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Moving to a Korea to teach English does not necessarily have to be a solo adventure. Oftentimes, people applying want to work alongside their friend from home or their significant other. However, finding such teaching positions can be a bit tricky…so if you’re in this position, there are a few things you should know if you want teach in Korea as a couple or with a friend!

In this post, we will cover the following topics to answer any questions you may have about how to teach in Korea as a couple or with a friend:

Teach in Korea as a Couple or with a Friend

First, is it even possible?

YES! We certainly have schools that hire couples and friends and some that actually prefer hiring two teachers at once. In fact, we place numerous couples together ever year.

However, for several reasons these jobs can be more difficult to get than if you were just applying alone.

Why Schools Are Hesitant to Hire Couples

Many schools view hiring couples or close friends as a serious risk.

Whether it is the result of homesickness or a family emergency, teachers occasionally end their contracts early. This is even more problematic with couples because if this happens to one person, the significant other will more than likely leave as well. So the school loses two teachers, instead of one. A loss of two teachers at once can be so serious that it can cause a school to shut down because the remaining staff is not enough to teach all of the students.

Issues with the Housing Provided by the School 

Many couples often say that they are fine working at different schools as long as they live in the same area and have shared accommodation.

However, this is almost impossible to make happen because it requires two schools in the exact same area needing a teacher at the exact same time. Especially for the urban areas like Seoul or Busan, schools in the same city might be an hour or two away from each other.

Even if that were to happen, there is still the issue of shared accommodation. Most schools continually lease apartments. When one teacher finishes a contract, they leave the apartment and the new teacher moves in. It can be difficult to procure shared accommodation because the directors do not want to give up their lease or waste money with no one living there.

Personal Emotions can be Carried over into the School 

Let’s face it: couples fight. This is all well and good, but when personal emotions are carried  over into the workplace, it can become a problem for everyone ranging from the co-teachers to the school’s management to the students.

The environment at any school is best when everyone gets along and this is what the owners and directors of schools do their best to achieve…and also to avoid.

Schools Primarily Looking for Female Teachers

Many of the teaching positions that our schools have are only available to female teachers as the parents are only comfortable having women teaching the younger students, namely those in kindergarten.

Even if a school is in need of two teachers at the same time, hiring a male teacher is sometimes not possible. This can limit the possibilities for some that are looking to teach in Korea as a couple or with a friend.

Benefits of Teaching in Korea as a Couple

If you are your better half are destined to be together forever, then it is likely you will have an excellent experience teaching English in Korea. There will also be benefits involved such as:

Saving more Money

Schools that are open to hiring two people together will have shared apartments for a couple. These are usually set up as a one bedroom apartment with a common living area. The apartment size is perfect for two people.

One of the benefits of living together is that you are sharing the cost of the bills for the apartment. While these are very affordable when you are living on your own, they are even less expensive when living together with your partner.

Sharing a Lifetime Experience 

10 years down the road when you have two kids, a dog and a cat, you WILL STILL be talking about ‘that time when we taught English in Korea’. The memories from your year – or more – will stay with you forever.

And the best part about going to teach in Korea as a couple is that you get to not bore your partner with your own stories, but can instead reminisce over the stories that you created together!

Why Schools Are Hesitant to Hire Friends

As is the case with hiring couples, schools are often worried about hiring two friends in the case where one teacher leaves, the other is likely to follow, leaving the school without two teachers in the classroom.

This is one of the worst situations that a school can be in, as it takes about 3 months for a replacement teacher to gather all of the required documents to teach in Korea, go through the visa process and then to arrive at the school.  This is a major reason schools will not even take the chance at hiring two friends; however, when schools are open to this type of situation, it usually works out fine.

Pros of Teaching in Korea with a Friend

There are many benefits of teaching in Korea with a friend! The main one would be that you would be going through the entire visa process together, which can be a bit complicated at times. You would be able to help each other in collecting the necessary documents and also with planning your trip to Korea.

Go here to see a full list of our available teaching jobs in Korea

On top of this, you would be able to go through the first two weeks in Korea with someone you know and are comfortable with. From taking off on the plane together to exploring your new surroundings, you have the comfort that a good friend will bring.

Cons of Teaching in Korea with a Friend

There are other aspects to teaching in Korea with a friend that you may not have considered. Probably the most important being that going to Korea with a friend will certainly limit the number of new people that you will meet. While you will definitely meet new people, you will most likely be spending the majority of your time with your friend from home.

When people go to Korea on their own it can be a bit intimidating, but once you get over the hump, you realize that you are entering into a brand new life, one where you can be whoever you want to be. Maybe your friend won’t hinder that experience, but maybe they will.

Finding Teaching Jobs for friends in Korea 

We do have many schools that are open to two hiring friends where they need two teachers at the same time. There are also situations where one teacher is needed one month and then another a month later.

Both are good options for two friends looking to teach in Korea together.

What we suggest if you really want to go to Korea with a friend, is working in two different schools and ideally in two different cities. But why?

If you are in two different schools, you will be forced to meet new people, which is a good thing! Making new friends from different countries is one of the best parts of the experience of teaching in Korea, so you don’t want to miss out on it.

If you are in two different cities, you can visit each other on weekends and explore each other’s new home. Along with this, you would also instantly inherit the group of friends that your friend from home has made – a real win win!

The point of this post isn’t to scare you! If you want to teach in Korea as a couple or with a  friend, you definitely can.

