Loading...

Follow The Guardian | Poland on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Forgiveness advocate who dedicated her life to Holocaust awareness testified in 2015 trial of SS officer Oskar Groening

Eva Mozes Kor, a survivor of Auschwitz and the death camp’s infamous doctor Josef Mengele, has passed away in Poland during a trip to the Holocaust site, sources said.

The Romanian-born Kor, who founded the Candles Museum in Indiana and devoted her life to Holocaust awareness, was 85.

We are deeply saddened to announce the passing of Eva Kor, Holocaust survivor, forgiveness advocate, and founder of CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center. Eva passed peacefully today, July 4th, 2019, at 7:10am local time in Krakow, Poland on the annual CANDLES trip.

Only five days ago we recorded a testimony of Eva Kor, an Auschwitz survivor, for @AuschwitzMuseum Archive. Today came a news about her passing away.

It more than just 'a breaking news'. It is a devastating one as one more survivor stopped sharing the story. https://t.co/ehGf2Gj27Q

Related: I fled Nazi Germany. I hope the US doesn't turn its back on refugeesAryeh Neier

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Courts jail eight people from gang that exploited 400 victims trafficked from Poland

The largest-ever modern slavery ring uncovered in the UK has been smashedbroken up after a three-year investigation into its activities. Some of its 400 victims worked for as little as 50p a day.

Their labour earned millions for members of a criminal gang led by a Polish criminal family, which preyed on the homeless, ex-prisoners and alcoholics from Poland. Gang members were jailed on Friday.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

David Navarro and Martyna Sobecka photographed postwar estates across central and eastern Europe, finding strange, stark beauty in these concrete giants

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A landmark ruling against enforced early retirement for Polish judges shows the EU has woken up to threats to democracy

Perhaps one day the spring of 2019 will be remembered as the moment when the European Union halted the destruction of democratic institutions in its member states. Just look at how governments in Poland, Hungary and Romania have backtracked on anti-democratic measures they were seeking to introduce. And this week, in a landmark ruling, the European court of justice declared that the enforced early retirement of Poland’s supreme court judges would be unlawful. Could this be a tipping point? What’s clear is that law, money and politics have aligned in ways that now make it more difficult for the Viktor Orbán playbook to be repeated across Europe.

Related: EU court rules Poland's lowering of judges' retirement age is unlawful

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Rightwing demagogues across the world, including in Europe, go unchecked. Darkness threatens to engulf us all

Vladimir Putin is right. When he celebrates the existential crisis of what he terms “liberalism”, his grounds for triumphalism are substantial. “The liberal idea has become obsolete,” he crows: he cheers on the anti-migrant backlash sweeping the western world, the onslaught against multiculturalism, and even endorses the ever-escalating campaign against trans people. If you were Putin, would you not be celebrating? His brand of authoritarianism is in the ascendancy: a rightwing populism based around a venerated strongman leader, where the trappings of democracy are kept for show, but where, in practice, the substance of democracy is hollowed out. Putinism could indeed be humanity’s future.

Donald Tusk, the European council president, has shot back, voicing his staunch opposition to the “main argument that liberalism is obsolete”, claiming instead that: “For us in Europe, these are and will remain essential and vibrant values. What I find really obsolete are: authoritarianism, personality cults, the rule of oligarchs.”

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Through video games, live-action role-playing games and interactive documentaries, developers are challenging the conversation around reproductive rights

The year is 1972. You’re part of an underground network of feminists in Chicago that provide illegal (at the time) abortion services to vulnerable, pregnant people with few options. Despite the risk of imprisonment, and the ways that your personal experiences may not always perfectly align with your activism, you persist.

It’s emotionally complicated. It’s politically fraught. It’s a live-action roleplaying game by Jon Cole and Kelley Vanda called The Abortionists, which requires three players, one facilitator, six hours and a willingness to dig deep into the painful history of reproductive rights in the United States. That history has terrifying relevance in 2019, as numerous states pass laws that put their residents in a reality where abortion is functionally illegal. Based on the real-life work of a 1970s activist group called Jane, it challenges its participants to think about the “internal landscapes” of its players, and how they deal with the larger political and personal landscape of their world.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A Polish agent follows a perilous route from London to Warsaw in this taut and arresting piece of storytelling

Given Poland’s nationalist turn under Andrzej Duda, you have to wonder about which audience this doughty but slightly self-pitying second world war spy thriller is meant to serve. Philippe Tłokiński stars as Jan Nowak-Jeziorański, emissary of the Polish government in exile in London struggling to make his way back across Europe to a Warsaw resistance caught between a Nazi rock and a Soviet hard place. The film has a taste for defiant proclamations – “Giving up for the first time in our history will surely break the spirit of this nation!” – that you imagine will put a spring in the step of the new breed of Polish EU-shin-kickers.

Having said that, Władysław Pasikowski – a crowdpleasing film-maker with a string of domestic hits – relays Poland’s darkest hour with enough nuance and peril to stop Kurier from being outright jingoism. His fluid direction ensures Nowak-Jeziorański’s infiltration – via a parachute drop from Brindisi, with a couple of SS-dodging set pieces en route – never shirks taut genre requirements. But the realpolitik hoops he must jump through en route are equally arresting. Nowak-Jeziorański’s journey, in order not to jeopardise British-Soviet relations, has to remain so clandestine that the resistance leader, Bór-Komorowski, initially refuses to see him. Once he is through the door, he has to persuade the rebels to disobey their historical instincts and buddy up with a Soviet war machine already sizing the country up.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

European court of justice decision is blow to nationalist Law and Justice government

Poland’s lowering of the retirement age for judges breaches EU law, the European court of justice has said, in a victory for civil society campaigners seeking to preserve democratic values.

The ruling from Europe’s highest court, released on Monday, is a blow to Poland’s nationalist Law and Justice (PiS) government, which has drastically increased control over the judiciary in recent years.

Related: Central European countries block EU moves towards 2050 zero carbon goal

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Director hits back at critics who say the institution, backed by Poland’s populist party, will distort wartime history

The museum of the Warsaw ghetto is not due to open for several years, but is already shaping up to be one of the most contentious museums in Europe.

Backed by Poland’s populist government, which has been accused of rewriting history to fit its political agenda, the museum has caused a bitter spat between historians of the Holocaust about how best to tell the tragic story of Warsaw’s Jews.

The history of the Holocaust is not a buffet where you can choose which bits you want

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Diplomats think agreement unlikely at Brussels summit but bloc could signal intention to move towards towards target

European leaders will spar at their latest summit over how to tackle the climate crisis, with Poland and the Czech Republic leading a minority action against a net-zero carbon emissions target for 2050.

Meeting in Brussels, European leaders will debate the EU’s role in tackling the unfolding climate emergency that threatens to significantly worsen the risks of drought, floods, extreme heat, poverty and destruction of wildlife around the world.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview