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When a teen misuses anything such as food, alcohol, or drugs to cover up emotions or produce a certain positive feeling, it can be a challenge when that substance is removed. The mind and body of an adolescent are still developing, and impulse drives are often more difficult to control. 

Where there has been plenty of study about the effects of drug and alcohol abuse on adolescents, not as much as been done on eating disorders early in life. One recent animal study seems to show that adolescent binge eating could produce greater vulnerability to alcoholism. 

Study Reveals Possible Link Between Teen Binge Eating and Alcoholism

An animal study by researchers at Oregon Health and Science University reviewed the behavior of 116 male mice. The mice were trained to have a binge eating disorder (BED) and then forced to abstain from that behavior for a period of two weeks. The mice also had access to alcohol as part of their regular diet. 

The results were recently published in PLoS. Once deprived of the binge eating activity, the mice began consuming six percent more alcohol than they did before. This behavior suggests that the animals were switching from one addictive behavior to another. 

The researchers believe that these results could be due to the changes taking place in a developing adolescent's brain. When a person binge eats, it can increase his or her basal corticosterone levels as well as change the body's sensitivity to feel-good neurotransmitters such as dopamine. 

Teenagers and Binge Eating Disorder

Binge eating disorder among teens is a serious condition that can have a number of causes. The disorder is characterized by consuming large quantities of food within a two-hour period, whether the person is hungry or not. Eating disorders affect both females and males and have roots that can be both emotional and physical. 

Some eating disorders are preceded by traumatic events. PTSD is a disorder that is closely linked to BED, where roughly 25 percent of teens who binge eat also have PTSD. The condition can also be caused by physical and genetic issues. Teens undergo sometimes drastic hormonal changes that can awaken a BED. Studies show that a teen with a family member who has a BED are twice as likely to have the disorder as well. 

Binge eating and alcoholism are often co-occurring disorders.

Why Binge Eating and Alcoholism Often Co-Occur

Many studies now conclude that BED and alcoholism are co-occurring disorders. One study concluded that pre-adolescent dieting was a predictor of future alcohol use. Another study suggests that both alcohol addiction and an eating disorder are related to atypical endogenous opioid activity, which is a proven determinant of both alcohol and food consumption. 

Because many people who suffer from these disorders also have other underlying conditions such as PTSD, anxiety, and depression, it is crucial that all of these disorders are treated simultaneously. At The Recovery Village, you will receive the therapeutic, medical, and psychiatric care you need to treat your BED, alcohol addiction, and other underlying conditions. 

Contact us now to speak with one of our addiction specialists about our comprehensive substance abuse rehab that includes co-occurring disorder treatment.


The post Teen Binge Eating and Alcoholism: Is There a Connection? appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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There are many misconceptions about interventions, and one is that these meetings with an addicted loved one are a last resort. The truth is that a drug or alcohol intervention is one of the best ways to facilitate communication with someone who has a substance use disorder.

It can be difficult to reach a person who has become dependent on alcohol or drugs, and denial is a primary characteristic of this disease. While an intervention can help break through that denial, these meetings can also backfire if handled poorly. If you are concerned about the health and welfare of a loved one, there are some particular dos and don’ts of a successful intervention.

DO make a plan. When you decide that you want to hold an intervention, doing so later that day could be a mistake. The more time and effort you put into planning your intervention, the greater your chances of success.

DO ask for help. An intervention can be a highly-charged emotional situation. Not everyone is equipped to handle the inevitable objections that will come from someone who is addicted to drugs or alcohol. You may get the best results if you enlist the help of an addiction professional or a certified interventionist.

DO remain calm. It is okay to give examples of hurtful and destructive behavior, but you should always remain calm when speaking during an intervention. Let your loved one know that you only wish for him or her to get better.

DO offer solutions. Speak about addiction as being a disease as opposed to a behavioral issue. Let your loved one know that there is addiction treatment available and give him or her a way to access that care immediately.

DON’T approach an addict when he or she is high. This may seem like a tall order when it comes to a loved one with a substance use disorder, but you will need to make a plan. Find the time of day when your loved one will be most lucid and coherent and schedule the intervention during that period.

DON’T be judgmental. The list of what not to say during an intervention is fairly long. You should avoid telling addicts that the way they are living their life is “wrong,” reminding them of their failures, or resorting to name-calling. None of these are productive and are sure to push your loved ones further away.

DON’T enable or allow excuses. Many people are able to stretch out their drug and alcohol use for years courtesy of excuses and the enabling behavior of family and friends. It is time for this to stop. Not only should you not accept excuses from an addict but you should also avoid making any on his or her behalf.

