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Even though the Batwoman pilot only premiered on Wednesday, it’s already amassed a pretty sizable fanbase, and counting (apparently half the audience at Comic-Con left before Pennyworth screened)? Unfortunately, though, the show’s panel will be one star short. On Thursday, Ruby Rose announced via Instagram video that she’s had to drop out of the con last-minute to put some finishing touches on a Batwoman episode instead.

Here’s what she said:

“Hey guys, it’s me. I come with bad news–sad news. I will unfortunately not be able to make it to Comic-Con this year, and it is devastating. I have wanted to go to Comic-Con for a million years, and never did I think I would be invited as a guest and be speaking on two incredible panels, let alone have my face plastered everywhere, on hotel keys, on the side of the hotel, in an elevator. My face is literally everywhere! But I’m not going to be there, which stings a lot. But just know that we tried everything we could humanly to be there–it wasn’t until now that we realized there wasn’t any other way to finish this ambitious episode that we’re doing and create this amazing show that really is special. And we want you to love it and be proud of it and be entertained and to laugh and cry and be empowered. And that means that in this particular instance, I got to work, and bring Kate Kane and Batwoman to the screen, and not Ruby to a panel. So I’m really sorry–I just talked about myself in the third person. I also really fucked up my hair. This is what happens when I’ve had the cowl on for too long and I just think adding product will fix it. That’s not a thing. I love you guys, and I’ll make it up to you, and I’m very appreciative of all the support so far. Thank you so much.”

Rose was scheduled to be on both the Batwoman Q&A Saturday morning and Entertainment Weekly’s “Women Who Kick Ass” panel on Saturday afternoon. As of right now, those panels should otherwise take place as planned.

The actor isn’t the only one who’s had to pull out of Comic-Con. Game of Thrones′ David Benioff and D.B. Weiss had a last-minute cancellation as well, citing schedule conflicts, with director Miguel Sapochnik and actors Nathalie Emmanuel (Missandei) and Iain Glen (Jorah Mormont) also being missed.

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It may sometimes seem as if science does nothing but harsh SF’s vibe: “No stealth in space,” “Mars is nigh-impossible to terraform with on-site resources,” “relativity and its speed of light limit has stood up to eleven plus decades of intense testing,” and “all getting bitten by a radioactive spider does is raise a small welt and give one a very slightly increased chance of cancer.” BUT…science gives as well as takes. Here are five examples of ways in which the Solar System as we currently understand it is way more awesome than the Solar System of my youth.

Even limiting oneself to “potential abodes of life (natural or introduced by us)”, the Solar System is far more welcoming than it seemed 40 years ago. Granted, it helps that I grew up in that window between Mariner 2, which ushered in eighteen years of increasingly gloomy revelations about the Solar System, and 1979’s Voyager probes, which revealed a far more interesting Solar System.

The Moon Has Water

Dick Tracy’s Moon Maid and Heinlein’s vanished Lunarians to the contrary, astronomers—as soon as there were astronomers worthy of the name—were pretty certain that the Moon was an airless, dead world subject to extremes of temperature. Space probes confirmed this. The Apollo moon landing then confirmed that the Moon was an arid world far too small to retain an atmosphere for geologically significant periods—a world whose lifeless regolith is made up of tiny jagged shards that can erode space suits and (presumably, with enough exposure) lungs as well.

Although there had been hints as early as 1971 that there might be water on the Moon, probe results in the 1990s and later returned increasingly convincing evidence that despite the lack of air and temperatures that can rise past 100o C, there’s water on the Moon. In fact, there appear to be substantial reserves of water in the permanently shadowed craters at the poles, somewhere between 100 million to one billion tonnes (good news for In-Situ Resource Utilization fans.). As well, researchers Needham and Kring suggest the Moon might have had an atmosphere worthy of the name for as long as seventy million years! Although not recently.

Granted, seventy million years may not be long enough for life to evolve, which gets me to my next item.

Planets Aren’t Quarantined From Each Other

If there’s anything science teaches us, it’s that Mars is a pretty boring place and our seeming endless stream of probes is a waste of resources better spent exploring Titan. Still, the fact that over 130 meteors have been determined to have originated on Mars has interesting implications. Under the right conditions, material can be transferred from one world to another in the Solar System, which raises the interesting possibility that potentially habitable regions unfavourable to abiogenesis might have been seeded from elsewhere. Could have happened is not did happen, of course. Even if it didn’t happen yet, perhaps we could arrange for it to happen in the future.

The Solar System appeared so dismal in the 1960s and 1970s because Earth is a garden world in an otherwise uninteresting part of the Solar System (Venus’ interesting clouds aside). Most moderates agree that nothing says boring quite like the rocky worlds of the inner system, particularly contrasted with the jewel we live on. I assume. I haven’t checked, but that sounds like the sort of thing reasonable people would say. Happily for us, the Solar System is so much more than the inner system.

Ceres Is Not A Dead World

If a dinky world like the Moon seemed arid and unwelcoming, the even dinkier Ceres might seem like an even worse bet for active geology and ample water supplies (and all the very interesting chemistry water permits). Not so! Large enough to have differentiated into layers, Ceres has a core and a water-rich mantle. In fact, there may be more water in Ceres’ mantle than in all of Earth’s fresh water bodies combined. Furthermore, some of that water may be in the form of a subsurface ocean. Which brings me to…

Liquid Water Oceans Turn Out To Be Surprisingly Common

We might have lost Venusian swamps and Martian canals to scientific reality, but reality has more than compensated. The first images from Europa made it clear that water is a significant component in the outer system and that a considerable fraction of it was in liquid form. Icy shells protected the liquid water from evaporation into the vacuum of space. Worlds suspected to have liquid water in familiar form include Ceres, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan, Triton, Pluto (although Charon’s internal ocean appears to have frozen solid), and astoundingly, the tiny moon Enceladus. We have no idea if these oceans have life (I blame all that money wasted on Mars) but still—what a far cry from the Solar System of forty years ago.

Titan Is One Weird-ass Moon

Titan is both like and unlike Earth. It has a dense atmosphere (like Earth’s), one composed largely of nitrogen (like Earth’s), but that atmosphere is just slightly warmer than liquid oxygen. Like Earth, Titan has streams and lakes. Unlike Earth, those streams and lakes do not contain liquid water (because “slightly warmer than liquid oxygen”), but methane and other hydrocarbons. Some of this was suspected as early as 1944 (although I think the nitrogen component had to wait for verification until the Voyager probes) but the full marvel of Titan had to wait until the 21st century and the arrival of the Cassini probe. Even after a lander and repeated Cassini flybys, there are still many questions about Titan to be resolved. Which is why there should be more space probes to the outer system and fewer to Mars.

There’s no evidence of complex life in or on Titan (although we’ve only seen one tiny part of the surface). Still, this is a world where energy-rich chemicals rain down out of the sky, like manna from heaven; if there are replicating chemistries that can function at cold temperatures, Titan seems to offer a suitable place for them to occur. And if nature hasn’t been kind enough to provide them, perhaps we could.

Originally published in September 2018.

In the words of Wikipedia editor TexasAndroid, prolific book reviewer and perennial Darwin Award nominee James Davis Nicoll is of “questionable notability.” His work has appeared in Publishers Weekly and Romantic Times as well as on his own websites, James Nicoll Reviews and Young People Read Old SFF (where he is assisted by editor Karen Lofstrom and web person Adrienne L. Travis). He is a finalist for the 2019 Best Fan Writer Hugo Award, and is surprisingly flammable.

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Fantasy fiction has a sweet tooth. It seems that worlds full of magic and mayhem need sugar to keep their denizens powered through endless winters, strange adventures, and harrowing school years. We’ve assembled a brief chronology of tales with a sugary bite (eschewing video games for the time being—the Mario games alone could fill a book with candy worlds) that contain our favorite (and often very magical) cakes, cookies, and candies—from an edible cottage set deep in the woods, to the enchanted sweets hidden in the robes of our favorite Headmaster…

 

“Hansel and Gretel” (1812)

Illustration by Arthur Rackham (The Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm, 1909)

