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Five years after hosting the World Cup, Brazil again was home to a major competition; this time the Copa América with 12 teams competing over 26 matches. Chris Brunskill is one of a few European photographers that headed to South America to cover the tournament

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The Brazil manager, Tite, was finally able to play his form of pressing game without the PSG forward and it led to a first major trophy in 12 years

Brazil winning a Copa América at home cannot be said to be a surprise. They have hosted the tournament five times and, after beating Peru 3-1 in the final on Sunday, they have won it five times. But to suggest this was some sort of procession, a pacing out of the inevitable, would be misleading, and would ignore why, 12 years after Brazil’s last success in a major competition, this felt so significant.

It is not just that this showed Brazil could handle being favourites, that they did not choke on the expectation as they did so spectacularly in the World Cup five years ago. It’s that they won with a largely modern, progressive style of play and, most importantly of all, that they did so without the injured Neymar. This was a victory for Tite and all for which he stands.

Related: Brazil end Copa América drought with victory over Peru in final

Related: Brazil 3-1 Peru: Copa América 2019 final – as it happened

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Fans have been celebrating Brazil's ninth Copa América title after the host nation beat Peru 3-1 in the final at the Maracanã Stadium.

Following the victory, Seleção supporters insisted it was important to prove they could win a trophy without Neymar, who was ruled out of the tournament due to an ankle injury.

This is the first time Brazil have made it past the quarter-finals of the contest since beating Argentina 3-0 in the 2007 final.

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• Gabriel Jesus scores and is sent off in 3-1 victory
• Éverton and Richarlison also claim goals for Brazil

Brazil’s Gabriel Jesus made one goal, scored another and was sent off in the second half as the hosts beat Peru to win the Copa América for the ninth time at the Maracanã stadium.

The hosts took the lead after 15 minutes thanks to some great skill from Jesus on the wing. The Manchester City forward bamboozled two defenders and crossed for the unmarked Éverton to fire home from close range.

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  • Live updates from the final at the Maracanã
  • Get in touch and with your thoughts

9.40pm BST

39 min A better move from Peru ends when Guerrero goes over in the Brazil area. There were no appeals for a penalty from the Peru players.

9.38pm BST

36 min: Good chance for Firmino! After another classy passing move, Alex Sandro curled a booming cross beyond the far post, where Firmino got above Trauco and thumped a header over the bar. Trauco just about did enough to ensure Firmino could not get over the top of the ball.

9.36pm BST

36 min “I don’t want to sound inflammatory, but Niall Mullen is an ill man if he genuinely doesn’t see the beauty in West Germany’s 1990 kit,” inflames Matt Dony. “I don’t have fond memories of that team, but that kit still looks wonderful. Admittedly, it’s no ‘Crown Paints’, but pretty darn spiffing nonetheless.”

9.36pm BST

35 min Everton goes on a thrilling run down the left, beating Avincula twice before Zambrano comes across to clear.

9.34pm BST

34 min Peru are a game bunch, but so far Brazil have had a bit too much nous. They have kept the Peru attack at arm’s length throughout the match.

9.33pm BST

33 min “Update from Naxos,” says JP. “A kid at the restaurant has drawn the ire of the bartender by overriding the TV with his phone and casting YouTube kids onto the big screen. The interesting thing is that Dejan Lovren appears to have a sideline as a singing Mexican in a sombrero on kids TV. Explains a lot...”

Wait till you see the Alberto Moreno channel.

9.31pm BST

30 min Gabriel Jesus is booked for a foul on Yotun.

9.30pm BST

30 min “How Liverpool dans achieve that grade?” asks Niall Mullen. “They judo don’t they though.”

9.30pm BST

29 min Brazil break through Gabriel Jesus, who is fouled just past the halfway line by Tapia. He knew what he was doing, but did it with sufficient clumsiness to avoid a yellow card.

9.28pm BST

27 min The Peru coach Ricardo Gareca is very animated on the touchline, waving his hands all over the place like David Brent. Peru win a corner, their first I think. Yotun’s outswinger from the left is headed over from six yards by the under-pressure Zambrano (I think). It wasn’t much of a chance.

9.26pm BST

25 min “Evening Rob,” says Simon McMahon. “Got to agree about the Peru kit being a timeless classic. But as for not capturing the public imagination, they certainly grabbed the attention of lots of Scotland fans in 1978.”

Related: World Cup stunning moments: Scotland's 1978 rollercoasterScott Murray

9.25pm BST

24 min That was almost a second. After a long, patient move, Firmino cut the ball back from the left to Coutinho, whose stabbed shot with the outside of his right foot drifted a few yards wide. Gallese had it covered.