A drug or alcohol intervention can be emotionally exhausting for all involved, but it might be the only thing that works to convince the addict in your life to seek help. When planned and executed carefully, many of these meetings end with the agreement to get addiction treatment help.

At The Recovery Village, we offer comprehensive and holistic substance abuse treatment programs that are tailored to meet the needs of each client. Contact us to learn more about admissions and our various programs before you schedule the intervention with your loved one.

The post Dos and Don’ts of a Successful Intervention appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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Take a glance around. Maybe you’re at a coffee shop and you see a group of friends discussing their last few days. Maybe you’re at a school and notice parents dropping off their children out front. You could be at work, in the breakroom and surrounded by colleagues. No matter where you, chances are at at least one person in your presence suffers from a mental health disorder. That’s the reality of this heartbreaking struggle for so many people, who so often have difficulty discussing their burdens and finding peace with themselves. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, around 1 in 5 Americans struggle with a mental health disorder. This equates to nearly 44 million people, which is a healthy chunk of the 325 million in the U.S. As this statistic has surfaced, many celebrities and prominent figures within pop culture have attempted to destigmatize these disorders. Oftentimes these well-known and loved actors and actresses, musicians, and business people reveal their internal struggles — whether it be depression or anxiety, sometimes connected to a substance use disorder — to help other cope with their issues. Another group that has stepped up: professional athletes. Physical strength is almost always a required trait for anyone who makes a living playing basketball, baseball, football, soccer or any other competitive sport. That can cause people to assume that professional athletes are also strong-willed, able to withstand the pressures associated with their jobs and celebrity status. Despite this assumption, athletes are also susceptible to depression, anxiety and other forms of mental health struggles. A few well-known American athletes have helped destigmatize mental health disorders simply by going public with their internal obstacles. These athletic heroes have helped raise awareness about the prevalence of these diseases by admitting personal struggles. Demar DeRozan DeRozan, an all-star basketball player for the Toronto Raptors, opened up in early 2018 about his personal struggles with depression and anxiety. In a Twitter post, he said, “This depression get the best of me.” DeRozan was quoting a lyric from a song called “Tomorrow,” by artist Kevin Gates. Still, his message was intentional. He later opened up to The Toronto Star about his personal trials, and those of other professional athletes. “It’s one of them things that no matter how indestructible we look like we are, we’re all human at the end of the day,” DeRozan told the newspaper. “We all got feelings … all of that. Sometimes … it gets the best of you, where times everything in the whole world’s on top of you.” Michael Phelps The most accomplished Olympic athlete of all time, Phelps has won 28 medals as an American swimmer. However, soon after his retirement in 2016, he opened up about his battles with depression. Phelps told USA Today in 2017 that he contemplated suicide following his 2014 DUI arrest, his second one. He added, “I didn’t want to see another day.” When he finally faced his issues, attending therapy and relying on “a life-saving support group,” he became mentally healthier and able to rebound from the setback. “Once I started talking about my struggles outside the pool, the healthier I felt,” he said. “Now I have kids and adults come up to me and say they were able to open up because I was open about my life.” Imani Boyette The Atlanta Dream women’s basketball player first attempted suicide at age 10, and tried twice more, she told USA Today. She suffers from clinically diagnosed severe depression, which she attributes to her childhood experiences being sexually abused and her genetics. When talking about her struggles, Boyette explains why so many people with depression are concerned about opening up to others about their issues. “You feel like because you’re not happy — when you should be happy — that you’re hurting people around you and a burden,” she said to the publication. “At a certain point, it just gets easier to shut up because people get sick of hearing you’re not OK when you’re not sick on the outside.” Since her darkest times, Boyette has emerged as one of the loudest voices speaking out about mental illness and its connection to sexual abuse. “If I don’t talk about it, don’t that make me as bad as him?” she said to The Chicago Tribune. “In my entire teenage life, all of that (that happened) was because I couldn’t talk. I couldn’t express what was inside of me. I was silent for too long to shut up now. Brandon Marshall A veteran NFL wide receiver for numerous teams, Marshall has accumulated hundreds of catches, thousands of yards and quite a few touchdowns in his career. He’s been tackled thousands of times, suffered injuries and is likely to have played through physical pain quite often. Yet, he wants everyone to know that the gladiators that make up this sport are not bulletproof. Marshall has been diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and stayed at McLean Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, for three months in 2011. Finding a reason for his feelings and struggles made accepting it and coping with the disease much easier for Marshall. “When I first heard the term ‘mental health,’ the first thing that came to mind was mental toughness,” he said in a self-written article on The Players’ Tribute. “Masking pain. Hiding it. Keeping it inside. That had been embedded in me since I was a kid.” He and his wife Michi founded an organization, Project 375, that attempts to eliminate the stigma surrounding mental health by raising awareness about the associated illnesses. Allison Schmitt An Olympic gold medalist in swimming, Schmitt was already a decorated international athlete when she began facing her internal struggles. As recently as 2015, she was suffering from depression but hadn’t opened up about it. Sharing her experiences with others was a major obstacle for Schmitt, who was always taught to be strong and persevere through pain. She believed that through her swimming competitions and training that physical pain could be defeated. The mental challenge — depression, which she calls “the invisible illness” — made her feel vulnerable. “I didn’t want to complain, because I knew I was lucky, and I knew I was in a spot where not many people get to be,” she told Women’s Health. “And I didn’t understand why I would be feeling like that. I always thought that people who struggled had a traumatic event that happened to them or they had a reason to struggle. I had a picture-perfect life.” Schmitt has since returned to school to pursue a social work degree with hopes of helping athletes who struggle with mental health disorders. She also has spent her free time beyond swimming attending events and speaking about mental illness at schools, conferences and on social media. The Recovery Village wants to help those who struggle with a mental illness alongside substance abuse. Disorders such as anxiety or depression are often related to, or the cause of, an addiction to drugs or alcohol. With rehabilitation facilities across the country, The Recovery Village has the staff and resources to help treat substance use disorders along with co-occurring mental health disorders. Raising awareness about how common these illnesses are is one of the first steps to helping people become more comfortable seeking assistance with their struggles.

The post Popular Professional Athletes Who Have Helped Destigmatize Mental Health Disorders appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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“That person is funnier than I am.” “That person is smarter and better at their job than me.” “My crush likes someone else. They’re more desirable than I am.” “I want that person’s life. They seem happy.” Does this sound like someone you know? I know it sounds like someone I know pretty well: me. Too often I struggle with a recurring issue, a tendency to compare myself to other people. These mostly internalized thoughts are the root of a lot of my own anxieties, which at times lead to bouts with depression. These falling dominoes bring an additional risk: Any time anxiety or depression is in play, there is a risk of substance misuse as a quick-fix cure to these exhausting thoughts. My burden is that I’m constantly unsure about whether or not I’m accepted by others — an irrational fear that borders on delusion — along with the question of how my life compares to other people’s lives. “Am I as funny as (insert person’s name here)?” is one such question. You can even swap out “funny” for any other positive attribute and I’ve surely asked myself that as well. It all circles back to the general question of, “Am I liked/respected/loved?” This is one of the main symptoms of social anxiety disorder. I hate these feelings. I hate comparing myself to other people. I hate that little voice — as one friend describes it — nagging at me every day, or even every hour.  That voice can make me question every decision I’ve ever made in my life. It can make me unsure of my friendships, my relationships, my employment, and my overall status in life. That voice results in “the grass is always greener on the other side” thinking, and I have difficulty getting around it. Concentrating on routine daily tasks such as household chores or eating a regular meal can become more difficult. Maintaining close relationships, even with a spouse or family members, is a challenge. Social anxiety and depression can be debilitating, and these comparisons are so often the root cause of why I sometimes struggle to even force a smile on my face. However, I recently learned something. It wasn’t surprising, but it was definitely revealing. A lot of people do this. Maybe not to the same extent or with the same debilitating outcome as me, but I believe that most have negatively compared themselves to others. So many people struggle with self-esteem and confidence in this way, and a lot of people let these thoughts take complete control of their minds and sink them into a dark hole of depression. It’s happened to me, on numerous occasions. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, around 40 million adults in the United States — nearly 20 percent of the population — struggle with an anxiety disorder. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, around 12 percent of Americans suffer from a social anxiety disorder at some point during their lives. However, that number can be misleading, as many people struggle in silence. A lot of people rely on drugs or alcohol as a way to self-medicate. Even if rehabilitation is an option, these comparisons will persist during a person’s recovery. Co-occurring disorders such as social anxiety are often the cause of a substance use disorder, and programs such as those offered at The Recovery Village work to identify these issues and help people cope with their burdens in a healthier manner. Making these comparisons to others is part of being human, because human beings have a natural tendency to become jealous of one another. We’re jealous of our friend who gets the attention of our secret crush. We’re jealous of our co-worker who won the esteemed award. Married people could be jealous of the person who is single and has a metaphorically empty life plate, ready to be filled by anything they want. Single people can be jealous of those who are married and have found love, commitment and comfort within a family of their own. People too often want what others have and forget what they have. That’s not just a me thing, or a you thing. That’s an everyone thing. The issue isn’t immediately solved, though. There will always be moments of struggling with these anxieties and moments of low self-esteem. However, knowing that you’re not isolated is a huge weight off anyone’s shoulders. No one is alone. In fact, a lot more people are in this with you than you might have realized. I have also realized some other ways to cope with these issues through my own trials and with the advice of friends: 1. Make a list of every positive quality you have. You could write down anything from your personality traits to professional achievements. There is no limit, either. Write down all the relationships with your friends, family members and colleagues. And this list can grow. Make a note of every person who has reached out to talk with you, who has wanted to make plans. Mention every compliment you’ve received from someone. Even write down small victories like a great meal you made or cleaning the entire house. Accomplishments are a great way to allow yourself to have self-pride. Steps like seeking help or reaching a milestone in sobriety are major accomplishments and worthy of a mention on the list. 2. Remind yourself that negative thoughts aren’t reality. Reach out to close friends or family members to remind you that your negative thoughts aren’t reality and don’t define you. Telling yourself over and over what you need to hear can get old — and eventually your own voice can lose its impact. Other people can have a powerful positive effect. 3. Go do what you love to do. Anxiety and depression can cause people to feel unmotivated. Depression can make you not want to get out of bed, much less go outside. Put one foot in front of the other and do something you enjoy. It’s a good way to pull yourself out of your own insecurities. Focusing on your passions is also a good coping strategy to continue your recovery after rehab, and if a substance use disorder is connected to a co-occurring one, enjoying activities can have an impact for both. Relying on friends or family members can be beneficial, but a balance is important. 4. Remember that you’re not alone. In fact, you’re trying to go through life with these burdens just like nearly everyone else. Another coping mechanism, going a step further: While you’re comparing yourself to other people, be aware that someone and possibly multiple people are comparing themselves to you. Recognizing this fact is another great way to take stock in the value of what you have, instead of yearning for what someone else has More than anything, remember that list of your positive qualities. Make it. Read it. Add to it. That list is every reason why you’re better than that voice says you are, and it’s every reason why so many people care for you. They don’t love you because you can become someone else; they love you for you, exactly as you are.

