Loading...

Follow Time-Lapse Systems By Hideaway Studios Group on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

In this video blog, we look at some of the ways in which time-lapse photography has been applied to capture FIFA's World Cup football related content.

After Russia's 5-0 win over Saudi Arabia last night in the 2018 edition's opening game, it seems fitting to explore this historic competition through time-lapse.

Recurring every four years, the FIFA World Cup sees 32 national teams compete over the course of a month.

At the end, the winner gets their hands on the World Cup trophy, made of solid 18 carat gold which was designed by Italian designer, Silvio Gazzaniga. According to Gazzaniga, the sculpture depicts two athletes stretching out to receive the world in their hands at the moment of victory.

As a perfect segue to this, check out this time-lapse by Marcello Barenghi, an Italian artist from Milan who creates hyper-realist 3D illustrations using a combination of paint, pencil, and pen.

Amazing 3D Drawing of FIFA World Cup Trophy - YouTube

We have featured Barenghi's work on our blog before because of the way in which he uses time-lapse to enhance his art, thus blending the two.

From a 3D drawing of the trophy to a 3D print, now. This time-lapse video shows hours of process in just under three minutes of footage. This is perhaps why these kind of videos are a popular application for time-lapse as, like Barenghi's drawing, they enhance every detail of this incredibly intricate creative process.

Of course, the World Cup itself is an incredibly rich event and can be experienced in many different ways.

Like most international sporting events, the World Cup brings people together in celebration of their country's achievements. As this time-lapse video from Kobus Loubser shows, Cape Town, Johannesburg was overflowing with fans celebrating the final between the Netherlands and Spain, hosted by South Africa in 2010.

The video cleverly combines time-lapse and still photography which captures both the collective movements of the crowds, as well as honing in on particular fans during this special 'FIFA Fan Fest.'

Organised by FIFA and their partners, the Fan Fests are public viewing events during which matches are broadcast live from giant LED displays to thousands of football fans. These special screenings take place in various locations across the world and began back in 2006 at the FIFA World Cup in Germany following the success of unofficial public viewing events in South Korea in the 2002 FIFA World Cup in South Korea.

This year's tournament, hosted by Russia, is FIFA's 21st World Cup.

A total of 12 stadiums in 11 Russian cities have been built and renovated for the event. The capital and most populous of these cities is, of course, Moscow.

Москва, Россия | One Day in MOSCOW - Timelapse / Hyperlapse project | City of FIFA 2018 World Cup - YouTube

Pavel Tenyakov's work (above) combines time-lapse and hyperlapse to showcase the stunning architecture of this vibrant city - home of the FIFA 2018 World Cup. The day to night transition also adds a depth to this narrative, proving that this city never sleeps.

FIFA themselves utilise time-lapse in order to document other important events in their football calendar. This video from their FIFATV YouTube channel, for example, documents the construction progress for the FIFA Congress, held at Hallenstadion in 2016.

An important event, where many landmark decisions and reforms were made, time-lapsing preparations for this enabled FIFA to keep publics informed as well as creating a permanent documentation of the preparations that went into this.

Hopefully this small selection of time-lapse videos have helped drum up your excitement for the upcoming games, as well as demonstrate how versatile time-lapse photography is when applied to the capture of (sporting) events.

The post Time-lapsing the World Cup appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It is easy to forget about the vital work that is completed on site before the construction stage of a project can begin. Pre-construction processes such as demolition, however, can be just as fascinating as actual builds can be to capture with time-lapse.

The first phase of transforming a premises into something new can be incredibly important for some companies so time-lapse may be used as a means of permanently documenting this. Indeed, it is a way of preserving the memory of an old structure before it makes way for a new one.
 

Project file #1 - Molson Coors Brewery

Location: Burton-upon-Trent, Staffordshire
Duration: January 2012 to April 2012

Our time-lapse solutions were commissioned to capture the first phase of the radical transformation at Molson Coors' brewery in Burton - the UK's largest brewery. 8,500 tonnes of concrete and 250 tonnes of steel were steadily removed from site in preparation for the construction of a new structure.

Images captured at regular intervals were able to pick up the incremental progress made as the cranes and hydraulic excavators safely and efficiently raised the brewery to the ground.