Hansel and Gretel live with their parents at the edge of a deep, dark, extremely Germanic forest. Their parents decide it costs too much to feed them, and concoct a plan to take the siblings into the forest and abandon them. But, as poor woodcutters tend to live in small houses, the kids overhear the nefarious plot and Hansel plans their escape via breadcrumb trail, but doesn’t stop to think about the existence of birds. (Whomp, whomp.) Lost and afraid, the kids come upon a house made of cake, decorated with candies and clear sugar windows, and make the only rational decision: they stuff themselves. The witch who owns the house overreacts slightly, caging Hansel so she can fatten him up and eat him, and forcing Gretel to clean the sugary house. Once the witch decides to cook Hansel, Gretel tricks her into demonstrating how the oven works by climbing halfway inside it (???) at which point the clever girl shoves the witch all the way in and cooks her alive. The kids find the stash of precious jewels that the witch had, because of course she did, and head back home. Their mother/stepmother has died while they were away, and now their dad (who was never really on board with the abandonment scheme, honest!) is only too happy to welcome them, and their sudden wealth, back home.

 

The Nutcracker and the Mouse King (1816)

Illustration by Peter Carl Geissler (The Nutcracker and the Mouse King c.1870)

When little Marie helps her family’s nutcracker defeat the seven-headed Mouse King by offering him the sword from her brother’s toy hussar, she doesn’t expect that the nutcracker’s success will cap off with a journey to a magical kingdom. This doll kingdom is built with sweets of all sorts, and was once attacked by a giant (aptly named Sweettooth), who tried to eat the whole dang lot of it. The denizens of doll kingdom hashed out a deal, offering the giant a portion of their kingdom to feast upon if he promised to leave and never return. The deal worked out in their favor, and once Marie breaks the curse on the nutcracker and he morphs back into a handsome fellow, he returns and asks her to marry him. She agrees, and he comes back a year later to whisk her away to the doll kingdom, where they live in Marzipan Castle.

 

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865)

Illustration by John Tenniel (The colour illustrated Nursery Alice, 1890)

Alice’s first stumbling steps through Wonderland are characterized by transformative food. First, a potion bottle bearing the words DRINK ME and the most peculiar flavor combination (cherry tart, custard, pineapple, roast turkey, toffee, and hot buttered toast, all mixed together) that shrinks her down so she can slip through a tiny door. Then, in the next room, a cake saying EAT ME (arranged charmingly in currants) that makes her grow several sizes larger in order to reach the key she needs to continue her journey. Even without knowing what these magical offerings would do to her, she commits to the experience, saying to herself, “I know something interesting is sure to happen whenever I eat or drink anything.” Despite the Mad Hatter’s Tea Party being an archetypal set piece from Lewis Carroll’s surreal tale, the true significance of the story is in these early amuse-bouches, and Alice’s trust in following instructions and seeing where it takes her.

 

The Moomins and the Great Flood (1945)

If you’re a fan of Tove Jansson’s lovable children’s book series from Finland, you know that Great Flood was the very first Moomin book ever published (it’s often considered something of a prequel, as it doesn’t contain many of the characters that are central to the series). In it, Moominmamma and Moomintroll head into the perilous forest to find Moominpapa, after he goes adventuring with the Hattifatteners. They are attacked by a great big snake, but helpfully saved by a young girl named Tulip. Eventually, Moominmamma and Moomontroll happen upon the home of an old man who has a garden made of sweets. He invites them to live there, but Moominmamma and Moomintroll have a lot to do yet, so hey continue on their way.

 

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1950)

“At first Edmund tried to remember that it is rude to speak with one’s mouth full, but soon he forgot about this and thought only of trying to shovel down as much Turkish Delight as he could, and the more he ate the more he wanted to eat, and he never asked himself why the Queen should be so inquisitive.” One must remember the dark side of confectionery indulgence. Edmund Pevensie sells out his entire family, and very nearly dooms Narnia, all because he’s too busy stuffing himself to remember the lessons of Hansel and Gretel. The type of Turkish Delight you’ll usually find in the U.S. or England doesn’t really live up to Edmund’s rhapsodies, and yes, there is a fascinating historical reason for that. But gosh does C. S. Lewis ever make Turkish Delight seem like a damnation-worthy treat.

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1964)

Nowhere captures the imagination quite like Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, full of singing Oompa-Loompas, and great glass elevators, and confections galore. What’s mesmerizing about this particular landscape is that—much like the witch’s house in Hansel and Gretel—the candy that Wonka makes can lead you somewhere very dark indeed. Augustus Gloop nearly drowns in the Chocolate River, Violet Beauregarde becomes a giant blueberry after insisting on trying an experimental three-course dinner gum, Veruca Salt is tossed in the trash after being dubbed a “bad nut” by working squirrels, and Mike Teavee is shrunk to the size of an action figure when he demands to get in on the technology Wonka is developing to send chocolate via television. The ideas in Wonka’s factory are truly bombastic and eye-opening, but it’s a mistake to take them at face value. The biggest tip-off that all that candy might not be worth the effort is Wonka himself, especially as played by Gene Wilder in the 1971 film version (and especially during that vertigo-inducing boat ride sequence…)

 

The Harry Potter Series (1998)

It’s a wonder that Hogwarts students and faculty ever explored the rest of Hogsmeade, when Honeyduke’s shop has everything they could need: “creamy chunks of nougat, shimmering pink squares of coconut ice, fat, honey-coloured toffees”; Fizzing Whizzbees, Pepper Imps, Drooble’s Best Blowing Gum; and, of course, blocks and blocks of chocolate. With its mood-enhancing properties against Dementors, who can blame Harry and co. for stocking up? The only reason to leave Honeyduke’s is to pop over to the Hog’s Head to cap things off with some stomach-warming butterbeer. In the world of Harry Potter, sugar is nothing short of magic.

 

Beneath the Sugar Sky (2018)

Seanan McGuire’s Wayward Children series features countless portal worlds that children stumble and creep their way into—and one of them is called Confection. It takes its role as candy world a bit more seriously than others: The practical application of sugar as infrastructure means a lot of the world is sticky. There’s a sea of strawberry rhubarb soda, which isn’t exactly the most pleasant thing to swim in—unless you’re from Confection, and can breathe the sea. According to our axis of portal worlds, Confection is pretty firmly on the Nonsense end of the spectrum for that reason. It also means that everything is edible, of course, though you might want to pluck cake pops from trees instead of dipping into the dirt. As a portal world, it is both committed to its concept and gleefully disdainful of anything resembling logic, with the world itself reshifting so that any tasty destination is only a day’s walk—very helpful when you’re on an important quest! But beware the dark heart at Confection’s core, and don’t be distracted by all the sugary layers; as one of its intrepid adventurers explains, “Confection is like a jawbreaker. Layers and layers and layers, all stacked on top of each other, going all the way down to the very middle, which is just this hard little ball of rock and sadness. Sort of like your world, only smaller.”

 

Add your sugary picks in the comments!

Originally published in January 2018.

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The cast, writer, and producer of His Dark Materials were at San Diego Comic-Con to talk about the upcoming show after dropping their second trailer, and were happy to answer questions ranging from fun times on set to daemon actors to their love of Pullman’s books in Hall H. Here are a few highlights! (Hint: season two has already been ordered!)

Jack Thorne, the screenwriter (who also did the script for Harry Potter and the Cursed Child) compared adapting material of this popularity and quality to doing a PhD on the original work and the author. Apparently, when he was on airplanes with Ruth Wilson (Mrs Coulter), he’d hand her bit of the scripts as he wrote, and she would give him notes on what she was reading. The whole atmosphere sounds incredibly collaborative, and they have already been given a greenlight for season two.

#HisDarkMaterials Panel: Writer Jack Thorne on book's relevance: "The thing I kept saying is that this is an anti-superhero story…there are people in the story seeking greatness, and other people following their own goodness." #SDCC

— SYFY WIRE @ SDCC (@SYFYWIRE) July 19, 2019

Apparently there were puppeteer actors on set doing the work of the daemons so that the actors would have something to work off of. Wilson said a man named Brian played her monkey. Lin-Manuel Miranda (Lee Scoresby) compared it to playing 3D chess, because all the scenes involved acting and reading one another, but also reading the daemons for motivations.