The post Loving Yourself More: Coping With Comparisons to Others appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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Other Side of the Line: She started using drugs at 9! - YouTube
When you call The Recovery Village, someone like Stephanie may be on the other end of the line. She’s a firm believer in addiction treatment and a passionate ally for people who want to get help. Every day, Stephanie helps people realize the truth about their addiction, and themselves, so that they can embrace the transformative power of recovery. However, Stephanie hasn’t always been the beacon of hope that she is today. The Downward Spiral of Addiction When Stephanie was nine years old, she tried marijuana for the first time. At 15, she started drinking alcohol regularly, and at 18 years old, crack cocaine was her drug of choice. “Everything on the outside looked OK, but  my secret double life was raging out of control,” Stephanie said of her early struggle with addiction. By age 26, Stephanie had undergone medical detox treatment seven separate times but was unsuccessful in maintaining her sobriety. She was addicted to opiates, among other drugs, and was slowly realizing that her substance use disorder was beyond her control. “I knew I was chained to this disease … during this time my husband asked me to leave the family, and I was so intoxicated I was hit by a car crossing a busy street. My life was spiraling downhill fast,” Stephanie recalled. In September 2013, Stephanie checked in to detox for the eighth, and final, time. She knew this was her last shot, and to save her life, she would need to commit to more treatment programs than one. “I begged for help other than just detox. I wanted inpatient treatment, something I had never done,” Stephanie said. She went on to successfully complete detox, inpatient treatment and aftercare programming in a sober living home. “My sobriety date is October third, 2013, from all mind-altering substances,” Stephanie said with a proud smile. Want to calculate your sobriety date? Use The Recovery Village’s sobriety calculator. Being Someone Who Understands When she was lost in addiction, Stephanie just wanted to be heard. Her memory of feeling desperate and hopeless drives her passion for connecting people to treatment every day at The Recovery Village. “I felt like nobody understood, so it’s good to be able to say, ‘I do, I understand.’” Stephanie ensures other people that help is real and recovery is possible, no matter how dark their situation may seem. “My job as an intake coordinator is to help these clients see that there is light after the darkness, that we do recover,” she said. “I love being a part of each person’s journey, even … just to be there and listen and share my experience, strength and hope with people who think there is no way out, like I did.” Stephanie fought hard to overcome her drug addiction, and today, she helps other people do the same. A Message From Stephanie, to You Stephanie knows that a meaningful, drug-free life is possible through treatment. If you struggle with a drug or alcohol addiction, she has some advice for you: “Realize that this way of life is not working for you. Reach out to a rehab facility and give yourself a chance. I didn’t believe I could do it but I did, and you can, too. I don’t care how many drugs you have done or how much you drink, there’s still a chance to get better and start a new life, and we’re here to help you fight at The Recovery Village. You’re not a bad person, you’re a sick person. When people are sick, they go to the hospital, and that’s what treatment is for people who struggle with addiction. It’s time to go get your treatment and get better.” Want to Speak With Someone Like Stephanie? If you’re ready to overcome addiction, call The Recovery Village at 352.771.2700 today. You’ll be connected to a compassionate individual (like Stephanie) who understands addiction, can answer your questions about rehab and can help you find a treatment center and program that meets your needs. Hear More Stories Like Stephanie’s Stephanie is one of the many dedicated people who are on the other end of the line when you call The Recovery Village. Hear the stories of other call center representatives, clinicians and numerous others who make recovery care possible every day in our YouTube series, The Other Side of the Line. Subscribe to our youtube channel for new content weekly!

The post Stephanie Bolin-Rivera: A Voice of Hope on the Other End of the Line appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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When a person has an opioid use disorder, he or she might end up in the emergency room for a variety of reasons. If abusing prescription opioids, doctor shopping for another source of the medication is one possibility. There are also health risks associated with opioid addiction, one of the most serious of which is an overdose. These health risks may land a person in the emergency department.

Turning these patients away or giving them minimal care are both possibilities, but they may not be the right choice. One recent study concludes that the emergency department (ED) might be one of the most cost-effective places to begin opioid addiction treatment. 

The Rise in ED Visits Related to Opioid Use

Between 2005 and 2014, there was a 99.4 percent increase in opioid-related visits to the ED. Over this same period, there was also a 64.1 percent increase in ED visits that resulted in inpatient hospital stays. Currently, just 10 percent of the people who need addiction treatment services are receiving that care. Yet, the ED might be one of the best places to initiate care because so many people with opioid use disorder are walking through the doors.

EDs are limited in the number of opioids that they can administer to patients (one day's medication for up to 72 hours) to relieve withdrawal symptoms as a patient arranges for treatment. However, an ED may be the best place to begin cost-effective addiction treatment with rapid referrals and outreach.

Study Reveals Cost-Effectiveness of ED Opioid Addiction Treatment

A study released by Yale researchers and published in the journal Addiction concludes that buprenorphine is the most cost-effective treatment for patients who are seen in the ED for opioid-related matters. 

Researchers studied the results of ED patients who were either given buprenorphine and a referral for ongoing treatment or just a brief intervention in the ED with a standard referral for treatment. The study concluded that buprenorphine was more effective in engaging patients as well as a more cost-effective addiction treatment. 

The cost of buprenorphine treatment was an average of $1,752. This is compared to $1,805 for a brief intervention and a referral that costs an average of $1,977. The buprenorphine group was found to be twice as likely to enroll in an addiction treatment program. They also used fewer opioids within 30 days of the ED visit than the other two groups. 

Buprenorphine and Opioid Addiction Treatment

Buprenorphine is a long-acting opioid medication that has uses for pain management as well as the treatment of opioid use disorder. When buprenorphine is used as opioid addiction treatment, it plays a role in managing withdrawal symptoms as well as the strong cravings that can come with these powerful drugs. 

Buprenorphine is one of the drugs most used in medication-assisted therapy (MAT) for opioid use disorder. The drug still interacts on the brain's opioid receptors but has a built-in ceiling that prevents a high and abuse. It also has the benefit of blocking other interactions on the brain. Most patients will use MAT until they can be gradually and safely weaned off of opioids entirely. 

If you or any of your loved ones are struggling with opioid addiction, The Recovery Village can help with its comprehensive addiction treatment programs that include MAT, the rehab program that best suits your needs, and aftercare. Contact us now to speak with someone about admissions and discuss your options for an addiction treatment program that will help you break free from opioids. 


The post Opioid Addiction Treatment: ERs on the Frontlines appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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Each week, Inside Addiction recaps timely stories and topics related to substance use and mental health disorders. Here are the top news headlines for the week of July 13, 2018. Amid Opioid Crisis, Meth an Overlooked Problem in U.S.

While the opioid epidemic ravages communities across the United States, methamphetamine has quietly increased in popularity nationwide. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American deaths from stimulants like meth rose by more than 250 percent from 2005 to 2015. In recent years, Mexican cartels have shipped liquid forms of meth into the United States, causing the widespread re-emergence of the drug. [The Herald-Mail]

Minorities Experience High Levels of Mental Illness, Rarely Seek Treatment

July is Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. Despite experiencing higher rates of mental illness, minority college students are less likely than white students to seek mental health treatment, according to a new study by Boston University. More specifically, minority Arab and Arab-American students experience the highest levels of mental illness yet are the least educated about mental health problems. Also, Asian students are the least likely to believe that they need mental health treatment. [The Boston Globe]

Pain Patients Ask FDA to Ease Their Access to Opioids

On July 9, the Food and Drug Administration listened as people spoke about their chronic pain and difficulties accessing enough medications to ease their discomfort. Many states have put a limit on opioid prescriptions to last for less than a week. As a result, chronic pain patients are often denied sufficient amounts of opioids needed to alleviate their pain. The FDA hopes to find a way to cater to the needs of chronic pain patients and also put an end to overprescribing practices that have contributed to the opioid epidemic. [NBC News]

Georgia Woman Donating Dogs to Veterans with PTSD

Bev Beres breeds German Shepherds in Georgia. For every puppy born, at least one will be donated to a veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Beres recently donated a dog to a Colorado veteran who developed PTSD after years of service. According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, dogs can provide companionship, offer emotional support and reduce stress in veterans with PTSD. [KUSA]

CDC Director: Opioid Crisis Deadlier Than AIDS Epidemic

Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said that the opioid epidemic is the public health crisis of our time. He also said that painkiller misuse has been deadlier than the AIDS epedemic, which occurred in the 1980s and 1990s. According to the CDC, 115 Americans die each day from an opioid-related overdose. [The Washington Times]

The Look of Depression: Young Woman’s Message Goes Viral

In an effort to demonstrate the realities of depression, an Indiana woman snapped a photo of a batch of clean dishes on her kitchen countertop and uploaded it to Facebook. She said that the picture shows what depression looks like. She was referring not to the clean dishes, but to the fact that they were once dirty dishes that depression kept her from cleaning. As she explained, depression can make normal tasks, like washing dishes, daunting. Since June 30, the post has been shared more than 200,000 times. [TODAY]

Inhaling Heroin Can Cause Brain Damage

New research shows that smoking heroin can cause holes in the brain to form. Also known as “chasing the dragon,” inhaling heroin creates an intense high similar to that of snorting the drug. However, this activity can result in the development of holes in the brain’s white matter, preventing brain cells from communicating with one another. When this happens, verbal communication problems, coma or seizures can occur. [Newsweek]

About 200 Prescription Drugs Can Cause Depression

A new study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association shows that about 200 prescription drugs list depression as a side effect. These drugs include prescription-strength ibuprofen, emergency contraceptives and anticonvulsants like gabapentin. According to the study, more than one-third of Americans take at least one prescription drug that can induce depressive symptoms, and people who use these substances have higher rates of depression. [The New York Times]

Adderall Does Not Help College Students Study

Many college students misuse the stimulant Adderall to stay up late to study for a test or to increase concentration. However, a joint study by the University of Rhode Island and Brown University found that healthy people who use Adderall without prescription can experience memory problems. The study also indicated that Adderall does not enhance reading concentration, but the drug can improve a person’s ability to pay attention. [Rhode Island Public Radio]

Living in Areas with Less Sunlight Can Lead to OCD

A report by Binghamton University in New York found that people who live at high latitudes are at an increased risk of developing or exacerbating symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) because they are exposed to less sunlight. These individuals often fall asleep later than desired and sleep in late, which disrupts their sleep-wake cycle. The study showed that individuals living in areas with less sunlight also have higher lifetime rates of OCD when compared with people in areas with more sunlight. [ScienceDaily]

Addiction and mental illness are common disorders in the United States. If you are experiencing substance use or mental health problems, it is important to seek treatment. The Recovery Village offers evidence-based treatment approaches for people dealing with co-occurring disorders. Call The Recovery Village to learn more about how treatment can help you heal.

The post July 13, 2018: What You Need to Know About Addiction and Mental Health appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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Not everyone walks into an addiction treatment center ready to make a change. This is completely understandable since alcohol and drugs can take so much from an addict, including the ability to make healthy choices. One way that addiction professionals help clients shift these views is through a treatment called motivational interviewing. 

What is Motivational Interviewing?

What is Motivational Interviewing? 

Motivational interviewing is a form of psychotherapy aimed at targeting your motivations to change. The methods will explore the internal motivations for your beliefs and behaviors, with the goal of resolving ambivalence. 

People might enter drug and alcohol treatment knowing that they need to stop drinking or drugging, yet they are still unable to imagine a life without alcohol or occasional drug use. These ambivalent feelings about addiction can be a barrier to recovery and also lead to relapse. 

Motivational therapy will not necessarily tell patients what actions to do or which pathway to take, but rather give them the tools they need to change attitudes and behaviors. 

How Motivational Interviewing Is Used for Addiction Treatment

When patients participate in motivational interviewing, they will have the opportunity to describe and discuss their feelings of ambivalence. The therapist will respond with feedback and open-ended questions that allow the patient to work through these issues and create a realistic plan of action. 

It is not uncommon for a person with a substance use disorder to have an ongoing internal tug of war. On the one hand, you want to stop drinking or taking drugs. On the other, you would like to continue with their use and just have the negative consequences disappear. Motivational interviewing can help resolve these conflicts based on four assumptions:

  • Ambivalence toward substance abuse is a normal challenge on the path to recovery. 
  • People possess natural values and motivations that can assist in overcoming ambivalence.
  • There is a collaborative relationship between the client and the therapist.
  • A supportive, directive, and empathetic approach to therapy can create the conditions necessary to produce change.
Effectiveness as a Treatment for Addiction

Motivational therapy is a recognized and proven method of addiction treatment. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the National Institute on Drug Abuse recognize this therapy as an effective way to assist with the treatment of substance use disorder. 

A study published in 1997 reviewed multiple clinical trials that involved motivational interviewing. The study, published in the Journal of Substance Misuse, concluded that this form of addiction treatment was "an effective, efficient, and adaptive therapeutic style" for drug users and problem drinkers. 

Few people like to be told what to do, and drug addicts seem to be particularly resistant to authority. A 2005 study published in The British Journal of General Practice confirms that this type of therapy is a better approach for this group. The results of a review of 72 clinical trials found that motivational interviewing was more effective than "traditional advice giving."

If you or any of your loved ones want to stop drinking or abusing drugs but still have misgivings, that should not prevent you from seeking qualified addiction treatment services. At The Recovery Village, we offer a comprehensive addiction treatment program that includes motivational interviewing to examine feelings of ambivalence. 

Contact us now to speak with one of our addiction specialists about your circumstances and discuss your admissions options.


The post What Is Motivational Interviewing and How Does It Work? appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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Our nation’s ongoing opioid epidemic has a far-reaching impact on those that are addicted, their loved ones, and the country as a whole. When a person is addicted to these powerful drugs, there are not only emotional and physical consequences but financial ones as well. The Federal Reserve just released one of its annual reports that now includes information pertaining to the opioid epidemic.

Fed’s Latest Report Addresses the Opioid Epidemic

The Federal Reserve Board has been issuing an annual report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households since 2013. This year, the Fed addressed this nation’s opioid epidemic for the first time, since it is having an increased economic impact on families.

The 2018 report is a result of the Fed’s 2017 Survey of Household Economics & Decisionmaking (SHED). Of survey respondents, roughly one-fifth personally know someone with an opioid use disorder. Those who have been exposed to opioid addiction had a less favorable impression of the local and national economy than those who had not been exposed.

The fact that people who have been exposed to opioid addiction see the economy less favorably supports the “deaths of despair” theory tied to opioid addiction. According to this hypothesis, one of the catalysts of this growing epidemic is a decline in economic opportunity. While this might ring true in some instances, it is certainly not the case with everyone who becomes addicted.

What is the Financial Cost of Addiction?

Many people mistakenly believe that the money tied to addiction is limited to what they spend on drugs or alcohol. It is much more than that. The personal cost of addiction can be staggering. This includes the financial figures tied to car crashes, arrests, custody battles, and damaged or stolen property. It also includes mounting healthcare costs for substance-related illnesses, accidents, and overdoses.

The opioid epidemic is also costing society billions. Our prisons are filling up with drug offenders and the social services system is overwhelmed with child foster care cases, many related to opioids. Businesses have less productive employees, and the healthcare system is stretched thin with the rise in opioid emergency room visits.

The opioid epidemic has created an expensive problem for families and this country.

Invest in Life Through Substance Abuse Treatment

Addiction treatment might cost money and require a time commitment, but the return on your investment will be more than positive. If you are struggling with alcohol or drug addiction, you already know that the costs associated with substance abuse can be crippling. Fortunately, getting help is a gift that you can give yourself and your loved ones, and it is one that has the potential to last for the rest of your life.

You may be most worried about saving your life or your family when you go into treatment, but you can save money as well. Studies show that there is a cost-benefit ratio of 12:1 for substance abuse treatment, meaning that every $1 you spend on rehab will save you $12 in healthcare costs. This does not even include the benefits to your career and other cost savings.

