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Horses are strong, beautiful animals. Like all animals, however, they suffer from their fair share of health conditions. Here are a few of the most common equine health problems, including their symptoms and possible treatment options.

​1. Arthritis

Arthritis is a painful joint disease that is also known as Degenerative Joint Disease. It affects many horses, and it can be difficult to manage. The most common symptoms include stiffness while running, walking, or moving; inflamed joints that appear larger than normal; and heat in the joint area. If the arthritis has progressed, your horse may become lame. If your horse has arthritis, you will need to exercise her much more carefully than usual, giving her plenty of time to warm up and exercising for shorter periods of time with less intensity. Your vet may recommend oral medication or injections to help control the inflammation. He or she may also recommend certain exercises to help increase your pet's mobility.

2. Colic

Colic is not a particular disease, but rather a term used to describe a range of gastrointestinal horse ailments. Signs of distress may include constipation, diarrhea, vomiting, excessive salivating, rolling, lethargy, and other signs of pain. Your vet may recommend changing your pet's diet or water, better hydration, better eating habits, and deworming.

​3. Hoof Problems

Your horse may experience hoof problems, like laminitis, from time to time. Laminitis is the inflammation of the inside of the hoof, and it's quite common for horses. Horses also commonly experience other issues with their hooves, including injuries. You should watch for anything abnormal, including smells, cracks, shoe problems, or signs of pain. The horse may also avoid using the afflicted hoof. Treatment for laminitis includes cold packs and anti-inflammatory drugs. Treatment options for other injuries depend on the type and cause of injury.

4. Eye Problems

Horses commonly experience eye problems such as infections and injuries. These range from mild concerns like conjunctivitis to larger issues like glaucoma and serious injuries. Signs and symptoms vary but may include tearing, watery eyes, redness, thick discharge (which may be yellow or green if infected), cloudiness, sensitivity to light, and squinting. Your horse may exhibit signs that the eye is painful or itchy. If the problem is an infection, the vet may recommend a treatment like Terramycin to clear it up quickly. If the problem is caused by an injury, the treatment will vary depending on the severity of the injury. If your horse has developed glaucomaor another serious eye condition, your vet will review long-term treatment options with you.

5. Parasites

Horses are especially prone to a range of parasites because they spend almost all their time outdoors. These parasites include ticks, lice, tapeworms, roundworms, lungworms, and pinworms. Check your horse thoroughly at regularly intervals for signs of external pests. You can usually spot them easily. However, internal parasites are more difficult to catch. Look for signs of distress, such as scratching (by rubbing against objects) or hair loss. Your horse should be dewormed on a regular basis, and you can remove other pests manually with your vet's guidance.
Most horses will develop some health condition over the course of their life. However, many of these issues can be solved quickly and easily. If you believe your pet has any of the conditions mentioned above, see a vet for assistance ASAP.


​Author: Lannie, writer for Allivet. Allivet provides affordable pet supplies and pet medications, all of which can be purchased online.

​Listed below are some helpful resources referenced in the article that can provide some guidance for those looking for helpful information on pet supplies & medication:
http://www.allivet.com/p-1292-terramycin-ophthalmic-ointment.aspx
https://equusmagazine.com/management/internal-parasites-in-horses
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We ​are very excited to announce a new division of The Horse Rescue... THR Elite Horses. While some of our horses are true rescues, others are not. The majority of our horses that come into our care are actually owner surrenders with little to no past lameness issues. We decided there needed to be a way to distinguish the "Elite Horses" from the horses who are in rehab, will be pasture or walk horses, or are retired.

To become a THR Elite, the horse must pass a health and wellness exam by an independent vet. The vet first does some basic checking of the eyes, ears, lungs, teeth and heart to make sure they are okay. Then, he hoof tests the horse to check for any sore points that might make them uncomfortable when they move. Last, he does flex tests of the front ankles and knees and hind ankles, hocks, and stifles. Lameness is scored on a 0 to 5 scale with 0 being no lameness and 5 being extremely lame (think a hoof abscess and how they move). If the horse scores a 2 or below, the horse qualifies to be an THR Elite Horse. If the horse has any known past injuries from racing, we will x-ray or ultrasound that area to confirm it is 100% healed.

The horse has to either have a show record or be actively in work to show. We typically compete at local shows, but if it permits, we will take them to away shows as well. We will also take the horse off the property to trail ride, jump cross country, or even fox hunt. The goal is to expose them to various places so they become comfortable with trailering and new surroundings.

While in the program, a THR Elite Horse will receive up to 6 days per week of training, various therapies to keep them feeling good, and premium supplements based on their needs. Our training sessions are typically 30 minutes long per day. They are different every day and are based on the horse's current ability. If the horse just started jumping, we will do a lot of gymnastics, where as if they are very knowledgeable in jumping, we will do more courses and technical work, like two stride to one stride combinations. We also do a lot of flatwork, such as cantering over poles, trotting poles in a row, and jumping small cavalettis. When they need a break from training, we take them out in the field for long hacks to increase their stamina. With the strenuous workload, we use different types of therapies to keep them feeling good. We love our vibrating floor and try to put them on it every day. We also use Centurion magnetic therapy, massage, chiropractic and acupuncture when necessary. 

We are super excited about this program and look forward to offering quality, sound, and well-trained off-track Thoroughbreds to potential adopters. Check out our new website here: www.threlite.org

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I like to keep my horses on as few supplements as possible. My thought is to provide quality grain and forage, and you really won't have to supplement all that much... but there are some cases where supplements do come in handy for certain issues that arise. Here are some examples.

Louisa was in season earlier this year... so she was acting super mareish, and her ability to concentrate while riding was at an all-time low. I try to stay away from Regu-Mate if I can, so I decided to give Venus by Cavalor a go. It is all-natural and really was a game changer for her. She went from super grumpy to just a little grumpy, and her ability to listen and concentrate did a 180. I highly recommend this product for anyone who has a mare that acts like a mare. You can buy Venus by clicking here
When Howdy first came to rescue, his system was not use to high quality feed and hay he was starting to eat. He had diarrhea, and it wasn't pretty. We used Probios Equine Paste to help his system while adjusting to the new foods. It contains live, naturally occurring microorganisms to help maintain a healthy microbial balance during times of stress. It works like a charm... every time. You can buy Probios Equine Paste by clicking here. 
For any of the horses at the rescue, if we work them hard one day, or are in a competition, we will give them Equioxx tablets. Equioxx is an non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. You can use it as a competition driven pharmaceutical or you can use it every day if you have an older guy that is a little more arthritic. It is a very cost-effective way to make your horse feel his best. You can learn more about Equioxx by clicking here. Remember, it is a pharmaceutical drug, so you will have to have a prescription from your vet to order.

Venus, Pro-bios and Equioxx are my most recommended supplements. None are long-term (unless you have a really special mare, then Venus can be long-term), but they provide great results when a specific need has to be met. If you have any questions about any of these, please feel free to contact me at kathryn@thehorserescue.org. 
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I have been around quite a few Thoroughbreds over the years, and I have heard some pretty great stories about a lot of them. I was in Wellington FL this past weekend watching my husband compete, and I had a great conversation with one of his old friends. He was saying that back in the 80s and early 90s, most all the horses competing in show jumping were Thoroughbreds. They all had their quirks, not all of them were 100% sound, and they were hot. Heck, even Touch of Class, double gold medalist in the 1984 Olympics, cross-cantered half the time. She was perfectly fine cross-cantering up to a 5'+ oxer. You see that now and people would tell you the horse was lame. I am sure there was something wrong, but it didn't stop her at all. 

This conversation got me thinking about how people these days are searching for a unicorn when they are wanting a new horse. The biggest issue I have when I show people horses at the rescue is they want the whole package. Here is a list of what people are looking for in a horse. 
  • Kind and loving
  • Well- mannered while grooming and tacking
  • Trust-worthy, meaning you can do whatever you want to the horse and they stand there perfectly
  • No vices, i.e. no cribbing, biting, kicking, stall aggression  
  • Calm while riding, no jigging, head tossing, teeth grinding
  • Safe, i.e. no spooking, bucking, rearing, spinning
  • 100% sound
  • Flatting and jumping upwards of 3'
  • Brave when jumping, no stopping
And all this has to be for less than $5,000. I am here to tell you that isn't possible.... well, it is possible if you want to write a check for over $25,000 (and that is on the low side). With a Thoroughbred, you have to cherry pick what you want. Are you willing to give up kind and loving for talent? Are you willing to give up no vices for soundness?

With my horse, I gave up calmness, a loving nature, and when I originally bought her, she wasn't sound. But in exchange, I have a horse than can compete in the 1.10 meter classes. Sure, I can't love and hug on her, and jigging is just a way of life, but I can compete. I am personally willing to give up a lot of things to have a horse jump. But that is just who I am. 

We have horses at the rescue who are incredibly sweet, but don't have the talent or soundness to jump 3'. We have others that aren't so sweet, but are brave and will jump anything you put in front of them. It is really up to you on what you are looking for. With our rescues, I try to be as upfront and honest as I possibly can with people. I don't want to waste my time or your time on looking at a horse that doesn't fit your must-haves. The best thing you can know upfront, before coming to try a horse, is what are your must-haves and what you are willing to give up. 

I know there are some amazing horses out there that have it all, but there is not one horse at our rescue that checks all the boxes.... but I am okay with that, they are all special and unique in their own way.
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To keep your horse happy, you have to keep your horse comfortable. Having a barn full of Thoroughbreds with typically high withers, you have to make sure you keep the pressure off the withers and adequately distribute the weight across the back. If a high-end saddle is out of your price range, one of the greatest half pads you can buy is from Bruno Delgrange. It raises the saddle off the withers, evenly distributes weight on the horses back, and incorporates shock absorbing technology within the pad. It will be the last half pad you ever own. You can learn more about it by clicking here
If you have the opportunity to buy a saddle for your Thoroughbred, we highly recommend Bruno Delgrange saddles. They fit these high withered guys very well. You can find them used on various horse websites, or even on eBay. Bruno Delgrange also sets up shop at various horse shows and you can find a great used one there, too. They have several different seat sizes, from flat to deep, and can even do complete custom saddles. Since we ride a variety of horses, we can't do a custom saddle. After much thought and research, I finally bought a saddle for the rescue. I bought a Kronos. It is totally different than anything I have ever ridden in. I chose it for a few reasons. First, it has some pretty large knee blocks on the front of the saddle. When you are riding Thoroughbreds off the track for the first time, I want to make sure I have plenty of leather keeping me in the seat. Thankfully, I haven't had anything super silly, but it is nice to know if something does happen, I have some knee blocks keeping me in the right position. Second, it is a mono flap. That means you do not have two flaps of leather between you and the horse, it is a single flap and the girth used is more like a dressage girth. You are able to feel the sides of the horse better which is better with predicting their next move. Third, it is 8 pounds lighter than regular saddles. I firmly believe 8 pounds makes a difference. I come from a show jumping background and if I can shave 8 pounds off my horse's back, I am going to do it. 
A saddle is definitely an investment. It is something, if taken care of properly, will be with you for up to 20 years. We have had saddles with us for well over 20 years. We have replaced billets, knee rolls, seats, etc... But when you buy quality, it is easy to fix and maintain. I highly recommend buying the best saddle you can and make sure it fits properly and comfortably on your horse. 
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Micklem Bridle
I am very particular about tack. Right now, we have three bridles that we use in the rescue... two bridles are Micklem Bridles and the other is just a plain bridle. Ideally, I would have a bridle for each horse so there is no resizing on the fly. Micklems are a little more difficult to resize... but I love them.