 

Not all demolition work is the same as it requires different methods depending on the nature of the surrounding environment.

Smaller buildings of only a few storeys high can be pulled down using hydraulic equipment which can undermine a building and determine in which direction that it falls. Larger structures often need something more robust, like a bulldozer or a wrecking ball.

Time-lapse can be applied to capture projects which utilise any method for any duration, providing a HD rendering of such rigorous works.

Of course, demolition does not always take place in an industrial setting and does not always involve large-scale activities. Ormand Oxenham produced this time-lapse video (below) to record the deconstruction of a Lego House!

Demolition of a Lego House - Time Lapse - Vimeo

Time-lapse works in the same way in this relaxed, internal setting as it does on a large-scale construction site. Progress is captured incrementally and is played back at a faster rate so that change is more visible to the human eye.

As part of more professional projects, however, images populate an online viewing portal during demolition, facilitating a 'live' view of site. This enables contractors to fully monitor progress as it happens, with images acting as a valuable source of visual information, thus providing a precise perspective.
 

Project file #2 - 125 Deansgate

Location: Spinningfields, Manchester
Duration: 18 months

An example of our Manchester time-lapse work, we have captured the demolition of the historic Lincoln House, making way for the construction of £45m Grade A office development, 125 Deansgate.

In scenarios like this, where both demolition and construction are being captured for our client, pre-construction works are just as important as it effectively demonstrates the breadth of work on the project from start-up to completion.

125 Deansgate utilised our images and time-lapse extensively across their different platforms in order to drum up publicity and excitement for their upcoming development whilst demolition was ongoing.

 

On completion of these works, the online viewing portal usually provided with a professional time-lapse service also acts as a comprehensive archive of pre-construction.

Available with the time and date of capture, images can be used for posterity, reference and more.

As well as contractors and those responsible for building developments, time-lapse photography is also effective for raising the profile of professional demolition companies, too.

Going, going, gone. pic.twitter.com/vCaWsjrhh6

— forshaw demolition (@ForshawDemo) August 11, 2017

'Then versus now' comparisons, like this one from Forshaw Demolition, easily communicate the logical progression of their work over a period of time. Each image freezes progress and activity at a specific time, making it easier to comprehend and scrutinise such pre-construction works for the complex works that they are.

As you can see from the examples included here, when put together such images form an HD (or even Ultra HD) time-lapse video to be used in a professional capacity. Indeed, as well as being informative, pre-construction works are fascinating processes to watch unfold in the form of a fast-paced visual sequence.

Demolition is a complicated process at any level and as proven here, it is just as extraordinary to watch a structure be taken down as much as it is to watch it go up.

The post Capturing demolition projects with time-lapse appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Typically, works that take place over the course over a few months, or even years, are often large in size and scale.

When applied to the 'BIG' projects, time-lapse provides a compelling document of extensive, long-term works from & across various contexts.

Time-lapse construction

The functions and benefits of a professional time-lapse & site monitoring service are various when documenting construction.

One of the largest sectors of industry in the world, it has become incumbent on contractors to publicly showcase their projects using visually compelling tools that will allow them to stand out among their competitors.

Some construction works can be particularly significant to the changing landscape of a city and so there can be a lot riding on contractors to deliver faultless work. And faultless work requires faultless time-lapse capture.

[caption id="attachment_3803" width="300"] Above: Riverlight construction from across the River Thames.[/caption]

Such was the case for St James' Riverlight project - the first phase of London's major regeneration development, Nine Elms - which we captured on behalf of the Berkeley Group company.

Taking place over the course of six years, from May 2011 to March 2017, the work consisted of several key stages of work, including: demolition of existing warehouse buildings; and the construction of five new residential towers.

Due to the extensive nature of Riverlight as construction work progressed, we had to utilise multiple camera positions to capture a complete account of this important development. This even involved moving the camera system to the other side of the River Thames to capture its final stages.

Of course, time-lapse construction does not refer exclusively to the erection of buildings.

We have also provided time-lapse and video solutions to capture the assembly of other structures including, various sporting & event stadia, railways and theme park rides.

We have extensive experience providing time-lapse for work in all of these sectors, including our recent work at Alton Towers capturing the construction of the UK's first wooden roller coaster in over 20 years.

The Wicker Man, the latest thrill ride at Alton Towers, is made up of 2,000 ft of wooden track and stands at over six storeys high. To provide an optimum perspective of construction from above, we carried out an innovative installation of our camera system onto the Sky Ride - the theme park's cable-car ride.

We combined long-term time-lapse with video to capture the Wicker Man's progress, even remotely increasing capture intervals so that we could record every detail during peak times of activity on site.

Alton Towers utilised our final edit to publicise their new ride online before its grand opening earlier this year.

A keen eye for detail

As well as a wide scope, projects that are big in size and scale involve incredibly rigorous work. In an industrial setting especially, you can expect heavy machinery and numerous personnel carrying out any number of complex manoeuvres.

So how can time-lapse be applied to simultaneously track intricate details and the bigger picture in the same sequence?

[caption id="attachment_872" width="300"] Above: capturing from below - Essar's Regenerator Head replacement.[/caption]

This was a question for our own engineers ahead of capture for Essar at their Stanlow Refinery. This was a truly epic project which involved the replacement of a huge regenerator head as part of £25m worth of refurbishment works.

It was our job to get as close to the action as possible so as to capture the removal and replacement of the regenerator head, as well as document the mobilisation of the many highly skilled professionals using the heaviest and most specialised engineering equipment in the world (which included a crane with a boom of 334 ft, rising to about 40 storeys high) (see feature image).

Combining time-lapse and video over the course of several days, we were able to document each phase of this important process from various angles: some from distance to incorporate the vast height and expanse of the cranes at work, and others which provided a more intimate, close-up look at workers operating heavy-duty equipment from considerable elevations.

Event management

Our involvement with Essar required incredibly specialist, hands-on work. Other projects have involved more stationary time-lapse methods, which we had to micro-manage remotely.

We operated a camera system at the Royal Albert Hall 24/7 for one entire year to create one of our most popular time-lapse videos to date. Despite taking place internally, this was another project of epic proportions, not least in terms of numbers: we captured 390 events and 1.7 million visitors at this extraordinary venue.

With the Hall fully functional all year round, we had to monitor the camera system continually, adjusting particular settings to account for subtle changes in lighting and atmosphere at this lively venue. Even the smallest of details can have a big impact on the overall quality of the final image.

[caption id="attachment_3656" width="300"] Above: de-rigging our time-lapse camera system from the Mary Rose.[/caption]

Another internal project from our portfolio also includes micro-management of sensitive conservations works at the Mary Rose Museum, Portsmouth. Not only was this 'big' in size but given the historic importance of the Mary Rose - Henry VIII's 500-year-old flagship - our work was also contributing in some way to its legacy.

Among the very few allowed access to the ship, we used a specialist rig to carefully mount the camera system; much planning and careful work was needed to carry out the installation so as not to cause any damage to the Mary Rose.
 
Indeed, projects steeped in history, prestige and financial investment can be daunting subjects to capture.

As all of these examples have illustrated, however, there is much to be gained from the unique perspective that time-lapse can bring to a 'big' project.

The post Capturing ‘BIG’ projects with time-lapse appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There is a plethora of content out there on the Internet just waiting to be explored. We bring you some of our favourite time-lapse videos from across the Internet, fresh from the past seven days.

A common but nonetheless compelling application of time-lapse photography to begin with: this video by Louis Raphael tracks the movement of thick morning fog as it descends on the Golden Gate Bridge.

Although fog can be troublesome, when you're watching from the Marin Headlands - or, indeed, viewing this time-lapse video - the stirring power of such elements can be appreciated without constraint.

Weather patterns such as these can be difficult to discern in real time. Time-lapse is an effective tool to capture subtle changes over time. The following video offers a great illustration:

The time-lapse showcases an installation from students at TAFE NSW (Australia's largest vocational education and training provider) as part of Vivid Sydney 2018 - the city's annual festival of light, music, and ideas.

The use of time-lapse really helps to bring out the changes, not only in the visual display, but in the surrounding natural light.

Indeed, time-lapse is also ideal for capturing 'process.' A large-scale creative project involving more than one pair of hands - like the one shown here - shows the finished product coming to life incrementally, which can be fascinating to watch at speed.