However, you should have realistic expectations. Couples’ positions are definitely harder to come by, so if your number one priority is being with your partner or friend, you should be more flexible with other variables like location or hours.

That being said, we regularly place couples in Korea so get ready for a great experience whether you’re single or in a relationship!

The post Yes, You Can Teach in Korea as a Couple or a with Friend! appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Travel & Teach by Travel And Teach Recruiting - 1w ago

So you think that you are completely covered by the Korean medical insurance your school provides for you? Think again! In this post, we will go over the reasons why travelers insurance to teach in Korea is an absolute must. We will also go over what is covered  and how Travel & Teach Recruiting Inc. can provide insurance for 50% of the standard rate.

>>>Jump to discounted travelers insurance policy provided through Travel & Teach Recruiting Inc.<<<

Topics covered in this post:

When preparing to leave for a year or more to teach English in Korea, people are usually focused on things like getting their visa documents prepared, saying goodbye to friends and family and packing what they will need for the upcoming year. Most people don’t even consider getting travelers insurance to teach in Korea – and for good reason – as all Korean schools are required to provide 50% of the medical insurance once you land in Korea. Unfortunately, this insurance does not cover all that much.

The Misconception of Korean Medical Insurance 

When looking into all of the amazing benefits of teaching English in Korea, you will see that on top of the provided rent-free apartment, plane ticket to Korea and high monthly salaries, that your new school in Korea will also pay for your medical insurance. This may set your mind at ease in thinking that should anything happen to you, you will be taken care of by this insurance. However, this is not the case.

The majority of teachers from the U.S. already have medical insurance coverage that was likely arranged by their parents.

Canadian teachers don’t need to even think about medical insurance, as it is completely free in Canada.

So it makes sense why getting insurance when teaching English in Korea would not be the highest priority on one’s list. However, it should be and some stores from some of our past teachers will shed some light on this.

Potential Risks & Teacher Horror Stories

Travel and Teach has sent thousands of teachers to Korea since we started back in 2001. In the earlier years, we did not encourage our teachers to obtain travelers insurance to teach in Korea until we had some incidences with a few or our teachers.

One teacher was attending a soccer game in Daegu where she was seated in one of the higher seating levels. As the game ended, she stood up but was bumped into by another fan. She then fell over the guard rail about 15 feet and ended up breaking bones in her legs and back. She was hospitalized and then returned home to the US after her father came to Korea to help her home. She had no insurance and was billed over $8000 from the Korean hospital she was taken to.

Another teacher had a disc slip in her lower back and had to have emergency surgery. She spent two weeks in a shared hospital room with 6 other people. The hospital bill for her surgery was $6000 which did not include the costs incurred by her mother who flew to Korea and stayed for two weeks until she was able to walk again.

Another one of our teachers was involved in a car accident as the taxi he was in was run into by another car. Suffering a broken leg among other injuries, he spent a week in the hospital and had to pay hospital bills amounting to over $5000.

Korean Medical Insurance: What is Covered and What is not

The medical insurance provided by your school in Korea ONLY covers things like trips to the doctor’s office and prescriptions, should you need them.

As an example, a standard trip to the doctor will set you back around $15-30 but with  insurance, you will only pay around $3-7. Prescriptions also come at a lower cost. That’s pretty much it.

What is NOT covered? Everything else such as: Hospital visits, surgeries, dental, emergency evacuation and so on.

What is Covered by Travelers Insurance?

The specific travelers insurance policy that is provided through Travel and Teach at a discounted cost covers you for pretty much everything else, including:

Hospital and medical: 100% of eligible charges to you up to $2,000,000

Family transportation: Cost of round-trip plane tickets + expenses in case of hospitalization for a relative or friend

Dental: 100% of eligible charges up to $1,500 for emergency dental treatment for accidental injury

Air Evacuation in case of war, natural disaster, military unrest or terrorism: 100% of the cost to transport you to your home country hospital via air ambulance or commercial airline

Prescription Drugs: 100% of eligible charges for new prescriptions

Lost or stolen baggage: Up to $800 in the for stolen, lost or damaged luggage

Lost or stolen passport: $500

Lost or stolen travel tickets: $250

Third Party Liability: $1,000,000 personal injury/ $1,000,000 damaged property

Psychiatric: 100% of eligible charges

X-rays, lab testing: 100% of eligible charges

Paramedic services: 100% of eligible charges

Medical Equipment: 100% of eligible charges for canes, crutches, wheelchairs, casts etc.

Discounted Insurance Rate Through Travel & Teach

After some of our teachers were injured in Korea, we decided that we needed to find an insurance policy for our future teachers on their way there – policy that covered all areas but one that would be affordable.

Luckily, we discovered a provider who offered the ‘Cadillac of insurance policies’ that covers everything from surgeries to emergency evacuation to flying a parent to Korea in case you get hurt.

As this policy covers so much, the individual rate is quite high. However, since Travel and Teach is a corporation, we are given a corporate discount which we can pass on to our teachers. We are therefore able to get our teachers insured for 50% of the regular rate.

For more details, contact your Placement Coordinator or get in touch with us here.

Getting traveler’s insurance to teach in Korea will add to your overall cost of your trip, which is an expense that you may have not thought of. However, you should consider the costs of  the ‘what if’s’ and remember that things don’t work in Korea the same way they do back home. It’s good peace of mind and not very costly.

