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Divers in Kolkata search river for Chanchal Lahiri as he fails to surface in escapology stunt

Indian divers in Kolkata are searching for the body of a magician who is feared to have drowned when a Houdini-like stunt in a river went wrong.

Chanchal Lahiri, 42, known by his stage name of Mandrake, went missing on Sunday after a ferry took him towards the broadest part of the River Hooghly in Kolkata at around noon. There, he was lowered by crane into the muddy waters with chains and ropes. Lahiri was inside a small, padlocked cage. His arms and legs were apparently tied and he was blindfolded.

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Racing’s ruling body refuses to publish the test reading when a jockey fails a breath test, allowing speculation to flourish

I found it frustrating, writing about Oisin Murphy’s failed breath test on Sunday, that I was unable to report the amount of alcohol recorded by his test. To me, this would seem essential context which in most cases would show that the jockey concerned had very little alcohol in his system at the time.

Related: Oisin Murphy prevented from riding at Salisbury after failing a breath test

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The neighbours from hell, horror in the Highlands and a tale of London’s ‘lost children’. Plus the latest in Mick Herron’s masterly spy series

Louise Candlish
Simon & Schuster, £12.99, pp400

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• James Vince to come in for Afghanistan and Sri Lanka games
• Eoin Morgan could be replaced by Moeen Ali after back spasm

England have confirmed Jason Roy will miss at least the next two games of the Cricket World Cup with a hamstring injury.

Related: Family comes first in this England team and that’s probably for the bestMoeen Ali

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Construction and services company’s shares hit record low as it struggles with debt pile

Kier Group is to cut 1,200 jobs in the UK, suspend dividend payments and sell its housebuilding and property businesses as it battles to reduce its debt pile.

Shares in the troubled construction and services company tumbled to a new low of 118p on Monday, down 10%, after crashing 35% on Friday, as its mounting problems prompted comparisons with Carillion, a former rival that collapsed last year.

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Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including Tory leadership candidates take part in the press gallery hustings

10.33am BST

In his Daily Telegraph column today (paywall) Boris Johnson, the favourite in the Tory leadership contest, says he wants to give every home in the country access to superfast broadband by 2025. He says it is a “disgrace” that rural areas have such poor broadband.

It is therefore a disgrace that this country should suffer from a deep digital divide, so that many rural areas and towns are simply left behind. They can’t rely on teleconferencing. They can’t skype properly. Sometimes the coverage is so bad that they can’t even email properly. This is 21st century Britain – the country that helped to pioneer the very idea of the world wide web – and yet we have only seven per cent coverage of full fibre broadband. In Spain there are now 85 per cent of households that have full fibre-optic broadband, with its almost limitless capacity to pump data to and from your home. There are remote Galician pueblos that have speed-of-light access to all the commercial and cultural glories of the web. There are whole towns in Britain where people are still being driven wild with frustration as they stare at the slowly revolving pizza wheel of doom.

This will cost some public money, but the productivity gains are immense.

TELEGRAPH: Boris: fast internet for every home by 2025 #tomorrowspaperstoday pic.twitter.com/h0GT9iHFul

I’m the last person to want to curtail the leadership race. But every Telegraph column by Boris Johnson increases borrowing by £billions.

If Boris wins, good luck to whoever becomes his Chancellor. It would be a noble act of self-sacrifice to accept the job. Who’d do it? ‍♂️

10.15am BST

Turning back to Matt Hancock’s decision to endorse Boris Johnson, Sky’s Sophy Ridge had a very good take on Twitter last night ...

Something tells me either Matt Hancock or Steve Baker is going to be disappointed....

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Destructive industrial fishing practices condemned as ‘corporate, organised crime’

Illegal fishing by foreign trawlers is decimating Ghana’s fish populations and costing the country’s economy tens of millions of dollars a year, according to researchers.

An investigation published on Monday by the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) claims that “saiko” fishing, whereby trawlers target the staple catch of Ghanaian canoe fishers and sell it back to fishing communities at a profit, landed approximately 100,000 tonnes of fish in 2017, worth $50m (£40m) when sold at sea and up to $81m when sold at port.

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We want to hear your experiences working front of house in the restaurant industry

This weekend it emerged that Wahaca was charging waiters if their table ate and ran (a policy they have since changed, following a heavy backlash). We want to hear stories from people working waiting tables in restaurants, pubs and bars about other ways they’ve been treated poorly, whether by employers, colleagues or customers.

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As basketball expands around the world it helps educate those abroad and at home that other cultures are not to be feared

Folklore tells us that if you can see your initials in a spider’s web, you have good fortune ahead. Maybe the NBA saw their initials in the hoop net last Thursday because the Toronto Raptors’ championship victory that night could be an early prognosticator of a brighter future for professional basketball worldwide. At the very least, it could encourage the expansion of NBA teams to include other countries from south of the border and elsewhere, leading to the league evolving into a more international competition.

As the Borg would say, “Resistance is futile.” The winds of change are already upon us. Despite California’s Golden State Warriors being the “hometown” favorites, it was Canada’s “visitor” team that most Americans were rooting for in the finals. According to a recent poll, the majority of Americans in every state except California, Nevada, and Hawaii were cheering for the Raptors to win. This is not a slight against the excellent Warriors, who may just be victims of their own deserved success in that people prefer rooting for the underdog. When it comes to sports, Americans don’t seem to share the xenophobia and nationalist fervor of the current White House administration.

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The environment Morgs has created and his standing as captain make you realise that decisions are made solely for the team’s benefit

Cricket can produce some amazing feelings on the field and I have been lucky enough to experience a few along the way. But this past week has been a reminder that, even midway through a home World Cup, nothing can beat the moment your child comes into the world.

To say it has been a hectic time would be an understatement. On Tuesday evening I was due to drive to Southampton for England training before the West Indies game. But both my wife, Firuza, and I had a sense things might be about to happen on that front so I texted our team manager, Phil Neale, to say I was going to hang back.

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