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Are you the victim of the following dangerous EAP myth?

Many EA professionals falsely believe that their programs are safe from closure, sale, contract loss, or takeover by

managed care hotlines because they have pleasant and positive relationships with top management. It takes more.

Many EAPs were axed in 2017, and more in 2018 are on the brink. Reason: EAPs fail to effectively engage, add value, promote services, and embed themselves in the work culture.How? What’s the secret?

One Secret to More EAP Security

An essential tactic for embedding your EAP is to use the right kind of EAP newsletter that shows your program’s personality. Ensure it reaches every level of the organization frequently. The key word is “frequently.” Frequency beats quantity.

Only a true EAP publication from EAP pros can produce the internal buzz that produces the embedded effect. That newsletter is FrontLine Employee.

FrontLine Employee is “EAP relationship glue.” It increases EAP utilization almost instantly, and promotes EAPs while building bulletproof relationships.

Articles in FrontLine Employee are written to promote wellness, offer productivity tips, and help employees and their families manage stress.

Guaranteed to Protect Your Program

Read the EAP testimonials enclosed. Most are notable professionals in our field. They all subscribe to FrontLine Employee.

FrontLine Employee arrives a week early, before the month. It has never been late—not once in 18 years. It’s editable, renameable, and amendable. However, it is ready to use the moment it arrives.

Frequent Newsletters Increase EAP Value and Utilization

The main reason for FrontLine Employee’s popularity is its monthly two-page format. This amounts to 50% more content per year than a quarterly four-page newsletter! Ironically, this also makes FrontLine Employee more likely to be fully read!

All articles in FrontLine Employee are between 75 and 250 words. They are tightly written without fluff, and easily digested with how-to’s, to-do’s, resources, lists, and links. Feedback after sending out just one issue will convince you that a new path of engagement and top-of-mind awareness is truly yours.

Here’s the point: Your newsletter cannot be casual entertainment, a cute reminder, or a snoozer. You can’t sheepishly

insert something into employee inboxes every three months. This will risk losing your EAP.

Absolute Flexibility—Not a Copyright Mark On It!

Do anything you want with FrontLine Employee except share it with another EAP – edit, amend, or rename it. Our copyright mark is not required. Take advantage of the free professionally created masthead using your own name for the newsletter! Or, insert our text in your own template if you like!

  • FrontLine Employee: Facts and Features
  • Affordable with a flat-rate price–for internally or external EAPs
  • Completely editable—you have full control of all elements.

  • Article depth—delves deeper to focus on productivity, stress, family, and wellness—also customer service, conflict resolution, relationships

  • Flexible—easy formats PDF, MS Publisher, MS Word, and/or text only.

  • Printable, web-usable, e-mail-able, and adaptable to any need.

  • Hassle-free –emailed early. Complete ready to edit or send.

  • EAP-driven–encourages employees to seek help from the EAP.

  • Subscriber hotline –EAPs can always request article topics.

Free professional masthead—you get a free, unique, and impressive-looking masthead with your own title, logo, colors, and look!

On time–we e-mail a week early, and have never been late—not once.

Thousands of companies get FrontLine Employee and readership is now over 3,000,000—including all employees of New York state, the state of Washington, the Social Security Administration, Army installations, universities, hospitals, municipalities, small businesses, and EAP providers worldwide.

Do Not Wait to Subscribe--$258 Gift Deadline!

100% Money-back Guarantee: 100% of your payment will be refunded at any time during the entire length of the subscription if you cancel.

I look forward to hearing from you, so complete the order form provided!

Daniel A. Feerst, BSW, MSW, LISW-CP

2001 Founding Publisher/Editor-in-Chief

P.S. Subscribe now. Get 14 issues instead of 12 (And $258 free resources CD!) The easy way is to phone me at 1-800-626-4327 or fax to 843-884-0442.

Since 1979 -- Member, International Employee Assistance Professionals Association

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When a crisis occurs, how you communicate with guests and employees matters. Safety is important. If you are able tobe proactive and have strong communication skills, you are going to save lives in the event of a disaster. While you can't predict when a crisis will occur, you can plan out specific responses or action plans in the event of a specific type of crisis. When you respond with skill and collaboration, guests and employees will be safer.

SMS is the fastest, most direct way to reach a large number of people quickly, and it can all be done from your phone. When you have the ability to text customers and employees, you can share all kinds of information during a difficult situation. With a 98% read rate, quickly notify your employees and guests during a crisis with SMS.

