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Some people may not be aware that anyone in Connecticut could receive the wrong medication simply by how the drug's name is spelled. Medicine names are not always very simple, and it is easy to mistake one drug for another just because the word looks similar. According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), similar drug names are a real problem and can cause patients to receive the wrong dosage, strength, formulation or the incorrect drug altogether.

People can mistake medication names in many ways. For example, some people may confuse a drug because it is spelled similarly to the correct drug they need. The error can be as simple as mistaking a word that contains a difference of one, two or a few letters from the name of another drug. Since people may not study the name of a drug closely enough to recognize variances in letters, it is easy to not catch the difference.

Pronunciation can be another issue. Some drugs are pronounced similarly. This can result in a person asking for a drug and receiving a medication that, while it may sound almost exactly the same as the medication the person is looking for, is actually a different drug. This can also be an issue if the person trips over the pronunciation and does not pronounce it correctly, as some drug names may not be easy to speak out loud.

Other instances of medicine confusion can be the result of drugs possessing the same dosage or strength. A person may unwittingly be prescribed a drug with a similar name because that drug is also recommended with the same dosages to other patients. Familiarity with a particular medicine can sway a person's mind toward that drug as he or she seeks out medication. The problem is that the medication the person really needs is not the one the person is thinking of. Conversely, a person may actually need a more popular drug but is provided medicine with a similar name that is not as well known.  

The problem of similar drug names is one the FDA continues to deal with. There are steps health care providers can take to cut down on the risks of medication confusion, including making sure the drug is matched to the patient's current medical condition. Patients are also encouraged to double check their medicines and to ask doctors about similar sounding drugs that may exist.

This article is intended to educate readers on medication errors and is not to be taken as legal advice.

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In most cases, a vaginal birth is recommended for healthy women whose pregnancies are free of complications. However, doctors recommend that some women undergo a Cesarean birth (also known as a c-section). If you're pregnant in Connecticut and wondering which option is best for you and your baby, the March of Dimes offers the following information on common reasons why c-sections are performed.

You're Having Multiple Births

For women pregnant with two or more babies, a c-section is often recommended. This is because birthing multiple babies can be more difficult if one or more babies are out of position. Women pregnant with multiples also have a higher chance of experiencing complications like preeclampsia (high blood pressure that affects only pregnant women) and preterm labor. Depending on these factors, having a c-section may be deemed safer to prevent a serious issue from occurring.

You Have a Chronic Health Condition

You may also be afflicted with a chronic health condition that can impact your ability to have a vaginal birth. For instance, if you have diabetes the birthing process can be a lot more complex, as you may face more potential complications than a person without this condition. In order to mitigate the chance of a risky birth, it may be suggested that you deliver the baby via c-section.

Complications During Birth

Complications can also occur during the birthing process. If a baby is breeched (i.e. with feet facing down) there are risks associated with giving birth vaginally. Your baby may go into fetal heart distress or labor could be progressing too slowly. Should these events occur it's vital that your doctor properly assess the situation to determine the safest possible method of delivery.

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