The post Do I Need Travelers Insurance to Teach in Korea? appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Teach English in Incheon Korea
The start date for this teaching position is  September 1st, 2019.
JOB HIGHLIGHTS   Great Working Environment| Close to Seoul | Morning Schedule
Location Incheon City (Cheongna), Korea
Working Days Monday – Friday
Working Hours 9:30 am – 6:30 pm
Age of Students Kindergarten, elementary students
Class Size 10-12 students per class
# of Foreign Teachers 6
Salary 2.1 million won per month
+ National Pension Plan (100,000 won per month)
Severance Equal to one month’s salary on completion of your contract
Vacation 10 days + All Korean National Holidays
Accommodations Single, fully furnished apartment provided by the school
Health Insurance 50% covered by the school; 50% covered by you
Airfare One way airfare provided
About The CityAbout The School
Teach English in Incheon Korea

More About Incheon City Korea

Incheon is known as one of the most reputable international business cities in Asia, as it was built by the government as a free trade city. Incheon has about 400 English schools which therefore means that there is a large community of foreign English teachers living there. The foreign influence in Incheon can be seen through its many western bars, nightclubs and restaurants so there is plenty of things to keep teachers busy outside of the school.

More About the School

The School is located very close to the teachers’ apartments, so teachers are able to walk to school every day. The teacher apartments are also all in the same building so the team usually walks to school together in the mornings. There are currently 6 teachers teaching at the school but this number will grow as they increase in student numbers.

The director is very nice and welcoming to her teachers, especially in the first few weeks after a new teacher arrives. Teachers are properly trained in how to teach the school’s set curriculum so they are aware of what and how they are expected to teach.

The school is also located very close to Seoul so teacher are able to access the big city on weekends or weeknights, but are able to live just outside of the craziness that is Seoul.

Apply For This Position! Ask Us A Question

<<<Back to Teaching Jobs in Korea 

The post Teach English in Incheon Korea (Cheongna) | Great School + Close to Seoul appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Teach English in Bundang City Korea
The start date for this teaching position is September 1st, 2019.
Location Bundang City (Bundang-gu ,Seongnam-city)
Working Days Monday – Friday
Working Hours 1 pm to 9:30 pm
Age of Students Elementary, Junior School students
Class Size 8 students per class
# of Foreign Teachers 5
Salary 2.1 million won per month
+ National Pension Plan (100,000 won per month)
Severance Equal to one month’s salary on completion of your contract
Vacation 10 days + All Korean National Holidays
Accommodations Single, fully furnished apartment provided by the school
Health Insurance 50% covered by the school; 50% covered by you
Airfare Round trip airfare provided
About The CityAbout The School
Teach English in Bundang City

More About Bundang City 

Bundang City is located right outside of Seoul and is attached to Seoul by the metro line, allowing you to access to the capital in 20 minutes.

Bundang is a modern city that was created in the early 1990s and has become one of the top destinations for Korea’s elite, as it offers large, luxurious condos, plenty of green space and clean streets that are not even as close to as populated as those in Seoul.

The streets of Bundang has a look that is similar to streets in Europe that are lined with cafes and small shops. There are also a lot of parks and outdoor recreational areas such as a jogging course along the Tan-chun stream.

Bundang is also surrounded by mountains which are popular hiking destinations for those that live in the city.

Ready to teach English in Korea? Get started today!

More About the School

The school is located in a great spot, close to the Shinbundang Line which allows teachers to commute to Gangnam Station of Seoul in 15 min.

The director, Mr. Choi, went to a University in the US, so he speaks English very well and has a western mentality. He prides himself on taking good care of his teachers.

The teaching staff currently consists of 5 western English teachers, along with 7 Korean English teachers. The smaller-sized staff is close-knit and work together by assisting each other in lesson planning around the school’s provided curriculum.

Apply For This Position! Ask Us A Question

<<<Back to Teaching Jobs in Korea 

The post Teach English in Bundang City | Afternoon Hours + Round Trip Airfare appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Teach English in Pohang Korea
The start date for this teaching position is  September 1st, 2019.
JOB HIGHLIGHTS           Close to the Beach| High Pay| Round-Trip Airfare
Location Pohang City, Korea
Working Days Monday – Friday
Working Hours 9:30 am – 7:35 pm
Age of Students Kindergarten, elementary, junior school students
Class Size 10-12 students per class
# of Foreign Teachers 7
Salary 2.52 million won per month
+ National Pension Plan (100,000 won per month)
Severance Equal to one month’s salary on completion of your contract
Vacation 10 days + All Korean National Holidays
Accommodations Single, fully furnished apartment provided by the school
Health Insurance 50% covered by the school; 50% covered by you
Airfare Round trip airfare provided
About The CityAbout The School
Teach English in Pohang Korea

More About Pohang City Korea

Pohang is a coastal city located on the East Sea, in the southern part of South Korea. There are great beaches that are very close to the school, as well as a bustling downtown where you will find plenty of restaurants (both western and Korean) as well as bars.  There is a large community of foreign English teachers in Pohang, so there are plenty of groups – or leagues – to join, such as softball, frisbee, soccer, etc.

More About the School

This School is located only 20 minutes walking distance to the beach, making it a nightly destination for teachers in the warmer months.  The area where the school is located is a newly developed part of the city. The teachers’ apartments are in the same area as the school and are quite large in comparison to standard Korean apartments.

Mr. Jun, the director, has run the school for 15 years and treats his teachers very well from the day they arrive until they leave Korea.

Apply For This Position! Ask Us A Question

<<<Back to Teaching Jobs in Korea 

The post Teach English in Pohang Korea | High Pay + Close to the Beach! appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Teach English in Bundang Korea
The start date for this teaching position is September 1st, 2019.
Location Bundang Korea (Bundang-gu ,Seongnam-city)
Working Days Monday – Friday
Working Hours 9am to 7:30pm (Mon, Wed, Fri) / 9am – 6:40pm (Tue, Thu)
Age of Students Kindergarten/Elementary students
Class Size 12 students per class
# of Foreign Teachers 15
Salary 2.5 million won per month
+ National Pension Plan (100,000 won per month)
Severance Equal to one month’s salary on completion of your contract
Vacation 10 days + All Korean National Holidays
Accommodations Single, fully furnished apartment provided by the school
Health Insurance 50% covered by the school; 50% covered by you
Airfare One way airfare provided
About The CityAbout The School
Teach English in Bundang Korea

More About Bundang Korea 

Bundang-gu is the largest district of Seongnam, which is a major city in the Seoul area.  Bundang is one of South Korea’s richest and most developed areas, as it is Korea’s first artificial city which was built in the early 1990’s.

Bundang is lined with many high rise luxury apartments and is home to some of South Korea’s wealthiest people. Know for its green space and clean air, Bundang has become one of the biggest destinations for the upper class.

As Bundang is on the Seoul metro subway line, you can access any part of Seoul in no time at all allowing quick trips into the capital city.

Ready to teach English in Korea? Start here!

More About the School

This school was established in 2006 and has a great reputation in the local community among parents. The school has grown in student numbers each year since they opened and now have a total of 15 western English teachers in addition to a large Korean teaching staff.

All of our teachers that we have sent to this school have reported to us that there is a warm, friendly working environment, which makes for a great teaching experience in Korea. They also feel that Bundang is the perfect city to teach as it is new, clean and not overly populated. Being so close to Seoul, you are able to travel wherever you want in no time.

Apply For This Position! Ask Us A Question

<<<Back to Teaching Jobs in Korea 

The post Teach English in Bundang Korea | High Salary + Great Location appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Teach English in Seoul Korea (Sungdong-gu) Korea
The start date for this teaching position is September 1st, 2019.
Location Sungdong-gu, Seoul, South Korea
Working Days Monday – Friday
Working Hours 1 pm – 7 pm
Age of Students Kindergarten/Elementary students
Class Size 10 students per class
# of Foreign Teachers 12
Salary 2.2-2.3 million won per month
+ National Pension Plan (100,000 won per month)
Severance Equal to one month’s salary on completion of your contract
Vacation 10 days + All Korean National Holidays
Accommodations Single, fully furnished apartment provided by the school
Health Insurance 50% covered by the school; 50% covered by you
Airfare Round trip airfare provided
About The CityAbout The School
Teach English in Seoul Korea

More About Seoul and Sungdong-gu

Seoul is the capital – and largest city – of South Korea.  With a population of over 52 million people, Seoul is ranked as the 16th largest city in the entire world.

The Sungdong District is a residential are in Seoul that is located on the north side of the Han River, giving you access to the recreational areas along the riverside such as parks and bike paths.You will also find plenty of restaurants, bars, shops and clothing stores in Sungdong.

As Sungdong is on the Seoul metro subway line, you can access any part of Seoul in no time! The local train and bus stations are not far, allowing you to make your way to any other city in Korea for weekend trips.

More About the School

This school was established in 2008 and has steadily grown in number of students and teachers since that time. The working atmosphere among the Korean and western teachers is very friendly and comfortable. The Korean staff make great efforts in welcoming new western English teachers, which

is friendly and inviting as all of the teachers at the school are eager to help each other out with the different curriculum allotted for each level. There is a ‘family feeling’ among the English teachers who hang out and take trips on the weekends and holidays together.

Apply For This Position! Ask Us A Question

<<<Back to Teaching Jobs in Korea 

The post Teach English in Seoul Korea (Sungdong-Gu) Daytime Hours appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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There are many important things that teachers have to do to prepare after they have made the decision to teach English in Korea. The preceding months before moving to Korea are filled with navigating the visa process, finishing a TEFL course, saying goodbye to friends and family, packing and so on. While these steps are all necessary, many teachers over look something that’s very basic, but super important – learning the language! So, do you have to speak Korean to teach in Korea?

This is going to sound painfully obvious, but Korea is a foreign country and their language is NOT English. Despite teachers going there to teach English, it’s very important to learn some Korean.

You don’t have to be fluent in Korean to teach there, but you will definitely need it for a lot of aspects of daily life outside of the classroom.

Additionally, if you really want to get the most of the experience you owe it to yourself – and to the locals – to at least try to learn some of their language!

Here are the top reasons why you need to learn Korean to teach in Korea:

Speaking Korean in your Daily Life in Korea

While many younger Koreans have a decent understanding of English, you might not have as much luck with older generations. Korean culture is often timid, so even if Koreans know English, they may be too embarrassed to speak with you. This can make a lot of mundane, daily errands really difficult! Whether you need to ask for directions, order food at a restaurant, navigate a grocery store, or get your laundry dry-cleaned – there will be no shortage of times when you’ll definitely need Korean.

