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The HR Star Conference Cleveland being held on July 25 will attract over 600 HR professionals for a day of education, networking, and engagement. ERC proudly supports this conference year after year. This year ERC has the privilege of providing four speakers on four different, engaging topics. Meet our speakers below and catch their sessions at the event.

Tara Motheral The Times They Are A-Changin’: How Your Handbooks, Policies, and Business Strategies will be Impacted by Recent Legislative Developments

2018 has seen a handful of landmark court decisions, critical employment legislation, and the implementation of new business-oriented programs. This session will look at what these events mean for your organization, from employee handbook updates to considerations when making business decisions. Participants will walk away with an understanding of key developments that impact their organization and what HR needs to do to ensure the organization is up-to-date and compliant. Topics like mandatory arbitration agreements, salary history legislation, and the status of medical marijuana in the workplace will be addressed.   

About Tara:

Tara Motheral is an HR Advisor with ERC. She co-manages ERC’s HR Help Desk where she provides members with information and professional guidance on a variety of HR and general business-related topics. Tara’s strong background as an attorney and in research and compliance has positioned her to tackle the common issues employers face today.

As an Account Executive covering the law school market for LexisNexis, she annually trained 1,200 students and faculty on how to effectively conduct legal research and held recruiting and performance management responsibilities over teams of student employees. Tara also previously served as an attorney at a regional litigation firm where her practice focused on litigation of civil matters, including employment issues and contractual disputes. She also worked for the Office of the Ohio Attorney General, where she represented the Ohio Lottery Commission in administrative hearings and staffed a Charitable Law hotline, where she researched and provided guidance to questions from the general public on topics including charitable giving, fundraising, and gaming.

Lisa Codispoti Trends in Performance Management

Many organizations are moving toward a new direction in performance management, keeping the performance conversation going throughout the year vs. a one-time, annual event.  What are the key differentiators that make one approach better than the other, and how do you know if your current system needs a refresh? This session will help review current trends regarding Performance Management and discuss best practices for making the transition to a new format.  

About Lisa:

Lisa Codispoti is ERC’s Director, Consulting. At ERC, Lisa is responsible for our Consulting services which include the full cycle of the Employee Experience. With over 25 years of Human Resources and business leadership experience, Lisa has gained valuable knowledge and expertise in everything from Talent Management, to HR transformation, organizational development, change management, and leadership effectiveness.

Prior to joining ERC, Lisa has held a variety of HR and business operations roles including prominent positions at Sage Software, Outsourcing Solutions, KeyCorp, and GE. Lisa received her Bachelor’s Degree from Walsh University and her MBA from Case Western Reserve University. She has completed Ph.D. coursework in Human and Organizational Development from the Fielding Institute.

Tom Ault Difficult Workplace Conversations

This presentation will provide tools to allow you to have more effective conversations in the areas of performance, behavior, attitude, and challenging workplace situations that need to be addressed. Many times we know what we would like to be able to say to an employee or a client, but how do we communicate in ways that leave the recipient of the message still motivated to make the necessary change or to not get defensive? 

About Tom:

Tom Ault is the Director, Technical Training and a Senior Training Consultant with ERC. Tom specializes in assisting organizations with a full spectrum of human resources projects, programs and training. Tom’s primary areas of focus are leadership development, supervisory development, financial accumen, goal setting, leading change, communication, talent management, organizational and employee development, performance management, coaching and mentoring, retreat facilitation, workforce planning, and employee engagement.

Before starting with ERC, Tom managed administrative financial offices in three cities within the United States. He then went on to hold numerous positions where he interfaced with internal and external customers to implement solutions that led to cost-saving improvement initiatives totaling over $90 million.

Tom’s past business and financial experience allows him to bring simple models and processes that allow participants to connect concepts and strategy to real-life application.

Tom possesses a unique blend of financial acumen, talent management, and process improvement techniques that are valued by all participants. He has designed and facilitated a full spectrum of customized training programs for clients spanning all industries.

Meg Matejkovic  Conducting Workplace Investigations

This session will review the basics of developing and conducting thorough, complete and timely workplace investigations. Participants will hear topics including but not limited to when is an investigation appropriate; who should conduct the investigation; what steps should be taken to prepare for the investigation; what are the elements for a successful investigation interview; how to assess credibility; and how to prepare an investigation report. 

