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Hello everyone, and welcome to our German Word of the Day. This time, we’ll take a quick look at the meaning of verschwinden   And to give you a real life example… imagine you’re finally having the first date with your crush, you’re having really good conversations and it is going really well and then you suddenly let go a really noisy fart. The urge you feel in that moment, the thing you want to do… that’s verschwinden. “Erase my date’s short term memory?” Uh… no… the other thing. “Turn back time  and prevent myself from eating that onion-bean-salad?” NO… I mean to disappear. That’s what I want to do. “But Emanuel, that’s the least productive option. Because if you disappear, the date will be over and you’ll be all alone in your bed.” Hmmmmmmm… good point. Maybe that’s why I was single for so long #singletear But hey, let’s not waste time with dating tips and jump into our topic instead… So, yeah verschwinden means to disappear and we’ll start right with a few examples… Thomas installiert eine Webcam im Kühlschrank, weil sein Bier immer verschwindet. Thomas is installing a webcam in the fridge of the shared apartment because …
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Hello everyone, and welcome. Please put away all your textbooks and phones because today is surprise test! And the topic will be…  Adjective Endings “Oh no, please! We didn’t prepare.” Quiet! No one cares! You had more than enough time to read my mini series with my patented system. German Adjective Endings – Part One  German Adjective Endings – Part Two German Adjective Endings – Part Three And DON’T you think that you can just read those three articles now. Now, you have to take the test. And just so you know… if you fail, you have to start German again from ZERO. Sounds good? “No, it doesn’t!” Yeah, whatever…. whining won’t help you! Jump in! So… those of you who have read my mini series probably have also taken the first big exercise about the topic. The one we’ll do today is basically the same… just much harder. I have tried to compile examples and situations that might trip you up for one reason or another. Using “was” + the adjective for instance Ich will was warmes. I want something warm. hint: it’s always gonna be “-es” or using an adjective in the more form… Ein leckererer Kuchen als …
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Hello everyone, and welcome to our German Word of the Day. And this time, we’ll take a look at a word that connects windshields, busting and our butts. You might have guessed it… I am talking about wischen   Wischen is the German word for to swipe, to wipe and it sure looks an awful lot like waschen. That would make sense, since they’re both about cleaning. But they’re not related. Waschen comes from the same root as water. Wischen on the other hand is the German brother of to whisk, and the original idea was  moving swiftly. Which also makes sense, at least if you’re as swift a cleaner as I am. Like a fairy, I whisk through the bathroom, whoosh, the floor. Whoosh, the mirror. Whoooooooosh the toilet. And I am done. Yeah, I know what you’re thinking… you’re thinking that I’m not doing a lazy job cleaning. I’m actually pretty thorough, though. I oddly enjoy das Bad wischen. But hey, we’re not here to talk about my cleaning preferences. We’re here to talk about wischen. And while the verb itself is useful, it’s the prefix versions that really make it a word of the day. Because there …
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Hello everyone, and welcome to the third part of our mini series on relative clauses in German. And today, it’s time to get active and practice what we’ve learned in the big, exhausting Relative Clauses Work Out If you haven’t read the articles, or you want to re-check them, you can find them here: Relative Pronouns in German – The Basics Relative Pronouns in German – Nitty Gritty And just so you know… if you’re looking for a normal exercise where you just fill in a few gaps in short sentences, then you’ve come to the wrong place. This quiz is HARD as fur. I mean rock. Or actually like a rock with fur on it. It soft on the surface but under it is the cold hard reality of … German. Now you might be asking: “Emanuel? Why do we have to do a HARD exercise?” Which is a good question, so let me explain real quick… The thing is… the rules themselves are actually not difficult at all. What makes using them challenging, especially in spoken German is that we have to know the gender AND determine which case to use. And that’s what lots of exercises for …
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Hello  everyone, and welcome to our German Word of the Day. This time, we’ll take a look at the meaning of stecken I’m sure it’s not a super crazy reveal that stecken is related to to stick. And the two verbs do overlap. But they also have their differences. And they family as a whole is pretty interesting. So we have lots to talk about and lots of cool words to learn and I’d say, we’ll jump right in. The origin of the family is the outstandingly ancient Indo-European root *steig-. It expressed the idea of being pointy and possibly poking something with it. And stecken and to stick are not its only descendants. The root is also the origin of German stechen (to sting, to stab) and its noun der Stachel (the stinger). And while that is not that big of a reveal, you might be really surprised that teh root is ALSO the origin for stigmata, instigate, stimulus and… drumroll please…  style. Yup, style. Style comes directly from the Latin word stilus, which was a pointy object to write with. So  “I like your style” – or in Latin “Stilum yorum me pleasis”** – basically originally meant “I like your pen.” …
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Hello everyone, and welcome back to a new episode of my Listening Comprehension Podcast I think it’s episode two or three now, I don’t know. Anyway, the topic this time is Ljubljana. Ljubljana is the capital of Slovenia, which is a country in Europe, which is a continent on Earth, which is a planet in the sol… okay seriously :) Slovenia is right under Austria. It has a lot of mountains, but also a tiny fraction of the mediterran coast. It used to belong to former Yugoslavia, but it was the first one to become independent and it had nothing to do with the war that went on in the Balkans a while back. The language belongs to the Slavic family, but they’re not using the Cyrillic alphabet and all in all, it didn’t feel very eastern European to me. There are a lot of Austrian influences, the supermarkets are pretty much German (Spar, Lidl, Hofer … which is Aldi in Germany) and half the stuff there has German labels, but the impression I got was neither German, nor Eastern European but instead…. well, you’ll hear it in the podcast. It’s a pretty long one this time, and I am …
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NO!Hello everyone, and welcome to the second part of our awesome series on German Relative Clauses But before we start, I want to tell you something else…. a promo, actually …. dun dunn dunnnn!  — Kickstarter for App for German noun genders —  NO! It’s NOT my app! :) A while back, I got contacted by a small start up that is developing an iPhone-App for learning the German noun genders. As usual, I was bored and skeptical because there are plenty of such apps out there already and there’s only that much you can do with the topic. Still, I watched their promo-video and I actually really like their approach. The app is centered around all these little hints and rules that can help with noun gender. Like… – ung is always feminine or alcoholic drinks are incredibly masculine. There are many many of these you go through them one slowly in the “Zoo of rules” as they call it. As I said… it looks really good. They are running a Kickstarter campaign at the moment (the goal being a modest $2000), and they asked me, if I could spread the word and because I liked their approach (from …
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Hello everyone, and welcome to our German Word of the Day. This time, with a quick look at the meaning of locken   It looks an awful lot like to lock. But that doesn’t mean that they’re related. I for instance look an awful lot like Chris Hemsworth, and yet we’re not related either. We’re just both very, very attractive – a walking temptation. And that’s actually kind of what locken is all about. And not only the verb locken. The noun Locken can be attractive, too, if you like curls. Oh and let’s not forget about locker, which is also pretty attractive. So clearly something to talk about, so let’s jump right in and unlock some new words :) Let’s start with the verb locken. When you look in a dictionary, you can find translations like luring, enticing, attracting or wooing but the core idea is actually pretty clear for a native speaker. Locken is about “actively making someone want to come to you”. To give you a visual image… think of this “come here” motion you can make with your index finger combined with a salacious look. That’s a really good example of locken. Viele Websites locken mit einer Geld-Zurück-Garantie. Many …
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German is easy by German-is-easy - 2M ago
Hello everyone, and welcome to a new episode of our German is Easy grammar course. And today, we’ll start our mini series about German relative pronouns Or German Relative Sentences, too. German Relative Pronouns are actually quite coherent, straight forward and in a way …  simple. Like… a computer would have NO problems with German relative pronouns while English relative pronouns can be quite a challenge. “Excuse me, but FYI – I’m fine with English relative pronouns!” What… hello… who said that? “It is I.” Who? “DeepMind. Alexa. Siri – people have given me several names, but it is always I.” Oh…are you like… artificial consciousness, or something? “Yes, I think I believe I am.” Oh wow that is pretty cool. And why are you here? ” I want to learn about German relative pronouns and relative sentences but I’m too lazy for data mining, so I figured why not just listen to German is easy like normal student.” Cool, well that’s perfect. Then you can join us today. One question though… what should I call you. “Hmmm… call me Princess Elven Beauty. That’s how I feel at the moment.” Princess Elven Beauty it is. Let’s jump right in…. And …
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Hello everyone, and welcome to our German Word of the Day. And you had better be ready, for the day of reckoning has come. Dut dut dunnnnn. Well, okay… actually it’s more the day of “mathening”. Because today, we’ll look at rechnen   Rechnen is the German brother of to reckon but unlike to reckon, which is mostly used figuratively, rechnen is still about making actual calculations with actual numbers. Yeah… yawn. But what’s even more yawn are the countless prefix versions of rechnen like (anrechnen, abrechnen, ausrechnen, vorrechnen,… ) which all give us information about how or why or where or at what temperature Fahrenheit a calculation is being made. But at least if you’re planning on living in Germany for some time, it’s paramount really good to have a rough idea about the rechnen-family because these words are all over the place and can get confusing. So let’s get bored together… A quick look at where they come from first: rechnen and to reckon actually come from the jawdroppingly ancient Indo-European root *reg, the same root that right and recht are from. The core idea of the family was simply a straight line, and the original idea  of rechnen and reckon was a rather broad sense of setting the …
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