But time-lapse can also be used in conjunction with other visual techniques to further enhance a narrative.

Recently we have covered the innovative applications of the latest in 360-degree video technologiesThis video by Creative Action combines both 360-degree technology and time-lapse.

Evocative images and words associated with certain experiences during particular creative engagement classes were drawn onto the internal six sides of a cube and recorded using regular interval photography. The result is an extraordinary, interactive visual representation of a particular creative journey.

May's Full Moon rises behind ancient Temple in Greece - Vimeo

We began this time-lapse round-up with a 'trendy' subject and so it feels fitting to end with one. If you didn't manage to catch the full moon last month, here's a glorious depiction of it brought to you using time-lapse.

Tracking lunar movements can be quite tricky without the right equipment but if you're prepared then you might be able to create something like this. The ancient temple of Poseidon in Cape Sounion, southeast of Athens provides an iconic silhouette to this special moon.

Known as the 'Flower moon', because May is associated with flowers blossoming and blooming at this time of year, time-lapse is an excellent way to capture lunar magic.

The post More time-lapse videos you might’ve missed appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Capturing the world in the same way as we experience it is now easier than ever before with 360-degree video technologies.

Taking photography and video to the next level, this kind of technology has numerous benefits across a broad range of visual genres and commercial sectors.

360° video - what is it?

Recordings that are captured typically using an omnidirectional camera, 360-degree videos present a field of view which covers the entire sphere surrounding the equipment. This is very similar to a panorama but without the need to manually move the camera to capture the content.

Unlike a traditional camera set-up - with a field of view of approximately 100° capturing light as it falls onto the focal point - a 360° camera rig allows for light to be captured from all directions. This widens the field of view massively so that playback becomes a truly immersive experience.

360-degree content can be played back on flat screen displays or on innovative spherical devices. Playback can also be controlled by clicking and dragging the moving image, adjusting the direction of view as desired.

It is hardly surprising that 360-degree videos are becoming increasingly popular commercially, with social media platforms such as Facebook enabling these videos to be viewed via their News Feed function on desktop and mobile devices.

Capturing life in the round

Applications for 360-degree content are various and always evolving.

Perhaps one of the most impressive things about this kind of content is how it seems to be transforming how we capture our experiences of the world.

Travel is a popular subject for photography and video anyway but the ability to capture where you are and what you are doing from all directions simultaneously allows yourself and others to relive the experience in an immersive way.

A photograph offers a snapshot of time but you are limited in terms of what you can see. 360-degree video enables you to view something that is moving without being resigned to a particular field of view. You have the freedom to choose which angle to view the action from.

Of course, bearing witness to an event that is known the world over - like the recent royal wedding of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry at Westminster Abbey, London - may be rare and plausible only for some. A 360-degree video shared by one of the well-wishers lining the streets of Windsor to watch the fairytale carriage procession, enables others to immerse themselves in the pomp and pageantry of this iconic occasion.

Similarly, our own 360 work aboard the Congo River Rapids - the premier water ride at Alton Towers Resort, Staffordshire - lets you experience the fun of swirling currents, twin waterfalls, and a pitch-black tunnel.

The first of its kind to be recorded at the park, Alton Towers shared the video across their various social media channels as an exciting source of exposure for one of their rides.

360° Alton Towers Resort Congo River Rapids footage - YouTube

Indeed, the advent of 360-degree technology is becoming more widely used in professional circles, particularly in advertising. During an age where consumers are constantly being bombarded with ads - on TV, on their computers, on social media - brands need to be able to do something extraordinary in order to gain and maintain attention from their target audience.

The use of 360-degree video by a number of leading brands seem to reverse the logic of advertising to a certain extent. Rather than delivering information as quickly and concisely as possible in a visually impactful way, this emerging medium encourages viewers to spend more time engaging with the ad.

Ford's 'ReRendezvous' campaign for their new Ford Mustang takes viewers on a stunning 360-degree tour around the streets Paris.

A reboot of the classic 1976 cult film, C'était un rendez-vous (It was a Date), the video takes you on a tour of the iconic city and its cobbled streets in a Mustang - a journey that closely replicates the original film.

