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Here we get to know our Members and learn about how they got started, how life has changed and other interesting facts.

Today we are introducing the Weaver Family who split their year between working and traveling, spending 6 months saving for the following 6 months of travel! Another incredible example of a family making this lifestyle happen for their family!

GET TO KNOW THE WEAVER FAMILY Introduce your family!

Hi, my name is Bridget. My husband and I are traveling with my DD who is 7 and my DS who is 9. This is our 3rd year of traveling part-time. We generally spend half the year traveling and half the year working.

What was life like before Worldschooling?

Before we started traveling life was one long waiting line. Waiting for the kids to get bigger, waiting for enough money to take that vacation, waiting for a promotion. Always waiting for the next bigger thing. And we were NEVER happy. I never saw my kids or husband except for the weekends and even then I was too tired to do anything fun after working hard all week. I think it hit me when my youngest child entered preschool that I had missed it. Missed the last time in a high chair, last time in a diaper (actually won’t miss that), last time for many of her “baby things”. And I was devastated. I didn’t want to miss another second of my kids’ childhoods. So we jumped.

When and how did you first hear about Worldschooling?

We first heard about world schooling on Facebook when we were considering downsizing and traveling within our home country. My husband is the one who spent many hours looking up sources of information on how to make traveling possible, but when I stumbled on some Facebook communities I felt like these were my people.

Before you started, what worried you about Worldschooling? And how has that turned out?

I think my biggest fear when I started traveling was, “how am I going to fund it”, and “what if someone gets sick?” Looking back I think I still struggle with finding ways to make money in the road but have found that when the budget gets too tight, I can easily return home and work a few months, then leave again. I am constantly on the lookout for ways to extend my traveling. As far as what if someone gets sick? Well, I have to declare that the BEST medical care I have received was in some of the poorest countries. I know that if an illness came up that I couldn’t handle I will be able to find medical care.

How has life changed since you began Worldschooling?

Life is a bit crazier now that we travel so often. Work is a necessary evil, but the amount of time I spend exploring other places, foreign and domestic, with my kids is 600 times more than before we sold our belongings (almost everything) and left on an adventure for the first time. I have found I am no longer so afraid to venture out of my comfort zone, and neither are my kids. I am more open to trying new things, new foods, new languages than I ever was before.

What have been some unexpected benefits of Worldschooling?

An unexpected benefit has been making friends I still talk to today with people from all over the world. We’ve found they aren’t so different from us, and it brings me joy to know my kids will grow up understanding this… Not having to rediscover our similarities as adults. And not just the people… But societies too. There are plenty of differences, but I’ve found no matter what country you are in, family is family, love is love, and people’s feelings are universal.

Exploring Peru

NUTS & BOLTS Could you share your monthly travel budget?

We travel on a budget of what the average household spends a month. Anywhere from $1000 US to $2500 US depending on our activities. We try to keep a budget of around $1500 but when you consider we don’t have bills to pay back in the US, it’s not unreasonable. And this is traveling on a shoestring. People at home wave farewell when we leave and wish us a nice “vacation”… But this isn’t a vacation… This is our life.

How do you fund your travels?

I am a nurse and can jump in and out of jobs at home when we return for more work. I’m always very honest with employers in the interview phase about my lifestyle. I let them know I intend to leave again and try to give them an approximate time. I have had to walk away from jobs where it wouldn’t be a good fit for either them or me, but I find most employers are very interested in my family’s lifestyle and want me anyway. My husband worked to DHS, but now grabs a job in security anywhere that’s hiring… Hotels, retail, corporate.

How do you choose your destinations?

When trying to decide on where to go, I get on just fly and start playing with dates and locations. When I find a good fare, I talk with my husband to see if that’s a place we could see ourselves being with the kids for at least a few months. There are countries our money goes much further in and other countries we would love to see but haven’t come up with a plan on how to afford it … Yet!

How long do you stay in one location and why?

My husband likes to travel fast, a week in one place, then a week in another. I prefer to travel slower… A month or 6 in one place. We have compromised on this trip, with fast travel for the 1st month then slowing down to my place. My husband prefers fast travel because he wants to see many things in larger areas, while I prefer to build roots, however temporary, and develop friendships.

What does a typical Worldschooling day or week look like for you?

Typical is not a word I’d use for one of our days. We choose to radically unschool our children when fast traveling, but this last year they needed more reading help than I was prepared for and we entered them into public school for a year. Next year I’m hoping to have them in school in a country where they have to learn Spanish. This week we have found historically significant places to take our kids to for education, including the zoo, which housed archeological sites as well as animals.

What has been the hardest part of Worldschooling & Traveling? How did you handle it?

I think the hardest part has been unsupportive family members. Some of our families support us, while other members don’t. And they have gotten pretty nasty about it. Our choice of handling it is just to ignore their words and behavior. This next time that we will go “home” it will actually be at least a few states away from the family members that have given us the most grief. We want a positive attitude in life and they tend to drag us into the mud with them… So we choose to find another forest to live in next time.

TRAVEL RECOMMENDATIONS What are your Top 5 Travel Products?

My favorite products are:

What Tech Gear do you travel with?

We stay connected with our loved ones at home via Whatsapp, and Facebook messenger via my cell phone. When you enter another country just buy a simple card and service… It’s often cheaper than in the US. We find WiFi where we can and post a lot of our activities on Facebook to help me keep a record of our activities.

What are your favorite booking sites and why?

My favorite booking sites are Airbnb, Justfly, Hotels.com, CheapOair. Trusted Housesitters and WWOOF.

SUMMARY As a Worldschooling Family, if you could step back in time, what is one thing you would do differently?

I would have started off internationally in a country where communication was easier. We started in China, without a travel group, the language barrier was extremely difficult. Also, the internet is restricted so looking things up for communication was slow and sometimes impossible. I’d start with a country where not all but many spoke some English like Bali or Mexico.

What would you tell someone who is considering Worldschooling?

I’d tell someone who was just starting world schooling that education for their children just happens. You don’t need to sit down at a desk to learn, in fact, some of the best learning there is for children is hands on. And feet and knees and sometimes upside down. Letting go of structure that school systems had ingrained in me as a necessity was difficult. It was painful and full of guilt that took me many months to let go of

What are you working on at the moment?

We just started Facebook page Worldschooling Weavers. Also trying our hand at a YouTube page…

Where Can We Find You?

Facebook: CLICK HERE

YouTube: CLICK HERE

Worldschooling Spotlight Q&A on Facebook

Our Worldschooling Spotlight Family are looking forward to answering any questions you might have for them! Be sure to return to the Facebook Group and find the link to this week’s Feature. Ask your questions in the comments section and our Spotlight Family will get back to you ASAP!

Enjoyed meeting the Weaver Family – Share their story on Pinterest

Want to be Featured on Worldschooling Spotlight?

If you wish to apply to be featured on Worldschooling Spotlight, please click here and fill out the application form.

The post Worldschooling Spotlight – Meet the Weaver Family appeared first on Worldschooling Central.

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A visit to the Central Market Kuala Lumpur is a wonderful way to experience Malaysian culture, art, and crafts. Only minutes from the heart of the city, it is a great place to spend an afternoon, with plenty for all to see and do!

What is the Central Market Kuala Lumpur?

The Central Market is a hub for Malaysian culture, steeped in history. Home to over 300 stalls, the Central Market was built in 1888 and initially used as a traditional wet market. After substantial renovations, Central Market is now a must-see tourist attraction.

Central Market in Kuala Lumpur

Activities at Central Market Kuala Lumpur

From shopping to Art, spa treatments to craft – the Central Market has something for everyone! Get lost in the aisles of countless shops, score yourself a bargain on some beautiful traditional items, or stock up on presents for friends and family back home. No matter who you are or where you a from, Central Market truly caters to everyone – without feeling like a tacky tourist attraction.

Fish Spa

Take a break at the local Fish Spa – but be warned, if you are ticklish, you’re in for a treat!

Enjoy a ticklish foot pedicure at the Central Market

7D Motion Theatre

What a hit with the kids! Select your favorite movie, strap in and take a ride. At only 10MRY ($USD2.50/$AUD3.33) per person, the whole family can have a turn. We tried something a little older for Brody, followed by a playful cartoon ride with Sienna.

Personally, I didn’t think it was fantastic – not much more than a bumpy ride, but I’m glad I had one go… I just wouldn’t go again. The kids on the other hand… we had to drag them off it!

All ready to enjoy the 7D Cinema

Shopping

With so many shops, it is easy to spend hours wandering the aisles, admiring the handiwork and seeing new things. Craft, art, clothing, knick-knacks, electronics, and keepsakes of your time in Malaysia – there really isn’t anything missing. One could easily spend a fortune.