About Meg:

Margaret “Meg” Matejkovic assists employers by providing practical tools to develop and maintain positive, proactive workplaces.  Examples of her work include conducting workplace investigations; offering counseling and coaching sessions for managers, supervisors, and employees often as part of an employee’s professional development; and training on a variety of employment law-related topics.  She regularly counsels employers on all aspects of labor and employment laws (e.g., Title VII, FMLA, ADA, ADEA, FLSA, USERRA, related state laws) and has represented employers before State and Federal Courts, the U. S. Department of Labor, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and State Fair Employment Practice Agencies.

With over 20 years of private practice exclusively representing employers and in-house employment, labor, and human resources law experience, Meg also served as Associate Dean for Akron Law from 2005 until 2013 when she opted to return to consulting with employers and the practice of law on a full-time basis.  Meg continues to serve as an adjunct faculty member for Akron Law, teaching a course that she developed entitled The Human Resources Lawyer.  She received the Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Award from Akron Law in May 2016 and also has been named an Outstanding Alumnae of The University of Akron School of Law for 2018.

Meg has been a member of the national faculty for the Society for Human Resource Management since 2013.

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Talent, in many organizations, seek learning and development opportunities to advance their careers. They often look to their employer for support and guidance. Therefore, it is important for organizations to provide structured learning. However, many employees may not know where to start when it comes to their professional and career development. Organizations have the unique opportunity to provide the “where to start” for employees in conjunction with developing the skills necessary for the overall goals of the organization.

Research conducted by the National Technical University of Athens notes “competency-based management has become a very crucial element in the effective operation of an enterprise or an organization, due to the increased need of the latter to be agile enough to adapt to quick market changes and re-orientation of their business plan.”

Therefore, first and foremost, the organization needs to establish what the business goals are and what needs to be done to complete those goals. For example, if an organization has the goal of launching an app, it’s likely that the need for skilled-coders and marketers will be necessary to achieve that goal. You can also use national surveys, to identify where the implications of talent or skill shortage are (or is coming).

From there, organizations can begin to compile an ongoing, continuously updated list of in-demand skills that support business objectives. Having a strategic approach like this to developing employees will ensure the efficiency and productivity of your workforce.

Next steps include using assessments to understand where your skills gap is, pairing that with your organizational goals, and identifying employees to fill that skills gap.

If your organization has succession plans in the near future, it’s important to emphasize identifying employees that can fill those leadership roles. Developing learning paths for these employees can ensure that your organization has the competencies it needs in the right places moving forward.

Develop learning paths for employees but providing them with a structured approach to their development. Create and provide a variety of paths for different employees to follow based on their career interests and goals, as well as the organization’s interests and goals.  

Beyond creating and documenting these paths, it’s important for organizations to also provide the resources for employees to accomplish these goals.

Work with a learning and development organization on what your goals are and have them provide ongoing support for employees, design formal training, and assess training effectiveness.

The success of learning path implementation at your organization greatly depends on your organization’s ability to effectively hold learners accountable. Be sure that employees and managers are mapping out year-long plans to achieve their learning goals and being held accountable for their progress moving through the learning path.

ERC provides workplace assessments for organizations across the nation.

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Recruiting and hiring the right people for the right position is an essential piece of an organization's success. Employee selection is much more complex than an impressive resume and a feeling that they're a cultural fit. When you employee selection is approached incorrectly, it may result in high turnover, low morale, increased stress, and decreased productivity.

The goal of employee selection is to find the maximum "fit" between the individual and the job, thereby maximizing individual and business performance. Reaching this goal requires a multi-faceted approach including job analysis, best athlete modeling, selection assessments, and competency modeling, just to name a few components that would make up your customized hiring approach for your organization. Employee selection is a strategy that could bring your organization to the next level.

One of the most important facets of employee selection is the use of assessments. Assessments can make the process of identifying what that maximum "fit" is, making it easy for organizations to make their candidate selection.

Selection assessments are pre-employment tests that measure a variety of competencies. When it comes to using these assessments for employee selection, it's important to conduct a job analysis to determine what the competency guideline is for the position you are aiming to fill. It's also important that the competency guideline is backed by research and facts. It's also important to remove potential personal biases from the job analysis.

During the recruiting and hiring process, the execution of administering selection assessments is relatively simple, especially if you are using a firm for administration and reporting. It can be as simple as shooting off an email for a candidate to take an online assessment, gathering the results, and comparing multiple candidates against the competency guideline created from the job analysis, resulting in choosing the candidate with the maximum "fit" to be successful in that position.

It's also important to be aware that you can measure objective, cognitive abilities, as well as subjective, personality characteristics.  The combination of both objective and subjective competencies can give you the most accurate needs assessment.

 There's also a number of EEO regulations and laws that you must follow, so it's recommended to use a professional in developing your employee selection assessment process to ensure compliance.

BLR recommends the following suggestions should be followed by all employers implementing a testing program:
  • Avoid starting a testing program without professional advice
  • Procure tests from established sources
  • Keep complete records of all test given, both to employees and to rejected applicants
  • Keep test results separate from the personnel file do that comparisons can more readily be made for validation purposes
  • Use hiring policies and procedures consistently
ERC provides employee selection consulting services for organizations across the nation.

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With everchanging political and legislative landscapes, it's important for employers to know and understand the trends that have the potential to impact their business. At ERC, we like to keep informed on legislation and rulings from around the country that may influence how you approach your handbooks, strategies, and even company culture.

Below, Tara Motheral, HR Advisor at ERC, discusses three recent cases, including what happened in each case and what the key takeaway is for each case that may impact your business:

First case discussed:

Rizo v. Yovino, No. 16-15372, (9th Cir. April 9, 2018). Click here to read the full case.

Second case discussed: 

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission v. R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes, Inc.,  No. 16-2424, 2018 U.S. App. LEXIS 5720 (6th Cir. Mar. 7, 2018) Click here to read the full case. 

Third case discussed: 

Mosby-Meachem v. Memphis Light, Gas & Water Division, No. 17-5483 (6th Cir. February 21, 2018). Click here to read the full case.

ERC provides customized employment law training for organizations nationwide.

Train Your Employees

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Employee engagement is generally defined as a positive, fulfilled state of the employee regarding their work and their organization. Employee engagement is characterized by vigor, dedication, and absorption in work-related activities. Unsurprisingly, employee engagement connects with many desirable outcomes, including high performance, overall positive attitudes, better mental health, and increased innovation. If employees are not engaged, they tend to burn out and disconnect from their work.

Unengaged employees take more sick days, have less knowledge about their work roles, and are more likely to quit the organization. Obviously, employee engagement is important!

But how would we measure employee engagement? Here at ERC, we use two different approaches in each employee engagement survey.

First, we look directly at employee engagement by asking employees how inspired they are by their organization, how willing they are to do more than their minimum job requirements, and how meaningful and fulfilling they find their work. Answers to these questions provide a general picture of the employees’ level of engagement.

Second, we look at 11 different areas that have been shown to impact employee engagement. If employee engagement is not at an ideal level, it could be due to any combination of the following factors, which we measure in each survey.

Here are the 11 different areas that we look at: 1. Autonomy

The degree to which employees are accountable for their results, influences the selection of their work, and has the power to manage the flow and pace of their work

2. Coworker Cohesion

The degree to which employees care about one another, help others when needed, receive help from others, and trust that fellow employees have the skills and experiences needed

3. Development & Growth

The degree to which employees feel that they have opportunities for learning, growth, and career advancement

4. Job Design & Challenge

The degree to which employees feel that they can use specialized skills, work on important projects, use their abilities, and share their ideas and opinions

5. Leadership

The degree to which employees feel that the organization’s top leadership team provides clear goals and direction, are concerned about employees’ well-being, and can be trusted

6. Supervision

The degree to which employees feel that their immediate manager is supportive, considerate of their needs, and provides feedback on performance

7. Recognition & Rewards

The degree to which employees feel that they are recognized and praised, paid competitively, and given rewards fairly

8. Performance & Alignment

The degree to which employees are aware of the organization’s overall performance, understand their contributions to this performance, and clearly understand the organization’s strategy

9. Organizational Support

The degree to which employees feel that the organization provides them with the flexibility necessary to meet their personal and family needs, supports their health and wellness, and provides sufficient opportunities to reach out to the community

10. Training

The degree to which employees feel that the training they have received is specialized for their job function, has improved their job performance, and has helped them qualify for better jobs

11. Value & Innovation

The degree to which employees perceive that the organization continually adapts, has superior customer service, and supports innovation and creativity.

Combined, measurement of employee engagement and the 11 factors that influence employee engagement will identify areas for improvement, leading to an increase in productivity, performance, and a number of other positive outcomes. Employee engagement is vital for both employees and organizations!

Interested in learning more about engagement surveys?

Submit your contact information and receive instant access to a brochure that overviews what is included in ERC's engagement surveys and our process for conducting and assessing.

View the Engagement Brochure

 

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After years of conflict amongst lower level courts, the United States Supreme Court has weighed in and settled the uncertainty of whether arbitration agreements and class action waivers are lawful.

