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Why Gender Diversity Matters (Even at Women's World Banking) - SoundCloud
(1260 secs long, 28 plays)Play in SoundCloud

Into clip (Tom Jones): It goes back to our philosophy that diversity across the board is key – cultural, ethnic and every type of diversity. But for us at Women’s World Banking, gender was so egregious that we said that if we really are going to practice this and sell this to our clients that we needed to start practicing it too.

Karen Miller: Welcome to the next edition of the Women’s World Banking podcast. My name is Karen Miller, and I’m pleased to be here today with my colleagues. At first, I’d like to have all my colleagues introduce themselves.

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: Hi! I’m Mary Ellen Iskenderian, President and CEO of Women’s World Banking.

Tom Jones: Tom Jones, the Chief Operating Officer at Women’s World Banking.

Mehi Mirpourian: I’m Mehi Mirpourian. I’m the Senior Data Analyst within the Women’s World Banking.

Karen Miller: Today, we’re going to talk about gender diversity but perhaps not entirely the way you might think. We hear lots of talk about the value of gender diversity but is all this talk actually changing anything? Mary Ellen, why does Women’s World Banking, in particular, believe that increasing gender diversity can improve business outcomes for financial institutions?

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: Well it’s not just something we think. There’s a lot of really good data that points to gender diversity leading to much better outcomes. McKinsey points to the fact that gender-diverse executive teams are 21 percent more likely to experience above-average profitability than those that are least diverse. But unfortunately, we also know that at the current rate of growth, which is kind of pathetic, financial services globally won’t even reach 30 percent female executive committee representation until 2048.

Karen Miller: And this isn’t unique to financial services. We see this amongst a number of different industries. But in our work to increase access and usage of financial products and services around the world for low-income women, how do we approach increasing gender diversity at our partner institutions?

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: So, at Women’s World Banking, we’re working on this issue in a number of different ways. Women’s Women Banking is an investor in women-focused financial inclusion institutions, and there, we’ve managed to put gender diversity targets into the shareholders’ agreement that we negotiate when we come in with an equity investment. In that instance, Women’s World Banking isn’t the only Board member banging their fists on the table for gender diversity, but all shareholders are in agreement that this is something that will make a stronger institution and will make their ultimate investment more valuable.

Tom Jones: You know one of the other things that we did was there was an initiative that was spearheaded with Mary Ellen and Angela Sun of Bloomberg at the time and Angela Sun was a Board member of Women’s World Banking. And what she led there was a Bloomberg Gender Equality Index and the index gives us insights into any public company here that Bloomberg reports on – that tells you the different gender dynamics of an organization so, if you’re an investor or someone else who wants to be attached to these entities, you can choose to invest in them based on that performance.

Mehi Mirpourian: And that’s true. Also, I like to add one piece of component here. What we really invest on in Women’s World Banking is to have gender-disaggregated data.

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: And we’re very excited about launching an online gender assessment tool that will allow financial service providers, but really other institutions as well, to see just how well they are attracting, recruiting, retaining, promoting women through the ranks. If they take the tool and they would like further work on this, we’d be delighted to help them. But this is an easier more accessible way for us to reach more institutions and we’re very excited about that launch. 

Karen Miller: The work with the fund and with Bloomberg’s GEI are a couple of our newer initiatives; but building gender-diverse teams has been a core part of our business for a significant part of our 40-year history. Mary Ellen, why are these programs so important?

Mary Ellen Iskenderian:  We’ve been training high potential women leaders in financial services in the emerging markets for well over a decade, and more recently we’ve started pairing them together with senior executives in those institutions. Both of them go through a really extraordinary executive management training, but I think the most interesting part of what we’re doing is they come to us with a strategic business initiative that either improves gender diversity within their organization or improves their outreach to women clients. And I think we’ve seen some of the most amazing business outcomes from those strategic business initiatives that the program participants come back with.

Tom Jones: When I think about the Women in Leadership programs to be able to witness them you can actually see a transformation that takes place within a week’s time. On day one, the voices in the room for those women were like absolutely silent. On day four and five, you couldn’t hear yourself thinking because there was so much energy and there were so many ideas and innovation coming out and so much passion about how do I take this back to the organization.

Karen Miller:  So, you know looking at the experience that we’ve had in building more gender- diverse institutions in the emerging markets and most of the discussions that we see in the media and stories and talking with our friends and colleagues and other institutions when we talk about gender diversity it tends to mean creating more opportunities for women. And so, it’s an interesting point because that’s not really the situation here at Women’s World Banking.  Tom, how do you view gender diversity here at Women’s World Banking. It’s an organization with women front and center in the name.  How do you address that as our Chief Operating Officer?

Tom Jones:  When I joined I think there was roughly 5 to 7 percent male employee participation here and Women’s World Banking. And today you know we’re at 28 percent with a goal of 30 percent, and it goes back to our philosophy that diversity across the board is key – cultural, ethnic and every type of diversity. But for us at Women’s World Banking gender was so egregious that we said that if we really are going to practice this and sell this to our clients that we needed to start practicing it too. I think recruiting is a huge hurdle for Women’s World Banking because of our name alone. And you know I’ve had conversations with people who have joined us men who have joined us in the organization and they’ve expressed that they honestly didn’t think they had a shot. That’s obviously not the case. And so, we thought about the way that we start to write our job postings, the way that we may do a blind posting out there. I think you know, in particular, Karen you and Mary Ellen are looking at opportunities to get more men out there speaking on behalf of women’s role banking because it’s such an important initiative and cause that we’re focused on as well as other organizations at this time and place that we have to heighten the advocacy that men bring to the table in these issues and demonstrate the participation.

Karen Miller: And that’s just for the staff, but thinking about the governance and the board of Women’s World Banking – how do we go about making sure that our Board is as gender diverse as possible?

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: There was about a six-month period or so where we were an all-female board of directors, and there was a lot more talk, a lot more drive to consensus. None of which is bad but even with just a few men then added to the Board when we recruited to fill some vacancies, it just felt like the richness of debate actually really improved. I’ve only appreciated having that diversity on the Board and, I guess, just leap on to something that Tom said – you know part of the reason why I’m so passionate about getting this message out is that the one thing we know about women’s empowerment, and economic growth is that it’s not a zero-sum game. When a woman is empowered, when there’s greater labor force participation in a country, what it usually means is a step change upward in growth for that country. So, the pie is not fighting over the same slice of pie it’s making the pie bigger overall. And that’s to the benefit of men, the benefit of women, children and if men can be the advocates for that view, it can just carry a passion and a resonance with it. That doesn’t always come if it’s just the women who are making that case.

Tom Jones: I think it’s important to reflect on that change process that it took even bringing men onto the Board. There was a high level of discomfort initially. At least I perceived it that way on both the male side as well as the female side. You know how do we make sure that we’re a community. How do you make sure that we have level discussions? But once you get through that, you know it’s extremely productive at this point. And what it really did for me at least in observing what was going on, was it leveraged the best of both worlds. You know I’ve come to realize that men and women tend to always get to the same decision. It’s just how we go about getting there. And when you can leverage the best of both of those processes, I think you have a stronger outcome. And it was the same thing here at Women’s World Banking amongst the staff. When it started out there was a big resistance to shifting of bringing men into the organization, especially in decision making roles. But as time has gone on, we actually have more women speaking up now saying we need to bring more men into the organization to balance this out because once you experience it, I think you really do recognize that performance.

Karen Miller: I think there is one other element here that you touched on a little bit Tom but it’s a struggle to not only build the gender diverse teams, internally at the Board level but to have those champions in the world that we work in every day which is about financial inclusion. Reflecting on our Making Finance Work from Women’s Summit that we held in New York recently, and the room was about 90 percent women. And there is a danger of that echo chamber, and how we can break through that to make sure that we are as inclusive as possible and to Mary Ellen’s point, the pie only gets bigger. So, are we missing a message here or a point that’s helping to build that broader tent?

Mehi Mirpourian: So, I think besides that if you have a gender-diverse environment the performance increases, there’s one aspect that is if you want to have financial inclusion and equality it’s not just by women, it’s like men are big obstacles in many cases the regulations. So, for me as a man who works in an environment that I encounter with women’s problem, I’m an advocate for that. I’m supporting the idea. I understand it. It has kind of become tangible for me. I think bringing more with men into organizations that care about societies, it makes it equal. And also, we need that coalition.

Karen Miller: Mehi, you know you came into this organization a little less than a year ago, and you’re a data analyst. You are the person that makes sense of the big data and analyzing how we can more effectively serve the women’s market, but it’s a hot, hot job right now. You could go anywhere to work. And so, what made Women’s World Banking so attractive?

Mehi Mirpourian: Every time that I start working in a non-profit organization, I feel that this is my land. Whenever I went to other places I just wasn’t just myself, I was an outsider. I never felt that I can be successful. However, because of my education and training that I received which was more technical, it was so difficult to find a job that I can deploy what I learned. And when I see this position is just oh look in here, and just you’re in New York. So, it was a great opportunity. But this is something really rare. I mean there are a few nonprofit organizations that they use really technical expertise. And here is really one of those few ones. And they know that what advantages it using technical people can bring for the organization. So, I was the lucky one.

Karen Miller: What else should we be doing?

Tom Jones: I think its proof at the end of the day. You know I think the work that we do allows us to demonstrate it works. We talk about the work that we’re doing with the funds, talk about the Women in Leadership program, even our own experience here, it is the proof, and we need to be sharing it. And I think this is part of that conversation.

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: I think you know I think a lot of what we’re doing we’re doing really well. I know think for example some of the men who’ve been through the Leadership Development for Innovation Program, they are probably the most eloquent in what they go back into their organizations and see for the first time. And so, I think a lot of it, as you said earlier Tom, it’s education. It’s trying to build the biggest tent to make to make our point known to as many people. I’m convinced that the business case will win over in the end. But sometimes it can seem like a hard slog. So, you’ve got to meet people at their heart as well as their pocketbook.

Karen Miller: And I think it brings up a really interesting point. You’ve touched on this about it being tangible. But to make that tent wider and more inclusive, how do we replicate that experience of seeing what inequality looks like and how we address those issues and I think that’s something for Women’s World Banking. We need to tackle and do a better job of and take that as a serious responsibility of our organization.

Tom Jones: Absolutely. I mean really looking at what the ceiling is of our strategy is thought leadership and thought leadership is about driving to the masses. It’s anyone who can influence institute change. And if we have to be that voice, let us be loud.

Karen Miller: And we have audacious goals. We want to be reaching over 20 million women by 2022. And so, the role of gender diversity in helping to make that happen, Mary Ellen, what’s your hope for that and how does this all come into play in helping us reach this goal, and you know going even further than that?

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: Well you know just bringing it back full circle in terms of you know high growth and the right ingredients in a high-growth organization, gender diversity is right up there. There’s no way Women’s World Banking is going to achieve anything close to that goal without that diversity. But I’d argue, and Tom mentioned it, it’s diversity on a much, much broader scale. I think one of the big challenges for us in the next couple of years is as we really push more of our work out to the field and we start hiring people in country. We went through a very rigorous and first-time process for Women’s World Banking of identifying priority markets. We choose those countries where more than 50 percent of the world’s unbanked women live, and we felt that that was where we could have the most impact. We should and will be hiring people in those markets to help us address these challenges at a much greater scale. So how do we make sure that the New York team and the field team work closely together, that’s really going to be a test of a different kind of diversity than I think we’ve ever had before. But I firmly believe it’s the only way we’re going to achieve our goal.

Karen Miller: Are we optimistic overall about what we see when it comes to gender diversity, not just in the United States and the issues here, but globally? Are we going to be able to tackle this?

Tom Jones: Yes.

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: Absolutely.

Mehi Mirpourian: I do agree. I mean, for example, if I want to talk about my origin Iran. So, I see really significant changes there. Nowadays, 65 percent of the university students are girls. After that what happens? You see, they become the next CEOs. It’s just it is changing.

Tom Jones: It takes time.

Mehi Mirpourian: Yes. It takes time. It is resilience, and it needs hands and hands between men and women together.

Karen Miller: I’m going to end on a lighter note. Are there any stereotypes we want to bust about working in an organization that is predominantly women? I know my personal favorite story is that the trash talking that goes on during the World Cup far exceeds any organization I’ve ever worked at, where the focus was on March Madness and so that to me was a surprise. I would not have expected at a predominantly women organization anyone else?

Mary Ellen Iskenderian:  Just how competitive everybody. We do a staff outing twice a year, and there is always some gam or competition and the level of competition. And I remember last year with the laser tag was insanely competitive. And we have a man on our team who was a sniper, I think, in the army and he did not do as well as he hoped. And was really upset when many of the other women on his team had scored higher than he had.