We were told it was a place to barter, but we found very few were willing – even after walking away, the Vendors were certainly not showing any eagerness to secure a sale!

Stroll the aisles of the Central Market and grab a bargain

Batik Painting

Batik Painting is a strong part of Malaysian culture and at the Central Market you and your family can learn how to do it, and create your own little masterpiece to take home! Definitely and experience not to miss – and super budget friendly! For a full review of Batik Painting, CLICK HERE

Art Galleries

For art lovers, there is a huge array of art on display at the Central Market. Locals sit sketching celebrities, brightly colored pieces catch your eye as you wander the aisles and unique 3D art pieces beg you to touch!

Food at the Central Market

There is certainly plenty to see and do at Central Market Kuala Lumpur, but when your tummy starts rumbling or the kids start complaining, head upstairs to the food court area – Central Market doesn’t disappoint!

There is a huge array of dishes on offer, from Indian, Thai, and Malay, to more traditional Western options. Purchase your drinks at the center stand., and definitely try the Icecream Floss, sold at the drink stand! There is lots to choose from, and it won’t break the bank, costing around 10MRY ($USD2.50/$AUD3.33) per person.

If you’re after a yummy treat, definitely try the Icecream Floss, or, for something much more traditional, try the Ais Kacang – it is actually super yummy, despite its appearance!

Central market catering options are endless – and the prices can’t be beat, with most meals costing around $5AUD/$USD3!

Ais Kacang and Icecream Floss – 2 must-try items at the Central Market

Central Market Opening Hours

The Central Market opening hours are from 10 am to 9.30 pm daily.

Central Market Location

Central Market Kuala Lumpur is located just minutes from the heart of Kuala Lumpur. A quick Uber ride, or a few minutes on the LRT will have you there quickly and easily, ready for the adventure ahead.

By Train
KELANA JAYA LINE

Pasar Seni Station is located right opposite of Central Market Kuala Lumpur.

AMPANG LINE

Masjid Jamek Station is within 15minutes walking distance to Central Market Kuala Lumpur.

KTM COMMUTER

5 minutes walking distance from Kuala Lumpur Station.

By Taxi/Uber Uber

This is our preferred method of getting around Kuala Lumpur. When booking your Uber, simply select Central Market as your destination. (If you haven’t already tried Uber – CLICK HERE for a free test ride!)

Taxi

There is a taxi stand located in front of Central Market Central Market Kuala Lumpur. Please ask your driver to take you to Central Market

By Bus
Rapid KL Bus

821,822,851,180,640,650,651, 652,772,780,781,782,750,751, 752,770,771,BET1,BET3,BET4

KL Hop-On Hop-Off

This City Tour Bus stops at the station right opposite of Central Market Kuala Lumpur.

GOKL

Visitors in Kuala Lumpur can also travel for free within selected routes in the city with the GOKL free city bus service. The GOKL bus stops opposite Central Market Kuala Lumpur.

Overall, the Central Market Kuala Lumpur was a fantastic place to spend a day – we arrived mid-morning and with so much to do and see we were well entertained until the early evening! If you are coming to Kuala Lumpur, don’t miss a visit to the Central Market!

Planning a visit to Kuala Lumpur – Pin this to Pinterest to save it for later!

The post Visiting The Central Market, Kuala Lumpur appeared first on Worldschooling Central.

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Here we get to know our Members and learn about how they got started, how life has changed and other interesting facts.

Today we are introducing

GET TO KNOW THE GREEN FAMILY Introduce your family!

We are a family of many with mom, four big boys and one little girl, all born in various locations around the world. Kate (mom) is from England and grew up around Europe before arriving in the US at age 17. Sam (30) was born in Texas, Jacob (28) in England, Benjamin (22) in Hawaii, Maxwell (15) in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and Charlotte (12) is our southern belle born in Knoxville, Tennessee.

We have been living and traveling around the world, as evidenced by the children’s varying birthplaces, and have been fortunate to live in many great locations. Kate is a professor in education working for a couple of universities plus doing some consulting and is extremely lucky to be able to do most of her work online thus freeing up travel time. The kids are/were all world schooled and again this is great as it gives us freedom plus allows us to incorporate our love of travel into our learning experiences. We love traveling but prefer slower travels and renting houses or apartments so we can get to know neighborhoods, grocery stores and live like locals. We are expats/global-digital nomads/travelers/third culture kids and adults/world schoolers/unschoolers….Labels don’t fit us well!

What was life like before Worldschooling?

We had moved from England to Hawaii about 25 years ago and that is where we discovered the idea of homeschooling (so kind of the start of the journey but we’d always traveled). My oldest went to kindergarten in Hawaii and it was terrible because he’d taught himself to read and was working on that and math skills at about the 3rd-4th grade level (we did very little and that was simply him and his innate push). Hawaiian schools could not accommodate him or do any additional programs until grade 3 and so the Director of Gifted Education for the state asked if we had heard of homeschooling and gave us links to a burgeoning new group. We met up and I discovered books by John Holt and the magazine Growing Without Schooling and we never looked back. Amazing to find our comfort zone.

When and how did you first hear about Worldschooling?

I think it was about three years ago that I first saw the term and thought “that’s us!” A little like the term attachment parenting; we’d been doing this for years without a name to it.

Before you started, what worried you about Worldschooling? And how has that turned out?

Gosh it’s been so long that I don’t really have any worries. We’ve just always lived and traveled and learned as a family. Learning to trust the process and let go of controlling things has taken a while. Trust in your children to learn even if they don’t openly seem to be doing anything remotely “educational.”

How has life changed since you began Worldschooling?

We only had one year of kindergarten and that was a long time ago! There is no before and after really as my entire life has been spent traveling and once I had kids they just went along. I think the before may have been when I thought I needed to buy into the system (kindergarten) and send my lovely attachment parented child off to be enjoyed by others for the day. After I was freed from that push, it was so joyful to be around them all day in and day out. Relaxing not to have to meet other people’s standards or get up and out of the door every day. We have a lot of PJ days!

What have been some unexpected benefits of Worldschooling?

I think the quality of my children’s relationships within the family is enhanced. One of my older YA sons is traveling with us now in Europe and seeing how he interacts with the two younger ones still living full time at “home” is amazing. I love how close they are and how they will all take the time for family. We drop everything to be with each other — around the world!

The Green Family travel the world with their beautiful dog in tow.

NUTS & BOLTS Could you share your monthly travel budget?

It’s hard to say as it’s so variable. I currently have two houses in the US with one rented out fully and another that we house swap with and use as a home base occasionally. So I pay for that place but it makes money in house swaps. I’d say we travel somewhere between $2,000 – $5,000 per month depending on how many are with me, where we are, and if the accommodation is swapped or not.

How do you fund your travels?

I am a professor in education and psychology and I teach all my courses online. I’ve been doing this since 2003.

How do you choose your destinations?

Really just depends but something will be an anchor or spot that we either fell into or it’s a conference type thing. So if I find an amazing house swap then we may build more countries that are nearby around that. Or we find a cheap’ish home base and then use discount airlines to travel around from there.

We lived in the UAE twice (I got f2f jobs for 5 years total) and we traveled a lot to S.E Asia from there. We are currently in Europe and had focused our house swaps for anywhere in the continent. We have been in Andalusia for 3 months and now heading to Brittany, UK, Slovenia, Holland and then in October will go to a family worldschool summit in Thailand. In 2019 we are spending two months on a horse farm in Wales as my daughter is an avid horse rider. So we often try to base it around interests. Hoping to be in Japan for a month as my son is taking language lessons there. Sorry this is scattered but it’s just so variable. Interests. Costs. Availability. Oh and a huge one for me — weather. I don’t do cold!

How long do you stay in one location and why?

Again it depends. We like to immerse ourselves in a location somewhat and then use that as a base to explore. Three months is often a good amount for us. Then we will intersperse short bursts from there or between. We’ve been in Andalusia in a gorgeous 300-year-old house in a white village since March. From here we did a house swap for a week to Seville and also jumped on the ferry and traveled Morocco for a week. It’s been great. We leave this week and will spend 3 days driving to Paris (6 days) and then onto Brittany for a few weeks. We usually get tired of fast travel pretty quickly.

What does a typical Worldschooling day or week look like for you?

The joy of this life is that each day can bring something different. But we like to do a couple of trips/excursions a week and then have a few days a week that are homebound. We lean toward introvert/bookworms and of course with my work then I need some focused time.

What has been the hardest part of Worldschooling & Traveling? How did you handle it?

Family life is exactly this. Not always glam but worldschooling is basically just family. We are a big and growing group (5-year-old grandson and a daughter in law who travel with us often now) and so normal ups and downs. I think the hardest is saying goodbye to any of them. It breaks my heart each time but then the joy of seeing them go off and explore the world is worth it.

TRAVEL RECOMMENDATIONS What are your Top 5 Travel Products?

A corkscrew! A sharp knife for the kitchen. Computer. And I travel with some essential oils as those help us stay well. Kindles and iPads as we have to read (I break out into hives if I don’t have access to books:) But really there isn’t much that are must-haves.

What Tech Gear do you travel with?

iPad, MacBook Pro, phones. We were all iPhones and local sims until I started with Google fi and so now I have a Motorola as the main phone. I am enjoying not having to change sim cards in each country — so far so good. 15 year old has his laptop for gaming. Multiple chargers and plug adaptors. I swear adaptors seem to multiply when we don’t need them and disappear when we do (so we buy another of course)!

What are your favorite booking sites and why?

I use Skyscanner and Kayak for flights mostly and then I go to the individual airlines that come up. I compare which is the cheapest option. If I know which budget airlines are close to us I often just look there. I use hotel.com for short term as I like the free nights. We also use Airbnb a good bit. My house swaps are from lovehomeswap, homexchange, and worldschooler exchange.

SUMMARY As a Worldschooling Family, if you could step back in time, what is one thing you would do differently?

We travel with our beagle who is about 30 pounds. I love him dearly but I would probably have got a smaller dog that was easier to transport than he is. An under-the-seat dog would be much easier. Nothing else really.

What would you tell someone who is considering Worldschooling?

Just do it. Don’t ponder if it’s the right time or the children’s ages are right. If you can get out there with your children then it’s always the right time. Enjoy being with them every day. They grow up far too fast and having 2 days out of 7 is never enough if you are sending them away to school! I wanted all 7 days, 365 days a year and I have never regretted that.

What are you working on at the moment?

I am working on a book with a fellow Worldschooler. We will be portraying family stories of worldschoolers in both their written story and photos. We are interested in jumping off stories. What caused you to jump into it and why this? How do you manage it workwise, financially, and emotionally? What does your daily life look like? And more. As a photographer (Julie) and social scientist (Kate) we too are fascinated by other people and their lives so we are planning to create a book that captures these stories; both in written pieces and photography. Much the same information portrayed in this piece Our goals is to showcase a diverse range of families so if you would be interested in participating please email Kate and Julie at: worldschoolingbookproject@gmail.com I have a family blog but it’s more like our family diary. If it helps anyone then happy to share: https://the-world-is-a-book.org/about-us/

Where Can We Find You?

Website: CLICK HERE

Enjoyed meeting The Green Family?? Share their story on Pinteret!

Worldschooling Spotlight Q&A on Facebook

Our Worldschooling Spotlight Family are looking forward to answering any questions you might have for them! Be sure to return to the Facebook Group and find the link to this week’s Feature. Ask your questions in the comments section and our Spotlight Family will get back to you ASAP!

Want to be Featured on Worldschooling Spotlight?

If you wish to apply to be featured on Worldschooling Spotlight, please click here and fill out the application form.

The post Worldschooling Spotlight – Meet The Green Family appeared first on Worldschooling Central.

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When planning for a trip, the one thing that can be super popular with families is riding camels through the desert. And what better place to do that than in the sand dunes that surround the city of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates. Today we look at a budget-friendly way to enjoy a night out in Dubai – perfect for families, even if you’re only staying in Dubai for 1 night!

Should You Do a Desert Safari in Dubai?

Dubai is a popular destination – if for nothing else than as a layover to break up long-haul flights. Whether you are staying for just a day or planning to slow travel through the UAE, it is an incredible city to visit. Known for extravagance, Dubai has a huge array of activities on offer and of course a super popular choice is a desert safari.

Camel Riding on our Desert Safari Adventure

There is a myriad of companies online that take bookings for Desert Safaris, with prices ranging quite dramatically. For those looking for a bargain though, there are a range of companies that advertise on sites like Groupon – specials that can save you 50-90% off regular ticket prices! No matter who you choose, most of these companies are selling packages for the same experience, and end up taking you to the same stretch of sand on the outskirts of Dubai!