Eating at Korean Restaurants   Are you really going to miss out on this??

Even if you have tried Korean food before leaving for Korea, you most likely have not eaten Korean as your main diet. When living in Korea, you won’t have much of a choice, and that is a good thing!

Korean cuisine is not only healthy, but absolutely delicious! There are also endless choices of dishes, making it one of the best parts of teaching in Korea.

However, if you do not speak any Korean whatsoever, you will simply be missing out as you will not be able to order food if you don’t know the basics.

The good news is that the basics are all you need! Learning how to say simple words like ‘this’, ‘please’, ‘more’, ‘one’ or ‘two’ are enough to get your point across and your desired food on the table in front of you.

The other good news is that many Korean restaurants have pictures on the menu, so pointing to your desired dish while saying ‘this please’ is all you need. Once you advance to learning how to read Korean (which you can do in a matter of hours!), you will then be able to sound out the words and then say ‘please’. And that’s it!

Now, if you are eating with other Koreans and want to pay for the dinner, this is how you do it:

How to Say It's On Me or I'll Pay in Korean | Learn Korean with Beeline! - YouTube

Learn more about how to start speaking conversational Korean through the Beeline Language Korean Program here. 

Ordering Take-Out Food 

Most days when you arrive at your apartment after a day of teaching, you will find your front door covered in flyers from local restaurants. They will have pictures of delicious food – anything from friend chicken to pizza to local Korean dishes – and you WILL want to pick up your phone and order. However, this is simply not possible if you try and speak English with the person answering the phone.

All you will need in this case is 1) to be able to read the name of the dish you want 2) give your home address (you will have to learn this) 3) and say ‘please’. Within about 20-30 minutes at the most, the delivery person will be at your door with your dinner in full plating and proper cutlery. You will pay for your meal – but will not tip, as that is not done in Korea – and afterwards, you will leave the dishes outside of your front door which will be picked up later by the driver.

The take-out experience in Korea is enough reason for you to learn some of the language!

Read more here about ordering Korean take-out food

Small Talk with Local Koreans

Being one of the only Westerners in the area, you will get more attention from the locals than you otherwise would back home. This isn’t intrusive or uncomfortable but rather something you will just get used to.  It can also be fun as children will randomly yell out ‘Hello! How are you? Nice to meet you!”.

You will also be running into the workers at your local convenience store, the bakery you buy your morning snacks at or even the caretaker of the apartment building you are in.

In all of these cases, these people will want to greet you and speak to you. The feeling of knowing what they are saying to you and being able to respond, even with elementary Korean is nothing short of wonderful. They will also give you a great reaction as Korean people LOVE when westerners even attempt to speak their language!

Here is how to say hello in Korean:

How to Say Hello in Korean (Formal) | Learn Korean Online with Beeline! - YouTube

Traveling Around Korea 

Did you know that Korea, who has a population over 45 million people, has a land mass of only 1/7 the size of Texas? In other words, it’s very small! On top of that, 70% of the Korean peninsula is covered by mountains.

So what does this mean to you, an English teacher in Korea? It means that you can travel from one end of the country to the other in a matter of hours! Each and every weekend, day off or vacation, English teachers hop on a train or a bus and are in a completely new city in no time.

With fast and cheap transportation, traveling around Korea is definitely one of the highlights for teachers teaching there.

However, travel for those with absolutely no Korean under their belts is no easy task.

Buying Train and Bus Tickets

So your first stop on your weekend trip will be to either the bus or train station, where the ticket vendors will certainly speak English, right? Wrong!

Although many Koreans speak some English, it is often like pulling teeth to get them to actually communicate with you, so they will resort to speaking to you in Korean first. Communicating with someone like this will still be difficult to get your point across or a ticket to where you are going. Try asking more in-depth questions about  seating, what platform number you are on, etc. and you likely won’t get too far.

Taking Taxis

You may not use taxis in your hometown as your main mode of transportation as they are usually quite expensive, especially in large cities like New York or Toronto.

However, in Korea taxis are not only inexpensive, but they are seemingly always there when you need one! On top of that, they are all nice and clean cars that are well taken care of by the driver who will likely be wearing white gloves :)

And the best part is that you will not – or cannot is the better word – tip the driver.  This gesture, while much appreciated in most cities around the world – is seen an an insult. That’s right – it’s an insult if you offer the driver more money than they are asking for. The reason for this is that you are telling them that their job is so low that you feel the need to overpay for the service!

But how do you get where you want to go? It’s actually not as hard as you may think. With directional words like ‘left’, ‘right’, ‘straight’ followed by ‘please go’, you will get to where you are going.

On your way home?  You’ll need to know your address followed by ‘please go’. It’s that easy if you know just a few words…but extremely difficult if you speak no Korean at all.

Once you get out of the taxi, a simple ‘thank you’ will be a great way to end your trip. This is how to say thank you in Korean:

How to Say Thank You in Korean | Learn Korean Online with Beeline! - YouTube

Asking for Directions 

Let’s say you are on your way to meet a friend at a popular fried chicken restaurant called ‘Chi-Mek’ at Gwangyuk Subway station.

You get to the station just fine, but once you make it to street level, you have no idea which direction to take. So what do you do?

