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Subject:  Long horn beetle?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern France
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 02:51 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  A friend sent me this photo.  I’m a geologist, not an entymologist, but some of my friends think I can ID most anything!  It does have quite diagnostic characteristics.
How you want your letter signed:  Terry Dyroff

Dusky Longhorn

Dear Terry,
We have identified the Longhorn Morimus funereus in the past, and we learned that it is listed as “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species site.  It is called the Dusky Longhorn on Alamy.

Hi,
No worries on the timing!  Thank you so much for the identification.  Do you have a recommendation for a good ID book?  We are working hard to instill in the campers to “Make Nature, Second Nature” so we appreciate your help!
Best to you,
Bean

Eric Eaton who frequently contributes to our site is the author of The Kaufman Guide to Insects of North America.

The post Dusky Longhorn from France appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Female Glowworm
Geographic location of the bug:  Santa Fe, NM
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 12:26 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  (Ed. Note:  This came from a comment submitted to a very old Firefly posting on our site.)  Saw and have photos of a presumed female in Santa Fe, NM on July 14, 2018. Bright constant glow. Have not seen one before in the 20 years living here.

We would love to review and possibly post your images.  You may submit them by using the Ask What’s That Bug? link on our site.  Please put “Female Glowworm” in the subject line to get our attention.

I used a flashlight for this photo. I have others but the attached one is the best.
How you want your letter signed:  Cathy Frey

Larviform Female Firefly

Hi Cathy,
Thanks so much for submitting your image.  This appears to be a larviform female Firefly in the genus Microphotus, which is represented on BugGuide.  Fireflies and Glowworms are both common names for different families of Beetles, and to further confuse things, Charles Hogue does refer to a California Beetle in this genus as a Pink Glowworm, when it is in fact a Firefly, which is proof that common names can often cause confusion.  We do classify them together in the same beetle subcategory though they are not really that closely related.

The post Female Firefly appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Please identify this pretty bug
Geographic location of the bug:  Sisters, Oregon USA
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 10:15 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This beautiful bug caught my attention because it resembles a dinosaur and seemed to calmly interact with me while I took pictures. Pictures taken today July 15th 2018 at 7pm. Thank you for your time.
How you want your letter signed:  Starla Kay Lajko

Snakefly

Dear Starla,
This primitive looking insect is a Snakefly in the order Raphidioptera.  According to BugGuide:  “Both larvae and adults are predatory, though they are capable of catching and killing only small and weak prey. Snakefly larvae feed on eggs and larvae of various insects, as well as adults of minute arthropods (e.g. mites, springtails, barklice, and homopterans). Adults typically prefer aphids but may eat a wide variety of arthropods. Adults take efforts to clean themselves after feeding. “

The post Snakefly appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Danbury Ct
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 10:23 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this large interesting moth?
How you want your letter signed:  David

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear David,
This is a male Polyphemus Moth.  The Polyphemus Moth is even more impressive in its defense posture of exposing the large eyespots on its underwings, which might startle a predator into thinking it has disturbed a much larger creature capable of eating the predator.

The post Male Polyphemus Moth appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  What Is this?
Geographic location of the bug:  Southern Illinois
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 01:40 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Never seen this before in this area… what is this critter?
How you want your letter signed:  Curious

Hanging Thief

Dear Curious,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites, commonly called a Hanging Thief because the insect often hangs from one leg while consuming prey.

The post Hanging Thief appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Large moth/insect sighted
Geographic location of the bug:  United Kingdom, England, Birmingham
Date: 07/16/2018
Time: 07:34 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, I spotted this insect in a block of flats on the wall. I have searched allover the Internet and i can not identify this type of moth/butterfly/insect species.
Flabbergasted.
How you want your letter signed:  S. JARVIS

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear S. JARVIS,
This is a Poplar Hawkmoth, Laothoe populi, and according to UK Moths:  “Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear. If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden.  Distributed commonly throughout most of Britain, the adults are on the wing from May to July, when it is a frequent visitor to light.”

The post Poplar Hawkmoth from the UK appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Death head hawkmoth
Geographic location of the bug:  Central Florida
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 02:03 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  This is a picture of the bug I saw in Florida
How you want your letter signed:  Jennifer Bouchard

Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar

Dear Jennifer,
As we indicated when you commented that you found a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar in Florida:  “We suspect you saw a different related Hornworm that is native to North America.”  Now that you have submitted an image, we can confirm that not only did not not see a Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar, we can tell you that you did see a Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar.  There are images on Sphingidae of the Americas to confirm your sighting.  There is a strong resemblance between these two caterpillars from the same family, despite the miles that separate their ranges.

The post Rustic Sphinx Caterpillar appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  This bug made our Girl Scout jump!
Geographic location of the bug:  Northern Virginia
Date: 06/30/2018
Time: 09:07 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  We were on a hike and had to step up onto the path over this bug.  Most of the girls thought it was very cool but some not so much!  When we came through this same area two hours later, this bug was still hanging out.  We’ve had no luck with the identification and hope you can help.
How you want your letter signed:  Bean

Male Dobsonfly

Dear Bean,
Sorry but we can never respond to all the mail we get, but when folks send reminders, we try harder.
This is a male Dobsonfly, and despite his formidable looking mandibles, he is incapable of biting a human.  He is perfectly harmless.

The post Male Dobsonfly appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Insect
Geographic location of the bug:  Portland, or
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 08:28 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  What is this.
How you want your letter signed:  Bob

Banded Alder Borer

How very exciting Bob,
This is our first Banded Alder Borer of the season.

The post First Banded Alder Borer of the season appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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Subject:  Never seen one of these
Geographic location of the bug:  Central New York
Date: 07/15/2018
Time: 03:25 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Saw this on my cone flowers.  Looks like a wasp with fuzzy  legs but the mouth parts looked more like a butterfly than a wasp.
How you want your letter signed:  Andy K

Squash Vine Borer

Dear Andy,
Most of the images submitted to our site of Squash Vine Borers are of females laying eggs on squash or pumpkin plants.  It is nice to get an image of one feeding.  Squash Vine Borers are Clearwing Moths in the family Sesiidae, and many members of the family mimic wasps for protection.

The post Squash Vine Borer appeared first on What's That Bug?.

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