“I’m a huge fan of the books. When my wife and I started dating, we read these books together…they’re in a really special place in my heart.” – @Lin_Manuel #HisDarkMaterials #SDCC panel

— His Dark Materials (@daemonsanddust) July 19, 2019

Most of the cast were fans of the books before signing on. Miranda heard the title and immediately shouted “yes!”, and James McAvoy (playing Lord Asriel) was cast literally the week they started shooting. He agreed immediately because he loves the story so much: “I’m a total softie in many ways but it’s great fun to play someone who looks at the world and says, ‘I don’t like this, I’m gonna change it, I’m going to rip it down and nothing’s going to get in my way.'” He also noted that the moment Asriel’s daemon settled into a snow leopard he must have realized what a baddass he was, but also that it forced him to play the character more emotionally closed off since leopards are solitary predators.

Dafne Keen (Lyra) was fairly new to the material, however, seeing as the book came out before she was born. She went into great detail about how Lyra spends all of her time absorbing the influence of those around, both for what to do and what not to do.

#HisDarkMaterials producer Jane Tranter on whether the story is anti-religious. "[Pullman] is not attacking belief, he’s not attacking faith or religion or the church per se. It doesn’t equate to any particular church or form or religion in our world." https://t.co/gXgbOeiteh

— James Hibberd (@JamesHibberd) July 19, 2019

Miranda said that he had to film a 3-day bar fight scene, and the crew told him he’d get a vacation after. “I’m here being a cowboy who flies and air balloon and gets into barfights, this is the vacation,” said Miranda. When asked if their were fun moments on set, he admitted that his first scene is him singing a duet with his daemon. So, you know. We can all get ready to die from that.

His Dark Materials is coming.

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The latest trailer for HBO’s His Dark Materials series (based on the eponymous Philip Pullman trilogy) is longer than the last offering, and gives us a better sense of the whole tone of the show. We also get to see the alethiometer much more closely, and get a gorgeous glimpse of Iorek.

Hold onto your daemons, everyone:

His Dark Materials: Season 1 | San Diego Comic Con Trailer | HBO - YouTube

It’s great (and terrifying) to see more of Ruth Wilson’s Mrs Coulter, who finally gives us something to be frightened of with such an alarming ease. We also see more of Dafne Keen as Lyra, and can get a better sense of the scope of the world that’s being built for the show. This supporting cast is phenomenal, and we’re only getting closer to the premiere date, which is set for this fall.

No word on who is voicing Iorek Byrinson yet, though…

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Farscape‘s 20th anniversary panel at San Diego Comic Con was packed to the brim with fans who miss the show. It’s always been beloved, but in recent years there have been more rumors about its potential revival. Everyone seems to be on board, actors and creators included, so what’s the problem?

Well, we might not be waiting too much longer…

Granted, nothing has been inked or signed, but creator Rockne S. O’Bannon and Brian Henson of The Jim Henson Company were on hand to assure fans that they’re still working on reviving the show, and have never stopped. “For a number of years we wanted to continue Farscape in movies,” said Henson, while also noting that any story they wanted to tell couldn’t likely be contained in two hours. So they’re moved back to television in terms of finding a new home for the series.

Amazon Prime Video was hinted as the most likely streaming venue to pick up the show—not surprising given that the entirety of Farscape is now on Prime Video after going without a streaming home for a few years—which begs the question of just how far along in the process they are, but O’Bannon was more direct: “We’re not done with Farscape.”

The audience burst into applause.

Henson: "For a number of years, we wanted to… continue #Farscape in movies." But they can't do it in two hours. But… BUT… they are looking at other formats!
O'Bannon: "WE'RE NOT DONE WITH FARSCAPE." *audience erupts!*#farscapenow #SDCC2019 #LootSDCC

— Loot Crate @ SDCC #229 (@lootcrate) July 18, 2019

It’s good to hear that the creative team has gone back to the idea of television; while it was satisfying to have the series end properly with the Peacekeeper Wars revival, the 4-hour mini-series was pointedly too short to contain the usual layered storytelling that Farscape was known for. Another show (even if it were closer to the more common 13-episode format of today) would be a better way to bring Farscape back to the masses.

Fingers crossed!

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Sci-fi and fantasy authors Leigh Bardugo, author of The Ninth House, and Erin Morgenstern, author of The Night Circus, revealed new details about their upcoming books and TV shows on Thursday afternoon at SDCC ’19.

The two authors also discussed world-building, writing tips, and the inspiration for their latest works in this panel, moderated by NPR Books Editor Petra Mayer.

But first, a surprise for Bardugo!

During the panel, Bardugo was presented with a Comic Con International Inkpot Award for Science Fiction and Fantasy. The Inkpot Awards are given out every year at SDCC, since 1974, and recognize individuals’ contributions in the fields of comics, science fiction/fantasy, film, television, animation, and fandom services. Past Inkpot winners include Rumiko Takahashi, Cory Doctorow, Julie Newmar, and George R.R. Martin.

@LBardugo receiving the Inkpot reward from Comic Con International for Science Fiction and Fantasy!!!!#inkpot #sdcc #leighbardugo pic.twitter.com/eAk8oEljTL

— Book of Cons@#SDCC (@BookofCons) July 18, 2019

Bardugo also talked about the upcoming Shadow and Bone Netflix adaptation, mentioning that the show will be a 50/50 split of Shadow and Bone and Six of Crows. It was also revealed that David Peterson, who worked on the Dothraki language for Game of Thrones, will be working on the languages for Shadow and Bone.

While talking about Morgenstern’s newest novel, The Starless Sea, the author confirmed that this new story will be set in the same universe as The Night Circus. Twitter user @TheGeekiary tweeted that the moderator had asked about an elaborate clock featured in The Starless Sea:

The moderator mentioned an elaborate clock in “The Starless Sea” and asked if it was the same universe as “The Night Circus”. Author Erin Morgenstern said yes. #SDCC

— TheGeekiary (@TheGeekiary) July 18, 2019

Morgenstern also admitted that The Starless Sea was in part inspired by her play-through of the video game Dragon Age: Inquisition, and that she wanted to write a book where different decisions led to different stories. Additionally, Morgenstern sometimes uses tarot cards as inspiration. We’d love to see what her tarot deck looks like!

Erin Morganstern sometimes uses tarot cards when she is writing to get ideas. She made her own tarot deck.#thestarlesssea #thenightcircus #books #sdcc50

— Book of Cons@#SDCC (@BookofCons) July 18, 2019

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If you had any doubts about Henry Cavill’s ability to channel Geralt in Netflix’s upcoming adaptation of The Witcher, then you should probably quell them, because guess what? He beat out 207 other Geralts to get the part. Yes, that’s right. No, that’s not a typo. TWO HUNDRED. AND. FREAKING SEVEN. GERALTS. (!!!)

That’s a whole lotta Geralt. Like, SO MUCH Geralt. Showrunner Lauren Hissrich told Entertainment Weekly on Thursday that the reason for all this Geralt was because Cavill (whom she described as a “huge fan of the process” who’d “read all of the books” and “played all of the games”) had approached her before the scripts were written.

“I met him at the very beginning of the process,” she told EW. “He said, ‘I would love to play this character.’ I said, ‘Henry, you’re amazing, but we haven’t even started thinking about casting yet.’ Then I met 207 other possible Geralts. And I came back to Henry at the end. He was my very first meeting and four months later I called him and asked if he was still interested and he was. The first time I met him I hadn’t even started writing the scripts yet. And once I started writing I couldn’t get Henry’s voice out of my head for the character. Looking at the final product, it’s really exciting. He embodies Geralt in a way that I don’t think anybody else could.”

This isn’t an exaggeration. Hissrich went on to say that Cavill played the part so well apparently that he didn’t even need lines to do it.

“In the first episode, I wrote Geralt with a lot of lines,” she told EW. “Henry shot them all, and in the edit we started pulling some of them out. Henry brings subtitles to this character, finding emotional resonance in small moments, and playing it in such a subtle way that you understand what the character is going through without necessarily having huge chunks of dialogue. By the time we got to episode 108 — the finale of the first season — we didn’t even shoot half the dialogue because we knew there was so much Henry could do with Geralt that didn’t require my words.”

So when will we get to see this magnificent, laconic Geralt in action–say, in trailer form? Hissrich was less forthcoming about that point, revealing only that she “cannot say” but “hope[s] it’s soon.”

Hmmmm. Mysterious! Considering The Witcher has landed a panel in Comic-Con’s fabled Hall H on Friday (set your alarm for 2:15 pm), this will be very soon, indeed.

Whom’st’dve YOU have considered for the other 207 Geralts?