Tom Jones:  I’m going to go in the opposite direction. You are the stereotype that men are messy and women are neat because that’s just not true here.

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: What did you say to me yesterday, Tom? Telling me if I were one of your kids to bed without dinner like my couch in my office was such a mess.

Tom Jones: Oh yeah. Our kitchen area and everything…[Laughter]

Karen Miller: And there we go. Well I want to say thank you to my colleagues and fellow conversationalist today to touch on this issue that we know gets talked about quite a bit but we really want to focus on the solutions and how we can address this globally. And so, I am confident that Women’s World Banking will do its part and I hope for all of our listeners today that you will do your part as well. So, thank you very much. Tom, Mary Ellen, Mehi, thank you for joining us today.

Tom Jones: Thank you

Mary Ellen Iskenderian: Thank you.

Mehi Mirpourian: Thank you.

The post [Podcast] Why Gender Diversity Matters (Even at Women’s World Banking) appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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By Ker Thao, Design Specialist

With a growing gender gap in financial inclusion in Bangladesh, it is imperative to understand the behavioral barriers women face when engaging with digital financial services. Passive account openings, limited use cases, the role of cash and lack of differentiation are contributors to low usage, preventing women from being financially included and financial service providers from untapping the tremendous market opportunity women have in Bangladesh.

According to the Global Findex, the percentage of mobile money accounts has jumped from three percent in 2014  to 21 percent in in 2017 in Bangladesh. At the same time, the gender gap in account ownership has widened—from nine percent in 2014, to 29 percent in 2017, representing a disturbing trend affecting the progress of women’s financial inclusion in Bangladesh. Furthermore, a vast majority of women who do have accounts are using them less frequently than men.

Women’s World Banking knows that women in Bangladesh can be promising digital financial services (DFS) customers, but the question is: Exactly how will digital financial services work for women in Bangladesh?

The obvious answer is to design solutions based on deep understanding of women clients in Bangladesh. Establishing the right partnerships, conducting qualitative and quantitative research on the ground to better understand the financial needs and barriers that women face are critical to opening up the market opportunity to serve the 41.3 million un- and under-banked Bangladeshi women.

*Photo credit: M. Ataur Rahman

As one of the largest mobile money providers in Bangladesh, Dutch Bangla Bank (DBBL) has enormous potential to drive financial inclusion for women through its mobile money account offering, Rocket. Rocket provides financial services by offering cash-in, cash out, merchant payment, utility payment, salary disbursement, foreign remittance, government allowance disbursement, and ATM withdrawal via mobile devices.

Women’s World Banking has partnered with MetLife and DBBL to better understand the financial behaviors and experiences of DBBL Rocket’s women customers. These findings will inform the design process and ensure that any solutions created to meet the needs of women Rocket customers and further their financial engagement.

Data helps us better understand low usage of DBBL Rocket by women customers

Initial data analysis concluded that although DBBL Rocket has a large customer base, its customers are predominately inactive, with only a 23 percent activity rate as compared to the industry benchmark of 30 percent. It also revealed that DBBL Rocket’s transaction types—cash-in/out, disbursement, P2P, airtime top-up, bill payment, and merchant payment—were all below the industry benchmark.

Women’s World Banking conducted qualitative behavioral customer research to better understand DBBL Rocket’s customers’ behavior and interactions with their mobile money account.

Using Women’s World Banking’s proprietary Women-Centered Design research methodology four key behavioral barriers emerged from Rocket’s women customers when deciding how to use their account:

  1. Rocket is not an active choice
    Across all customer segments, customers did not choose to open their accounts. Instead, accounts were opened for them: employers open the accounts for women who use the account for salary disbursement; schools open accounts for women who receive government stipends; and for other accounts that fall into a “general” category, family and friends often open the account for women in order to facilitate a transaction. This passive relationship with the product makes customers less likely to use it.
  2. Usage is driven predominately by cash-out
    The customer’s main use of the account is driven by cashing-out. Women do not see the account for any other purposes than receiving and getting their money.
  3. Cash is still king
    The way which customers are carrying out their financial transactions is still driven by cash.
  4. Lack of differentiation
    If customers use Rocket, they are using it interchangeably alongside its competitor. They don’t see the difference between products.

Women-centered design will deepen engagement in order to drive transactions

Women have the potential to become complex, multi-case users of DBBL Rocket, given the right opportunities and resources.

In order to drive account usage, the team’s work will focus on decreasing the cash-out rate, while simultaneously increasing and creating opportunities for women to use their accounts. By making these opportunities salient to women customers, Rocket can begin to introduce and create new use cases, such as savings.

Women’s World Banking will use an iterative Women-Centered Design process with co-creation techniques to take these insights and transform them into commercially viable and customer-centric designs that work for the women customers and for DBBL. This approach forms a central part of Women’s World Banking’s strategy to address the deepening gender gap in Bangladesh.

Women’s World Banking’s work with DBBL is generously supported by the MetLife Foundation.

The post Making Mobile Money Work for Women appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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Expanding Financial Access for Rural Women in Egypt - SoundCloud
(696 secs long)Play in SoundCloud

“It’s not that the barriers are necessarily different for the rural women and the urban women. But the same barriers are greater for rural women.” 

In this podcast, Veronica Karpoich, Project Manager at Women’s World Banking discusses Women’s World Banking’s progress in closing the gap of financial access for one of the most challenging segments to reach, rural women.

For the past year, Karpoich has been working with Women’s World Banking network member Lead Foundation to leverage the success of its individual lending program to introduce another methodology, one that is tailored to rural business activities performed mostly by women.

Sabah’s Story: The Life of a Rural Entrepreneur in Egypt - Vimeo

Sabah’s Story: The Life of a Rural Entrepreneur in Egypt from Women’s World Banking on Vimeo.

The post [podcast] Expanding Financial Access for Rural Women in Egypt appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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India has experienced exponential growth and enacted innovative financial initiatives in recent years, but promising indicators of greater financial inclusion mask a concerning trend. About half of the women in India with personal bank accounts use them in a limited capacity or not at all. Women’s World Banking’s India Strategy addresses why women aren’t engaging with financial services, lays out a plan to better understand the trend, and outlines a systemic remedy that will result in greater financial opportunity.

