Loading...

Follow The Guardian | Breast cancer on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Combining ribociclib with hormone therapy found to cut risk of death by up to a third

Younger women with breast cancer have been given the hope of living longer after what is described as “one of the greatest advances in breast cancer research in recent decades”.

Adding ribociclib, a targeted drug that disrupts cancer cells, to standard hormone therapy was found to boost survival among premenopausal patients who have an advanced form of the disease.

Related: I was 31 when I was diagnosed with breast cancer – it cost me so muchBecca Leaver

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

UK study covering 100,000 women finds ‘no overall link’ between cancer and night work

Night shift work does not increase the risk of breast cancer, finds a UK study covering analysis of 102,869 women over 10 years.

The Breast Cancer Now Generations study is the latest to examine the supposed link presented by experts for decades.

Related: I’ve had breast cancer. But I know some screening can do more harm than goodFay Schopen

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Visually impaired women in Colombia are using their enhanced sense of feel to improve early breast cancer detection

As a child, Francia Papamija started progressively losing her eyesight due to a retinal detachment. Today, everything is darkness for the 36-year-old – except for the job she holds in a clinic in Cali, Colombia, where she contributes to the early detection of breast cancer.

Papamija is a medical tactile examiner (MTE), a role created especially for women who are blind and have higher sensitivity in their fingertips.

Related: How breast ironing is spreading in the UK

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The most stressful period of my life was made even more stressful by our welfare system

Waiting to book into my first round of chemotherapy, the registrar said there was some good news: the then NSW premier Mike Baird had got rid of a co-payment for the chemotherapy drug I was about to sign up for.

It was November 2016, and Baird was embroiled in controversy after backflipping on his decision to ban greyhound racing. I would have loved to see greyhound racing banned but, selfishly, Mike inched a few rungs up in my book that day. Is this how the health system worked? Every time you went to settle a bill you were reminded of which politician to thank for each Medicare rebate?

Related: Record number of sick or disabled Newstart recipients as Coalition seeks savings

Related: Cancer professionals need to be aware quality of life is an abstract concept for many patientsRanjana Srivastava

Related: Labor promises $500m to cut public hospital waiting times for cancer treatment

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ian Paterson scandal prompts call for more oversight of safety in private hospitals

The leader of the Royal College of Surgeons of England is calling for private hospitals to be encouraged to publish information on their safety to prevent another scandal like the one involving jailed breast cancer surgeon Ian Paterson.

“The surgical community was deeply shocked by the case of Ian Paterson, the surgeon convicted of intentionally wounding patients by carrying out unnecessary breast surgery operations,” said Prof Derek Alderson, president of the organisation.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Morrison government to announce $32.6m in next week’s budget while Labor pledges $47m if it wins election

Women with breast cancer have secured commitments from both the major parties for additional funding for MRI scans – $32.6m from the Morrison government coming in next week’s budget, and $47m from Labor if it wins in May.

The Coalition will use next Tuesday’s budget to create two new Medicare items for MRI of the breast, to be available from 1 November 2019, scans that will enable more accurate diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer.

Related: Medicare: Labor vows to lift freeze on rebates if it wins federal election

Related: Cost of x-rays and ultrasounds to drop under Coalition pledge to increase Medicare rebates

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Study says women aged 50-69 most likely to benefit, while those aged 70-79 will gain least

Death rates from breast cancer are falling faster in Britain than in any other of the six most populous countries in Europe, research shows.

The rate of death from the disease has fallen by 17.7% since 2010-2014 thanks to screening, earlier diagnosis and better treatment, a Europe-wide study has found.

Related: GPs could use breast cancer 'calculator' to predict risk to women

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

UK women claim they were not told enough about potential risk of rare breast cancer

A group of more than 200 women are considering legal action over controversial breast implants that have been linked to a rare form of cancer.

The women claim they were not sufficiently informed about the risks of textured Allergan implants, which were pulled from the European market in December. Six of the women developed anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), a rare blood cancer that has been linked to textured implants.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Home Office says ritual is child abuse and should be prosecuted under assault laws

The government has vowed to confront the practice of breast-ironing, calling it child abuse and saying the police should prosecute offenders under assault laws.

In a written parliamentary statement following Guardian revelations that the abusive practice was spreading in the UK, the Home Office said it was committed to challenging the cultural attitudes behind all “honour-based abuse”, but gave no indication it would legislate.

Related: How breast ironing is spreading in the UK

If you or someone close to you have been affected by this story you can tell us your experience using our encrypted form.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

National Audit Office finds more than 150,000 untested samples in laboratories

More than 150,000 untested cervical screening samples were discovered in laboratories across England, Whitehall’s spending watchdog has found.

The National Audit Office (NAO) said that changes to testing arrangements led to a backlog. This has since been reduced, but the size of the backlog suggests that hundreds of thousands of women have had to wait to find out if they needed treatment.

Related: If we don’t stop smearing smear tests, women will die of embarrassment

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview