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The then London mayor stole the show on the day of Britain’s first 2012 Olympic gold

The rowers Helen Glover and Heather Stanning were still celebrating Britain’s first gold medal of the 2012 Olympics when their moment in the spotlight was hijacked by a man wearing a hard hat dangling five metres above a park in east London.

As mayor, Boris Johnson was visiting Victoria Park to highlight Olympic attractions across the capital when he was persuaded to ride a newly installed zip line. It was the sort of stunt from which any sensible politician would have sprinted. Instead, Johnson climbed a tower, allowed himself to be strapped into an undignified harness and, with a small plastic union flag in each hand, he set off.

The real Boris Johnson

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Former world champion boxer who won gold at the 1984 Olympics

During debates about who is the best boxer of all time, the former four-weight world champion Pernell “Sweet Pea” Whitaker is sometimes overlooked. He was not a fearsome puncher, nor was he a braggart who commanded headlines in the era before social media when newspaper reporters treasured outrageous quotes to sell a fight. But his peers always rated him among the sport’s elite.

Whitaker, who has died aged 55 after being hit by a car while crossing a road in his hometown of Virginia Beach, Virginia, was an Olympic gold medallist for the US at the Los Angeles games of 1984, after which he turned professional, first becoming a world champion as a lightweight in 1989. He eventually quit boxing in 2001, having fought in a total of 23 world title contests, of which he lost only three and drew one, in hugely controversial circumstances against the Mexican fighter Julio César Chávez.

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Employees will stay home for two weeks as part of mass trial to take pressure off crowded public transport system

Hundreds of thousands of employees in Tokyo will work from home for two weeks as part of a trial of measures designed to reduce congestion during next year’s Olympics.

With more than 8 million people commuting into Tokyo every day, the influx of visitors for the Games in 2020 is expected to pile more pressure on the Japanese capital’s infamously crowded train system.

Related: Tokyo dawn: is the impenetrable city finally opening up?

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Ministers announce long-awaited plan to get youngsters to do 60 minutes of activity a day

The leaders of more than 30 top sporting organisations have called on the government to commit more money to improve sport in and outside school. It comes as ministers announce a long-awaited but limited action plan, including pilot trials to offer young people an hour of exercise a day.

The School Sport and Activity Action Plan, announced today by the education secretary, Damian Hinds, the sport minister Mims Davies and the minister for public health, Seema Kennedy, sets out a range of new measures to strengthen the role of sport in young people’s lives, and explain to teachers and parents how they can play their part by promoting a “joined-up approach to physical activity and mental wellbeing”.

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9 July 1900 The president of the International Olympic Committee observes a wide international diffusion of sport

Editorial
The “British monopoly” of sport is at an end, as Baron Pierre de Coubertin points out in an interesting and good-natured contribution to the current number of the Revue des Deux Mondes. Last Saturday provided a striking commentary on this statement in the contest for the Amateur Championship at Stamford Bridge. Out of thirteen events at this meeting our American cousins carried off eight – the hundred yards, quarter-mile, and hurdle races, the high, long, and pole jumps, throwing the hammer, and putting the weight.

Related: Irresistible force: how British sport learned to be ruthless againGuardian Sport Network

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A jailed former governor of Rio de Janeiro state told a judge on Thursday that he paid about $2m for the votes of International Olympic Committee members to award the Brazilian city the 2016 Summer Games. Sérgio Cabral said he paid $1.5m in bribes through intermediaries to the former president of the International Association of Athletics Federations, Lamine Diack, originally in exchange for up to six votes in the meeting that awarded Rio the Olympic and Paralympic Games. The former governor added that another $500,000 was paid later to Diack's son with the aim of securing three more votes of IOC members for Rio, with former Brazilian Olympic Committee chairman Carlos Arthur Nuzman handling the negotiations.

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• Former state governor accuses nine members of corruption
• Sergey Bubka among those named by Sérgio Cabral

The International Olympic Committee is to investigate allegations that nine of its members – including the pole vaulter Sergey Bubka and the Olympic swimming champion Alexander Popov – were bribed to vote for Rio’s 2016 Olympic Games bid.

The claims were made by the former governor of Rio de Janeiro Sérgio Cabral, who told a court he had paid $2m (£1.59m) to Lamine Diack, the former president of athletics’ governing body, the IAAF, to buy votes.

Mr Diack has never contacted me about my vote at the election of the host city for the Olympic Games 2016. My lawyers will write to Mr Diack to ask him to explain the allegations of Mr Cabral who wrongly claims in his testimony that Mr Diack could secure my vote.

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  • Breaking among four sports Paris looks to add for 2024 program
  • Final decision on added sports to be made in December 2020

Breakdancing, known as breaking in Olympic circles, moved a step closer to the 2024 Olympics on Tuesday, and now organizers can look to book a street venue in Paris.

The sport’s medal debut was last October at the Buenos Aires Youth Summer Games. The street dance competitions will have 16 athletes in each of the men’s and women’s medal events in Paris.

Related: Reconstruction and robots: can Tokyo 2020 live up to 1964’s Olympic legacy?

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Emails suggest aide to the crown prince received request from Papa Massata Diack, who is wanted on corruption charges

Leaked emails appear to link a member of the Qatari royal family to a deal that is being investigated as part of a inquiry into alleged corruption surrounding bids for the 2017 athletics world championships and 2020 Olympic Games.

French investigators have spent three years scrutinising two payments of $3.5m made in October and November 2011, a month before a vote by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) to decide the host of the 2017 world championships. French investigators suspect the payments may have been a bribe to win votes for Qatar for the event, which was eventually won by London.

Related: Lamine Diack to stand trial for money laundering and corruption

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They call it X Day – a major earthquake striking the heart of the world’s most populous city in the most calamitous event since the second world war. Can hi-tech solutions save Tokyo?

Every day, at 5pm, the gentle melody of the children’s song Yuyake Koyake chimes across the Minato area of Tokyo from a loudspeaker – one of hundreds dotted across schools and parks throughout this megacity of 37 million people.

The daily jingle does more than signify the arrival of evening. It is a test for the system that is designed to save Tokyoites from what would be one of the worst natural disasters in recorded human history: an earthquake striking the centre of the most populous city on Earth.

As Japan's capital enters a year in the spotlight, from the Rugby World up to the 2020 Olympics, Guardian Cities is spending a week reporting live from the largest megacity on Earth. Despite being the world's riskiest place – with 37 million people vulnerable to tsunami, flooding and due a potentially catastrophic earthquake – it is also one of the most resilient, both in its hi-tech design and its pragmatic social structure. Using manga, photography, film and a group of salarimen rappers, we'll hear from the locals how they feel about their famously impenetrable city finally embracing its global crown

When you have a city this big and your basic lifelines are out, that’s a very significant problem

Related: Tokyo 2020 organisers cut crowds at sailing events over tsunami risk

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