India’s Story of Growth

At first glance, India appears a picture of economic progress. Its economy is the seventh largest in the world, its startup ecosystem is generating international buzz, and its government has pioneered experimental programs, like PMJDY, which mandates that every household has at least one bank account, and Aadhaar, which grants residents a unique identity number that can be used to access basic banking services.

These efforts, though not without flaws, have significantly increased access to and inclusion in India’s economic system. In 2011, only 53 percent of adults in India had a bank account. In 2017, that number reached 80 percent with a gender gap of just 6 percent, a significant improvement from 2014, when the gender gap was 14 percent.

The numbers indicate a positive trajectory for one of the world’s strongest emerging markets, but they don’t tell the entire story. Despite the narrowing gender gap, women—especially underserved or low-income women—still lag behind men in critical ways.

Where Women Fall Behind: Engagement

While the lines on India’s various economic charts trend upwards, dangerous gender disparities persist. For example, only 51 percent of women are literate, compared to 77 percent of men. Women also face greater health risks, like a high maternal mortality rate, and are increasingly less likely to participate in the workforce. So, while data suggest improvement in women’s financial access and inclusion, it’s important to look more closely at how and exactly to what extent women really participate in India’s economy. Consider this: of that 77 percent of Indian women with a bank account, about 50 percent use it either in a limited manner or don’t use it at all. This statistic illustrates a larger problem, but it also provides a starting place to solve it.

While India’s FinTech sector accelerates, its asset-management industry grows, and its government fosters financial innovation, women remain largely outside of the financial fold, underserved and unengaged. The problem is that they aren’t taking advantage of the gateway to financial inclusion: basic banking services, such as savings. This stymies economic growth, hinders social progress, and represents an enormous opportunity missed.

Making it possible for more women to engage with their savings accounts will allow them to increase their financial capital, their financial understanding, and ultimately, their financial inclusion. Women, in turn, will use a greater number of financial services and invest back into the economy. There are approximately 430 MM women in India, which means well-executed, products and programs designed with women’s needs in mind represent an enormous opportunity to scale up. Because India’s population skews young, there is also huge potential for long-term customers for financial service providers.

Women’s World Banking’s Country Strategy

The barriers preventing more complete financial engagement among women in India exist both for women and for the financial service providers. Women’s World Banking will implement a strategy that tackles the constraints on both levels.

To begin with, Women’s World Banking will work o better understand Indian women’s specific needs and where the interaction with financial institutions fails. Based on initial research, women’s reasons for remaining “underbanked,” or relying on alternatives to their bank accounts, include issues like not owning a mobile device, a tradition of cash transactions, limited understanding of the value in banking, and lack of financial literacy.

Better understanding the nuances of women’s barriers to financial inclusion will give way to stronger initiatives. Microinsurance, digital financial services, and the use of third-party business correspondents (who bring financial services right to women’s doorsteps) already stand out as promising areas of opportunity in which to act.

Women’s World Banking will partner directly with financial service providers—e.g. small finance banks, commercial banks, and insurance companies—to design women-centered products, teach risk-mitigating strategies, and encourage asset building. Take Small Finance Banks as an example: many of them were once microfinance institutions and therefore know the underserved women’s market already. Those relationships, combined with Women’s World Banking’s significant experience in education and training, will ensure a productive and sustainable partnership. A Small Finance Bank whose employees learn to introduce new products to clients who already trust them will see greater engagement more quickly.

How to Reach and Recognize Success:

Women’s World Banking is setting out to be the preeminent advocate for women’s financial inclusion in India. To do that, it will partner with local financial service providers and facilitate an ongoing dialogue via media coverage, conferences, and education efforts.

Measurable indicators of the strategy’s success include:

  • Implementation of women-focused financial programs by India’s government
  • An increased number of banks and other financial service providers that develop strategies to target underserved women
  • A rise in the average savings account balance
  • A greater percentage of women saving consistently to reach a goal
  • More women having both active savings accounts and buying health insurance voluntarily
  • A greater percentage of women who are able to complete transactions through digital technology

The return on investment—of time, resources, and attention—is enormous. Once women experience greater financial agency, their participation will help power the engine of sustained economic growth in India.

The post Indian Women Aren’t Using Their Bank Accounts. This Is How and Why Women’s World Banking Plans to Change That. appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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By Women’s World Banking

In March of 2018, Women’s World Banking announced the launch for She Counts, a global platform that harnesses the power of financial services to put savings and financial tools in the hands of women, enabling them to plan for a more prosperous future. Through extensive due diligence to identify the institutions exemplifying best practices in savings, Women’s World Banking is pleased to announce the first cohort of She Counts members including: NMB (Tanzania); CARD Bank (Philippines); Diamond Bank (Nigeria); and MaTontine (Senegal).

An innovative two-year pilot program led by the Center for Global Development with support from ExxonMobil, tested the impact of formal savings accounts by connecting more than 5,000 women entrepreneurs in Indonesia and Tanzania with mobile savings tools and business trainings. The rigorous evaluation found that these financial tools have a substantial impact on women’s savings, business practices, and economic empowerment.

Furthermore, a deeper analysis of the pilot revealed this important trend:  women want savings accounts more than men do. Across different contexts, 63 percent of women will take a savings account when offered, versus only 26 percent of men.

Despite the demand, not enough women have access to well-designed savings solutions that allow for building a more secure and prosperous future. For this to happen, more awareness and best practices for serving low-income women with savings products must be shared across financial institutions in the emerging markets.

As a result of these findings, She Counts was launched to bring together select financial service providers to share best practices and drive more savings solutions into the hands of underserved women.

What makes an institution successful in serving women well with savings products?

Before selecting the appropriate financial institutions for She Counts, Women’s World Banking identified the best practices along the customer journey. These best practices are broken down into 4 key stages:

  • Acquisition/Awareness: To build awareness to acquire a woman client, financial service providers need to be creating marketing messages and visuals that speak to women. They also need to develop use cases that meet women’s lifecycle needs and leverage existing channels women already access, such as savings groups or G2P payments.
  • Activation: It isn’t enough to just acquire a client. Women need a reason to conduct the initial transaction. This can be facilitated by a simple account opening process, employing tiered KYC when regulation allows, and leveraging existing ID databases to more easily fulfill documentation requirements.
  • Active Usage: To keep women using savings on a regular basis, it is necessary to have well-trained agents that women trust. Building financial and digital literacy programs help women increase their confidence and comfort in using formal financial services. Ensuring women have convenient access points to overcome mobility, distance and time constraints make it easier for women to use products on a regular basis.
  • Retention: Women are loyal and profitable clients when treated with respect and with well-designed products. Financial service providers need to ensure fees are not prohibitive and design tools to create ongoing peace of mind, such as balance inquiries. Encouraging goal setting with behavioral nudges builds consistent usage.