Where to next?

Indeed, this cutting-edge 360-degree video technology sits at the forefront of innovation and creativity.

As we have written about before, 360 is also enhancing 'virtual reality' gameplay, providing a richer degree of interactivity in virtual environments. Not only useful for the gaming industry, though, applications in areas such as journalism, narrative & educational content are already being trialled.

A thought-provoking example of this kind of educational media can be found in the virtual reality series by The Guardian. In their 360-degree video entitled 'The Party,' you can experience how a birthday party can be a stressful environment for a teenager on the autism spectrum. The visual and auditory effects in the film (you can hear what Layla is thinking and feeling) is based on scientific research about symptoms seen in autistic individuals.

These kind of virtual worlds are not only entertaining, then, but can be incredibly informative when applied in the right way.

With this level of innovation and creativity at our fingertips, there is no doubt that we will be able to experience more and more through virtual means in the future. Who knows where this could lead.

The post 360° video – recent applications and innovations appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

FOR almost two years we provided time-lapse capture of the new Project Capella building at the University of Cambridge, for the UK’s second biggest contractor.

Working with Kier, we provided a fully managed, long-term time-lapse solution for the project – the second largest they have ever undertaken at the university.

Throughout the duration of this major, 17,000 sq ft development – beginning in October 2015 and completing in August 2017 – we captured over 40,000 images using our bespoke camera system overlooking site.

As well as micro-managing the capture to match conditions on site, we provided Kier with the ability to monitor project progress from anywhere in the world, via our dedicated online viewing platform.

And once works were complete, our editing team skillfully arranged the images into the following time-lapse video:

We also carried out more traditional film & video capture on site, for further use by Kier and their subcontractors.

Project Capella is now home to the Cambridge Stem Cell Institute (CSCI), the Milner Therapeutics Institute (MIT) and Cambridge Institute of Therapeutic Immunology and Infectious Diseases (CITIID).

Part of their £2bn+ masterplan, this new facility is but one of the University of Cambridge projects we have been involved with, having also captured the construction of another of the university's science buildings – the new Chemistry of Health Centre – at the same time.

At the time of installation, Project Capella marked the 10th construction site on which we had worked for Kier. Other projects we have captured previously include:

  • A multi-camera system set-up at RAF Lyneham, capturing modular construction of military accommodation for over 1,100 trainees
  • Rail improvements at the Moorgate Station Crossrail site
  • Installation of sewage treatment tanks in Lostock, Bolton
  • Several other educational builds elsewhere in the south of England, including a new Cambridgeshire primary school and a three-storey teaching block at Whitefriars School in Harrow

With even more projects now underway with Kier, we look forward to continuing our partnership with one of the UK’s most recognisable contractors.

The post Capturing new £58m laboratory at Cambridge Biomedical Campus for Kier appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Time-Lapse Trends” is a video blog series which draws attention to some of the many exciting trends in time-lapse production. We feature a new trend in each instalment, to demonstrate the scope of the medium and the various ways in which it is applied, ranging from the popular to the more obscure.

Whether man-powered, propelled by sails or motors, boats can be fascinating vehicles to record with a camera. It is not surprising, then, that they are a popular subject for time-lapse photography.

In many communities located by the water, sailing is not only a hobby but a way of life for some. Recording important boating events can be important to the collective memory of such communities, as this first video illustrates.

Sailboat Ballet - A time lapse of Boston's Community Boating in HD - YouTube

Capturing the high school regatta at Community Boating in Boston, Massachusetts, this time-lapse acts as a kind of moving scrapbook of the day's events. As a result of the accelerated frame rate of 24 frames per second, two hours of sailing can be viewed in under two minutes.

Appropriately named "Sailboat Ballet", the motion of the boats as they make their way around the water course is fascinating; the smooth and steady movements of these boats on video is probably much different to the intense and competitive moves experienced when out on the water.

Smooth waters

In addition to boats as a trend in time-lapse videos, when rendered through this mode of photography boats are often associated with the act of "dancing". Indeed, the way that the Boston boats move around in particular circuits does conjure up images of dancers moving around each other in a choreographed manner.