If you are ready to give up this expensive day-to day-fight, The Recovery Village can help. Contact us now to discuss admissions to one of our comprehensive addiction treatment programs.

The post Fed’s Latest Economic Snapshot Factors in Opioid Addiction appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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When you have a loved one who is struggling with substance abuse, you would likely do almost anything to get him or her addiction treatment help. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that as many as 23.9 million people need substance abuse services but only 2.6 million, or about 11 percent, actually receive help.

Since fatal overdoses nearly tripled in this country between 1999 and 2014, families and regulators alike are looking at taking desperate measures to keep people affected by this crisis alive. One of the ways that they are doing this is through involuntary commitment laws.

These laws, which are now active in a majority of U.S. states, are just one more tool in the battle against addiction and its devastating effects. Even as families take every measure possible to protect the lives of those they love, there are questions about whether or not these methods will work.

How Do Involuntary Commitment Laws Work?

If you are hoping to “force” someone you care about into rehab, this could be possible, but it is not as simple as many would hope.  Just being concerned about someone’s drug or alcohol use is not enough. As a parent, you may have more rights to “commit” a minor child to substance abuse treatment if this is permitted in your state.

If the person that you are worried about is not a minor, the bar is higher before a court will grant such an order. In most states with these laws, you will have to go to court and prove one or more things. First, there must be some proof that the individual in question has a substance use disorder. Some states allow voluntary commitment for drugs or alcohol, while others are limited to one or the other.

In typical cases, you will also need to show either that the person has inflicted harm on themselves or others or, if not committed to rehab, there is a substantial risk that they will harm themselves or someone else.  You may also be able to show that the person is so addicted to alcohol or drugs that he or she has become incapacitated to the point of not being able to provide for his or her basic needs.

There are hearings in these cases, and the person that you seek to have committed has the right to attorney representation. If the person cannot afford an attorney, the court or some other participating agency can appoint one for him or her.

States With Involuntary Commitment Laws for Addiction Treatment

There are currently 37 U.S. states (and the District of Columbia) that allow some form of involuntary commitment for addiction treatment. The process, requirements, and how long a person can be committed will vary by each state. The states that permit involuntary commitment for either alcoholism or substance use disorder are:

  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Nebraska
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Pennsylvania
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin

Just Montana and Rhode Island limit involuntary commitment for alcoholism only. Vermont allows this process for substance use disorder only. There is proposed legislation in New Jersey to allow these types of civil commitments, but it has not yet been approved by the legislature.

Does Rehab Work If It Is Not Voluntary?

One of the common questions that arise about these programs is whether or not they work.  Unfortunately, there is not much data available about this issue.  What is known is that many people go to rehab for reasons other than wanting to find recovery.  In fact, data published by SAMHSA in 2016 reveals that as many as one-third of patients admitted to rehab from 2004-2014 were admitted through compulsory court programs.

These patients no more wanted to go to rehab than someone who is forced to go by their family. Despite this, the process seems to work just as well, if not better. The NIDA published a research-based guide concluding that individuals who are coerced into substance abuse treatment stay in rehab longer and do just as well, if not better, than their peers who were not forced to attend a program.

Can You Convince an Addict to Go to Rehab?

There is little doubt that the treatment gap, the difference between the need for treatment and its use, is massive. If everyone that needed substance abuse treatment received it, there would be a rehab crisis in this country. Sadly, this is not the reality. The best possible scenario is that loved ones are able to convince an addict to go to rehab, but this does not always work.

You may try a professional intervention, which often has positive results, but there is no guarantee that someone who is operating with an impaired brain will make the right and healthy choice. When loved ones feel at risk or are worried about the health, safety, and future of someone they care deeply about, it may be time to take drastic measures.

Involuntary commitment is available in most U.S. states, including Florida. The Sunshine state had over 10,000 requests to use their Marchman Act in both 2015 and 2016. If you are looking for a caring and compassionate rehab for your loved one, addiction treatment is available at The Recovery Village.

One of the common criticisms of involuntary commitment laws is that, even though they are a start, the length of stay they recommend is often insufficient. States vary on how long someone can be civilly committed, but the most effective addiction treatment program is tailored to the particular needs of each individual.

At The Recovery Village, we will speak to you or your loved one about your circumstances and customize a program that will provide the best chance for success.  We offer detox, medication-assisted therapy, traditional and holistic therapies, and treatment for co-occurring disorders. Contact us now to speak with one of our addiction specialists about admissions options.

The post Which States Have Involuntary Commitment Laws for Addiction Treatment? appeared first on The Recovery Village.

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