Responses Can Occur Immediately

When a crisis occurs, you can't predict if your employees or customers are going to be sitting at a computer. With time management of the essence, it is vital to reach out on mobile devices. If you need to check on your employees or you want to make sure each guest at your facility is safe, a quick text message requesting a reply to check on safety can make a big difference. You will hear back from those who are safe and be able to send help to those who don't respond.

In critical situations, your staff may be on the move and won’t always have immediate access to their computers or a reliable internet connection. With a texting platform, your staff can easily send a text alert from their mobile phones to everyone on their distribution list. They don’t need to install any apps or even have internet access on their phones. In times when seconds matter, the flexibility this offers is crucial to ensuring guest safety.

Answer Employee or Customer Questions

To keep everyone feeling safe, information is essential. As the crisis occurs and you have gathered information, share any pertinent information through SMS. In the event of a fire, for example, you can send out a text stating exactly where the fire is located and what the evacuation procedures are. If the fire has been put out, send out another text to let everyone know. You can respond to questions or concerns through SMS and use creativity to problem solve the crisis.

Share Safety Tips

In the event of a large disaster at your facility, you'll need to do more than keep people informed about what is going on. If you have safety tips, share them through SMS marketing. For example, if there is a security risk in the building, you need to let everyone know of this risk through SMS. Tell people to shelter in place or share any escape routes that are deemed safe. Be clear about the risk, as being vague will only confuse those who receive the messages. Keep everyone up to date during the crisis.

Use Automation to Respond More Quickly in a Crisis

Good planning can make a huge difference when a crisis occurs. Use project management strategies to set up a response protocol. You will be able to automate text messages based on the crisis that occurs. You can even send out a daily safety tip through an MMS picture message for those that prefer visual thinking. When there is a crisis:

  • A solid action plan is necessary.
  • SMS gives you the ability to reach out in an instant.
  • Security risks are easier to manage.
  • Answer questions immediately and gather vital feedback.
  • Manage your response with creativity.
  • Use collaboration with emergency services to keep everyone safe.
  • Increase productivity by managing the crisis effectively.
  • Send infographics to maximize your response with visual thinking.

Preparation makes managing a crisis easier. While you can't predict when a crisis strikes, you can try to manage how you respond to the crisis. With a plan in place, you and your employees will know how to respond. SMS gives you a powerful communication tool so that you can reach out to others, check on safety, and gather information as the event unfolds. When you can share information and collect updates from those directly involved in the crisis, it will become easier to manage the entire situation and makes your organization more secure overall.

Author Biography:

Joel Lee

Joel Lee is the marketing specialist atTrumpia, which earned a reputation as the most complete SMS solution including user-friendly user interface and API for mobile engagement, Smart Targeting, and advanced automation. Jumpstart your business by grabbing your free copy of this powerful Mobile Marketing Success Kit.


More Safety and Wellness Products Links

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No matter how well employees do their jobs, chances are they will have a corrective

interview someday with their supervisor at least once--if you're an above average worker, your chances increase that a mistake will come someday because you aren't playing it safe all the time.

As an HR manager, use your employee health, wellness, and productivity tips newsletter (I hope you are distributing your own. It's easy.) to help disciplined employees bounce back from that awful interview with the boss.

Use these tips or re-write them to fit your situation and help workers stay positive, make the needed corrections, value the feedback that came from their boss, admit their mistakes, communicate better with a supervisor in the future, head problems off early next time, and bounce back with resilience from the ego-slapped feeling of being verbally corrected -- OUCH!!!.

Consider these five tips on managing corrective interviews like a champ.

Trust your ability to succeed. Being corrected isn’t pleasant, but if you have a successful track record, a corrective interview can’t take that away. Use this knowledge to detach from feelings of dread so you can focus on what management has to say.

Remain calm.
Listen and keep notes. You don’t have to refute everything you disagree with now. Consider a second appointment to raise concerns, or compose a memo to tactfully refute points raised in the meeting. Don’t try to take control of the interview away from your supervisor in a fit of emotion.

Accept reality. Corrective interviews are management tools, not disciplinary actions. They happen, and mostly for good reasons. Try to understand management’s perspective, even if you disagree. Don’t attack a supervisor for correcting your performance. Don’t hesitate to ask for clarification on what you don’t understand.

Supervisors don’t enjoy corrective interviews. Understanding that your supervisor does not take pleasure in correcting your performance can help you avoid feeling “picked on.”