This sort of graceful movement probably inspired the title for this next time-lapse video, "The Dancing Boats". Shot at the Old Port of Montreal, this panning time-lapse perfectly captures the continuous side-to-side motion of the jetty along with several moored sailboats.

The beauty of time-lapse, in part, comes from its versatility. A change of location and atmosphere can dramatically change the mood of the video but still give the same fascinating rendering of boats on the water.

This video from Liz Dellar takes us to the Murray River in the Port of Echuca, Australia. The river is clouded in low-hanging mist which adds an eery quality to the video, along with the quite unnerving sounds of birdlife which overhangs the time-lapse. Still capturing the boats' seeming gliding motion over the water, but the mist adds an ominous effect to their approach.

Adding a tilt-shift technique to a time-lapse video can also transform a waterfront scene. Nathan Kaso's work makes even the largest boats in Sydney look like toys. In contrast to the seamless motion of the dancing boats above, the tilt-shift in "Toy Boats" exaggerates every movement through a shallow depth of field.

From little boats to big ships

Time-lapse can be applied so as to exaggerate the subtlest of movements but also to capture the most arduous of manoeuvres. The bigger the boat, the bigger their manoeuvres.

Indeed, ships are often used for transporting goods between countries across vast oceans. This stunning 4K time-lapse by Toby Smith captures one such voyage from Ho-Chi Minh, Vietnam, to Ningbo, China.

Tracking a period of night to day, this impressive time-lapse also documents the impressive loading sequences at each port along the way. The complex machinery required to lift, load and unload the heavy freight carried by the Gunhilde Maersk makes for a fascinating subject for time-lapse capture; every phase of these complex manoeuvres stand out.

Here at Time-Lapse Systems, we have done our own fair share of capturing big ships. Not just any big ships, however, but those with an iconic history.

In collaboration with museum media specialists, Motivation 81, we documented sensitive improvement works at the iconic Mary Rose Museum at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

Behind Closed Doors at the Mary Rose Museum - YouTube

The Mary Rose - Henry VIII's flagship - was raised from the Solent in 1982 and has since had to be monitored and carefully preserved in a climate-controlled 'hotbox'. Our camera system helped to time-lapse the final conservation works before her reveal to the public last year.

In a similar way to the museum itself, our video (or any time-lapse featuring boats and ships) helps to preserve the memory, and continue the legacy of the Mary Rose long after its life at sea.

The post Time-Lapse Trends: boats appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The construction of office developments are a popular subject for time-lapse. We consider the benefits.

In big cities especially, new state-of-the-art office builds make up a large percentage of ongoing construction work.

[caption id="attachment_5266" width="300"] Above: Mace's 'Can of Ham' unique office structure punctuating London's high-rise skyline.[/caption]

For a capital city like London, for example, their skyline is changing rapidly. With each new build there is a fierce competition for a place 'amid the UK's undisputed high-rise catwalk.'

Although office expansions are a common investment, each new project comes with its own specificities; perhaps in a bid to stand out.

Like Mace's 'Can of Ham' - a major development we are currently capturing in the heart of London's financial district - its 25mm of curvature and cold-curved glass cladding provides a distinctive contribution to the heavily occupied area.

How is time-lapse suited to these projects?

Versatile in its application, time-lapse photography can bring out the best in each individual project.

High definition images

Whether documenting the external construction, the internal fit-out, or covering several stages of a development, capturing images at regular intervals in high definition can serve many functions for contractors and other stakeholders.

Observing progress made over a period of time can have a remarkable visual impact.

[caption id="attachment_5251" width="300"] Above: an office build in its preliminary stages.[/caption]

[caption id="attachment_5252" width="300"] The finished product in full working capacity.[/caption]

When viewed comparatively, images like these show the essential bare bones of construction which eventually become fully functional office space.

Progress in motion

The true beauty of this medium, though, is that these images have more than one function for construction projects. Typically the hundreds and/ or thousands of images from a completed project are then edited together as part of a time-lapse video which allows you to see progress unfold right in front of you.

MEPC Wellington Place - office build time-lapse - YouTube

As you can see from our time-lapse edit of 10 Wellington Place above, progress of the 3,900 sq ft of Grade A office space takes shape incrementally; that's 12 months of work unfolding in less than two minutes. The first major office development in the city centre of Leeds for five years, this was a big deal for the city and its residents.

