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What is an employment reference? An employment reference is meant to provide important information about the potential employee, that helps the employer in deciding whether the employee is suitable to be hired for the required job, or not. Does an employment reference have to be provided? While there is no legal foundation to provide an employment reference, an employer can choose whether they want to provide a reference about their ex- employee, or not, or how much information they want to provide. Many previous employers decide to provide merely the basic facts about the applicant and nothing more than that.

The post Employment References – New ACAS Guidance appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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There are sometimes cases when an employee doesn’t perform their job up to the required standard. This could happen because they don’t have the right aptitude or skills needed for the position. It is also possible that they are unwilling or reluctant to do their job correctly, despite their capabilities. In cases such as these, the employer may choose to deal with the issue by dismissing the employee, after following the statutory disciplinary and dismissal process. This category of dismissal is called capability dismissals. To prove a ‘fair’ dismissal, an employer must show that they have acted reasonably and fairly

The post Dismissal on the Grounds of Capability appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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Redundancy There are three common situations where an employer can make you lawfully redundant. You may lose your job due to redundancy because: The organisation you work with has permanently closed down The organisation moves to a new location and you cannot travel to the new place of work When fewer employees are required for work To select a woman for redundancy because she is on maternity leave is a case of unfair dismissal and maternity discrimination. It is important that, besides taking necessary actions in such a situation, you also check your employment contract as it may give you

The post Redundancy during Maternity Leave appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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What is risk assessment? Every employee working in an organisation has the right to be protected from any potential harm. A risk assessment is an essential part of an organisation where a careful examination is conducted to check for potential hazards caused by a work activity. This can help the employers in taking appropriate safety measures and corrective action to prevent harm. Any important findings from the assessment must be noted down, if you employ more than 4 employees, as it will be helpful to manage the risks involved in the workplace and communicate the same to employees. Is it

The post Risk Assessment for Pregnant Employees and Breastfeeding Mothers appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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In the UK, employment law entitles older employees and workers to retire whenever they want voluntarily and draw any occupational pension that they are entitled to. Employers cannot force their employees to retire or set out age for retirement, unless they can objectively justify that, by doing so, there is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate business aim. Retirement Ages and Procedures The law entitles all employees to retire when they want to. Therefore, you need to consider setting up individual informal workplace discussions with your staff at regular intervals. By doing so, you can get the opportunity to

The post Know About Retirement Discrimination appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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A withdrawal of a person’s employment or occupation from their active working life, due to a certain age, is known as retirement. A person may be fully or semi-retired as per the employer’s policy. Recently the minimum age of retirement, which was 65 years previously, has been abolished. This implies that an employer cannot force an employee to quit their job, solely on the basis of their age. Many people are trying to delay total retirement by opting for semi-retirement, by reducing their number of working hours. Can your employer force you to retire? For several years, employers have forced

The post Can You Be Forced to Retire? appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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What is a Grievance? Any concerns, complaints or problems at work that you might want to raise with your employer is known as a grievance. The process is not legally binding, therefore, raising a grievance does not require that you or your employer have to abide by the rules. Here are some examples of situations you can raise a grievance for: Things you are forced to do as a part of your job Not being considered for a promotion, when you feel you should have been The way you are being treated at work Any sort of discrimination at work,

The post How to Write A Grievance Letter appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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Employment law in the UK defines grievances as concerns, complaints or issues that employees raise with their employer. While there is no specific, legally binding process for grievance handling, that you or your employer must follow, there are some established principles. These are incorporated into workplace employment policies and which, you and your employer should observe. What is Meant by Raising a Grievance? As an employee, if you have an issue, concern or complaint at work, you might want to bring it up with your employer. The process of taking up your complaint with your employer is known as raising

The post Raising A Grievance appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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What is maternity leave? Any pregnant woman, irrespective of their employment status, reserve the right to maternity leave of a maximum of 52 weeks. The leave is divided into two broad categories, where the initial 26 weeks are considered as ordinary maternity leave and the remaining 26 weeks are classed as additional maternity leave. There is no minimum amount of service required to claim maternity benefits but it is important to remember that you must inform your employer of your pregnancy at least 15 weeks before your due date. Pregnant employees have the right to 52 weeks’ maternity leave. The

The post Maternity Pay and Leave appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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In the UK, employees are eligible to take time off work if they are having, or adopting, a child with their partner. As a result, they are eligible to receive one or two weeks of paid paternity leave and pay. An individual may also be eligible for Shared Parental Leave (SPL) and Statutory Shared Parental Pay (SHPP). The statutory weekly rate of Paternity Pay for the year 2018-19 and 2019-20 is £145.18 or 90 percent of your average weekly pay (whichever is lower). Any amount that you receive will be paid in the same manner as your wages (for example,

The post Paternity Pay appeared first on Tribunal Claim.

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