If they’re right, they’re right. It is possible to leave a corrective interview thanking your supervisor for feedback. Affirm your intent to perform satisfactorily. Add your own suggestions. Cooperation demonstrates professionalism, and it will be remembered. It might also be reflected in your annual performance evaluation.

Resilience is about getting the right perspective, finding a way to step back from very uncomfortable event, and quickly doing what it takes to feel good again while retaining all the necessary lessons. There are several ways to do this.

Make up your own schedule to meet periodically with the boss. Take a list of essential functions with you on a sheet of paper and discuss how you are performing on each one. Repeat this process every three months--we are talking about a 10 minute meeting, and get feedback. Make it conversational. Don't drill your supervisor with a checklist!

To download some free newsletter content, go to Frontline Employee Download Page.

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Humorous Supervisors May Not Produce Happy Results

Everything in moderation...Humor can motivate and engage employees according to research. But research has found in some cases, that the boss’s humor is not the best kind for productivity output. Instead, it can sabotage productivity.

Swiping office supplies, insulting coworkers, goofing off, and even fudging on financial reports can be consequences of a work culture led by a supervisor who attempts to enliven the workplace with too much humor.

Analysis: Supervisors represent a natural existential threat to employees because of their control or influence over job security. Removing this perception may precipitate less unproductive behaviors, attitudes, and a loss of urgency to work above standard.

Read more about humor and supervisors, and the research about this style of communication.

Hi Subscriber - I will discuss this topic in the May 2018 issue of FrontLine Supervisor. Do you subscribe? Fax this form to subscribe or write "free trial" on it for 3-issues.

Daniel Feerst, BSW, MSW, LISW-CP

Publisher, WorkExcel.com 1-800-626-4327
Click here to see our 100+ page catalog.

Follow me on Linked-In - http://linkedin.com/in/workexcel/

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You already know what it means to be an enabler. These are the people alcoholics and addicts know and depend on to somehow or in some way prevent them from really feeling the consequences of their problematic substance abuse.

Enablers "buy off" the addict's pain by what they say, or do, or think, or admonish others to do or say, that essentially allows the addict not realize the seriousness of  the problem they face. Addicts then avoid the pain that would cause them to do something radically different...like get effective treatment.

But there is another type of enabler, and this one is not human. It's the organization itself, and its policies, customers, expectations, excuse-making, and traditions. And in many ways this is the worst kind of enabler because it is linked to the alcoholic's paycheck.

Everybody strives for a safe, healthy and happy workplace. Sometimes, management believes that employee behavior, such as addiction, is an isolated problem--and that nothing contributes to it that they could possibly be responsible for changing. How wrong they are. It starts with appropriate policies, education, awareness, and helpful EAP programming.

Just like loved ones of the addict, organizations can enable workers who abuse drugs and/or alcohol. Not only will your workplace suffer when organizational enabling takes place, but employees who are intoxicated on the job can lead to profound consequences, such as injuries and resulting lawsuits.

Here are four ways that your workplace may be enabling substances abusers to continue their behavior.

Employees are not empowered to confront peers. Often, a substance abuser’s coworkers are the ones who first become aware that there is a problem. Without education and awareness, and out of pure ignorance, they label alcoholic coworkers as "functional alcoholics". This means: "The alcoholic's drinking problem does not bother me." If employees were educated, they could proactively begin interrupting these sorts of enabling patterns.

If you don’t have an effective way to communicate with employees or you don't work toward giving them the right education on behavioral risk issues, you won’t get their cooperation in helping reduce risk in the workplace. A poor employee assistance program mechanism (call it a "faux EAP") may also contribute to keeping coworkers in the dark by not providing education and awareness and being proactive with both supervisor and employee training.

Drinking is part of the work culture....Not only does the substance abuser continue his behavior, not acting sends a signal to your employees that you don’t care. If you are investigating the situation, let key employees know so that they are aware you take substance abuse in the workplace seriously.

Clear, direct policies aren’t in place. Employees with addiction problems or who abuse substances on the job are pushed underground by fear. There may be a zero tolerance policy, but it does not add up. -- It fires rather than seeks to help via referral, treatment, and follow up. This drives drinking and drug use further underground, reinforcing stereotypes that create enormous risk to the organization.

You’ll learn in DOT Supervisor Training (if it is done correctly) how to organizational enabling happens and how seeing not only set up a plan to deal with substance abusers, but also how to communicate it to employees in a way that does not hold them in contempt or stigmatize them further. When this happens, employees with substance abuse problems begin thinking in different terms about how to solve their life problems associated with addiction..and this means treatment.