In addition, financial service providers need to collect and analyze gender-disaggregated data to measure outreach and engagement with women clients as well as design product bundling to meet women’s diverse financial needs.

Introducing the first cohort of She Counts

After identifying the best practices along the customer journey, Women’s World Banking began its due diligence process to identify the first cohort of She Counts members. Each of the inaugural members has a different business model and approach to serving low-income women but has a deliberate focus on many of the best practices along the customer journey. The members include:

  • NMB (Tanzania): A large retail bank in Tanzania, NMB has several savings propositions that serve women effectively including Pamoja, a group savings account that leverages existing Village Savings & Loan Associations (VSLAs) to drive acquisition; Chap Chap, an account that can be opened instantly to drive activation; and Wajibu, a suite of youth and parent-controlled accounts along with financial capability training to drive active usage.
  • CARD Bank (Philippines): CARD Bank’s Pledge Savings Account is a commitment savings account that requires deposits at weekly meetings. As part of the Pledge Account, clients have the “konek2Card,” a mobile application where clients can monitor their account, creating peace of mind for ongoing usage.
  • Diamond Bank (Nigeria): Diamond Bank’s BETA proposition reaches low-income women market traders throughout Nigeria. The BETA suite of products includes both transactional and commitment savings accounts to meet women’s needs at each stage of their life. BETA Friends are agents that come to the client’s market stalls each day to collect deposits, manage withdrawals and provide basic financial education, building trust with the financial institution through the BETA Friends.
  • MaTontine (Senegal): MaTontine is a FinTech platform that digitizes the traditional “Tontines” in order to provide a suite of financial products for women including savings. The managers of the Tontines are well-regarded in the community in order to build greater trust with the financial system. In addition, SMS messages are sent to members to remind them to deposit, creating an ongoing savings behavior. MaTontine also collects and analyzes its data to provide credit and insurance products based on prior client behavior.

The first cohort of She Counts members were brought together in November 2018 to share their experiences, learn from each other and explore new solutions to reach their clients. Women’s World Banking will continue to share insights from these institutions as well as build additional cohorts of She Counts members. If you are interested in becoming a She Counts member, please contact communications@womensworldbanking.org

She Counts is generously supported by the ExxonMobil Foundation.

The post Introducing She Counts Members appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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Yashmin Fernandes, Director of Development and Partner Engagement

The opening Plenary Session at the Making Finance Work for Women Summit discussed the progress and the opportunities ahead in financially empowering low-income women in the developing world. Four key themes emerged: the role of digital, policy design, a broader tent, and leadership skills are necessary to make finance work for women.

Kicking off the opening plenary session from the Making Finance Work for Women 2018 summit, President and CEO, Mary Ellen Iskenderian challenged the audience with some sobering statistics. Despite seeing progress in building assets and resources for women, there are still 104 countries that have laws precluding women from working in certain jobs. The gender gap in the developing world still has not budged from a stubborn 9 percent over the last three years. The gender gap has even widened (doubled in some cases!) in certain countries, such as Nigeria and Bangladesh. And in India where the gender gap has been dramatically reduced, financial service providers are being challenged by 48 percent dormancy rates for savings accounts, one of the highest rates in the world.

The microfinance institution leaders from 40 years ago have been joined by new leaders from the fintech, technology, telecom, and commercial financial services sectors. While tremendous opportunities are presented by new players, the financial inclusion community has failed to create a bigger, more meaningful tent. It needs to expand the number of champions for women’s financial inclusion to truly meet its potential. Mary Ellen made a heartfelt request to the audience to recruit more male champions so that industry leaders are not just speaking amongst themselves in an echo chamber. The panelists, led by moderator Anjali Kumar (author, attorney, advisor, speaker, and “idea acupuncturist”), discussed how their organizations were accelerating gender solutions.

The panelists debating this topic included: Sarah Kaplan, Director of the Institute for Gender and the Economy, and Professor of Strategic Management at Rotman School of Management; Liz Kellison, Gender Lead for the Financial Services for the Poor team, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Mike Useem, Director of the Center for Leadership and Change Management, and Professor of Management at the Wharton School; and Sri Widowati (Wido), Country Director (Indonesia), Facebook.

Digital Opens Doors to Gender Equality Opportunities

Widowati discussed the role of digital as a great gender equalizer. It provides women with access to new ideas, opportunities, customers, and markets. Additionally, women can enjoy this access from the comfort of their own homes. Digital platforms, such as Facebook, are creating new channels for women to reach (and even create) new markets. Women can also access knowledge and networks through social platforms to help them set up, run, and grow their businesses. Digital literacy is key to ensuring widespread participation.

Kellison mentioned that the Gates Foundation believes that digital payment systems are an effective way to reach low-income populations at scale. The Foundation sees great promise in digitizing government-to-person (G2P) social safety net payments as a way to onboard more women to adopt and use digital financial services. Since the vast majority of the G2P cash transfer recipients are women, this is a great way to leverage an existing channel to effectively target women.

Enlisting Support from Regulators

Another key to achieving financial inclusion is to engage regulators to help create the right inclusive enabling environment. Kellison mentioned that one-third of the Financial Services for the Poor team is focused on how regulation can be evolved to enable gender equality. Tiered accounts, eKYC, flexible identification requirements, and alternative credit scoring methodologies are some of the recent developments in the industry that have allowed for greater access by women. To this end, Women’s World Banking and AFI are partnering to deliver a Leadership and Diversity program for Regulators (funded by the Visa Foundation). The program aims to drive greater gender diversity within regulatory bodies, as well as accelerate strategic policy initiatives to more effectively close the gender gap.

Pushing for Progress

Beyond the opportunities presented by digital and policy initiatives, the panelists discussed how else the sector might push for progress. Useem discussed the need for leaders to think strategically, communicate persuasively, and take action decisively. He used the image of a coalition of the eager and ready. Kaplan added that innovation needs to be brought into the conversation. By working under incorrect assumptions, such as women are risk-averse or do not know how to ask, women are still limited by the current system structure. She urged participants to look where interventions are breaking down, and then apply gender analysis; fixing the system to take women into consideration will also help men.  Fighting for gender equality needs to make life better for everyone.