9.25pm BST

23 min It’s been all Brazil since the goal.

9.21pm BST

20 min Now Brazil are pressing high up the pitch, and Peru have struggled to get out in the last few minutes.

9.19pm BST

18 min Brazil have not conceded in the entire tournament, so it’s fair to say Peru are up against it.

9.17pm BST

It was a really nice goal. Dani Alves drove a long pass down the right to Gabriel Jesus, who turned Trauco inside out and drove a cross towards the far post. It picked out the unmarked Everton, who arrived late and slammed a volley into the net from eight yards.

9.16pm BST

And Brazil have got the opening goal!

9.15pm BST

14 min Brazil have started to settle, with Arthur and Casemiro seeing more of the ball in midfield. The first goal already feels vital, such is the edginess around the ground.

9.13pm BST

12 min Alex Sandro is sent flying by Yotun, who is chastised by the referee.

9.12pm BST

11 min “These two teams,” begins Scott Bassett, “are going to kick the bejesus out of each other, aren’t they?”

Well, it’s an option.

9.11pm BST

10 min Peru have been the better team in the first 10 minutes, playing with more aggression and purpose. It makes sense to start fast and try to undermine Brazil before they settle into the game.

9.10pm BST

9 min “As a Liverpool dan,” says JP, “it’s great to see two current player and one ex-player in the Brazil XI as well as Everton to round things out.”

A Liverpool dan? How do you achieve that rank, then?

9.07pm BST

6 min Peru are starting to settle into the game and are pressing Brazil high up the pitch. A clearance goes straight to Yotun, who chests it down and hits a looping shot from distance that goes well wide.

9.06pm BST

6 min “I hope Peru can make it a game but I doubt it,” says Mary Waltz. “Brazil at home with a huge edge in quality will be too much.”

I agree, although I said the same before the 1950 World Cup decider against Uruguay.

9.05pm BST

5 min It’s been a bitty, slightly nervous start from both sides.

9.03pm BST

2 min Coutinho is penalised for handball 35 yards from goal. Cueva steeps up, to huge jeers, and curls a few yards wide. Alisson had it covered.

9.02pm BST

2 min “Peru have always had the most underrated jersey in world football,” says Niall Mullen. “Maybe because they have never captured the public’s imagination like Denmark 86. Most overrated, since you didn’t, West Germany 1990.”

I agree about Peru’s shirt, which is a timeless classic. That said, I wonder if it falls foul of the Irwin/Parlour rule, which says you can’t be underrated if everyone says you’re underrated. Brazil’s current kit is also lovely.

9.01pm BST

1 min Peep peep! Peru get the match under way. They are wearing white with the familiar red sash. Brazil are in yellow and green.

8.58pm BST

“Sitting alone in a restaurant in Naxos,” says JP. “The bartender is 99.99% confident that the game is rigged in the hosts’ favour. Is that indeed so?”

Yes: Brazil have a population of 212 million to Peru’s 33m.

8.56pm BST

The Peru players are belting out the national anthem. Some of them look close to tears. Brazil’s players are a little less emotional, with the inevitable, wonderful exception of Dani Alves.

8.53pm BST

This is Brazil’s first game at the Maracana since Fred routed Brazil in the final of the 2013 Confederations Cup.

Related: Brazil have just made the World Cup more interestingPaul Doyle

8.34pm BST

8.14pm BST

Alternative live action

Related: Algeria v Guinea: Africa Cup of Nations, round of 16 – live!

8.08pm BST

Brazil (4-3-3) Alisson; Alves, Marquinhos, Thiago Silva, Sandro; Arthur, Casemiro, Coutinho; Jesus, Firmino, Everton.
Substitutes: Miranda, Filipe Luis, David Neves, Willian, Eder Militao, Allan, Cassio Ramos, Fernandinho, Lucas Paqueta, Richarlison, Fagner, Ederson.

Peru (4-2-3-1) Gallese; Advincula, Zambrano, Abram, Trauco; Tapia, Yotun; Carrillo, Cueva, Flores; Guerrero.
Substitutes: Corzo, Santamaria, Araujo, Ballon, Ruidiaz, Caceda, Polo, Pretell, Alvarez, Callens, Gonzales.

4.19pm BST

Hello. Brazil may have made a gruesome, historic mess of hosting the World Cup, but the Copa America has provided a much happier story. This is the fifth time they have hosted it; on the first four occasions, in 1919, 1922, 1949 and 1989, they won the tournament.

Approximately 100.00 per cent of the Brazilian population will expect them make it five out of five by beating Peru at the Maracana today. It’s hard to envisage any other result. Brazil under Tite have been extremely hard to beat – even if, as is their post-Sarrià wont, they have generally been more efficient than erotic since he took over.

Related: Ricardo Gareca bids to join rare group by leading Peru to Copa América titleJonathan Wilson

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Brazil have reached the Copa América final without conceding a goal, but the public remain unconvinced about the team

By Yellow & Green Football for the Guardian Sport Network

Despite their tactical teething problems, Brazil got there in the end. At the Maracanã on Sunday, the Seleção will attempt to maintain their record of having lifted the Copa América every time they have hosted the tournament. Standing in their way are Peru, who have improved enormously since they were beaten 5-0 by Braz in the group stage a fortnight ago.

A victory for Brazil would mean a third trophy on home soil in six years, after they won the 2013 Confederations Cup and the gold medal they won at the Olympics in 2016. Such a run would be considered a golden period for many countries, but Brazil remains unconvinced. “In this period,” explains Breiller Pires, a football writer for the Brazilian edition of El País, “Brazil suffered the biggest embarrassment in their history, were twice eliminated from the Copa América and again disappointed at the World Cup by falling in the quarters to Belgium.

Related: Everton: the little onion making a big impact for Brazil at the Copa América

Related: Brazilians are falling out of love with their distant, expensive football team

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Peru were well beaten by Brazil in the group stage but victory over them at the Maracanã would give them a third triumph

Jack Greenwell was born in Crook in the Durham coalfield in 1884. His career as a football player took in just two clubs: Crook Town and Barcelona. But as a coach he was a visionary, leading Barça for seven seasons before becoming an evangelist for the game in South America.

Related: Peru set up Brazil clash in Copa América final after resounding win over Chile

Related: Lionel Messi accuses referee of Brazil bias after Copa América defeat

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Everton cycled 6km to train with his youth team in Maracanaú. Now he is playing in a Copa América final at the Maracanã

By Yellow & Green Football for the Guardian Sport Network

Millions of boys in Brazil lace up their boots every day hoping to become professional footballers, many of them wanting to give their families a brighter future. But the doors of opportunity open for only a few. Everton, who is currently starring for Brazil at the Copa América, was given his big chance when Grêmio appeared with an offer in 2012.

Signing the deal would mean moving 3,800km away to the opposite end of the country. But it wasn’t necessarily the distance that intimidated the promising young forward. Everton didn’t want to leave Maracanaú in the north east of Brazil for Porto Alegre in the south as it would mean leaving his girlfriend behind.

Related: The Serie A team of the 1980s

Éverton ganhou um desenho dos ilustradores da Turma da Mônica, com aprovação de Maurício de Sousa - o criador dos quadrinhos, por conta do apelido de Cebolinha.

Beto Azambuja/GE pic.twitter.com/LiRI8KU5Pf

Related: Iván Zamorano on Ronaldo, Chile at the Copa América and his 1+8 shirt

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  • Chile outclassed by quick and eager Peru side
  • Peru lost 5-0 to Brazil earlier in the tournament

Peru advanced to the final of the Copa América and a date with hosts Brazil after beating double defending champions Chile 3-0.

Chile were outclassed by a quick and eager Peru side, who looked a different outfit from the one that scored just three goals in four games on their way to the semi-finals and lost 5-0 to Brazil earlier in the tournament.

Related: Lionel Messi accuses referee of Brazil bias after Copa América defeat

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  • Uruguay 0-0 Peru (Peru win 5-4 on penalties)
  • Suárez also had goal chalked off by VAR

Luis Suárez missed in the shootout as fifteen-times Copa América champions Uruguay suffered a galling quarter-final exit on Saturday to Peru, losing 5-4 on penalties after they had three goals ruled out in a 0-0 draw after 90 minutes.

Suárez spurned the first penalty in the shootout as his shot bounced off the chest of the Peru goalkeeper, Pedro Gallese, completing a frustrating evening for Uruguay’s all-time top scorer, who also had an effort ruled out for offside.

Every other player converted their spot-kicks and Edison Flores sealed unfancied Peru’s place in the last four by blasting past Fernando Muslera.

Peru will face neighbours Chile in the last four, with tournament hosts Brazil meeting arch rivals Argentina in the other semi-final clash.

“I am very proud. I am speechless,” Peru striker Paolo Guerrero told reporters after scoring in the shootout. “Lots of people said we don’t have the desire, some people tried to destabilise the squad but we showed what we are capable of on the pitch, we showed we have fighting spirit and courage.

Related: Argentina beat Venezuela to set up Copa America semi-final with Brazil

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