is free from chemical fertilizers, their cows enjoy extra room to roam around and 50 acres of their farm is devoted purely to homing wildlife. The company also thinks long term and has invested in solar energy panels to power the farm.

To ensure our readers truly benefitted from the unwavering sunshine, Yeo Valley’s on-site fitness instructor, Lynne, took us through a quick Pilates class in a field. Our tour finished by meeting the latest additions to the herd – three utterly adorable new-born calves. Like all the others cows on the farm, they are each given a name.

Next stop: the canteen. And, much like everything at Yeo Valley, this was not your average canteen. With the restaurant taking bookings up to 3 months in advance, you need to plan ahead. With stunning views overlooking Blagdon Lake and a bright yet rustic interior, it wasn’t difficult to see why the restaurant is so popular.

The menu offers an array of dishes that make the most of local produce while championing the humble vegetable. We tucked into a nourishing bowl of green spelt risotto, garnished with feta and pea shoots, followed by a yoghurt (of course) pannacotta. It was all delicious, wonderfully comforting and nice to know that the ingredients hadn’t come much further than a field away – literally.

Click here to find the recipe for green spelt risotto and yoghurt pannacotta.

Lunch was followed by a cooking masterclass, lead by chef Paul, where we learned how to make beetroot burgers, Pimms jelly and two-ingredient linseed crackers, to name a few. Again, the focus was on vegetables and using local and seasonal ingredients. Paul managed to whip up six different dishes in the space of 30 minutes, proving just how easy healthy cooking can be.

Finally, we were all given an opportunity to taste a range of Yeo Valley yoghurt, from their thick and creamy Greek varieties to their slightly lighter natural and 0% fat yoghurts. Healthy Food Guide nutritionist, Amanda Ursell, was on-hand to explain the health benefits of yoghurt, including their varying fat and sugar content. Luckily, I’m already an avid yoghurt-lover and you don’t need to tell me twice to eat the creamy stuff!

Yeo Valley’s attitude to farming is exactly what you want, and expect, from a food producer. From their zero waste mentality – see their left-Yeovers yoghurt for proof! – to the way they look after their plants, land and animals, we could all learn a thing or two from Yeo Valley’s family farm.

The post Yogurt, pilates and a field trip to Yeo Valley appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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This healthier pannacotta recipe was created by the chefs at Yeo Valley HQ. They’ve used yogurt and milk in place of the traditional cream to keep it low in fat and a little higher in protein. It’s much lower in sugar, too. Try serving alongside these chewy chocolate and hazelnut biscuits for a real treat.

PREP 5 MIN
COOK 10 MIN, PLUS SETTING
SERVES 4

Ingredients:

3 gelatine leaves
250ml full-fat milk
35g caster sugar
300g Yeo Valley bio light (3 small pots)
Fresh red berries, to serve (optional)

Method:

1. Soak the gelatine in cold water for 5 min, until it becomes very soft.
2. Put the milk and sugar in a saucepan over a medium heat and bring to the boil. Then turn off, and stir so that the sugar dissolves entirely.
3. Remove the gelatine from the cold water and squeeze out excess water, then add to the hot milk, stirring to ensure it is all dissolved.
4. When cooled slightly, add the yogurt and pass the whole mixture through a fine sieve. Divide among whichever moulds you are using.
5. Allow to set in the fridge for 3-4 hours, or even overnight.

PER SERVING

Gluten free

130kcal
2.4g fat
1.5g saturates
18g carbs
18g sugars
0g fibre
8.8g protein
0.2g salt
209mg calcium
0.1mg iron

LOW CAL
LOW FAT
LOW SATS
LOW SALT
HIGH PROTEIN

The post Yeo Valley’s Bio Light yoghurt pannacotta recipe appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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Nourishing, fabulously nutty and full of green goodness, this spelt risotto recipe was created by the chefs at the Yeo Valley staff canteen – open to both the staff and the public. The food’s so good there’s a three-month waiting list. Using spelt instead of rice boosts the fibre content of the dish. It’s completely vegetarian too!

PREP 10 MIN

COOK 35 MIN

SERVES 2

Ingredients:

150g green spelt
1tbsp olive oil
75g leeks, finely diced
75g carrot, finely diced
2 banana shallots, finely diced
2 garlic cloves, finely diced
1 chilli, thinly sliced
200ml reduced-salt vegetable stock
100g baby spinach
60g feta (optional)
Pea shoots, to decorate

Method:

1.Cook the spelt according to the pack instructions in lightly salted water until cooked but still with a little bite, this should take around 30-35 min.
2. Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium-high heat. Add the leeks, carrot and shallots and cook for 2-3 min. Add the garlic and chilli and cook for 2 min more.
3. Add the cooked spelt and the stock and cook for another min.
4. Add the spinach and cook for 1 min more. Crumble over the feta (if using) and decorate with the pea shoots to serve.

Per serving (without feta)

Vegan
Vegetarian
Dairy free

357kcal
11.2g protein
9.2g fat
1.4g saturates
52g carbs
5.9g sugar
9.8g fibre
0.5g salt
88mg calcium
1.9mg iron

LOW CAL
LOW SALT
LOW SAT FAT
LOW SUGAR
2-5-A-DAY

Per serving (with feta)

Vegetarian

432kcal
15g fat
5.5g saturates
52g carbs
6.4g sugars
9.8g fibre
15g protein
1.2g salt
196mg calcium
1.9mg iron

LOW CAL
LOW SUGARS
2-5-A-DAY

The post Yeo Valley’s green spelt risotto recipe appeared first on Healthy Food Guide.

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