Kaplan also suggested that until now, the industry has been designing for low-income women; providers need to design with women for true progress. Some of the negative unintended consequences of interventions have resulted because the women were not sufficiently brought into the conversation.

One of the male attendees asked how to get more men involved (the room was approximately 80 percent female). A passionate discussion ensued about whether the business case for serving women should be the way to bring men into the room. A McKinsey Global Institute report finds that $12 trillion could be added to global GDP by 2025 by advancing women’s equality. While the business case is certainly compelling, it must be supplemented by moral outrage at the gender inequality that still exists. Kaplan suggested that if it’s just the business case that brings financial service providers to the table, women customers can feel on the outside. The business case must be carried by the vision of serving women as valuable customers so that everyone wins.

How do we build the coalition of the eager and ready to make finance work for women? The opening…
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By Diana Boncheva Gooley, Manager, Digital Financial Services

 A strategic approach to investing in women can power economies.  It was only fitting that after a day of exciting presentations, debates and discussions, Women’s World Banking closed out the Making Finance Work for Women Summit with five amazing women leaders who shared the three elements we need to have the most significant impact on women’s lives and greater economic growth: the right stakeholders, data, and policies.

Women’s World Banking’s recent Making Finance Work for Women Summit brought together leaders from the public and private sectors, investors, and researchers to discuss, debate and create the solutions to drive women’s financial inclusion globally. Throughout the day, issues highlighted included financing women in the supply chain, gender lens investing, the role of technology, and the latest research to drive action. The end of the day, however, brought together esteemed representatives from the private, public and donor communities to identify the critical topics that need to be addressed to power economies effectively. The panelists determined that those topics included bringing together the right stakeholders; collecting and using the right data; and designing the right policies so that women aren’t left behind.

The Right Stakeholders

 “We live in an interdependent environment, but we are not all at the table,” said Ambassador Geraldine Byrne Nason, Permanent Representative of Ireland at the United Nations. To ensure women’s needs are met, we must have the right players collaborating, including the private and public sectors as well as civil society.


Collecting and Using Data

The importance of gender-disaggregated data has been a pillar of the discussion on how to reach more women with financial services. Companies and the executives that lead them want to see the business case for serving women but feel they don’t have the data to make strategic decisions.  However, the power of data could transform business and policy practices. An example highlighted on the panel was when the United Kingdom published information on the gender pay gap in the country, which led to “an incredible change of behavior. This transparency on women’s compensation created a lot of action and showed how data can create beneficial conditions for change,” shared Lydie Hudson, Chief Operating Officer, Global Markets at Credit Suisse.

Data isn’t just used for the business case for companies. We also need to look at data to measure women’s impact on the overall economy. “We need to reimagine an economy where women are taken seriously, and then work to build towards that. We need a feminist economy and work together to build it with feminist economists,” said Marina Durano, Program Officer at Open Society Foundations.

Designing Inclusive Policies

The data can give us some answers, but effective policies to address these answers need to be developed. Ceyla Pazarbasioglu, Vice President for Equitable Growth, Finance and Institutions at the World Bank Group shared an example from Africa where one central bank saw that between 4:00 AM and 5:00 AM there was a huge surge in transactions. It was about to close processing during that time as it was assumed to be fraud. However, the Central Bank took the time to research this issue which showed that the surge in activity was a result of women traders who went to the market to sell their goods early in the morning before they had to take their children to school.  The Central Bank did not shut down the system and did not introduce unnecessary policies that would have unintended consequences for women’s businesses.

Amina Tirana, Senior Director for Governments and Partnerships at Visa Inc, reinforced the view that it is necessary to see the whole picture. “We want to enable businesses to thrive yet women-owned businesses have financing gaps. Policymakers say we need more lending to SMEs, but is this what is really needed? Women want security and increased income. But is a loan the way to achieve that? Many women want a job more than owning a business.” It is necessary to understand women’s needs more thoroughly  in order to design inclusive policies.

Taking the time to bring together all the key stakeholders, collecting and analyzing the data, and designing inclusive enabling environments are all key to ensuring we build a world where women thrive, business grow and economies are powered.

The post Powering Economies by Investing in Women appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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By Angelika Mendes-Lowney, Manager, Development & Partner Engagement

The concept of gender lens investing as a powerful strategy to achieve positive financial and social returns is rapidly increasing. In a workshop during Women’s World Banking’s “Making Finance Work for Women” summit on November 7, discussions highlighted that the time is right for gender lens investing but a few barriers are still limiting its potential impact: the need for more demand, data, misconception of what gender lens investing is, and clarity on the business case.

A room full of eager participants at Women’s World Banking’s Making Finance Work for Women summit in early November gathered for a deeper dive into the topic of gender lens investing. Throughout the workshop, four panelists shared their extensive experience and powerful insights around this hot topic that has recently made it on the agenda of major conferences worldwide.

Earlier this year, Suzanne Biegel, founder of Catalyst at Large and moderator of the workshop, proclaimed 2018 the year of gender lens investing.

However, the term “gender lens investing” remains unclear to many, and one of the first requests from participants was a clear definition. According to Biegel, gender lens investing is “the use of capital to simultaneously generate a financial return and advance gender equality.” This requires an integration of the gender analysis with the financial analysis.

Key gender “lenses” typically include access to capital, workplace equality, value chains, and products and services that positively affect women and girls. Biegel encouraged participants to ask how thinking more consciously about women in specific sectors may improve the financial or social performance of a fund or a particular business, since finance plays a significant role across a variety of sectors.

Clearly, the time is right and opportunities are plentiful for gender lens investors. However, compared to other, more mainstream approaches, such as climate finance, gender still only occupies a niche: $187 billion were invested into climate bonds in 2017 while only $1.3 billion were invested in gender. What is holding us back? Four key themes were touched upon.

“We need more demand,” said panelist Luisamaria Ruiz Carlile, Wealth Manager at Veris Wealth Partners and co-author of the report Gender Lens Investing: Bending the Arc of Finance for Women and Girls. “Clients can now demand a gender-focused fund to invest in for a low minimum and low fees, but it’s still a too well-kept secret.”

There was also agreement that data is key to making the case for gender lens investing since some investors still won’t accept that investing in gender yields better results. “Increasingly, we see information that gender-diverse teams correlate with better returns,” said Christina Juhasz, Chief Investment Officer of Women’s World Banking’s own gender lens investing fund. As an investor, Women’s World Banking requires portfolio companies to commit to equal pay, at least 35 percent women representation on their board, and the collection of gender-disaggregated data.