Meeting Our Tour Group

Our adventure into the dunes of Dubai, started by meeting our tour group at Lu Lu Hypermarket in Dubai. For those that haven’t been to Dubai, the traffic is pretty full on – picture peak hour traffic, most of the time! To make things worse, we misread the GPS and ended up in a lane that sent us in the opposite direction of where we wanted to go. With only 20 minutes until we had to meet our guide, what one might think would be a quick U-turn, turned into a 15-minute nightmare of side streets, back alleys and crazy drivers – nothing in Dubai seems easy!

With minutes to spare, we saw the Lu Lu Hypermarket… BUT seeing and arriving are two entirely different things. Navigating the next block and a half was infuriating! But, with no time to lose, we decided on a short cut… a little 4WDing in downtown Dubai! (I should point out we weren’t alone!)

Always allow plenty of time to navigate driving when in Dubai!

With numerous phone calls from the Tour Operator, in broken English at best, we finally parked and raced to meet our driver before being whisked off into the Dubai desert sands.

After a hair-raising drive along the Dubai freeways (I tell you these drivers are NUTS!) our driver began to slow along a stretch of road teaming with 4WD’s. While only 8 of us had joined our tour, we were to meet up with hundreds more, all awaiting the beginning of the adventure!

The Dubai Skyline with the Burj Khalifa towering over other normal sized, big city buildings!

A big city needs a lot of power – the outskirts of Dubai city!

There’s no shortage of spending on building in Dubai, yet another building is almost complete!

4WDing in the Dubai Sand Dunes

The first component of our adventure was 4WDing through the sand dunes. I’m not one to shy away from adventure, but this put me way outside of my comfort zone! The kids had an absolute ball, and years on, still refer to this experience as one of their favorites!

4WDing in the Sand Dunes of Dubai - YouTube

To be fair, I laughed my head off the whole way, I just couldn’t do it with my eyes open! We sped along the tops of soft sand dunes, slid precariously down the sides (deliberately) and then flew towards the top of another dune only to quickly drop to the sand below. While the kids squealed in delight in the seats behind me, I clung on for dear life, with images of a rolling 4WD flashing before my eyes. Again, I did love it – a bit like I love a really exciting roller coaster – I couldn’t keep my eyes open but had tears from laughing rolling down my face as I giggled like a school girl at every turn.

Arriving at Our Desert Camp

With a massive sigh of relief (from me!) we arrived at our destination, a beautiful site of Arabic tents in the middle of the desert. Upon arrival we each had the opportunity to hold a Falcon – some enjoyed it significantly more than others!

Brody and his new friend!

What an experience!

Sienna wasn’t so sure!

Riding Camels in the Desert

Finally, our dream came true – riding camels in the desert. Unfortunately, the experience included in our package was extremely short, and involved a long time waiting in line. However, you are offered the opportunity to upgrade to a private ride (around 20min), that is well worth the price.

We thoroughly enjoyed our ride, however, camel riding wasn’t all Sienna thought it would be! Holding on for dear life as the camel stood up, and later sat down, was pretty scary for a 5 year-old! And having a third camel on the back of our camel train, who took an instant dislike to both Sienna and I made for an interesting ride. Smiling and laughing whilst keeping an eye on number 3 who kept trying to nip us (despite his mouth being covered) was not the dream I had in mind, but overall it was as much fun as I’d hoped it would be.

Our guide was absolutely lovely, stopping at numerous spots to take more photos than we could ever possibly hope to need!

Smile for the camera!

Sienna was very unsure!

Dressing in traditional clothing

As the old saying goes… when in Rome, do as the Romans do… so when you’re in the middle of an Arabic Desert, the kids thoroughly enjoyed dressing in customary clothing. They had a ball trying on various things, and Sienna was thrilled to jingle like a set of bells as she shook her head and hips in a new little ensemble. And of course what’s a new outfit without a photoshoot in the sand dunes!

Brody didn’t like this outfit at all, but loved the headpiece!

What’s a new outfit without a photoshoot?

A beautiful setting for dinner

Dinner in the desert

Our gorgeous dinner setting began as the sun set on the horizon and continued under a sky of stars (and a few planes getting ready to land in Dubai!) With much excitement, an Arabic dinner was served and a wonderful performance of belly dancing and fire-breathing began.

The meal included unlimited water and soft drinks, with a full bar available for an extra cost!

And Just Like That it’s Over!

As the evening drew to a close, we wandered back to the collection of 4WD’s, with no idea how to find our driver. But as luck may have it we found the family we’d traveled in with who were able to track down our driver in no time.

A Desert Safari in Dubai is a must do while visiting the UAE – a great adventure for the family and something the kids will likely remember for many years to come!

Looking for more activities in the UAE? Checkout this AWESOME post by Our Globe Trotters

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The post A Desert Safari in Dubai – Fun For the Whole Family! appeared first on Worldschooling Central.

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You’re a traveler. You love nothing more than jumping on a plane and heading off to a new destination. But are you a serious traveler? How many things can you tick off this list?

You know you’re a serious traveler when: 1) You open your wallet and find 2 or more different currencies!

2) Someone asks for your home address, and you don’t have one to giv

e!

3) The sight of a new stamp in your passport excites you!

4) There are multiple time zones stored in your phone!

5) You refer to cities by their airport code! 6) You can say hello, goodbye and thank you in multiple languages!

7) People back home start a conversation with you by asking where you are!

8) You have to think about time zones before making a telephone call! 9) Getting through security, in the quickest possible time, has become an art form!

10) You can pack everything you need for travel, into a small backpack, in less than 15 minutes! 11) You have more travel apps on your phone than anything else!

12) You have a VPN on your phone, computer, and iPad so you don’t miss a second of your favorite shows back home! 13) You have more friends all over the world than you have back at home 14) You own multiple sim cards from different countries and hold onto them with plans to use them again!

15) Trying new foods is not so unusual! 16) You arrive in a new city and make a smooth transition from one type of transport to another, without a care in the world! 17) You are surrounded by people that you don’t understand, and it doesn’t phase you in the slightest! 18) You talk to friends and family online, more than in person! 19) You constantly have to check your phone to know what day of the week it is! 20) You get excited to visit a local supermarket and see your favorite food from home on the shelves! 21) You know how to convert many different currencies into your home currency, without using a conversion app!

How did you go? Do you have more you’d like to add? Post your score below and let us know of any others you’d love to share!

The post 21 Signs you’re a Serious Traveller! How Many Do You Do? appeared first on Worldschooling Central.

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Here we get to know our Members and learn about how they got started, how life has changed and other interesting facts.

Today we are introducing The Heggie Family of Cake And Eat it 3, who describe their life before Worldschooling as simply Work, Eat. Sleep. Repeat! Many of us begin Worldschooling because we are tired of that routine, so let’s learn how the Heggie Family have made the transition! 

GET TO KNOW THE HEGGIE FAMILY Introduce your family!

Our Cake and Eat It 3 family is Dad – Brett, Mum – Leanne and Miss B who is 10. We have traveled for over 20 years and have an older daughter who is all grown up that saw a large part of the world with us too.

What was life like before Worldschooling?

Work, Eat. Sleep. Repeat. Not kidding.

When and how did you first hear about Worldschooling?

When we made the decision to travel fulltime we started exploring various schooling methods for Miss B. I was not a stranger to alternative schooling methods having done all my high school by distance education. There was lots and lots of research and forums and facebook groups. It was during one of these late night reading sessions that I discovered there is a name for what we wanted to do and lots of people were already doing it!

Before you started, what worried you about Worldschooling? And how has that turned out?

We did not fit a mold of any one type of formal education. We were going to be in and out of the country, traveling light and data would be an issue when outside of Australia. Taking that initial leap of faith was difficult. As soon as you hit the road you fall into a routine. Both Brett and I are very organized people and believe an education is important, we had totally over prepared and there was no need for concern.

How has life changed since you began Worldschooling?

Total opposite. We always have been very focused on working hard to achieve our goals and be able to travel while doing so. Our work ethic has served us well, however, in order to achieve those goals little time is spent relaxing or enjoying the moment. Doing something we all love is great but being able to do it together is amazing.

What have been some unexpected benefits of Worldschooling?

Having traveled for over 20 years we knew what we headed into and probably the biggest change or benefit that we have seen over the years is the addition of social media and the ability to make connections all over the world. Keeping in touch with friends (new and old) and family has never been easier.

NUTS & BOLTS Could you share your monthly travel budget?

$AUD3,900/$USD3,000 in Europe moving faster and $AUD2,200/$USD1,700 when we move a lot slower.

How do you fund your travels?

Many years spent building a property and investment portfolio to support our goal to fulltime travel. I did retain a few hours a week from my employer that I access remotely and when I return home I assist with training on site. Every bit counts and sometimes it is as simple as asking your current employer if you can provide remote assistance.

How do you choose your destinations?

We have a campervan in Europe at the moment and so all our immediate travel is focussed there. Previously though, a trekking challenge or an area we haven’t been to grabs our attention.

How long do you stay in one location and why?

This changes all the time, depending on time frames of visa’s, time off work when we were not fulltime. If we are visiting an area to complete a trek, we arrive before it to adjust to climate/altitude. So many variables!

What does a typical Worldschooling day or week look like for you?

We all do better keeping somewhat to a schedule, I keep a weekly diary of what we have done, visited, reading etc. We generally aim to do a min 2hrs per day in workbooks (Maths, spelling, grammar) then multiple hours in real life world around us type learning. Element of online learning when wifi/data not an issue (hence our Educational Websites and Resources Page) for science, history. We have various books, documentaries, and movies that relate to an area which we watch before going. I have a lot of downloaded tutorials for various subjects. We also read a lot of information boards, talk risk management, safety, what if situations. Currency conversions, budgets, languages are all part of every day living on the road.

What has been the hardest part of Worldschooling & Traveling? How did you handle it?

Missing out on family gatherings and having relationships with young nieces and nephews – still working on it. But doing a lot more video for our youtube and getting Miss B’s confidence up to be in it a little more so they can watch them and see what we are up to.

TRAVEL RECOMMENDATIONS What are your Top 5 Travel Products?

Different travel needs different products but as we are road tripping at the moment we could not live without…

  1. Samsung Tablets for maps and reading
  2. Laptops for blog and schooling
  3. Homeopathy Kit (fix all sorts of illness and injury on the spot, naturally)
  4. Inverter for charging devices
  5. SLR Camera, Samsung phones/camera, Osmo+, Drone
  6. My favorite Culinaire vegetable peeler
What Tech Gear do you travel with?

Hooley Dooley, there is a bit of a list here but I will list the main ones

  1. Toshiba Laptops solid state drives (work, blog, investments, school)
  2. DJI Osmo+
  3. Samsung S7 Samsung Tablets
  4. External Hardrives (digital library, movies)
What are your favorite booking sites and why?

Flights come from whatever the best deal is for when we want to go, we are members of multiple sites and airlines, Emirates, Flybuys travel, Qantas, I know the pilot, Skyscanner, there are sooo many. We don’t really book any tours, we arrive, research locally then book (generally after checking sites like Wowcher, Scoopon, Groupon etc.) Any that we have booked in advance we have generally found cheaper if we had bought locally. But be careful some need to be booked in advance to get in at all.

SUMMARY As a Worldschooling Family, if you could step back in time, what is one thing you would do differently?

In preparing for fulltime travel, I think it is important to be teaching the kids about what is worldschooling or international travel. We had a Little Passports membership for a while before leaving and it really enabled our youngest to get an idea of what is out there and what to expect. Theme unit study of different countries is also great we have a few on our website. It is also important to get them used to long walks and carrying their items like water bottles. This will make it easier in the transition to worldschooling. We are happy with our preparation and probably the only thing we would do differently is not spend so much time building the portfolio. Life is short get out there.

What would you tell someone who is considering Worldschooling?

Join Facebook groups, learn from others experiences, read blogs of families with similar size or adventures that you would like to do. Start saving yesterday. Arrange connections with other traveling families allowing kids to interact. Start writing down necessities that you will need and make sure all birthdays, Christmas and gift giving occasions are relevant to your travels so there is less expensive when you are due to leave. Starting exploring your own town together as a family.

What are you working on at the moment?

We have an amazing Educational Websites and Resources page of our website. Essentially meaning all the research has been done (and continues to be done) of various educational links to assist with curriculum and information on various subjects saving you data and time. We have some science experiments that Miss B has done and also currently working on some exciting projects in this area.

Enjoyed meeting the Heggie Family of Cake And Eat It 3? Share their story on Pinterest!

Where Can We Find You?

Website: CLICK HERE 

Facebook: CLICK HERE

YouTube: CLICK HERE

Worldschooling Spotlight Q&A on Facebook

Our Worldschooling Spotlight Family are looking forward to answering any questions you might have for them! Be sure to return to the Facebook Group and find the link to this week’s Feature. Ask your questions in the comments section and our Spotlight Family will get back to you ASAP!

Want to be Featured on Worldschooling Spotlight?

If you wish to apply to be featured on Worldschooling Spotlight, please click here and fill out the application form.

The post Worldschooling Spotlight – The Heggie Family appeared first on Worldschooling Central.

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