Indeed, office expansions are a common investment in the city but are also an important marker of growth. As well as documenting the construction of new builds in an engaging visual way, time-lapse is also valuable to contractors and city councils in terms of publicising such expansions.

Via our interactive remote imaging system (iRis), live images were made available for public view on the contractor's website during the build. In addition, the completed time-lapse video was also made available on the site upon completion of the project.

As this shows, such visual solutions serve a useful intermediary function between contractors, clients, and the wider public.

Time-lapse videos can also affirm the capabilities of contractors in ways that other marketing strategies cannot.

A comprehensive narrative

Time-lapse is not only useful in such ways when capturing the external construction progress of office projects. The internal fit-out can be an equally important phase of overall progress.

Putting together interiors often happen across a shorter length of time than the construction of a building, so an increased rate of capture is crucial when tracking periods of such increased activity. Rapid capture time-lapse does just this, providing a much more detailed documentation across shorter time periods.

In order to gain the most ideal perspective of progress, multiple camera systems may need to be in place so as to capture an all-encompassing perspective. Perhaps one camera moved incrementally is all that is needed. It is also possible to use camera functions to zoom in and highlight particular internal details or zoom out to get the bigger 'finished' picture.

Additionally, for office builds which require both internal and external capture, time-lapse is able to be implemented in combination with other media. Video, for instance, also produces creative variations in terms of camera angle, proximity to the action and a versatility of movement which can all enhance the completed visual narrative of progress.

Our work for Southampton Freight Services - an independent logistics provider - involved a multi-media approach. Documenting the renovation of their headquarters in Hampshire required both time-lapse and video, covering the processes of remodelling, refurbishment and the final move into the new premises.

SFS - Building Our New Home - Time Lapse in Ultra HD - YouTube

Indeed, the combination of techniques made for a dynamic representation of building progress; time-lapse meticulously detailed various elements of labour involved in the fit-out, while the video capture added more of a 'live' overview of progress, showing employees in their new headquarters.

So, time-lapse photography is the ideal tool for capturing, documenting, archiving, publicising, and sharing the construction of office builds.

The post Why time-lapse office builds? appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The term 'natural' world encompasses the world and anything in it that is derived from nature itself. This implies an originality, individuality and authenticity that cannot be disputed.

Photography is a visual medium with which such qualities can be captured; frozen in time so that they may be preserved and studied.

But what happens when such moments are fabricated? And is it easy to spot the difference between a scenario that is natural, and one that only claims to be?

Faking it?

Such was the case recently when the winning entry in the 'Wildlife Photographer of the Year' competition was disqualified for allegedly featuring a fake animal. Marcio Cabral's entry, 'The Night Raider', shows a nighttime scene featuring an anteater moving towards a termite mound in in Emas National Park, Brazil.

The Natural History Museum investigated the entry following a number of concerns raised by others. The anteater - pose, markings & all - bears a striking resemblance to the taxidermy model on display at the entrance to the visitor's centre on the reserve. Cabral persists that his photograph is the 'serendipitous' encounter that he first claimed it to be.

A similar instance occurred in 2009 when Jose Luis Rodriguez was stripped of his 'Photographer of the Year' title after it was thought he had used a well-known domesticated wolf from a zoological park near Madrid to pose for the image. Rodriguez's photograph, which shows a wolf in mid-jump over a wooden gate, has since been dubbed 'the storybook wolf'.

Mark Cowardine, a judge for the competition, expresses his disappointment: "This is very sad and I think it might make us more suspicious of entries that are too good to be true."

Image manipulation

Of course, this is not just an issue relevant only to the natural world. Images can have a powerful effect on how we see the world, but in the age of "fake news" and evolving photographic technologies, it is becoming increasingly difficult to verify genuine images.

This can be very serious where humans are concerned. In the realm of politics and other global affairs, for example, certain images can carry very grave consequences. Fake images may be used for propaganda, to discredit someone, to influence opinion, and could even inspire drastic actions in certain circumstances.

The practice of photo manipulation has become so widespread that there is now a need for experts in image verification. But this is nothing new to our time, with recorded instances of image manipulation dating back years. It is, however, becoming even easier to achieve convincing results using post production software.

