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A three-part branded content novella is premiering on Univision, starring Danilo Carrera and Daniela DiGiacomo, who relay the key health benefits of Quaker Oats

The ‘novella within a novella’ airs today (Dec. 10) as part of the primetime showing of Univision’s new hit novella, Jesús. The campaign will also feature custom cooking segments on Univision’s morning show, Despierta America, where Chef Yisus will demonstrate the recipes showcased the night before. In addition, there will be a social media push by Univision influencers.

Deeply rooted in Hispanic insights that speak to Latinas as the main “caretaker” of the household, the campaign will encourage them to take care of themselves so they can take care of their families. In a teaser video in Spanish, a man headed to work is encouraged by his wife to eat a healthy breakfast of Quaker Oats with fruit to get heart healthy. One doesn’t need to speak Spanish to know what’s happening, and Quaker is going after a huge audience with this collaboration.

Univision’s premiere of Jesús, starring Dudu Azevedo (La Tierra Prometida, Moises y Los Diez Mandamientos), reached 3.5 million total viewers, who tuned in to all or part of the initial one-hour airing in November. The series has averaged 1.9 million total viewers.

“This was an extremely fun campaign to deliver on because it allowed us to use our insights into the Hispanic consumer to bring something new and creative to our client,” said Luis De La Parra, senior vice president, partner solutions, at Univision. We were able to bring to life the importance of health and Latinas as the ‘caretaker’ of the home, along with their relationship with food, to develop a unique campaign that will hit home with our viewers.”

The Quaker mini-novella will go live on Univision’s Facebook page after it airs. The video will also be amplified by social influencers Lauren Arboleda and Ingrid Macher, as well as distributed through Danilo Carrera (actor), Daniela DiGiacomo (actress), Chef Yisus (from ‘Despierta America’ morning show), and Univision social handles. The ‘Despierta America’ cooking segment will go live on Univision’s YouTube channel.

This isn’t the first time the companies have collaborated. In 2013, Quaker Oats and Univision teamed to launch a digital destination for Hispanic moms called "Fuente de Energía" (Energy Source).

See the videos by clicking on the Creative Works box below.

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State Street Global Advisors, the investment management firm behind the Cannes Lion-winning Fearless Girl, has hinted at plans to commission siblings for the original bronze statue for financial hubs outside New York City.

Lori Heinel, deputy global chief investment officer at the firm, told The Drum the company has “talked about whether to have replicas ... of Fearless Girl” as it looks to expand its campaign, and is placing more women onto company boards globally.

“We've certainly been asked by many outside the US for their own Fearless Girl, and that's certainly a conversation we continue to have,” she said.

However, she added that State Street is focused on celebrating the original’s new, permanent location for now.

Today (10 December) State Street moved the bronze statue, originally at Bowling Green, to face the pedestrianized New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on the corner of Wall and Broad Streets. The company worked with the City of New York and the NYSE to broker the statue's first permanent site; originally, it was only meant to be in situ for one week.

The move means the sculpture will no longer face the Arturo Di Modica’s Charging Bull – a stance the Italian artist vocally criticized – and will help alleviate traffic issues caused by heavy tourist footfall at the previous Lower Manhattan spot.  

Ta-dah! pic.twitter.com/EvF53t6Bnb

— Katie Deighton (@DollyDeighton) December 10, 2018

 

Additionally, Kristen Visbal’s artwork is no longer accompanied by the plaque connecting her with State Street at the new location. A bronze sign previously declared: ‘Know the power of women in leadership/SHE makes a difference,’ followed by the State Street logo.

The copy was written by McCann New York creative Tali Gumbiner, who admitted she “never spent more time writing anything" in her life.

Heinel explained the decision not to move the plaque is symbolic of State Street gifting the conversation sparked by Fearless Girl to the wider world.

“The world moved the conversation [surrounding female leadership] away from just us a long time ago ... it is way beyond State Street at this juncture,” she said.

“We wanted her to really symbolize the potential for all women everywhere and not be associated with just State Street. Clearly, we're very proud of the fact that we commissioned her and were the first to install her, but this is really about the girl now.”

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While most might think of Christmas as being a time of snow and cold, in the southern hemisphere of the planet it´s the opposite: the beginning of the summer season where the fire warnings are high.

To highlight those who devote themselves to keeping others safe, retail brand Ripley and McCann Santiago are paying an animated tribute to firefighters and other people who must work on Christmas Eve. The animated short film features a main character who is both a fireman and family man.

The three-minute animated short film, ‘The Magical Night of Gaspar,’ produced by Academy Award winner PunkRobot (‘Story of a bear’), tells the story created by McCann Santiago about the Alegría (Happiness) family and their interrupted celebration of Christmas Eve because the father, Gaspar, is called for Christmas Eve duty. Even though Gaspar is disappointed, his wife doesn’t want to upset the children, so she tells them he is helping Santa that night. The kids are excited and help him prepare for his big night. He goes to the firehouse sad and alone, but finds his holiday spirit and decorates the fire engines with lights. Families gather around, including his own, making for an uplifting Christmas for all.

“Firemen in Chile have something special, they are volunteers, and their service is because of their vocation; and in a season where their duty is so important for the country, we wanted to point out by their example the individual sacrifice each of them give up for society,” said Jose Ignacio Solari, McCann Santiago chief creative officer.  

Added Pilar Barriga, marketing manager at Ripley: “We decided to make magic happen this Christmas. Through a 360-campaign, we worked with Facebook to bring a message to Chilean and Peruvian families that revives and emphasizes social values and vocation to serve of all the people who help us around those dates.”

The campaign included PR activations such as the iconic Christmas tree lighting in Plaza de Armas, the most relevant square in Santiago, where the short film characters were present, along with a social networks strategy on retail store channels.

See the film by clicking on the Creative Works box below.

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My clients often ask me what I consider the biggest challenge facing today’s marketer. My answer almost always surprises them. It’s not that they’re too slow (although they sometimes have been). Or that they’re too timid (although they certainly can be). Or even that they’re too traditional (although they most definitely are). One of the biggest issues for brands today is that they are simply too nice.

Many marketers today are trying to define their purpose, their role in the world, and what they stand for. That’s a big step forward, and a welcome (and long-overdue) advancement from the era of product claims and unique selling propositions. But the biggest mistake brands now make is neglecting to define their antagonist, their enemy, what they stand against. That’s where the creative and cultural tension comes from. That’s where marketers can make a bet and take a stand. That’s where brands can break through the clutter and stupor of today’s marketing landscape — and actually get noticed.

In other words, if you’re truly standing up for something, then you must — by definition — also be standing up against something. 

Think of classic storytelling convention. Every story needs a villain. Why? Because without one, nothing happens. There would be no tension, no conflict, and, ultimately, no interest. Ask any actor and they’ll tell you that the juiciest roles are those of the villains, because that source of tension is the most interesting part of the story. It’s no different for brand narratives. You only need to look at Fearless Girl, which once stared down Wall Street’s Charging Bull, to understand my point. Without the bull, she would be just a stubborn kid with crossed arms. With the bull, she’s a powerful icon of feminism, courage, and conviction.

Every story — and every brand — needs an enemy.

Challenger brands inherently understand this. Their whole proposition is based on defining an enemy — often the category status quo and its shortcomings — and clearly and systematically fighting those norms. T-Mobile’s “uncarrier,” JetBlue’s “jetting versus flying,” and Mini Cooper’s “motoring versus driving” are classic examples of challenger brands taking aim at their respective category defaults. Leadership brands should also adopt this approach; their need to define an enemy is even more pressing because their core proposition is not based on one.

The biggest objection to this argument that I hear from clients is around negativity: “I don’t want work that’s negative.” But knowing your enemy doesn’t mean being mean.

Enemies are not just competitors, although they can be. More often, they’re ideals — conceptual counterpoints that can give brand ideas the tension they so desperately need. For example, a brand that stands for flavor and variety stands against the bland, boring, and banal; a brand that stands for openmindedness stands against prejudice; a brand that stands for caring stands against today’s empathy deficit; a brand that stands for human connection stands against modern human isolation. These are all powerful, positive thoughts, and knowing what you’re against gives you something to fight, and that means there’s something to fight for.  

Too many clients fall prey to what I like to call the “world peace” trap—they chose to stand for something totally benign and utterly unobjectionable—therefore something totally generic and utterly forgettable. Even world peace needs a conflict to resolve.

So, no more Mr. Nice Guy—it’s high time brands pick a fight and find an enemy. 

Jennifer Zimmerman is global chief strategy officer of mcgarrybowen

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The squishy organ in our heads is truly fantastic. Scratching the surface of what the human brain can do (without us even having to think) is simply amazing. However, there are some common misconceptions about the brain that need to be addressed be marketers...

Our brains aren't dominated by one side  

You would find it difficult to find someone that hasn't come across the question "Are you left or right brained?". Worryingly enough, this is something that teachers believe.

Actually, the two hemispheres of the brain have developed to work together. There are two visible hemispheres, the left side is more associated with things like language for example, but this doesn’t make someone more logical or creative. Telling children that they are a right or a left brain is an old wives’ tale.

When designing your product or service you should avoid designing it for a specific type of person. Design it based on their behaviour.  

You don't want access to 100% of your brain

With films like Limitless and Lucy, you'd may believe the tagline; "The average person only use ten percent of their brain capacity. Imagine what we could do with 100%". But you'd be wrong. 

Modern brain scans show activity coursing through the entire organ. Even when we're resting. So, even when you think you are not doing a lot, your brain is. Take a moment to think about what your brain does for you. When you get up out of a chair, what muscles are you using? How do they all work together at the same time?

It is likely that this myth has evolved, as there is always more potential to use the brain more. We could learn a new language, a new instrument but we don't. Our brains tend to shortcut difficult decisions by substituting them for easier ones, this is a 'cognitive miser'.

"A bat and ball together cost $1.10. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does ball cost?"

Retailers often take advantage of this laziness. Recent research shows that we are aware of the fact that not allocating enough brainpower over buying decisions. This may harm consumer sentiment and trust. A digital product or service is now expected to be intuitive and easy to use, it's no longer a 'nice to have'. In order for our customers to trust us, we have to make buying decisions as easy and clear as possible. 

Our decisions aren't based on cold hard logic

People who drink alcohol and smoke tobacco know that they are actively poisoning themselves. But they still do it. We know that we should exercise regularly, but don't. We also know that we should be investing or saving our money, but, again, we don't. 

We use our brain to make many decisions, but we don’t always choose what is best for us. Why is this? 

We don't have one brain, we have three. The forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain. The hindbrain takes care of all the things we don't need (or want) to think about. The unconscious actions like pupil dilation, muscle contractions, food digestion etc. The forebrain is where all the logic happens, when you overthink something, or try to apply logic. The midbrain looks after all our emotions and whether you like it or not, this is where the majority of your decision making happens. 

It doesn't stop there. The midbrain also deals out the rewards. It releases dopamine, which makes us feel good. Our midbrain is making decisions, then rewarding itself for them. The midbrain also makes the bad decisions, as it felt good in the moment, such as eating those extra Yorkshire puddings or drinking that extra pint. 

They aren't logical decisions. Advertisers take advantage of our emotional decisions. The most notable are companies like Nike and Apple. When was the last time you saw them listing out technical features? Their campaigns aim for that emotional centre. Telling their would-be customer how their product will make them awesome.

