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Danny Rose has been open in tackling his demons and that can only be a good thing in the wider world

Danny Rose remembered getting angry. He’d suffered his first really serious injury and the team were doing well without him. “I didn’t socialise, I wasn’t sleeping, I was looking to fall out with anybody.” Gareth Southgate and the Duke of Cambridge were among the small audience listening intently as the Tottenham left-back described the signs of his depression.

Related: Elite sport is gradually waking up to widespread mental health issuesSean Ingle

Related: ‘They’ve just scratched the surface’ – football tackling mental health but more can be done

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Listening to people in need has enabled me to process my own emotions and appreciate the complexity of life

A ghostly, grey rubbery screen bulges with indistinct, yet recognisably human, shapes: a hand here, a face there. An unsettling hum underlies eerie, dislocated sounds. An icy voice half sings: “Is there anybody out there?” There is a harrowing howl, then a moment of respite: the word “yes” appears, followed by: “The Samaritans”.

These 55 seconds of existential desperation followed by five seconds of hope were shown on ITV in 1986, when I was seven. This advert had an effect on me. It was as if I had suddenly become aware of the extent to which humans could suffer. I had no idea what the Samaritans did, just that they were there.

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Scott Walker struggled to cope after suicidal person was struck by his train, Hull inquest hears

A man killed himself after struggling to cope with witnessing a suicidal person being hit by the train he was driving, an inquest has heard.

Police found the body of Scott Walker after they broke into his home in Hedon, east Yorkshire, on 2 November last year.

In the UK and Ireland, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.

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For decades, many psychiatrists believed depression was a uniquely western phenomenon. But in the last few years, a new movement has turned this thinking on its head

• Warning: this article contains discussion of suicide

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If you have been affected by anything you have heard in this episode, in the UK, the Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14.


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A growing movement is promoting the role gardening can play in patient recovery and rehabilitation

Sydenham Garden feels out of step with its surroundings in urban south London. Fringed by houses on most sides, with a school on its doorstep, it is hard to imagine that this small patch of green space is bringing a new lease of life to people struggling with their mental health.

The site, run by the Sydenham Garden charity trust, is just under an acre and boasts a wellbeing centre with gardens, a nature reserve and activity rooms. Therapeutic gardening sessions are held weekly, and are run by experienced staff, who are in turn supported by a team of volunteers.

Related: Sign up for Society Weekly: our newsletter for public service professionals

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As he tackles one of his most harrowing subjects yet, the documentary-maker talks about parenting, psychosis – and his secret beard

Louis Theroux turns up for our interview looking more hairy than usual. “You’ve caught me with an unauthorised beard,” he says sheepishly. He was meant to shave it off ahead of filming a new documentary, but couldn’t find his trimmer, necessitating a hasty shopping trip to buy a replacement.

It makes for a strange sight, given how used we are to Theroux quizzically stroking his hairless chin in the middle of one of his unfailingly polite interrogations. He’s been doing it for 25 years now, starting in 1994 on Michael Moore’s polemical magazine show TV Nation. “I couldn’t actually grow a beard at that time,” he says. “I could manage a few wispy hairs. I supposed I should just be clean-shaven – it would be good for continuity. But in my private life, I have a beard.”

The babies pop up throughout the story, bringing lightness and joy into the mix. And poo

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Analysis shows London v rest of England divide when it comes to mental health and treatment

The most depressed neighbourhoods in England are all in the north and the Midlands, with almost a quarter of patients at some GP surgeries seeking help for the condition, research by the Guardian shows.

Yet it is in these areas where psychiatrists are most scarce, with more than twice as many practitioners in London as in Yorkshire per head of population. Proportionately, more specialist psychiatric research and treatment is also undertaken in the capital.

Related: Children who need help with mental health face postcode lottery – study

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The Guardian | Depression by Helen Pidd North Of England Editor - 2w ago

Dr James Higgins’ surgery in Brinnington covers an area with highest depression rate

Dr James Higgins knew he saw a lot of depressed patients at his surgery in Brinnington in Stockport, Greater Manchester. But it was only upon learning the area had the highest prevalence of depression of anywhere in England (23.6%, compared with an average of 9.8%) that the GP decided to do his own calculations.

He looked back on every consultation in the previous six weeks. Of the 123 adult patients through his door, 24% were actively asking for help with depression, a further 28% were already being treated for the condition and 16% had previously had it. “Only 31% had never been depressed,” he said, slightly surprised at his own findings.

London plays a crucial economic, political and cultural role in the UK. It is home to one of the world’s busiest financial centres, the royal family, parliament and some of the best museums on the planet.

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It is wrong to brush aside non-western mentalities and understandings of distress, says Derek Summerfield

As a teacher of psychiatry to medical students in Zimbabwe, I find Tina Rosenberg’s account of the work of Vikram Patel overly glossy (The long read: Busting the myth that depression doesn’t affect poor countries, 30 April). At issue is the globalisation of western psychiatry, for which Patel is a prominent salesman.

In claiming that a local idiom of distress – “thinking too much” – is really depression, he is asserting the universalist supremacy of western frameworks and categories. This is indeed cultural hegemony, brushing aside non-western mentalities and understandings of distress. Moreover, a poverty-haunted Zimbabwe has enough problems of its own without the importation and promotion of “depression”, with its assumptions of mental pathology.

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Marine Tanguy thinks our eyes deserve more than narcissistic soft porn – so she’s building a stable of talents to rival Kim Kardashian

One day Marine Tanguy decided to do a test. She posted a picture of her bottom in a bikini to her 24,000 Instagram followers. The post received 75% more views than usual – and most of the viewers were other women.

“I’m a grown woman,” says the 29-year-old French founder of arts talent agency MT Art. “But imagine if I was a 16-year-old girl. What would this tell me? It would tell me that my body is more valued than anything I could say, more valuable than, say, posting my exam results. Quite possibly it would mean I would put up more photos of my body to increase my profile.”

My hope is that art will change people’s philosophies, shake them up rather than keep them in their little bubbles

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