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Linda Hamilton is reprising her role as Sarah Connor in that latest Terminator film, but there was still much more to reveal at San Diego Comic-Con this year. Here’s what went down in Hall H at the Terminator: Dark Fate panel!

James Cameron could not appear in person, as he is hard at work on the Avatar sequels. He recorded a video greeting for fans and said that his only stipulation in the next Terminator film was making sure Arnold Schwarzenegger could return for the film. After selecting the director (Deadpool‘s Tim Miller), he stepped back and let him take over completely. Miller took the stage and let the audience know that Dark Fate was really all “about finishing Linda’s story,” and that the film will explore the consequences of Sarah’s choice to destroy Cyberdyne at the end of T2. There’s only one timeline at work in this film

The first major confirmation of the panel is that John Connor is returning! Edward Furlong will be reprising his role as Sarah’s son, though we’ve got no word on how extensive his role will be.

A R-rating was also confirmed for the film, though there’s little surprise there.

Linda Hamilton says once she stopped looking back she was able to embrace playing the role again #TerminatorDarkFate #SDCC pic.twitter.com/7FUx7R97Pz

— SFX magazine (@SFXmagazine) July 18, 2019

Linda Hamilton arrived to thunderous applause, and said that while people obviously appreciate all the physical training that goes into these roles her real task was exploring the life of a woman who has always been an outsider. Costar Natalie Reyes admitted to being terrified of being out on the Hall H stage, citing the fact that she hadn’t even been born when the first Terminator film came out.

Hamilton praised Miller’s vision as a director and told the crowd that he was loved by the cast. Miller later said that Mackenzie Davis (the new Terminator) worked harder than anyone on the set expect Linda Hamilton. According to Hamilton, “[Davis]’s definitely stronger and younger, but I’m meaner.”

Actor Gabriel Luna said that he and fellow Terminator Arnold Schwarzenegger talked quite frequently on set and became friends. So it was only right for the man himself to finally arrive on the Hall H stage:

Arnold wins $20 on a bet for the most swear words on the #TerminatorDarkFate panel #SDCC pic.twitter.com/bNoj0WAiu2

— SFX magazine (@SFXmagazine) July 18, 2019

Schwarzenegger said that of course he had to come back for this film: “I’m addicted to Terminator.” Apparently, he’s already seen the film, and said he was blown away by it. And the swearing bet referenced above was Arnold betting that director Tim Miller would swear a bunch—he won the bet with ease.

Hamilton also revealed her favorite line from the series, which is (unsurprisingly): “You’re terminated, fucker.” The audience was eventually treated to some footage, but we won’t spoil that for you here!

Terminator: Dark Fate will hit theaters on November 1, 2019.

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When your premium cable network neglects to submit you for consideration in the Emmys, just submit yourself! Or, at least, that’s the lesson learned by Alfie Allen, Gwendoline Christie, and Carice van Houten, who found themselves with a nomination each after sending in their own names (and a $225 entry fee, according to The Hollywood Reporter).

Sweeping the drama category, Allen’s portrayal of Theon Greyjoy got a nod for best supporting actor, Christie’s turn as Brienne of Tarth earned her a best supporting actress nom, while Carice van Houten as Melisandre is nominated for best guest actress, reported THR. That makes 32 nominations in all for Game of Thrones’ final season, including lead actor (Kit Harington) and lead actress (Emilia Clarke), and a slew of supporting actors and actresses, including all three Lannister siblings (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Peter Dinklage, and Lena Headey) and both Stark sisters (Sophie Turner and Maisie Williams).

The other nominations, according to TV Guide, included several nods for Outstanding Directing (David Nutter for “The Last of the Starks,” Miguel Sapochnik for “The Long Night,” and D&D for “The Iron Throne”) and one for Outstanding Writing (David Benioff and D.B. Weiss for “The Iron Throne”).

Speaking of, it turns out D&D will not be attending the Game of Thrones panel at San Diego Comic-Con this year—nor will Miguel Sapochnik, despite their nominations. (Nathalie Emmanuel, aka Missandei, and Iain Glen, aka Jorah Mormont, won’t be there either.) Maisie Williams (Arya) and Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Jaime) will be in attendance, however (along with Bran, Grey Worm, Sam, Davos, and Varys), so if you see them, be sure to congratulate them on their noms!

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