If you speak some Korean, you simply ask anyone ‘Where is Chi-Mek Restaurant’. As it is very popular in that area, they will give you directions – i.e. left, right, go straight and you will know where to go. Just a few simple Korean words and your problem is solved.

DID YOU KNOW?
To get your point across in Korean, you only need to use one or two words instead of using full sentences as we do in English. Therefore learning grammatical rules isn’t exactly necessary when speaking Korean.
Booking Hotel Rooms 

Once you arrive at your destination, you will need to get yourself a hotel or motel room. It is more likely that you will stay at a motel, as they are much less expensive, but are extremely clean and enjoyable to stay at.

Once you approach the desk at the motel, you will be asked questions such as ‘how many people?’, ‘how many nights?’, etc.

So how do you answer?

Even if your Korean is at a basic level, you will pick up on some words in the questions you will be asked such as ‘how many?’ (which is a very common question you will be asked in many situations), and can then answer using the few numbers you have learned, such as one, two or three. And that is all it will take to get you a room…and a smile from the clerk :)

Here is how to count from 1-4 in Korean: 

How to Count in Korean (Numbers 1-4) | Learn Korean with Beeline! - YouTube

Relationships with Koreans  Falling in Love in Korea 

From Korean boys who look (or just dress like) K Pop stars, and Korean women being some of the most beautiful in the entire world, there just might be a chance that you will fall in love when living and teaching in Korea. So if you meet that man or woman who instantly captures your heart, how will you communicate with them?

You guessed it! You need to know how to speak some Korean!

Making Korean Friends 

Aside from possibly meeting the love of your life in Korea, befriending Koreans is also possible as long as the language barrier isn’t too great.

Koreans are simply some of the nicest, warmest and friendliest people you will ever meet, and are more than happy to introduce you to everything that Korea has to offer. So don’t feel like your western co-teachers are the only people you will be making friends with!

The Many Benefits to Speaking Korean Fluently 

In a year or two after you have left Korea, you will likely be in the search for a job or a career. If you used your time in Korea wisely and dedicated a real effort to learn Korean to a conversational or even fluent level, you will have SO many options available to you.

As Korea has concentrated on expanding their economy on a global scale, there are abundant opportunities for those who are able to speak English and Korean.

The U.S-Korean Free Trade Agreement was the start or this global expansion but has steadily been growing ever since, making Korean one of the most popular languages to learn in the world.

So if you have any interest at all in learning Korean, don’t worry about what you will use it for in the future – it will be absolutely useful to you and will open up doors that you never knew existed!

The Best Korean Program for Conversational Korean

When you start out learning Korean, we do not recommend using books or starting with grammar. What we recommend is learning how to speak your first Korean words.

Being able to speak some basic words in Korean – and knowing that you are being understood – will be all of the motivation you will need to keep going.

The Beeline Language Korean Program will provide just that for you.

And the best part is that it is only $1 to access the entire 3-level program! 

Learn Korean Today with Beeline! - YouTube

Classroom Management

One of the key reasons for picking up some Korean is classroom management.

You will most likely be teaching kindergarten, elementary or middle school students. Although you’ll see them in English class, they will eventually (if not immediately) want to switch into Korean. Having an understanding of Korean will help you use commands and let you in on what they’re talking about.

Also, if you can speak a little bit of Korean, most students will think you’re fluent. At that point, Korean is no longer their “secret code.”

The Full Experience

The final reason for learning Korean should be pretty obvious – you’ll be living in Korea!

Just imagine a foreign person moving to the U.S. or Canada. Would it be pretty ridiculous if they didn’t try to learn any English?? Yes – it would be ridiculous.

So, don’t be that foreigner who lives in Korea for a year (or more) without picking up some basics. It will definitely make your life easier. Also, it will show the locals that you care about them and their culture because you’re making an effort.

The post Do I Have to Speak Korean to Teach in Korea? appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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When applying to teach English in South Korea, most people are confused when comparing private vs. public schools in Korea. There are many varying opinions online so it difficult to know which is better.

Many people from the US and Canada believe that a government-run program of any kind is more reliable and trustworthy than a private program. Why? Because it’s the government! This way of thinking, however, does not carry over to Korea, especially when it comes to the public school program EPIK (English Program In Korea).

What people forget are the most important aspects of a job. This includes job security, satisfaction in the school as well as in their personal life in Korea.

We have outlined below the reasons why EPIK is no longer as safe an option as it used to be and why private schools are a better option overall.

Teach English in Korea Epik Public Schools Vs Private Schools | Travel & Teach Recruiting - YouTube

The Original Goal of EPIK (That Failed)

EPIK was first created to stop parents from paying high fees that private schools (hagwans) were charging. It aimed to eliminate the need for private schools by providing proper English lessons (taught by foreign English teachers) at public schools. While the intention was noble, the results have been disappointing.

EPIK is dying a slow death thanks to less government funding (a result of families having fewer children), poorly created curricula and sub-par teaching.

Private Vs. Public Schools in Korea

All too often, people looking to teach in Korea are too focused on aspects like location and vacation time. EPIK, for the most part, offers better vacation than private schools (about 5 days more per year).

Location, however, is not guaranteed, even though you are told that before arriving in Korea.

Other aspects of teaching at a public vs. a private schools are simply unknown by most when considering which to apply for. Here are some of the major comparisons:

One English Teacher vs. Team of Teachers

There is usually only one teacher that is hired per public school, which means that you will be the only Westerner and likely the only English-speaking teacher at the school. Aside from the other Korean teachers who may speak some English, you will be essentially be on your own during the time you are at school, which makes for very long and lonely days.