In its Epic Systems v. Lewis decision, decided May 21, 2018, the Supreme Court ultimately held that employers can require employees to resolve disputes through arbitration (rather than a bench or jury trial) and employers can prohibit employees from banding together and filing class-action or collective action lawsuits.

This decision considered three separate appeals that were consolidated, each with slightly different fact patterns. Essentially, all three plaintiffs filed suit against their employers, making wage and unpaid overtime claims. Individually, the claims for unpaid time were fairly small, and likely not worth the cost of filing suit. So, the employees wanted to bring individual and collective claims in federal court, even though the plaintiffs were all subject to agreements that required them to arbitrate any claims against their employer on an individual basis.

The plaintiffs argued that their arbitration agreements violated the National Labor Relations Act and infringed on employees’ rights to engage in ‘protected concerted’ activities. 

The United States Supreme Court saw it differently, ruling in favor of the employers, reasoning that federal law gives employers the right to use arbitration agreements and class action waivers if the employer chooses to do so.

Uncertainty still remains

Many questions still must be answered, like whether this decision applies to state law claims or only federal ones. Will Congress pass legislation that overrides this result? Critics of arbitration agreements claim that arbitration can often be expensive and unfavorable for employees, and a very secretive process. 

These critics argue that when employers can force employees into individual arbitration, the employer may be contributing to a work environment where the consequences for improper behavior, especially sexual harassment, are so negligible that they are in fact, no deterrent at all. 

In the dissenting opinion in Epic Systems, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s suggested that immediate “congressional correction” is needed to avoid this exact result. Legislation is already out there that could make the Epic Systems decision moot—for example, last December, a bipartisan bill was introduced that would end arbitration in all sexual harassment cases.

To combat the notion that arbitration agreements allow wrongdoing by employers to go unchecked, some employers have already pledged that the Epic Systems decision does not impact their operations, and even though arbitration agreements are now confirmed to be lawful, the organization will not force employees into individual arbitration.

In early May, Uber said that it was eliminating forced arbitration agreements for employees, riders and drivers who make sexual assault or harassment claims against the company. Similarly, last December, Microsoft announced that it was eliminating all forced arbitration agreements.

So what does this mean?

In the Epic Systems case, the three plaintiffs will each be forced into independent arbitration to resolve their claims—or the parties may ultimately settle before an arbitrator hears and decides the case.

For employers across the country, the Epic Systems decision likely means there will be a surge in employers using arbitration agreements containing class and collective action waivers.

Despite the Epic Systems decision paving the way for employers to use arbitration agreements, employers should still ask themselves if these agreements are right for their organization and answer important questions, not only about the logistics associated with litigation versus arbitration, but about the company culture and image the organization wants to present to employees. 

If employers decide to use arbitration and class action waiver agreements, they should consult with legal counsel to draft an appropriate agreement that is tailored to their specific organization’s needs.

ERC provides customized employment law training for organizations nationwide.

Train Your Employees

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As HR leaders and professionals continue to fight for (and maintain) their seat at the table, it’s important to move beyond just being an expert into a role of being a trusted advisor to the organization.

An expert is someone “having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience.” While being a trusted advisor means you have gained the trust and responsibility of others, especially leadership.

There are a variety of factors and focuses that need adjusting to get from expert to trusted advisor, but the most important may be building trust and solid communication.

Building trust involves connecting with others, cultivating relationships, and communicating effectively and respectfully.

To connect, cultivate, and communicate effectively:
  • Be present and visible
  • Visit staff member workspaces
  • Ask to be invited to meetings
  • Proactively ask for feedback and insight
  • Share things about yourself with others
  • Reach out to others rather than waiting for “the” email or phone call
  • Check-in regularly
  • Honor confidences
  • Focus more on the “who” than the “what” or “how
  • Support, guide, and mentor
  • Don’t fear the difficult conversations
  • Listen, listen, and listen

It’s also important to recognize the different communication styles of colleagues, coworkers, and leadership.

By recognizing the different communication styles of who the interaction is with, more effective, respectful, and efficient communication can come about.

Trust is built by putting forth the effort to connect, cultivate, and communicate with others. 

ERC provides customized training solutions that turn experts into trusted advisors.

Train Your Employees

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With the war for talent in full-effect, it’s important to look more deeply into how compensation factors play in an organization’s ability to attract, engage, and retain top talent. As we’ve seen trending in the past few years, talent is not attracted to, engaged with, or retained by, compensation alone but that doesn’t mean it isn’t an incredibly important factor. Stay competitive for talent by keeping up with compensation trends.

1. Employee Motivation and Retention

Compensation is an important part of the package for many employees. However, research shows that work factors such as “the quality of the company and its management, belief in the organization’s products, alignment with the company’s mission, values, and goals, ability to make a meaningful contribution, and ability to develop new professional skills” are bigger motivators for employees than pay.

Be aware that while there is much more to a great workplace than compensation, there is a significant number of your workforce that may be open to new opportunities that provide them more compensation. Design your compensation plan accordingly.

It’s also important to note that while today’s workforce is increasingly putting value on factors beyond pay, being underpaid (or the perception of being underpaid) may cause a widespread issue in your organization. Prepare a plan and strategy that addresses these potential issues.

2. Pay Transparency

Assume that your employees are discussing their compensation with one another. Legislation has been passed in 16 states that protect the practice of pay transparency. Additionally, Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) allows employees to engage in pay discussions as “concerted and protected activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection.”

With pay transparency in the workplace, it’s imperative to have a properly designed, market competitive, and internally equitable compensation programs.

3. Close the Gap in Managers’ Compensation Knowledge

Studies have shown that employers don’t believe their managers have enough competence around the organization’s compensation strategy to have meaningful communication with employees.

As Mollie Lombardi from Aptitude Research Partners notes, “We ask [managers] to be the key translation point between business strategy and day-to-day employee activity.”

In compensation, this often means asking managers to do the heavy lifting around communicating comp strategy to the organization. Successful compensation professionals will look to close existing gaps in managers’ comp knowledge and their ability to effectively communicate about pay in 2018.

4. Variable Pay Programs Increase in Usage

Kerry Chou, a WorldatWork senior practice leader, noted to SHRM that, "employees are still seeing increases in pay through improved variable pay plan payouts,” despite base pay increases remaining stagnant in order for organizations to maintain a handle on fixed costs.

ERC’s Senior Consultant, Compensation & Benefits, Sue Bailey, notes that “there is also a greater emphasis on significant differentiation in base pay increases for jobs that bring value to the business and for hot skill jobs.”

5. Use Professional Development to Drive Retention and Performance

It’s important to recognize the opportunities for professional growth that your employees are looking for, which are not necessarily vertically driven. Often, employees will be interested in developing their skill set more broadly and develop non-traditional career paths.

However, HR must think out-of-the-box to provide these opportunities to the retain the talent at their respective organizations.

Compensation professionals must also work hand-in-hand with HR to develop structure and processes which properly assess job descriptions, functions, etc., for proper and market-competitive pay practices.

6. Hot jobs will Continue to Outpace Stagnant Annual Increases

Year after year, for the past few years, salary increases have stagnated at around 3% for many organizations. This 3% figure is also predicted for 2018. Notably, however, not all jobs fall into this 3%.

The current suite of growing- and in-demand jobs, such as developers and artificial intelligence, is pacing ahead. Salaries for these “hot jobs” are forecasting and growing much more quickly.

Compensation & Benefits Consulting

ERC offers a variety of compensation and benefits consulting services including competitive market pay analysis, salary structure design, total rewards strategy, variable pay design, and more!

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Research has highlighted three key non-performance factors that can distort the performance ratings managers give to their employees.1 While rating subordinates, managers consider the negative consequences that can occur when providing accurate ratings, the organizational norms surrounding how they are supposed to rate, and the potential of fulfilling self-interests. These three factors add to the complexity of how managers are motivated to rate, and they lend support to the idea that managers are not always motivated to rate their subordinates accurately.

Avoiding the negative consequences associated with rating a subordinate accurately can be a significant motivator for managers to distort ratings. Managers have been found to have a desire to develop or maintain positive relationships with their subordinates, and if giving their subordinates inflated ratings helps them build relationships, it can be attractive to distort those ratings.2 Furthermore, giving negative, albeit accurate, ratings to subordinates can produce negative consequences. These negative consequences can include damaging interpersonal relationships, conflict, and uncomfortable situations.1 If managers inflate the ratings of subordinates, they have the potential to avoid these negative consequences all together while potentially benefitting their relationships with their subordinates.

Another important factor to consider is the organizational norms present within the organization. These norms can describe the common practices or beliefs surrounding performance management, and they will be unique to each organization. These can become a problem in the context of managers providing accurate performance ratings when the norms are associated with bad practices.1 For example, a problematic norm at an organization could be when managers do not take performance ratings seriously, and that they are just something they are tasked to do once a year. Additionally, a norm could be that all managers might give every subordinate an “Average” rating regardless of how they performed. These norms can drive managers to give inaccurate ratings to avoid violating the organizational norms of their organization.