A common misconception is the assumption that gender-lens investing excludes men or is a silo while it really is an analytical tool that, if used correctly, reveals rich options on how to drive returns. Moreover, investing in women really helps address all other impact goals. More education is needed to help investors understand this potential.

Finally, the business case for gender lens investing has to be expanded. Johannes Feist, who represented the German Development Bank KfW on the panel, stressed that for too long, gender mainstreaming has only focused on equal opportunity and fairness. Now that there is a renewed focus on the private sector to consider the business case for gender, it is key to help nurture more ventures and more private equity-like structures. Other participants felt strongly that the business case had already been sufficiently proven and that perhaps it needs to be brought home through experience and an emotional journey rather than via facts alone. In an earlier session, Sarah Kaplan, Director of the Institute for Gender and the Economy at the University of Toronto had made the same point and referred to her own meditations on the business case for gender equality.

Investors in the room also shared some best practices based on their own experience. Shareholder agreements, for instance, have proven powerful tools for holding portfolio companies accountable and reminding them of their commitments. In one case, a CEO’s compensation was linked to increasing gender diversity in his company. Solving a company’s key business challenge with a gender lens, or illustrating where that company ranks compared to peers in the market also helps. What should not be underestimated is the power of emphasizing that a follow-on investment will be unlikely if an investee doesn’t deliver on the agreement. Bringing women into the design process to understand what barriers they face and to make sure the products and services provided meet their needs is also key. In order to be successful, investees need to know how to conduct a gender analysis and to understand the regulatory environment, because there is no use in designing a beautiful product to which a woman legally has no access.

The workshop on November 7th demonstrated that despite tremendous momentum for gender lens investing, there is more work to be done. Women’s World Banking is proud to be at the forefront of this promising approach, advancing positive results for low-income women.

The post The time is right for gender-lens investing, what is holding us back? appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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Egypt is on the road to recovery after the 2011 revolution, and financial inclusion is growing at a steady pace. But even though women’s financial inclusion is on the rise, the gender gap is widening. Women’s World Banking’s strategy for closing the financial inclusion gender gap in Egypt targets the players and the solutions that will ensure women benefit from, and contribute to, Egypt’s potential for robust growth.

Egypt is still recovering from the economic impact of its 2011 revolution, which crippled growth for a half-decade. Tourism and investment suffered most, and unemployment remains high—with nearly a quarter of Egypt’s women now jobless. But the forecast is brightening: Egypt’s economic growth is projected at 5.3 percent for 2017-2018, and financial inclusion has tripled over the past six years.

While women are benefiting from the recent growth, they’re mostly getting left behind men in financial inclusion. Women’s financial inclusion has quintupled to 27 percent over the last three years—thanks to microfinance, mobile money and government transfers (G2P)–but the financial inclusion gender gap is still widening, doubling to 12 percent in the same timespan.

It’s time for Egypt to leverage the political and cultural shifts that are allowing women to participate more fully in the economy—despite educational barriers, low labor-force participation and challenging social norms. Women’s World Banking’s strategy for closing the financial inclusion gender gap prioritizes women’s financial security as a crucial part of Egypt’s economic growth. Closing the gap will not only benefit women; it will mean a speedier recovery for Egypt.

Women’s Financial Inclusion Taking Center Stage in Egypt

Egypt has nearly 24 million unbanked or underbanked women: that’s 73 percent of its adult female population. The Egyptian government is focusing on gender-related policies as part of its Financial Inclusion Road Map. Its Strategy for Women aims to increase women’s economic and political empowerment by 2030, and to roll out cultural and legal initiatives to protect women. On the provider side, financial service providers are taking a page from the microfinance playbook and reaching out to low-income populations.

Women’s World Banking’s strategy for Egypt will cut the number of unbanked women by 10 percent—adding 2.5 million women to the ranks of the financially included. The strategy targets mobile money providers, FinTechs and other financial service providers with a social mission over traditional banks, which still favor the corporate sector. As the supply of financial services for the unbanked and underbanked grows, the emphasis must shift to providing solutions designed to work for women. Women’s World Banking’s financial inclusion strategy for Egypt will focus on:

  • Optimizing solutions low-income women already use, such as mobile money accounts, to ensure increased uptake
  • Working with financial service providers (FSPs) to create better safety net solutions
  • Increasing awareness for FSPs of the market opportunity of serving women and increasing awareness for women of the options that are available to them

Making the Most of Mobile Money

Roughly 97 percent of households in Egypt, and 80 percent of low-income households, own a mobile phone. Unlike many of the markets we work in, Egypt is close to gender parity in mobile phone ownership. That high penetration rate represents a huge opportunity to raise women’s mobile-money usage. Women’s World Banking’s strategy will double the number of women using mobile money, from roughly 6 percent active wallets to 12 percent. The strategy also calls on mobile network operators (MNOs) to target mobile phone owners who are unbanked and don’t yet use mobile money, which provides a huge untapped market.

With the mobile money sector primed for growth, Women’s World Banking will work with MNOs to ensure that women’s needs are identified and met, and hurdles minimized. For instance, permission from men is still usually required to buy a phone, and 40 percent of women report discomfort from their families about their handset usage. Beyond these social barriers, women in Egypt don’t have enough compelling use cases for mobile money, and use mobile wallets mainly for cash transfers. Women’s World Banking will work with providers to identify more relevant use cases for women such as savings, loans or insurance, thus giving them a reason to use the services.

Creating Better Financial Safety Nets for Women

Stronger financial safety nets are pillars of financial inclusion. In Egypt, women have low adoption and usage rates for savings and insurance. Women who save typically use group savings schemes known as Gami’yaat (ROSCAs).

Behavioral research by Women’s World Banking will identify barriers that keep women from using formal savings and insurance. Learnings from the research will guide the design of solutions that actively engage existing and new women clients.

Women’s World Banking will partner with FSPs, and Fintechs to help them diversify and create new women-centered savings and insurance solutions. Additionally, Women’s World Banking will work with providers on solutions that reach at least 1 million women who receive G2P payments, and other such programs.

Bridging the Distance between Women and Financial Service Providers

Financial solutions designed for low-income women will never gain traction unless the women who need them know about and can access those solutions.