A drinking culture exists and reinforcement of it is rewarded. In many companies, reasonable suspicion training conflicts with their company traditions. Such training is avoided. It simply gets in the way of the fun, the business, and can harm an organization financially. One reason this happens is because of misguided definitions and understanding about alcoholism. Imagine taking customers to lunch but avoiding alcohol when that is in fact a lubricant for conversation that encourages deal making at all the other companies that compete. It's a problem. However their is a way around it -- educating employees about alcoholism and alcohol abuse -- so those who may have be in recovery are not penalized for failure to participate.

Enabling substance abusers on the job leads to employee dissatisfaction, workplace safety issues and dwindling production, and organizations can be the worst enablers.

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So, you just finished your DOT supervisor training and are worried that because you have a drinking problem that you

can’t confront employees? Think again. You can, and you may even do it more effectively than other supervisors in your organization.

That’s because your issues with drinking give you an edge. It’s called educated second guessing of defense mechanisms. No we are not talking about diagnosing your employee, we are talking about a better ability to know a bullshitter.

Your drinking problem (you may not yet have identified yourself as an alcoholic, but are pretty worried about or sure) gives you special insight into an alcoholic’s thoughts and behaviors. You can get inside the head of employees drinking on the job and determine how to avoid their manipulative tactics. You can easily see patterns of behavior that may escape your peers. Again, you are not diagnosing, you are using your affinity for the problem to reduce risk in the workplace.

All of this may make you a bit uneasy, but the truth is that EAPs see this everyday. Many people with drinking problems believe they are lucky and efficient drinkers. They know their body and life experiences with alcohol are periodically problematic, but they are still counting themselves a clever drinkers with high levels of productivity, awareness, and a following of people who love them…but, they are alcoholic.

If you suspect that a worker is drinking on the job, you know how to investigate the situation almost instinctively. You know the best hiding places for a flask or a bottle. You can spot behavior right away, such as shaking hands, slurred speech and poor judgment.

But where you’ll really excel is in confronting employees who are drunk at work. Alcoholics know how to manipulate to stay out of trouble. You already have used many of these methods yourself, such as attempting to make others feel guilty, telling would be "confronters" that their perceptions aren’t real, and trying to appeal to friendship with the boss to invoke a sense of loyalty that overshadows the needs of the workplace.

You understand that the alcoholic is incapable of accepting blame for the situation he now finds himself in, and that excuses are well-thought out and sophisticated.

You can be an example to your employees drinking on the job. Show them that they can manage their addictive illness and recover from it with help, such as treatment or recovery groups when, and if they employee offers a confession about the nature of their drinking problem—but link this to referral to the employee assistance program of your organization, instantly and without delay. This is an open window of opportunity, and it closes fast. Your goal also in such a discussion is to help the employee overcome fear of getting help.

One caution about being a supervisor in recovery: Don’t try to be a worker’s sponsor. Many supervisors have gotten sober after drug and alcohol training and the referral of employees to treatment. But don’t 12-step your employees. It’s a mixing of roles that simply does not work. It’s easy to slip into this role. Boundaries, limits that alcoholics tend to have problems with, need to be set between you and your workers. Remember always that your role first and foremost is to be their supervisor. You can still be supportive, but within the confines of that role.

Although you have insight into the addicts at work, you will still benefit from reasonable suspicion training—no one is a complete expert on it. You’ll learn how to gather evidence effectively and tips on how to de-escalate situations that may get volatile when you confront employees high or drunk at work. You’ll be the supervisor that all the others look to when they need help confronting their own employees.

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Supervisors want to keep their workplace happy, healthy and productive, and part of that is keeping your organization

free from employees from being drunk or high on the job. However, once a worker gets help for their addiction, the battle isn’t completely over. Recovery takes time and effort, and supervisors may unwittingly hinder their employee’s success. Here are six ways you may be sabotaging his or her recovery. Can you think of any more?

1. Hyper vigilance. Especially if you are an adult child of an addict, you may be conditioned to be hyper-vigilant. This means that you watch your recovering worker’s every move to determine if they have slipped. Although the employee does deserve some scrutiny, overdoing it could make him uncomfortable enough to relapse.

2. Inflexibility. People in recovery know there are certain things they need to do right away if they are thinking about using. These tools include going to a meeting or calling their sponsor. Not allowing your employee the time to do these things may hinder his recovery. At least for the first year or so, give him the flexibility to get the help he needs.