The last important factor involves the self-interests of the managers.1 In general, managers have been found to desire to possess a positive image of themselves and their employees, and this can be a motivation to distort the performance ratings of their subordinates.2 Regardless of if it is true, managers might believe a part of their own performance is dependent on the performance of their subordinates. In this context, managers would be tempted to distort ratings to make themselves look better to their superiors and to the organization. Financial bonuses could be tied to how their subordinates are performing as well, which could further motivate managers to inflate ratings.

Overall, there are many factors that can motivate a manager to distort their subordinates’ performance ratings, and it is safe to say managers are not always motivated to rate accurately. With this in mind, there are two tactics that can be taken to encourage managers to rate accurately. First, create organizational norms that support and encourage accurate and thoughtful performance ratings. This can be formally accomplished by training managers on how to evaluate performance effectively. The training can give managers the tools and knowledge they need on how to rate accurately, display the value of performance ratings, and emphasize the importance of accurate performance ratings specific to their organization. Secondly, hold managers accountable for rating their subordinates accurately. Give performance ratings to the managers based on the thoroughness and accuracy of the ratings of their subordinates. This can be accomplished by asking managers to provide reasoning for the ratings they give their subordinates. Since managers will expect to be held accountable for why they gave specific ratings to their subordinates, they will tend to be better prepared for their rating task, take more performance-related notes, and pay more attention to their subordinates’ performance over time.3

Creating a performance management system that is effective can be complex and overwhelming. Rater motivation is just one consideration that needs to be addressed when developing, maintaining, or improving a performance management system. However, with the right assistance, this is an achievable and rewarding endeavor.

ERC delivers customized performance management training nationwide.

View the Courses


1Spence, J. R., & Keeping, L. M. (2010). The impact of non‐performance information on ratings of job performance: A policy‐capturing approach. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 31(4): 587-608.

2Spence, J. R., & Keeping, L. M. (2011). Conscious rating distortion in performance appraisal: A review, commentary, and proposed framework for research. Human Resource Management Review, 21(2): 85-95.

3Mero, N. P., Motowidlo, S. J., & Anna, A. L. 2003. Effects of accountability on rating behavior and rater accuracy. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 33 (12): 2493–2514.

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As for most departments within an organization, measuring effectiveness is an essential part of continuous improvement. Sales departments analyze previous deals to determine their average buy-cycle and use that information to improve their performance, finance departments measure their accounts payable and accounts receivable timelines and use that information to improve cash flow, and so on. However, oftentimes HR metrics are misused. When HR metrics are simply calculated and reported on, the true value of the metrics is lost.

If you are currently re-evaluating your HR metrics system or are looking to implement one at your organization, there are a few things you should consider:

1. Strategize First

Don’t create an HR metrics dashboard, just to have an HR metrics dashboard.

If you begin collecting data on absences, turnovers, and cost per hire but fail to establish a strategy on how you are going to use those metrics, the likelihood of your HR metrics spreadsheet collecting virtual dust increases greatly.

Work with your leadership team to discuss the organization’s workforce in its current state and the vision or goals they have for the future state of the business. Develop these goals with your leadership, strategize your plan to achieve those goals, and then begin thinking about the role HR metrics will play. Having a business approach to HR puts the HR department in a better position as a business partner.

2. Remember the Purpose

Make your metrics reporting meaningful by pairing your data with organizational initiatives. It’s crucial to not get lost in the weeds and remember the primary purpose of analytics is to support and improve decision making.

Be sure you are asking the right questions when it comes to your measurements. If you find that your HR metrics dashboard system, process, or strategy, are no longer being used for that purpose, it’s time to pause, reflect, and revise.

3. Don’t Measure Everything

This notion ties into the importance of both strategy and purpose. It’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of a new HR metrics strategy but you need to resist the urge to measure anything and everything.

Utilize your strategy and purpose to determine which metrics will tell the best story for what you are trying to ultimately analyze and achieve.

Consider your resources. If you have a large HR department with the capacity and technology to take on an HR analysis project across the board of categories, great! If you are a solo-superhero or have minimal resources, it’s probably a good idea to tackle these HR metrics projects on one at a time.

Don’t let your employee engagement, talent management, and human capital in general, fall short of success by using decision-making tactics powered by a well-informed data analysis.

ERC provides HR consulting services for organizations across the nation.

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