Women’s World Banking will design messaging campaigns that reach out to low-income women in Egypt. Through cognitive and behavioral research and ecosystem development, Women’s World Banking will identify and address gaps in access that prevent low-income women from finding and using financial products.

Women’s World Banking will train financial service providers on the make-or-break necessity of women-centered design. When products are developed with women in mind, women are not just more likely to adopt them but also to actively engage with them and form lasting habits, thus creating the opportunity for women and growth for financial service providers.

With Women’s World Banking’s strategy for Egypt in place, it looks for others to join to build a more secure and prosperous Egypt.

The post Egypt’s Economic Recovery Will Not Succeed Without a Key Ingredient: Women appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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By Women’s World Banking

Women in Bangladesh have the highest-ever rates of literacy and employment, and the country’s economy is growing. Financial inclusion now stands at more than 50 percent, nearly doubling in the past few years. But the financial inclusion gender gap is growing rapidly too, with fewer than half of women accessing or using formal financial services. Women’s World Banking’s strategy for Bangladesh addresses why women are getting left out of the country’s financial inclusion gains, and sets out ambitious, workable solutions to shrink the gender gap.

Bangladesh’s economy is on an upswing, and the world’s eighth most populous country reaps the rewards of financial inclusion and rising literacy. More than half the population now uses formal financial services, a big jump from 29 percent in 2014. The literacy rate of girls stands at 80 percent, more than double what it was in 1990—and outpacing the literacy rate of boys.

That’s the good news. Here’s the bad news: the financial inclusion gender gap is growing at an alarming rate, from nine percent in 2014 to 29 percent in 2017. Two-thirds of men have an account with a financial institution, but less than half of women do. And the vast majority of women who do have accounts use them less frequently than men.

At first glance, the financial inclusion gender gap in Bangladesh looks like a runaway train—but it can be stopped. Women in Bangladesh, increasingly literate, employed and employable, are poised for financial inclusion. The barriers that keep women from participating in Bangladesh’s wins are longstanding but fixable. And there’s an enormous upside to closing the gender gap: Women’s financial inclusion will build significantly stronger security for individuals and families, accelerating Bangladesh’s ongoing economic growth.

The Missing Link: The Right Strategy

Women in Bangladesh face many of the same obstacles to financial inclusion as they do elsewhere: gaps in financial literacy, low rates of mobile-phone ownership, and an absence of products created with women in mind, to name just a few. Women who do have an account with a financial institution, especially a mobile money one, do not always know why, how or where they can use it. Discovering and fixing those access and communication issues will be crucial in closing the financial inclusion gap.

Women’s World Banking’s financial inclusion strategy for Bangladesh will make accounts and financial products more accessible, intuitive and indispensable to women in Bangladesh. Working with its partner financial service providers, Women’s World Banking will leverage its financial inclusion expertise and thought leadership to identify targeted solutions and to ensure those solutions are effectively produced and marketed to engage women in Bangladesh.

The “Why” That Drives Women to Use Financial Services

Unbanked and underbanked women need a convincing reason to use financial services to meet their long-term and short-term goals, beyond cashing out government subsidies or their salaries. Women’s World Banking and its partners will conduct behavioral research with women across diverse segments of the economy, to tackle the first barrier to usage: the lack of compelling value propositions. The behavioral research will shed light on the financial needs women have that are currently unmet, and the types of financial products they would use if available.

Providers can then springboard from those findings to develop bundled financial products that do what they’re intended to do: reach women and convert them into active users. In cases when financial products already exist to fill the identified needs, Women’s World Banking will work with providers to position those products so women can access and use them.

There is already a giant missed opportunity in the estimated 15 million women in Bangladesh who are government to person (G2P) recipients, and the additional estimated 13 million women who receive remittances. The majority of those women are not using their accounts to save money or meet other financial goals. Women’s World Banking will work with institutions that deliver remittances, salaries, government transfers and microfinance loans to convert recipients into active clients, through value propositions that make sense to women.

The “How”: Creating Better Distribution Channels

Finding out which financial products women need, then creating those products, will not make a dent in the financial inclusion gap unless women can access the products. Women’s World Banking will guide providers in eliminating barriers that keep women clients away—by strengthening the agent banking network, offering fully digital services that work for women, and identifying the channels that drive engagement.

Each distribution channel has its own potential challenges that need to be met. Agents need proper training so they can effectively serve women clients; and providers need to find a suitable business model for agents, including a competitive and fair compensation strategy.

Digital solutions such as mobile financial services (MFS) or payment cards at ATMs will not gain traction either unless women know how to use them: clients will need training, and providers must be ready to resolve other digital literacy gaps that come up.

Providers will also need to focus on building out their client networks to include more women. One way is to partner with microfinance institutions (MFIs), which already serve women and can expand the providers’ reach to a wider population of women in Bangladesh.

The “Where:” Usability Makes All the Difference

Even if providers develop tailored financial products and conquer the distribution challenges, a customer journey full of roadblocks will guarantee both clients and providers get nowhere. Figuring out ways to create user experiences that clients will want to return to is a crucial step.

Providers need to hire a team who can earn clients’ trust and build confidence. Simultaneously, elevating women to leadership positions within these financial institutions can also help achieve these goals. Easy-to-understand marketing documents are an important component of the trust-building process. For instance, the menu of options on mobile phones (USSD menus) must grab users’ attention with clear, intuitive language.

Other usability barriers will come to light during the behavioral research process, and providers must make it a priority to overcome those obstacles if they want women clients to become long-term customers.

Tracking Results

What will success look like? One measure is a growing number of providers that reach women clients, hire women, and promote them to management positions. Providers will need to hit ambitious financial inclusion goals, such as raising the number of average monthly transactions; reaching 10 percent of Bangladesh’s G2P and remittance recipients; and serving 10 percent of MFI customers and salaried workers in the readymade garment (RMG) industry. These goals are all achievable.

Recognition of Women’s World Banking as the leading voice on financial inclusion and women in Bangladesh will represent another measure of success for the organization. Women’s World Banking is primed to mobilize stakeholders and drive the strategy around financial inclusion, and to ensure those goals stay top-of-mind through an ongoing roster of conferences, events, workshops and publications.

The success of Women’s World Banking’s strategy will be evident in Bangladesh’s success, as the country expands its financial inclusion gains to close the gender gap and speeds up its journey to economic security and prosperity.

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The post Why Women in Bangladesh Are Staying Away From Financial Services, and How to Win Them Over appeared first on Women's World Banking.

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