3. Not completing DOT supervisor training or reasonable suspicion training. You’ll get tips on how to support your employee in recovery with the proper training. Even if you are in recovery yourself, you’ll receive new insights from this specialized training.

4.Trying to be the employee’s sponsor. A man can’t serve two masters. Remember that you are his supervisor first. Modeling good boundaries is helpful to someone new in recovery. Allow the employee to get his support in recovery from a sponsor.

5. Overreacting to a relapse. Addiction is a disease, and relapse is a commonplace symptom. Although you need to follow your organization’s protocols for drug or alcohol abuse, continue to support the employee if he slips a time or two, especially in early recovery.

6. Discussing your own ignorant ideas about addiction, especially trying to convince your worker or employee that they are not alcoholic in order to overcome your own alcoholic denial.

In treatment, employees are intensively educated about three things: 1) the nature of the disease of addiction; 2) What to do in order to arrest the illness; and 3) What not to do in order to arrest the illness. This information is based upon the best research and the experience of millions of recovering addicts and alcoholics. Involving yourself in discussions with employees that negatively influence what they have learned is one way to sabotage your employee and facilitate a relapse.

Recovery is a slow process where sometimes people take one step forward and two steps back. It’s important to remember that addiction is a disease. Addicts need time and appropriate support in all areas of their life to be successful. As a supervisor, you can make or break their success by your actions. The fact that the employee has sought help- is a promising first step. Appropriate boundaries, flexibility and specialized training will give you the tools to manage him in a way that will equal success for both him and your organization

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You’ve finally got the goods on an employee who is coming to work drunk, and you appropriately confront him about his behavior. You may not know it, but you’ve just put yourself

in the sights of a master manipulator.

Will you understand the disease of addiction properly or will you be hoodwinked by enabling?

Addicts are experts at pulling at your heartstrings, lack of self-confidence or your common sense. Through reasonable suspicion training, you’ll learn how to spot the following manipulative behaviors and techniques to stop them.

“ But I haven’t had a drink since last night.” Your employee smells like a distillery, but he tries to convince you that you can’t trust your own perceptions. Point out what you are seeing, hearing and smelling.

“ I thought we were friends.” Playing on your loyalty is a classic manipulation. Remind him that you’re his boss first. And even if you are his pal, true friends confront each other with bad behavior.

“It’s medicine.” Even If bourbon was prescribed by a doctor (which it won’t), no one is allowed by policy to come to work with alcohol in their system. Keep hammering home his coming to work “medicated” is the problem.

“You’ll ruin my career.” Addicts often take no responsibility for their actions by blaming others. They can’t perceive that their drinking may possibly ruin their career. His behavior has created your response.

“ What you’re smelling is mouthwash.” Heck, it may be. But your employee may have used enough of it to get drunk. Many cold medications and mouthwash contain copious amounts of alcohol, and they can and will get someone drunk. It doesn’t matter whether your employee has been drinking mouthwash or champagne. It all causes the same behavior when it’s not used responsibly.

“ Yes, I did drink, but I’m an alcoholic.” It may sound noble that your employee realizes he has a problem, but it’s important to remember it’s not an excuse for being intoxicated at work. The issues his condition cause in the workplace are the real problem.

“ Give me a pass this time. I’m going through something at home.” Again, the employee is blaming his wife leaving him, his father dying, his child not speaking to him, etc., for his drinking. Your giving him a pass isn’t going to the solve the problem: He’s drunk at work.

Through DOT supervisor training, you will earn how to be assertive, firm and respectful when confronting an employee about coming to work impaired. It’s important to learn these skills, as well as deescalation techniques, to keep your workplace safe and productive for your other employees.

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For some, getting high is as close as a can of spray paint or a few ounces of gasoline. Inhalant abuse, often called “huffing, or “sniffing,”” generates a quick high from breathing a variety of easy-to-acquire chemicals. From nail polish remover to solvent glue, some people will seek out this cheap and easy method to change the way they feel -- get high. But will it happen in the workplace? Or will you see its effects in an employee who has brain damage from the practice of huffing volatile chemicals? And is it important to put in DOT Supervisor Training.

Inhalant abuse was once thought to be prevalent among teens and young adults, especially those who lived in poverty. After all, things to sniff like gasoline and paint solvent are virtually everywhere.

