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You may be questioning if dog health insurance is worth it for you. Wondering if you should be paying a monthly premium for something that you may never need. What if your dog gets injured and without insurance you now need to pay over $2,000 on surgery. If you have insurance it would cover most of the cost!

Why Dog Insurance is Important

A serious illness or injury to your dog can take a large toll on your finances. Cancer treatments can easily cost well above $5,000, ACL treatments can cost over $3,000, and other serious illnesses can cost just as much if not more! Pet insurance is meant to help you cover some of the medical bills and take “economic euthanasia” off the table. 

Throughout the years dog health insurance has become more prevalent; however, it is still around 1% of dogs, cats, and other pets that are insured. Dog health insurance is now one of the fastest-growing optional employee benefits. If your company offers insurance for you and your dog, you should highly consider it.

If you have a puppy or an older dog you can purchase dog health insurance at any time for your furry friend! However, it is cheaper to purchase insurance for your dog when they are younger. This is due to the fact that as they get older they are more prone to accidents (similar to an older person).

There are differences in how pet insurance and people insurance works. Many pet policies come with deductibles, co-payments, and premiums. The difference between people and pet insurance is that you often have to pay the vet bill and then be reimbursed. There is also a difference in the cost of insurance based on the type of dog you own. If your dog is a purebred it can cost more, and they can be more prone to hereditary conditions.

What Insurance Can Cover 

When picking a plan for your beloved dog you can choose to have insurance that covers accidents and illnesses such as injuries from vehicles, arthritis, or cancer. Depending on your provider and coverage it can also offer wellness coverage for annual exams, vaccinations, routine care, and tick and flea treatments. Many dog health insurance plans cover all of this for your furry friend!

While dog health insurance may not be the cheapest, in the long run it can pay out much more than it costs you. There is no way to predict if your dog will become sick or injured and vet bills are also different for every animal. You should consult with your vet on policies they may recommend or what your breed may be prone to.

During your research on what dog health insurance is best for you and your doggo download sample policies and see what is expected and included. If you are unable or don’t want to get pet insurance for your dog consider having a savings fund for emergencies. If you are unable to afford a medical bill the Humane Society lists organizations that may help pay.

Why You Need Dog Insurance

With many misconceptions on how expensive pet insurance can be, in reality you will pay less than $100 a month for your dog. In the end, this can save your dog’s life. By thinking about pet insurance you now have the ability to not choose between your dog and your wallet. When seeing the bills or how much surgery and treatments can cost it can be one of the toughest decisions to make as a pet owner. However, with pet insurance you don’t have to worry about the financial aspect, and you can put all your focus on your beloved dog.

When debating if you should purchase pet insurance consider the fact that accidents do happen. Your dog could sprain an ankle running around the yard and chasing birds or tear a cruciate ligament from jumping off the couch or bed. These injuries can be small or large leading to expensive bills from your vet.

Having a good dog health insurance plan can ensure that you are compensated up to 90% of the costs. You are also often able to tailor your pet insurance to fit your budget. Again, consider signing up when your dog is young to give you more options and cheaper premiums. If you are facing any issues with your dog take them to the vet to be sure they do not have a serious injury. Be observant and remember your dog is unable to express how they feel verbally.

The post Is Dog Health Insurance Worth It? appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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The knee is one of those parts of the body that seem ‘simple’ enough. It connects the upper and lower leg, it works along a single axis a simple hinge. Of course, nothing in the body is so deceptively simple. There are many intricate parts that work in precise order, from organs, digestive systems, joints right down to nails. Our dogs are no different. Their knees are complex mechanical marvels that they rely on day in and day out, just like us! As you might imagine, knee problems in dogs are a huge blow to their quality of life.

How to Treat (and Better Yet, Prevent) Knee Problems in Dogs Understand the Risk Factors

Any dog can have a knee issue during their life. However, some breeds are naturally inclined to have them more than others so while your pooch might not be off the breeds that are facing a high risk, they are still facing some risk. Mitigate these where you can.

CCL injuries, the ones we prescribe our dynamic brace for, are one of the most common kinds of knee problems in dogs, especially in the larger breeds. Labradors, Staffordshire Terriers, Rottweilers, Newfoundlands, and other large breeds are susceptible to this tear.

Smaller dogs have problems of their own! Luxating patellas, a condition where the kneecap moves out of place that is particularly common in a number of breeds.

Recognize the Pain

Unfortunately, our furry family can’t say, “Oh, my knee ow!” We need to be vigilant and have an eye for it. The most common sign of knee problems in dogs is being lame in a leg. They may hold the paw off the ground, limp after some exercise. They may have a hard time standing in the first place. If the limp resembles a skip or walking on eggshells, hesitant to put any real weight down, that can be a sure sign of the luxating patellas.

Exercise Smartly

Dogs require different amounts, levels, and kinds of exercises. Makes sense, we play and work out differently than we did in school, it’s the same for dogs. While their younger selves may have loved bounding up and down the stairs, jumping onto furniture, that kind of high impact activity can be an increasing risk as dogs age.

Regardless of the kind of activity, older animals still have the risk for CCL tears, as the years of incremental, gradual damage to the ligaments. Something as simple as walking can be the straw that broke the camel’s knee.

An Ounce of Prevention…

Looking to prevent knee problems before they crop up? Look into getting a supplement for their joint health to strengthen while they are still healthy. Something with MSM, glucosamine, and chondroitin – these ingredients when combined are key in promoting joint health.

While a supplement can go the extra step, maintaining a healthy weight is so, so, so much more crucial to protecting joint health.

Physical Therapy

Should your animal already have been injured, a proper physical therapy regime will see them healing incredibly better. Recovering from an injury is going to go much more smoothly and leave the pet better than ever if they properly rehabilitate the injury. Small-dogs especially can benefit from physical therapy and avoid needing knee surgeries entirely!

Custom, Dynamic Knee Braces!

And of course, one of the best things you can do for your pooch when it comes time to treat their knee problem is a knee brace! Sometimes dogs have health conditions that prevent them from qualifying for surgery, and for them, a knee brace is absolutely the best. These braces are measured specifically to the dog, meaning you’re getting the exact right fit and tool to help heal the knee problems in dogs.

Looking to get a knee brace for your dog? Take a look at Wound Wear’s A-TraC Dynamic Brace and get the exact right device to help your pet rehabilitate their knee problems. Keep them a healthy weight, offer them a joint health supplement, and practice age-appropriate exercise and you may be able to avoid an injury entirely! Any questions? Contact us and we’d be happy to help!

The post Knee Problems in Dogs – How to Prevent Them appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Your dog is limping, clearly in pain. You’ve taken them to the veterinarian to see what’s wrong, what can be done to help your best friend get back on their feet again. It turns out for your dog, CCL surgery is the recommended course of action. This time on the Wound Wear blog, we are looking at what goes into the dog CCL surgery to repair our furry friend’s knees!

Dog CCL Surgery – Fixing the Cruciate

The most common orthopedic surgery dogs undergo isn’t for hip dysplasia – no, 85% of all orthopedic surgeries performed on canines every year are CCL surgeries. There are several different kinds of CCL surgery for dogs.

The four most common techniques are the extracapsular suture (MRIT), the tightrope CCL, tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA), and the tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO). All of them have the same goal, to stabilize and support the stifle joint following a CCL injury. Often this means incisions and placing sutures around the outside of the joint to mimic that stability of a healthy joint, preventing the tibia from sliding out from under the femur.

The extracapsular suture procedure, for instance, does this by placing a nylon suture around one of the bones of the femur and then through a hole in the tibial tuberosity. These are then held in place by a stainless-steel clip.

For you dog, CCL surgery alone isn’t going to get the results it needs to heal right.

For a surgery to be successful it needs the proper post-operative and home care as well as rehabilitation done by the owner and dog. Should this step be neglected, you might as well not even get the surgery done in the first place as the animal is likely to reinjure themselves.

Complications of Dog CCL Surgery

As we said, dog CCL surgeries aren’t 100%. There are things that can go wrong after the fact without proper care but there are also possible complications during the surgery itself! Infection, a failure for the repair to take, ongoing lameness, implant failure, and arthritis progression can all be possible complications of a CCL surgery gone sideways. That can be terrifying, and if the surgery doesn’t take then what’s the point you might wonder.