What is so different about a Micklem? It's all about the pressure points. It takes pressure off the sensitive parts of the nose while giving you more control of the horse. The bridle padding over the poll is wider than a typical bridle which helps distribute the weight better and relieve pressure. It does not prohibit the nose expanding during heavy work like a drop nose band or figure-8. The horses really love it! To help distribute the weight across the poll even more, we put a BeneFab Therapeutic Poll Pad (click on the name to order) on the bridle. This pad is super soft and cushy and increases circulation in the poll area with magnetic and ceramic therapy. It seems that a lot of horses that come into the rescue have sensitive polls, so the more we can do to make the horse comfortable, the better for the horse. 
Flexible Mullen Mouth with Loose Rings
For the most part, Thoroughbreds have sensitive mouths. Right now, we have a Happy Mouth French Link D-ring, a Copper French Link D-ring, and a Hard Rubber French Link Loose Ring. We have a horse in the rescue right now that has an old scar on the side of his mouth. Who knows how it got there, but I don't want to irritate him with anything hard. He uses the Happy Mouth, but I feel like I can find something better for him. His mouth is like butter. So I did some searching and found a Loose Ring Flexible Mullen Bit by Bombers Bits. It has a stainless steel chain on the inside covered with flexible PVC. It is great for young horses or horses with sensitive mouths since it is so soft and forgiving. It is also good for horses that chew or grind their teeth or are sensitive to metals. I am super excited to try it! I also bought a Soft Rubber Mullen Mouth to try as well. It has no metal running through it and is also very flexible. I will keep you posted to see how he does with his new bit.

We really work with the horse to make sure they are happy. From our saddles (another post, I promise), to the saddle pads, to the girths, to the bridles. We want to give our Thoroughbreds every opportunity to succeed in their new job. 
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It's cold... and I feel like I can never get a horse clean in this kind of weather. No matter how much I curry or how much I brush, there is dander and dirt that won't vacate itself from the horse's coat. I wanted to buy an Electro Groom, but they are super expensive... like over $600 super expensive. I can't justify purchasing a $600 vacuum for THR... we just can't afford it. That's close to 170 bales of hay! 

So I went to Home Depot and did some searching. I found a few vacuums that bragged about being more quiet than the rest. I settled on this one: Ridgid 16 gallon 6.5HP Stainless Steel Vacuum with the Industrial Hose. I really didn't know what to expect with the sound of the vacuum, or its sucking power, or if the horses would like it. I took a chance, that's for sure! But Home Depot is great with returns and at $179, I knew I couldn't go wrong. I set it up yesterday and tested it out today! First, I tried one of the vacuum attachments that was sold with the vacuum. It didn't work well. It grabbed at their skin too tight and made the horse nervous. It really didn't do a good job of picking out the dander. Then, I tried an attachment with a brush end. It didn't get deep enough to the skin to get the dander off either. Finally, I duct taped one of the barn's Electro Groom chrome attachments to the end of the hose and tried it. It worked perfectly! You can buy it here: Inside Fit Replacement Nozzle

I'll have to say, I am really pleased with the results. I was able to get off the dust and dander on their coats and the horses really seem to love being vacuumed. I was apprehensive about vacuuming the more thin-skinned Thoroughbreds, but they loved it too!

​Check out the video I did below!
Best Winter Grooming Tool - Ridgid Shop Vac - YouTube
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We currently have five rescues that are stalled and one that is on full turnout. What does a day look like for them? Read more to find out!

Since we are short on paddock space, our stalled rescues go out at night. It isn't ideal during the winter, but we don't have enough paddocks for turnout during the day. They come into their stalls by 7:00AM. They are fed their breakfast which consists of Tribute Kalm Ultra and various supplements supplied by FarmVet. They are given a flake of grass hay to munch on and their water buckets are filled.

After their food has been digested, we take them out and groom them. We curry and brush their bodies, comb their manes, and apply turpentine to the bottoms of their hooves, Keretex Hoof Hardener to the outside of their hooves, and a hoof conditioner to the coronary band. We then ride them based on their needs. We ride our horses 4 to 6 days a week. We try to put as much training on them as possible before they are adopted out. After they are ridden, we groom them again. Finally, we put them on the vibrating floor. They love this. They stand on it for upwards of 30 minutes. It really helps their muscles relax after work. If they jump, we will put ice on their front legs while they sit on the Vitafloor. 

By 12:00PM, they are back in their stalls. They each get a large flake of alfalfa for lunch. We clean their stalls and make sure their waters are full. By 3:00PM, it is time for their afternoon feeding. We give the same amount of grain but a different set of supplements based on their needs. We blanket them according to the temperature it is going to be at night before they head back outside.

By 4:00PM they are turned out. At night check, we throw them 3 flakes of grass hay and one flake of alfalfa each outside. Since there is not much grass, you really have to supplement with hay. We want to make sure our horses are staying fat throughout the winter because fat means energy and warmth.

For the outdoor horses, we feed them grain only once per day. We give them hay and alfalfa in the morning and also at night check. We typically bring them in once or twice a week. We check their hooves and make sure their legs look good and they are maintaining weight.

This is what winter looks like at The Horse Rescue. Comment below on how your winter looks!
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I have seen some pretty amazing things accomplished with acupuncture. I use it regularly on my personal show horses as a way to address any potential issues before they become problems.

I  use acupuncture on the rescue horses for a couple of reasons. The first big reason is muscular stiffness. When these horses come off the track, their muscles are incredibly tight. They have a tendency to track better one way than the other because of under/over developed muscles when they are exercised on the track. I have seen Thoroughbreds canter perfectly with their head completely bent to the side since that is how they were exercised. To get a horse to move slower at the track, exercise riders bend their head's to the side. Could you imagine running that way? Their has to be pain and stiffness associated with such an unnatural movement. Acupuncture allows those muscles to relax. It also allows the energy to flow properly throughout the body. When the horse feels more relaxed, they are more open to learning and are able to move more freely when asked.

The second reason I use acupuncture is behavior. A lot of times, if a horse has a sour attitude, it is because their energy is not flowing properly. In the case of Louisa, she was incredibly grumpy when she first came to us. Her first acupuncture session resulted in her bulldozing us down and a twitch on her nose to quickly finish up her session. After her energy pathways opened up and we put her on a Liver Happy Chinese supplement, her attitude completely changed. During her second acupuncture session, she was like a different horse.  She stood relaxed, chewing, and a hind hoof cocked. The acupuncturist thought it was a different horse. I'm just happy she came back to work on her!

A lot of people think acupuncture is used when there is a problem. I don't view it that way... I view it as a way to prevent problems and to make the horse even better. I highly recommend it to anyone who owns and actively rides/competes a horse.

Check out the video below to learn more!
Acupuncture with Dr. Delisle at The Horse Rescue - YouTube
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We do more than rescue and rehome horses off the track... and that is what makes us different. So, what exactly is our process from racehorse to adoptable horse? Here is a brief overview of what we do and why we have so much success with placing horses.

When a horse comes off the track, they need time to relax. We give our horses at least 60 days off to recover from the stresses of the track. We call this time "active recovery." We still groom them, handle them, and administer therapy, but we do not ride them. We look at any preliminary issues they may have. We have a vet do flex tests, x-rays, and ultrasounds if needed. If there is an issue, we focus on repairing that issue during active recovery. 

After they have received adequate downtime and have been cleared for exercise, we start them into gentle work. We only walk/trot for the first 30 days. Here they learn the basics... how to move off your leg, how to stretch into the bridle, and that contact with your leg does not necessarily mean to move forward. Also, we ride them in groups. This can be stressful in the beginning for a lot of Thoroughbreds. The immediate reaction when a horse canters past them is to move forward. We teach them how to maintain the same pace no matter what the horse next to them is doing. We also take them on trail rides to get them use to more than just riding in a ring.

During the first 30 days of riding, we look closely at how they are tracking. We want to make sure they are tracking evenly and comfortably... both moving in straight lines and doing figure-8s. Our goal is for the horse to be 100% sound before moving forward with more extensive work. We also want to make sure the horse is safe to ride, and to figure out what type of rider the horse needs. Some horses need more confident riders, while others are good with intermediate riders. If a horse has quirks... we let the potential adopter know as we want both horse and rider to be happy.

We work our horses 4 to 6 days a week. We jump them twice a week, mainly through gymnastics. We want them to learn the mechanics of jumping before we even concern ourselves with jumping big.

By the time the horse is in full work, they are up for adoption. Adoption fees are based on age, talent, past injuries, and experience. Some of our horses are given away due to the extent of their injuries, but most are adopted out at various fees. 100% of the adoption fee goes back to THR to help other horses in need. We are  completely run by volunteers and we have no overhead. This allows us to solely focus on the horse.

​We are proud to be able to offer horses a second chance at a new career, and give people the confidence to adopt a horse who is sound, healthy, and safe. 
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