Solvent glue, also called airplane glue, was one of the most common inhalant substances,

along with spray paint. Lawmakers made it difficult for anyone under legal age to buy these items, which many believed solved the problem. But inhalant use has never gone away completely.

In reasonable suspicion training or DOT supervisor training, you will rarely hear anything about inhalant abuse for one reason--it is not required by the U.S. DOT. Is this a reason for supervisors not to have the information?

It is not one of the key drug categories for which the DOT requires education and awareness. However, some programs will mention it, and in my opinion they should because it only takes a few seconds to educate supervisors, and frankly, you may see evidence of inhalant abuse in some companies. Here is a video below that shares in a few minutes what inhalant abuse symptoms possibly exist in the workplace

566 teenagers trying inhalant abuse in order to get high EVERY DAY! (http://www.consumered.org/learn/inhalant-abuse/statistics)

Learn how important it is to be aware of inhalant abuse in the workplace. When speaking of abuse, we mean "symptoms of use" and actual use on the job. The former could be physical neurological deficits the origin of which are inhalant abuse.

Industries that require employees to frequently use paints or solvents are usually on the lookout for the signs: paint on an employees’ face, plastic bags that contain paint or solvent, or a strong smell that is out of place for its location in the workplace, to name a few. In these workplaces employees may gradually get addicted to the items they use constantly to do their jobs.

Here's a shocker: For children under 12 the most commonly abused substance after Alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco are inhalants! 13% of teens have tried huffing inhalants.

In other industries people most likely to abuse inhalants are those who are attempting to stay away from street drugs. The guy trying to stay clean for a drug test may get desperate and alleviate his cravings through inhaling diesel fumes or a chemical used by your organization. Your company could be liable for accidents related to inhalant abuse, especially if the employee gets the means from your facility.

Be on the lookout for behavioral changes. Inhalant abusers can appear drunk, euphoric, drowsy or seem to be experiencing hallucinations. It’s important to address this type of abuse early because the effects can be devastating. Misuse of flammable inhalants could put your entire workplace in danger of fire or explosion. There are also the risks associated with inhalant abuse that you see with drugs and alcohol, such as on-the-job accidents.

Anyone who abuses inhalants set themselves up for serious illness and even death. Only one instance of abuse can lower the user’s oxygen level to deadly levels or disrupt heart rhythm. Long-term abuse can lead to organ failure and brain injury. Many of the substances used are known to cause cancer with long-term exposure.

Don’t let inhalant abuse fly under your radar. Receiving adequate training and passing it on to line supervisors can help your organization stay vigilant against this disturbing menace. Keep your workplace safe and healthy for all of your employees.

Preview in full the DOT Drug and Alcohol Training Program for Supervisors

#dottraining #inhalants - Learn more about teen drug abuse awareness and training

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All mental health professionals conduct assessments and/or treat people for depression from time to time.

Some who suffer with this illness may experience such chronic long-term sadness that they barely understand any more what it is like to feel normal.

When depressed employees find relief, it is not unlike those who are able by a medical procedure to hear or see for the first time.

You probably have employees on payroll right now who suffer with chronic depression. They function with depression, but they are not firing on all cylinders. Productivity losses for this group of employees is enormous.

Employees with depression may not look "depressed", sulk at their desk, or behave sluggishly. Still, depression is one of the most costly illnesses to employers at a whopping $75 billion in lost productivity and absenteeism alone.

Consider educating employees about depression perioidically so those who suffer from it have the chance to self-diagnose, rally with motivation, seek help. This is easy to do, and the payoffs can be great.

Here's a tip: Educate employees about depression in an article, and refer to a term called "bottomless sadness" associated with depression, and normal sadness. Google this term, and wrap a 150 word article around it. Put it in your health and wellness newsletter (or wait until March when I will do it in Frontline Employee.) You will be surprised at the impact this article has employees. Some who need help right now may reachout.

Don’t do a one-shot educational presentation or brown bag on depression. Instead trickle the information out in chapters with your newsletter, fliers, or another wellness tips program. You will see people move toward getting help after awareness builds after about six messages.

Consider this reproducible and editable tip sheet called “Understanding Depression.” Or Google for one like it somewhere on the Web. There are many. But, begin educating employees about this brain disease if you have not done so in a while.

Note, the tip sheet above also is available as a Video, Web Course, DVD, and PowerPoint. All have professional narration.

Contact me anytime.

Daniel Feerst, BSW, MSW, LISW-CP

Publisher, WorkExcel.com 1-800-626-4327

See the 100+ page catalog of 220 Products.

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