Cost of Dog CCL Surgery

The surgery easily costs in the thousands of dollars. According to the ASPCA, it isn’t uncommon for the total cost to run close to $8,000.  All for a surgery that might not take, that might have complications in the process. It can make a terrible situation even worse. That’s why it is imperative to really consider all the options available to you and yours before committing to an expensive, lengthy procedure.

Things to Consider Before Dog CCL Surgery

So, the cost is on your radar, and you know of the possible complications. What else should you take into consideration before opting for dog CCL surgery? Think about the age, size, weight, and activity level of the dog. The rehab/post-care necessary. The surgeon who will be performing the project. All of these should go into your decision for surgery or not because it is an expensive procedure and one that does not guarantee results.

What Other Options Are There?

Surgery isn’t the only option out there, however! For animals that don’t have complete tears, or are of a certain weight, the conservative CCL brace provided by Wound Wear can be all the treatment they need! Our dynamic braces replicate that same effect as that extracapsular

Better yet, it’s built-in post-operative/rehab! If you are ready to get your dog on the path to healing, contact us and get your dog their dynamic brace!

The post What Goes Into Dog CCL Surgery – Is It Necessary? appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Welcome back to another entry on the Wound Wear blog. We are hard at work here, building a wealth of resources for our readers, whether they be out there who have a pet limping and wondering what might be happening to those seeking post-surgery help.

When our pets suffer, we suffer. It can be an incredibly trying time and so we want to put together an easily found archive of valuable information. Last time we began that quest with the discussion of what are commonly thought of as ‘dog ACL injuries,’ actually canine cruciate ligament injuries. The next logical step is one of the methods to heal: the canine knee brace.

How the Canine Knee Brace Works

A canine knee brace, like our own A-TraC Dynamic Brace, works by stabilizing the knee or stifle, joint after anterior/cranial cruciate injuries. It prevents any translation of the tibia on the femur. That is to say, it keeps the tibia from moving freely and, as such, harmfully.

The brace is made up of multiple layers and interchangeable rods, with stabilization at three points: the leg, the opposite thigh, and the collar. All of this makes for a completely custom brace, that can be adjusted to allow for as much range of motion at the joint as healing allows.

The brace places resistance against the leg, allowing for the muscles and joint to operate in a more normal fashion, preventing loss of muscle and lameness, making for a more rapid and healthy rehabilitation of the joint post-injury.

Does My Dog Need Surgery First?

A pet doesn’t have to have gone through surgery to utilize a canine knee brace. While a surgery can help your pet fully recover from the tear and regain their joint stability, it is costly. It also isn’t always the best option. There are many different contributing factors, from injury to pet and their activity levels and a whole lot more that can affect whether a surgery is the right course of treatment.

Regardless of whether you go for the canine knee brace after, or in place of, surgery, it functions the same and offers the same benefits to your dog. The system will assist them in walking, working against the resistance of the brace to develop their knee joint and the musculature surrounding it. This makes for a much more natural movement experience which will have your pet walking confidently as they heal.

Should you get surgery for your pet to fully heal their injury, utilizing a canine knee brace in their recovery has the benefit of helping prevent reinjury. This is important because the rate at which dogs reinjure following surgery without support can be as high as 10 or 15%! Getting the surgery done just for another torn CCL and another surgery is not only harmful to your dog, but also for the bank account!

Want to know what size to get your dog? Use our handy sizing page to quickly and accurately determine the kind and size of brace your own pet needs. The more difficult measurements have easy to follow YouTube instructions to help you. You will need a tibia measurement which can be provided via x-ray, your vet likely took this before your pet’s surgery. You can find out loads more about our specific canine knee brace on our product page, this has been just a brief rundown of the mechanics.

If you have any other questions about the process, do not hesitate to reach out and ask us! Our U.S. and Canada friends can reach us at 1-800-443-4055, elsewhere call 1-847-634-1700. Let’s get your pet in a canine knee brace and get them healing! The A-TraC Dynamic canine knee brace has been 90% effective, and the sooner you begin assisting your pet, the sooner they can walk with confidence again, tail wagging!

Until then, we’ll see you next time on the Wound Wear blog.

The post Canine Knee Brace – Helpful Healing appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Here at Wound Wear, we focus on one thing: creating the best leg braces for our furry friends to treat dog ACL injuries. Today on the blog, we wanted to dive deep and answer some common questions about CCL, or dog ACL, injuries.

Just to be clear, lots of folks looking to find their answers about their dog’s hurt knee search for it as a ‘dog acl injury,’ which while technically incorrect, isn’t too far off. We reference it as both an ACL or CCL injury throughout this blog to help those searchers find the answers they need.

Common Questions on Dog ACL Injuries What is an ACL?

An ACL is the anterior cruciate ligament in the knee, it is also known as the cranial cruciate ligament in reference to pets.  It is one of the critical components of the knee that allows for healthy, strong movement.

What does the ACL/CCL Do?

The ligament crosses with another inside the knee joint proper, keeping the two bones (the upper femur and lower tibia) in place, and making sure there is a soft barrier between the two, as well as keeping the bones from slipping out from place of each other.

Are Dog ACL Injuries Common?

ACL and MCL injuries are fairly common in people, especially athletes. That’s because the knees are such intricately put together joints, made to handle a certain amount of work. If someone pushes too hard or isn’t used to enough and then gets some use, they can get injured. When it comes to dogs, these kind of injuries are the most common kinds of injuries.

What Causes a CCL Injury?

As mentioned there is a wide variety of causes. In addition to the activity strain, age, breed, and weight all can increase the likelihood of injury.

Symptoms of a CCL Injury?

Unsure if your dog has an injury? They can range from a suggestion of lameness, favoring a leg all the way to being unable to stand or put any weight at all. There can also be swelling on the side of the knee.

Is My Dog at Risk?

Your dog may be at an increased risk for a CCL injury depending on certain factors.  Some breeds are more prone to knee injuries, such as Newfoundlands, German shepherds, rottweilers, Labrador, and golden retrievers. Larger dogs, in general, are at an increased risk of injury.

Larger, by any means, in fact. Obese animals or those who rarely get strenuous exercise are more likely to suffer a strain or injury to their CCL which will only get worse with time. The animal may show no signs of injury until the CCL fully ruptures, which can make it difficult to care for. That’s why keeping your dog at a healthy weight and reasonably active is critically important for their long-term health.

Some studies have shown a correlation between spay or neutering before a year old and the development of CCL injuries in later life.

If a dog ruptured their CCL in one leg, they are also more likely (about half) to have a CCL injury on the opposite leg. So if your pup is injured, keep a close eye!

How do I Treat the CCL Injury?

A number of avenues for healing exist for CCL injuries. If your dog is under 30 pounds, your vet may simply recommend a conservative treatment plan without surgery. Rest, meds, and weight loss can all help your dog get to a place for healing. But, no matter the size of the dog, without surgery, the knee will degenerate.

Vets can perform surgery to provide the stability back to the joint which is important to avoid complications from CCL injuries. With a torn CCL, the join is no longer structurally sound and can lead to bone rubbing against bone, creating pain, restricted range of motion, development of arthritis and bone spurs.

There is also, of course, the A-TraC Dynamic Brace. Using our brace system, the dog’s leg gets much-needed support.  This prevents the atrophy of muscles as well as decreasing the chances for opposite leg ccl deterioration.

If you are handling your dog ACL injury, looking for treatment, or are already post-surgery, an A-TraC Dynamic Brace can be the tool to help your furry friend heal. Find yours here and together we can help your dog recover from their knee injury. We’ll see you next time here on the blog.

The post How Common are Dog ACL Injuries? And Other Questions appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Does weather affect dog behavior? There are various factors that can affect the behavior of your pet canine to a great extent and these include the weather, the heat, the wind and so forth. Nevertheless, similar to the human beings, dogs too have their own quirks in terms of reacting to different weather conditions. While some of them can suffer from depressive disorders during the cold winter months, others might get terrified by the loud sound of thunder. All these are going to depend on the breed of the pooch and how sensitive he actually is.

Does Weather Affect Dog Behavior?

1. Low-pressure fronts

As per the American Animal Hospital Association, a canine’s behavior can be affected to a great extent by alterations in the barometric pressure. In case he is scared of winds or violent storms, he might get curious and excited or he might even become annoyed which will depend entirely on his disposition and nature. Sometimes you might come across any canines that start sniffing the air while a gale is approaching and this might indicate that he is sensing a possible weather change. In fact, the pooch will be able to feel the alterations in the odor with a slight decrease of the barometric pressure.