In comparison, private schools (hagwans) usually have 5-15+ Western English teachers at the school.

Therefore, on your very first day at school, you will instantly inherit a group of friends. Having this support after just arriving in Korea is very comforting as there is a lot coming at you in your first days and weeks.

So while public schools offer slightly more vacation time, you won’t necessarily have anyone to travel with unless you meet some friends outside of your school. And, if those friends work at private schools, your vacation days will not line up.

Cold Working Environment vs. Warm Working Environment 

In the EPIK program, you go through a group orientation soon after arriving in Korea. After that you are sent to your school and from that point are on your own. The other Korean teachers at the school may be welcoming, but will not likely speak much English, so conversation will be limited.

On top of that, while the classroom teacher is supposed to assist you while teaching your classes, many Korean teachers will use this time to catch up on marking or may not even be in the classroom while you are teaching.

In comparison, once you arrive at your private school, you will be trained and then assisted during your first days and weeks at the school. Should you need direction, there will be plenty of help available to you, either through your manager, Korean co-teachers (who will be able to speak English) or through your Western co-teachers.

The working environment at private schools is often family-like as teachers are made to feel like they are part of a team. Outings such as teacher dinners, nights out at the karaoke bars and weekend team building trips all contribute to a better working experience.

40 Students per Class vs. 10 Students per Class 

In public schools, you will be responsible for teaching 40 students at time.

This is quite a large group of children to handle, so teachers are supposed to have a Korean co-teacher to assist. However, as stated above, some teachers use this time to catch up on marking, while others just disappear from the class, leaving you on your own.

Trying to get 40 students to listen to your lesson is one daunting task, which makes for very long and frustrating days.

Private schools limit their class sizes to 10-12 students at the very most. This allows for much better class management and participation. On top of that, the students are actually learning what you are teaching making it a more rewarding experience as you will see them progress from week to week.

Teaching ABCs vs. Teaching Conversational English

As public schools teach per grade level in comparison to the students’ level of English, you will be teaching students who have little or no English ability the same lesson as those who have a very high English efficiency.

Therefore, some students will have no understanding of your lesson whatsoever while others will be bored as it is far too basic for them.

It’s a one size fits all approach that simply does not  work.

In comparison, the classes at private schools are separated by levels where each student in the class will have the same English ability. This also adds some variation to your day, where you will be teaching some classes the basics, while teaching others advanced conversational English.

Multiple School Locations vs. One Location 

As government funding for the EPIK program has dwindled, teachers are now expected to teach at more than one school – sometimes up to 5 or more. This means you as a teacher will be spending a large part of the day commuting. Not fun.

We constantly receive emails from applicants who opted for EPIK over private school positions complaining about this. Unfortunately, once you are in Korea under an EPIK contract, it is really difficult to get out of it.

Here are two emails we recently received:

Subject: EPIK teacher looking to work at a Hagwon

Message: Hello, I am currently working as an English teacher at six different public schools in the Jeonbuk province (4 Elementary and 2 Middle schools). I am only at the beginning of my contract, but honestly once I complete this semester I do not wish to continue working under these conditions.

I really enjoy living in Korea though and I would prefer to work with younger students at the Kindergarten level in a private school that offers teacher support (I receive NONE now).

I really need guidance and advice on what steps I should take to apply at a Hagwon even though I am currently signed to a one year contract with EPIK. Do I apply to Hagwons first, wait to get a job position, and then notify EPIK 45-60 days in advance that I am ending my contract. I appreciate any advice on what I can do to escape the situation I am in.
Thank you,
Caroline :)

Subject: Looking to work at a hogwan

Message: My name is Alison and as of August 2019, I have been an EPIK English Teacher. It is time to renew or terminate my contract but I simply cannot see working under these conditions any longer. While I have enjoyed Korea, I’d gladly welcome a better opportunity than the this position. One with more support, involving more foreign teachers, and only working at one location as I am working at 3 different schools resulting in 2 hours of commuting each day.

If you have information in reference to how I can go about finding a new job with a private school while already living in South Korea, that would be great. Thank you!

Alison.

At private schools, you will be teaching at one school and one school ONLY. As schools find their teachers apartments as close to the school as possible (oftentimes in the same building as the school), the ‘commute’ is usually a 5-10 minute walk.

Why the EPIK Program has Failed

Korean parents sacrifice everything for their children and their future. Accordingly, they want the best of the best when it comes to English lessons. This is because speaking English offers many opportunities for Koreans. The curriculum that EPIK provides is very generic in nature, so children with medium to high levels of English learn nothing they don’t already know; conversely, those with little or no knowledge learn only the very basics.

Lessons are taught to 40 students at a time (often with only 1 teacher!). As a result, there is no individual focus on speaking. On the other hand, private schools offer extensive individual practice because class sizes are typically 8-12 students. Also, students are grouped by ability so there are never large discrepancies between students.

As parents realized that their children were receiving mediocre English lessons at public schools, enrollment in private schools skyrocketed.

Why Teaching Through EPIK Isn’t a Safe Option for Teachers

At first, we at Travel and Teach wanted to offer both private and public school positions to our teachers. That way, people could make a decision depending on individual preferences. We therefore worked with EPIK for 4 years before multiple problems started happening. Eventually, it got to the point that we no longer felt comfortable and safe sending our teachers through EPIK.