We're in a fast, ever-evolving digital world, of which the brain cannot keep up with. This means we have to think differently about problem-solving, product and service design. By putting people's behaviour first, you will unlock your products or services unmet potential. 

Matt Jackson, behavioural design lead, Big Radical

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The Conscious Advertising Network's (CAN) co-founder Jake Dubbins is to talk today (December 10) about the impact of fake news, hate speech and ad fraud as part of the UN's Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration Conference. 

CAN is a cross-industry group that believes that ethics must catch up with the technology of modern advertising. 

The UN International Conference rests on the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which celebrates its 70th anniversary today. Although the world has witnessed an exponential development of international rights since the declaration was adopted, we still face grand challenges in the face of human rights. 

Technological advancement and promotion of rights to access that information and data is a big factor, and is an issue that the CAN will address at the conference being held in Morocco. 

Working under the premise that brands do not live in a vacuum, the group recognises how money spent on advertising has a profound impact on society.

Launching officially in January 2019, CAN has already made a lot of movement to encourage the advertising industry to adopt a leadership position in a number of key issues.

CAN believe that the advertising industry is perfectly placed to consciously change both their operations and the content they produce. The group hopes to encourage the industry to embed CAN’s criteria in company internal policies, creative guidelines and agency briefs. 

With a number of big bodies on board, including its official sponsor Incorporated Society of British Advertisers, CAN has worked with a number of top industry experts to produce six manifestos that cover: children's wellbeing, hate speech, diversity in content, fake news, ad fraud and consent. 

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A study published today by marketing agency Gekko – ‘Service not Sci-fi’ - reveals that UK shoppers would rather deal with real people over robots or artificial intelligence when it comes to shopping.

The study finds that 81% of UK shoppers claim the personal touch has disappeared from retail customer service in modern Britain, with almost a third (32%) blaming an over reliance on technology for this decline. Half of those polled believe that companies in the UK are using technology to save money, rather than improve customer experience.

Only 30% said they would like to see ‘smart pricing’ initiatives adopted by retailers, where prices change in real time depending on demand, 22% smart mirrors that show a 360 view of themselves, 16% a virtual reality changing room, 14% augmented reality to help visualise products in the home and only 9% in favour of a talking robot assistant.  

When it comes to buying online, 43% of UK shoppers have had their screen freeze while trying to make a purchase. When asked what makes a great bricks-and-mortar shopping experience, 49% of those polled said it was down to having good staff on the shop floor, staff that know the products and staff that go the extra mile (47%). Coupled with this, 61% of the nation would prefer to deal face-to-face when complaining, 59% when enquiring or trying to find out more about a product and 73% when getting a refund.

A third of Brits say that the personal touch is more likely to make a repeat purchase, and more than a fifth (22%) claim they always spend more money in a shop if they are served by a good assistant, incrementally adding to sales. Over a third (34%) of shoppers stated that a poor experience has driven them to buy from another retailer.

The research also highlights the impact of the decline of the local shop, with a quarter of Brits saying they miss shopping somewhere where people recognise them, 16% confessing they preferred the days when they could talk through a purchase with a someone in-store, and a quarter saying online shopping is less fun than buying something in a real shop.  The convenience of a store’s location is also stated as important by 43% of respondents which means that as retailers consolidate their estates, many will notice the effects, further emphasising the need to carefully consider the experience being provided in-store and the staff needed to deliver the experience.

According to the research we waste almost an hour and a half a month – which is 17 hours a year, the equivalent of more than two days at work - interacting with automated technology, only for a human to have to step in and help. Bug bears include getting someone to rectify a problem with the self-service checkout, and ringing customer services and dealing with a recorded voice, only to repeat the details to the person you end up talking to. 

Little wonder, then, that 51% of Brits have slammed the phone down during an automated call, as the system didn’t recognise what they were saying.  And 47% of shoppers have experienced self-service checkout failure that’s had to be rectified by a shop assistant.

In fact, more than three quarters (77%) of UK shoppers admit they’d much rather use a checkout with a person on it, rather than taking the self-service option.  More than 4 in ten (43%) British shoppers would rather speak to a person than an automated system when making a phone enquiry, with almost a quarter (23%) ending up having to complain on social media when their query hasn’t been responded to via the automated service.

Daniel Todaro, managing director of Gekko said: “Everyone is talking about technology and innovation within retail, but our research clearly shows that what consumers really want is the human touch.  With traditional retail under more pressure than ever and an astonishing 81% of people feeling that the personal touch has disappeared from shopping, businesses need to focus on the customer experience in these tough trading times to help keep the high street alive.” 

The survey was conducted by Ginger Comms in December 2018, speaking to a sample of 1,500 shoppers aged 18+ and representative of the UK population.

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The Drum caught up with Marc Keating of Stein IAS to discuss his understanding of the emerging sector.

The Drum together with Stein IAS has been honouring the individuals who are pushing forward their business by using martech platforms, giving them a chance to speak openly about the changes in martech and have them recognised as Top Martech Heroes within the industry.

Keating spoke to us about the biggest martech trends from the past year, key challenges overcome within the sector and shares his predictions for 2019.

What are the biggest trends you’ve identified in martech in 2018?

AI has become one of the hottest trends in B2B this year, but its application within marketing beyond programmatic, personalisation and predictive data technology has been limited. The challenge for martech vendors now is how they embed AI and machine leaning capabilities within their stacks, beyond predictive data and analytics, which has been its initial application.

Also 2018 has been the year of ABM tech activation, as brands start deploying ABM platforms to activate intent data and deliver account targeted advertising and web personalisation.

This year, digital transformation has been higher on the agenda of most organisations, and as brands digitise their offerings and create new tech-driven service models and platforms, there has been more pressure on CMOs to transform the marketing function and GTM strategies. As part of this drive, immersive content experiences, AR/VR/MR, blockchain, AI/ML, personal assistants and chatbots are just some of the uses to address in 2019 and beyond.

What do you think have been some of the biggest challenges in effectively implementing martech in 2018 and how have organisations overcome these? (Or do you think they still have a way to go?)

At a strategic level, one of the biggest challenges that brands have faced is selecting and connecting the right tools to power their CX strategies. We’re seeing a rationalisation of the tech stack as brands begin to align technology investment more closely with the business and marketing strategy and overall integration goals.

2018 has also been the year of compliance as brands navigated the minefield of GDPR, which forced organisations to address their marketing, data, digital media/programmatic, content and tech strategies. In many ways, it has made organisations go back to basics by placing permission-based marketing at the heart of their strategies, with inbound, content marketing and contact preference centres driving effective data acquisition and nurture strategies.

At a more strategic level, GDPR has made organisations prioritise their data strategy in terms of how they capture, structure and manage first, second and third-party data for marketing activation and how they unlock data silos to build a 360-degree view of the customer. This has seen the wider adoption of data management platforms and an increase in the adoption of customer data platforms, which I believe will increase in 2019 as brands put the foundations in place to feed AI technologies with relevant data.

What new skills or practices, if any, do you think the industry will need to learn with the evolution of martech?

Over the last 10 years we’ve seen the rise, fall and rise again of martech and we are now entering an inflection point where the tech that has powered GTM and the CX will be very different than the emerging and disruptive technologies that will power it in the future. This is going to highlight and create skills gaps at all levels of the marketing and digital function and with a greater prioritisation of the stack and the deeper integration of tech across the customer journey, brands will also need to rethink their operational models and the teams and resources within them.

C-level marketers will need to adapt to a new lexicon as the tech stack layers of CRM, content management and marketing automation blend with predictive, AI and data science platforms.

At the practitioner level, talented individuals that understand the technology and have the strategic marketing intellect to align it with the marketing and business strategy will be in demand. Connecting the dots between the “Mar” and the “Tech” is where the biggest gap is. Designing “click to conversion” experiences that blend creative, content and media requires a new type of “CX orchestrator”. When AI and machine learning become fully bedded into the stack a new type of marketing architect will be born.

Where you do expect the martech industry to head in 2019?

2019 will see five rapidly evolving martech characteristics begin to become commonplace as we see the birth of the “cognitive marketing cloud”, enabling one-to-one intelligent experiences across the brand-demand continuum.

Recombination

Today, creative and content are mostly built as complete executions, sometimes with multiple versions developed for each persona or segment. But a handful of marketing AI players have illuminated “tomorrow” by beginning to “atomize” creative: breaking complete executions down into smaller objects. Tomorrow, this ‘recombinant creative’ approach will be required to feed automated marketing and programmatic advertising systems capable of dynamically constructing millions of individualised experiences.

Individualisation

This is where increasing targeting precision leads to the ability to recognise an individual (based on big data) and craft a unique experience using recombinant creative and content. The next wave of individualisation will be far more dynamic, and work across many more touchpoints, orchestrated by AI and enabled by big data and by integration of the adtech, martech and emerging sales tech stacks.

Adaptability

A corollary to individualisation, adaptability in this sense is about re-defining buyer journeys in real-time based on automated analysis of audience engagement data. Tomorrow’s automated tools will need to adapt the buyer journey path at every stage and turn, driven by their digital body language. Instead of being limited to a single channel, there will be a new kind of ‘adaptive campaign canvas’ across all channels and that adjusts in real-time.

Automation

Near-future marketing automation platforms will have adaptable campaign canvases and experiences that build themselves. A self-learning AI platform will compile disparate elements together to create the ultimate real-time, adaptive, optimised experience for each user.

Self-learning

Future multi-channel adaptive campaign canvases will adjust the entire buyer path in real-time, not only based on behaviour and profile data but also previous conversion data for that target user profile. And they will continuously learn from all their previous interactions and get better and better and better at knowing when to convert, and what’s converting.

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According to research from Attest, almost all brands (95%) shy away from asking their customers the questions they want to, because they perceive market research methods to be an expensive, complex and frustratingly slow process. 

With the rise of new technologies that help unlock customer data, brands and businesses no longer have to stay wedded to traditional practices. The emergence of mobile, social and programmatic technology has not only changed the way we communicate as humans but also the way brands communicate with their customers.

Industry leaders are calling for market research to evolve in the same way; technology has created a way to access real time insight into customer preference, and there are online tools available to access these insights faster, cheaper and with more transparency than ever before.

There is clearly a need for it.  Cultural shifts happen much quicker than they used to, and trust in a brand can change overnight. Whether it’s responding to a breaking news story, designing new creative for OOH, or building out new consumer segments, insight based on real-time research can provide marketers with the ability to test, learn, reiterate and re-evaluate campaigns (or respond to trends) as they are happening.

That combined with the proliferation of web and social listening tools, joining the likes of Mintel and Nielson offering trends analysis, it’s easier than ever for a brand to understand what’s happening with their customer base as and when changes happen.

“The accuracy, the ability to target your exact audience so specifically, adding interlocking quotas to get a specific make up of audiences is really powerful. That accuracy gives you incredible confidence in the data you hold as a business,” explained Mark Walker, Marketing Director at Attest. 

“The entire [market research] business model is under threat, which is why some of the more established specialists are reluctant to embrace change,” says Walker. “But we’re on a mission to ensure all companies can put real consumers and real time data at the heart of every decision.”

Download the Scalable Intelligence Report here to understand how shifting to more agile approach could be the answer for brands hoping to keep in tune with a rapidly changing and ever unpredictable consumer.

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Outgoing Unilever chief marketing officer Keith Weed has offered some parting wisdom to holding groups: get your agencies to collaborate or brands will find value elsewhere.

Speaking to The Drum, Weed reiterated his call from earlier this year that complex holding company structures must continue to evolve to meet client needs and said its experiments with an alternative model were making "good progress".

“When I speak to Mark Read at WPP, John Wren at Omnicom or Michael Roth at IPG, I tell them they need to do more within these holding companies to integrate the offer,” Weed said.

"I [tell them], ‘in integrating the offer we have value coming to you. If you just keep all your agencies separate, I can pick and choose from you as much as I can pick and choose from the whole market’."

As the exec prepares to step down in May after close to four decades at the helm of the Dove owner to pursue new opportunities, he’s already testing a model that does just that.

Unilever has asked two of the different holding companies it works with to pool talent together into single teams working under the umbrella of their retrospective networks (in other words, rival networks aren't sitting at the same table but competing agencies are). 

Unilever's test is running at the same time as a similar initiative from P&G which goes a step further by bringing rivals from competing networks together

Despite relaying concerns in June that there was a challenge in bringing a different set of egos and P&Ls under one roof, even if they represented the same network, Weed gave an update on the experiment, saying it was making “good progress”. 

“I don't want to yet declare victory but certainly we're on the path to victory,” he mused, saying he was appreciative of the agencies who had taken part and “brought together resources in a way that does put all the right people around the table and integrate the offer."

He added: “It's exciting, if anything it makes me feel nostalgic for the olden days. It's back to the future in a positive way.”

Weed's comments also come amid ongoing consolidation in the holding group space with Read's WPP officially bringing together a slew of P&Ls to better serve clients over the past six months. So far, this has included VML and Y&R (now VMLY&R) and Wunderman and JWT (AKA Wunderman Thompson).  Speculation is now swirling that another significant merger will be revealed at WPP's shareholder gathering later this week. 

Unilever has already slashed the number of agencies it works with as part of a cost-cutting exercise which has helped to deliver savings to the tune of $2bn.

'Stop optimising by media, start optimising by brand 

Weed’s call for less agency silos echoes a previous appeal to partners to reinvent themselves in order to help modern marketers overcome the issue of “brand fragmentation”.

With just five months left in the top marketing job it’s still something he’s focused on – but for Weed it’s not just about bringing agencies closer together. There’s also the issue of deeper integration between media and creative and which should come first.

Weed said that when he walked through the doors of Unilever in 1983, agency-brand meetings were all about creative, then “someone would come in on media” for a short discussion.

“It would be on one or two pages of A4 and the talk would be about is it burst or is it drip? That was it.”

TV, print, cinema and radio were discussed in the same meeting, he added, with planning tacked on to the creative discussion.

“Now,” he went on, “a media plan is a complete tomb of all sorts of complex things. It’s brilliant because you can do lots of different things, but it’s really challenging for a marketer.

“Today, marketers have a mobile agency saying: 'if you don't do it this way you won't be 100% great on mobile', then they have a social agency saying: 'if you don't do it this way you won't be 110% great on social'.

“Frankly, I'd be very happy to be 90% great on social, 95% great on mobile if I was 110% great for the brand. What we've had is a level of fragmentation that's happening on brands and the biggest challenge for advertisers right now is integration, to get that consistent voice and feel across different media.”

Explaining how this fed into his point about telling agency bosses to break down barriers, Weed was firm that it was time to stop optimising by media and start optimising by brand.

“The marketer back then was helped because the agency – the agency, not 12 agencies – would integrate it and bring the experts to you.”

Within its own walls, Unilever has responded to this challenge by building a series of digital hubs in 28 of its biggest markets so it can better understand its own data and activate in real-time. 

With the end goal of achieving one-to-one personalised marketing at scale, Weed said this year has marked a "significant turning point" for the business in edging closer to it. 

Keith Weed has been nominated for the World Federation of Advertisers' global marketer of the year award. You can vote for him, and the other finalists, on the WFA website.

You can read The Drum’s full exit interview with Keith Weed on Tuesday 11 November. 

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