2. Lightning and Thunder

It is known to many of us how an approaching storm can influence the behavior of a pooch especially if he is scared of storms. He will start exhibiting symptoms such as barking, panting or even whimpering. In some cases, he might end up hiding as well. A recent study carried out by the researchers of the Penn University has revealed the fact that canines experience a rapid increment of cortisol (which happens to be the stress hormone) during storms. It was likewise unveiled in the research that those canines which were scared of thunderstorms had experienced a massive production of the stress hormone while the ones that weren’t afraid did hardly exhibit any increment at all. The scientists also found that 15% to 30% of the pooches were actually intimidated by thunderstorms.

3. Sensing inclement weather

It is a fact that canines are much more sensitive than human beings when it comes to feeling any change in the weather particularly with the approach of a violent storm. They can do this by sensing the changes that happen in the static electric field in the atmosphere. As per some recent reports by the SPCA, several pooches have even shown the tendency to jump into a bathtub once they sense an alteration in air static.

4. Sultry weather

Apart from storms, hot weather can likewise affect the behavior of a dog significantly. For instance, some canines tend to consume a lesser amount of food and they also become lazy during hot sunny days. Often times, they are reluctant to go for strolls or even perform any exercise in hot conditions.

5. SAD

SAD (Seasonal Effective Disorder) which is sometimes called “Winter Blues” can make the dogs suffer from depressive disorders. This happens usually during the cold winter months when there is less sunshine as well as illumination. Human beings usually show these types of conditions; however, according to some research, dogs too have been reported to get affected by Seasonal Effective Disorder. During these times, they tend to sleep longer and also become quite lethargic as well. The reason for this might be the excessive production of melatonin during winter which triggers these symptoms in both humans as well as dogs.

So, does weather affect dog behavior? As mentioned throughout the article, weather can definitely influence your dog’s mood. You can monitor the weather when your dog is acting differently to know if this could be a factor. However, if your dog is acting outside of the norm beyond weather patterns be sure to talk to a local veterinarian who can better assess your dog’s health.

The post Does Weather Affect Dog Behavior? appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Can I shave my dog to stop shedding? If we are being honest, NO! Most dog owners believe that shaving their pet can help to stop shedding. However, shaving can cause irreparable damage to your dog’s coat, so much, it can even make it more uncomfortable. Shaving comes with numerous risks hence it is not a necessary procedure for your dog’s comfort and health.

What About the Breed?

Some dog breeds such as those with double coats should never be shaved as this procedure may damage their intricately balanced coats besides causing painful bumps or lesions. It is actually a misconception that shaving your dog can stop shedding. While your dog may seem to be shed-free soon after shaving, the dog will later start shedding hair again this time making it even messier since the shed hair is shorter. This makes even cleaning your carpets and upholstery more tedious and difficult.

What are Some Alternatives to Shaving Your Pet?

Shaving your dog is completely unnecessary as it can do more harm than good. Some alternatives to shaving that will help your dog stop or minimize shedding include:
• Regular Grooming – Giving your dog regular baths and brushing
• Feeding your dog with higher quality food
• Ensuring the dog drinks enough water regularly
• Using supplements such as omega 3 fatty acids

Health & Coats

The overall health of your dog is a major factor that determines how much hair your dog sheds. Keeping your dog well-groomed and healthy can help reduce shedding or stop it altogether. Avoid cheap dog food that is mostly made of fillers that your dog cannot be able to digest such as grains and corn. Instead, go for dog food whose main ingredient is meat. The first ingredient listed on any pet food is going to be what they use the most of. Most of these foods contain healthy nutrients that are easier to digest and absorb.

Pros & Cons of Shaving a Dog

There are many cons to shaving your dog, however, there are some pro’s as well. Wound Wear suggests a quick coat trim to improves your dog’s appearance as well as it makes it more comfortable but ensure that you only trim the longer and uneven parts of the dog’s coat. Trimming minimizes bulk but avoid removing too much length. Trimming also prevents warm weather parasites such as ticks and fleas from attacking your dog thus making him happier and healthier.

Shaving has its own demerits as the dog’s skin is very sensitive and it often relies on fur coat to block dangerous UV radiation that may cause sunburns. Dogs that are exposed to sunburns are at a higher risk of developing skin cancer among other skin problems. Shaving clippers too can injure your dog causing severe cuts or burning at times. If your pet is prone to skin conditions such as sensitivity and dryness, shaving will only cause more problems.

The two layers of a double-coated dog do not grow at the same rate. The undercoat is more dense and softer while the guard layer is coarse and long hence shaving off both layers together can damage your dog’s coat permanently. This means that your dog will not get adequate protection and insulation and the coat will also grow back unevenly giving the dog an unkempt and ragged coat texture that is difficult to groom.

Closing

While trimming your pup has its advantages shaving your dog will not prevent shedding in the long run. Therefore, it doesn’t help to shave your dog. In fact, shaving is not recommended and is probably a mistake that you might regret later.

The post Can I Shave My Dog to Stop Shedding? appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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It’s hard to resist a cute, puppy face staring back at you when you’re eating your dinner. However, some human foods can are actually severely toxic to your pups. Here are three foods that you should never feed your four-legged friend.

Raisins – While they may seem like a healthy option to some, grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. While the ingredient that makes them toxic to pups is still unknown, it’s crucial to make sure you’re not feeding them anything with these two things in it.

Onions – This food can be in a dish you’re making for dinner, but it’s best to not give any to the dog. Onions and similar foods, like chives and garlic, are extremely toxic to dogs. It is best to avoid feeding your canine anything with these three ingredients in it, since they can cause intestinal damage and pain.

Avocado – With the recent avocado trend sweeping the national, it’s important to keep these green fruits away from dogs. This is potentially one of the most potent on the list, as it can cause heart failure and damage to our furry friends.

Looking for a K9 leg brace to help your pup heal from a CCL injury? Visit and shop our selection at WoundWear.com today!

The post 3 Foods You Should Never Feed Your Dog appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Our pups are like our family members: they’re there to see us after a long day at the office and are always there to comfort us through tough times. While our four-legged pals are like our family members, they can’t always communicate to us the same way our human family does. That’s why it’s important to make sure we’re paying even more attention to them during the summer months. Here are some ways that you can make sure your dogs are safe during the warmer season.

Always have water – This is important no matter what season it is, but making sure you have water wherever you go is essential in keeping your dog safe during summer. If you’re traveling, make sure you have a bowl and water with you that are easy to carry. If you’re leaving them at home for a while, make sure their water dish is filled to the brim with cool, fresh water. Remember – they wearing a fur coat during the hottest time of the year and cannot take it off, so water is crucial to staying cool.

Tread lightly on pavement – As a general rule of thumb, don’t walk your dog on hot pavement if it is too hot for you to put your hand on it. Your dog’s feet are extremely sensitive and can blister if they’re on a long walk where the ground is extremely hot. Additionally, this could contribute to heat stroke since your pup’s paws are being directly exposed to hot temperatures.

If your pup is suffering from a CCL injury, WoundWear has the best canine leg braces to help them heal. Visit us & browse our entire selection today!

The post Keeping Your Dog Safe from Summer Heat appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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Our dogs are our family members and often the ones who understand us the best. That’s why when they’re in pain or sick, it’s frustrating to not fully understand what’s going on with them. A cranial cruciate ligament is one of the most common injuries in dogs, and one of the hardest to recognize. Here are some common signs that your dog is suffering from a CCL injury so you can address it as soon as possible.

Lameness – If your dog is limping and is clearly not putting as much pressure on a back leg as much as they have before, this could be a sign of an injured CCL. This could happen in one or both legs, and could come and go depending on the severity of the injury.

Weakness – If your dog is experiencing weakness or not full strength in one or both of their back legs, this could be the sign of a CCL injury. Reluctance to make quick movements and not standing up on all legs completely are also weakness signs related to CCL injuries.

Swelling – If there is swelling near the stifle joint, which is between the thigh and lower leg, this could potentially mean there’s an injury to your dog’s CCL. Swelling may be hard to detect at first, but if it is visible without being directly up close with your dog, injury is definitely possible.

If you’re searching for leg braces for dogs, our A-TraC Dynamic Brace was specifically created for CCL-related injuries. Shop our braces or find more information today at Woundwear.com.

The post How to Tell if Your Dog has a Cruciate Ligament Injury appeared first on Dog ACL Brace.

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