Problem #1: The application process requires applicants to apply 6 months in advance.

In fact, they are forced to apply even before they have the necessary documents ready to apply for the visa. This resulted in lost jobs when documents were not produced in time. Applicants then had to start their job search all over, by which time most private schools had completed their hiring. At best, this caused many people to go to Korea 3-6 months after they originally wanted to. At worst, it caused many to not go at all because they didn’t want to through the process again.

Problem #2:  EPIK hires twice the number of people they need.

For one intake, EPIK will ‘hire’ around 2,000 teachers for 1,000 positions. This is so that there aren’t any teaching positions that are not filled. The ‘first come, first served’ way of recruiting results in hired teachers losing their jobs after completing most of the required steps. They then have to start all over.

Problem #3: EPIK promises that if you send your visa documents to Korea in a hurry, you will secure your desired location.

Unfortunately, this is not always the case. We had multiple reports of teachers being promised positions in large metropolitan cities. When they arrived at EPIK orientation, however, they were given placements in rural areas. They were then told that they could either accept that position or return home on their own dime.

Problem #4: Government cutbacks started to be a common occurrence

As schools could no longer afford to employ foreign teachers. While losing your job before getting to Korea is a problem, losing your job while in Korea is infinitely worse. At that point, the entire visa process needs to be redone, and you must do this all on your own.

Problem #5: Teacher support through EPIK is essentially non-existent

EPIK teachers commonly complain that there is a serious lack of support. Whether it is from EPIK representatives or within the school, there is often no support structure. At private schools, you have managers, directors and co-teachers who can assist you or answer your questions.

Why Travel and Teach Stopped Working with EPIK

In addition to the problems outlined above, in late 2009, EPIK cut 150 jobs 1 month before those positions began. For Travel and Teach alone, we recruited 35 of those teachers. We then had to inform them that they were jobless, even though they had already completed the visa process and purchased plane tickets.

Once we realized that we essentially had no control over the security of our teachers’ positions, we stopped working with EPIK once and for all.

The Misconception of Private Schools (Hagwans)

Is it true that some private schools will not pay you on time, add on extra teaching hours or fire you in the 11th month of your contract to save on severance and plane ticket payout? Unfortunately, we still hear stories like this. However, these stories are usually from people who have either 1) been hired directly through a school or 2) been placed through a Korean recruiting agency. While not all schools that hire directly are bad, nor are all Korean recruiting agencies, the fact is once you have a visa sponsorship with a school in Korea and are unhappy, your only two options are to 1) quit, go home and do the visa process all over again or 2) stay put and deal with the poor working conditions or treatment.

Don’t Listen to the so-called online ‘ESL Experts’ 

Unlike what the so called ‘pundits’ of the teaching industry in Korea say online on Dave’s ESL Café or other online forums, the majority of private schools are well-run institutions that would not risk their reputation for the sake of saving some money by not paying a teacher what they are owed.

At Travel and Teach, we have always been very picky about which schools we work with. This gives us full confidence when we send teachers to these schools year after year. We have partnered with many of these schools since 2001. Therefore, we pass on extensive information to prospective teachers so they know exactly what they are getting into. And if there are any issues or miscommunication, we are there to help figure everything out. This is the Travel and Teach Guarantee.

Once people are informed of the differences between private vs. public schools in Korea, the choice seems pretty clear.

If you are ready to get started on your job search, you can check out our list of private school teaching positions in Korea here. 

The post Private Vs. Public Schools in Korea & The Death of EPIK appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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Travel & Teach by Travel And Teach Recruiting - 1M ago
Teach English in Gangneung City, Korea!
The start date for this teaching position is  September 1st, 2019.
JOB HIGHLIGHTS                             Only 2 hours to Seoul | Relaxed Beach Lifestyle | Great Working Environment                        
Location Gangneung, South Korea
Working Days Monday – Friday
Working Hours Mon, Wed, Fri : 9:40 am – 7 pm
Tue, Thu : 9:40 am – 5 pm
Age of Students Kindergarten, elementary, junior school students
Class Size 12 students per class
# of Foreign Teachers 3
Salary 2.1-2.3 million won per month
Severance Equal to one month’s salary on completion of your contract
Vacation 10 days + All Korean National Holidays
Accommodations Single, fully furnished apartment provided by the school
Health Insurance 50% covered by the school; 50% covered by you
Airfare Round trip airfare provided
About The CityAbout The School
Teach English in Gangneung, South Korea

More About Gangneung 

Gangneung is a city in Gangwon-do, on the east coast of South Korea. Gangneung is the economic centre of the Yeongdong region of Gangwon Province. Gangneung has many tourist attractions, such as Jeongdongjin, a very popular area for watching the sun rise, and Gyeongpo Beach. There is a ROK airbase south of downtown Gangneung which formerly doubled as a civil airport.

More About the School

Known in the area as one of the most respected and well known English schools, the school has a great reputation for excellence in teaching ESL.  With a curriculum set on speaking conversational English, the success of the students’ English abilities has made a name for the school and its teachers.

Apply For This Position! Ask Us A Question

<<<Back to Teaching Jobs in Korea 

The post Teaching by the Beach in Gangneung City, Korea! appeared first on Travel and Teach Recruiting Inc..

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