Depending on how this is applied and what are the intended uses, image manipulation has evolved into an art form and even developed as a signature style for some photographic artists. For these ten artists, for example, their work has been used by high profile advertisers as a clever means of telling stories about certain products and their brand.

This digital artistry bends reality to create certain surreal effects. This creates a fine line between what is real and what is fantasy but in contexts where credibility does not rest on how best to portray reality (like the 'Wildlife Photographer of the Year' competition does), photo manipulation can be a fun and inspiring practice.

Take these animal manipulations, for instance; their qualities are based on purely natural sources but are blended together in interesting ways to create some extraordinary images.

Au naturel

Despite these recent digital developments, photography in its purest form remains an enduring art form.

Images are a vital part of validating what we say and what we experience in our culture.

Additionally, as we have covered previously, there are also certain moments for which photography - whether planned or not - can open up new, maybe even quite bizarre, layers of meaning beneath the surface of a particular situation.

Although evolving technologies and the development of new techniques presents new complications, this also extends the potential of photography to wow and amaze us. The value of this medium, therefore, cannot be underestimated.

The post Capturing the ‘natural’ world on camera appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

New developments in the unmanned aerial vehicle world will potentially make flying drones safer.

We have previously touched on the advantages that drones can bring to the retail industry.

The latest developments from the UK air traffic control service (NATS) could help to make this more of a reality. Working in partnership with Altitude Angel to create an automated UK drone-tracking system, drones and passegners planes may soon fly along safer routes, providing a better visual of all vehicles & their intended paths.

Such innovations will allow commercial operators to fly drones over much longer distances and the technology could be trialled as early as the end of this year.

[caption id="attachment_5223" width="300"] Above: drones could completely change the way that some retailers deliver their goods.[/caption]

Global retailers such as Amazon have already envisioned using drone-based deliveries to revolutionise their services. UAVs that are able to fly beyond the pilot's line of sight - which they are restricted to by law - could vastly expand the logistics of goods deliveries.

As Dr Ravi Vaidyanarhan, from Imperial College London, argues: "Drones flying beyond line of sight would be a very big deal - the scope of operations just changes dramatically.

"One could argue that if a drone has to be limited to being within line of sight, as at present, then it's probably easier to drop the package off yourself."

Better tracking systems for drones would certainly help to allay some fears that this kind of aerial technology often precipitates. Arguably laws that restrict when and where unmanned vehicles can be flown are to prevent collisions and breaches of privacy.

Accidents do happen. Recently a drone owner in the US was charged with starting a forrest fire which destroyed 300 acres of grassland in Kendrick Park, Arizona. The fire reportedly began after the drone caught fire following a crash-landing, quickly igniting dry grass in the area.

But when operated safely and within a regulated environment, unmanned aerial vehicles have the potential to revolutionise certain sectors of business. Professional companies now offer safe, regulated drone capture services.

The sector where drone use is considered to be most revolutionary is construction.

The ways in which UAVs are put to use in this line of work demonstrate that these are thought more highly of than just high-tech toys. Drones are sophisticated devices, allowing contractors to carry out surveys, inspections, and other tasks which mean that staff are kept away from potentially dangerous areas.

Additionally, up-to-date images and data provided by cameras affixed to drones can also improve communication and collaboration between various parties involved with a particular project, whether on or off site.

Utilising drones and cameras allows for images with greater perspective on a subject. This can offer a wider variety of angles and help to create more dynamic mediated narratives.

In the event & leisure industries, drone footage is increasingly used for marketing purposes. Take this exclusive first look at the Wicker Man, for example, the newest roller coaster at Alton Towers Resort.


A drone was able to capture from angles that would not have been so easily accessible. The sweeping movements over and around the Wicker Man are made simple using such aerial technology. A unique perspective of the ride is offered that would not otherwise have been seen by human eyes, even those riding the new roller coaster.

 
Despite some operational complications, then, it is clear to see from this handful of examples that drones continue to contribute to various sectors in many respects, especially creatively and logistically.

The post What’s new with drones? appeared first on Time-Lapse Systems by Hideaway Studios Group.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview