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The CareGivers Depot by Guest Blogger - Lisa Y. Greenwade - 5M ago
My guest blogger is Lisa Greenwade. She is a part of the stamp development team at the U.S. Postal Service. Her goal is to educate people about stamps that might be of interest to them and their communities.Net proceeds from sales of the Alzheimer’s semipostal stamp are distributed to the National Institutes of Health, which is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, all part of a national effort to find ways to prevent, treat, and someday stop this heartbreaking disease. In its first 13 months on the market, the US Postal Service has sold 5.4 million Alzheimer’s Stamps, raising $771,000 for National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded dementia research. But we only have the semipostal through November 2019. Please take a moment to read this post to see why it's important that we support by purchasing this stamp.
The U.S. Postal Service® is proud to issue this semipostal stamp that helps raise funds to fight Alzheimer’s disease. As one of the top ten leading causes of death in the United States, Alzheimer’s destroys the minds of the people affected by it and poses enormous challenges for family members and caregivers. Today, Americans are increasingly committed to finding ways to prevent, treat, and someday stop this heartbreaking disease.
The most common form of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It is a progressive, irreversible disorder that attacks nerve cells, or neurons, and their connections in the brain, causing memory loss, decrease in cognitive skill, and changes in behavior. The disease is named for Alois Alzheimer, the German physician who in 1906 discovered and described two hallmark signs of the disease in the brain—clumps of amyloid protein fragments and tangles of tau protein fibers—and linked them to observable symptoms. More than 5.3 million Americans age 65 and older are estimated to have Alzheimer’s disease, a number predicted to rise as the population ages. The nation has also turned its attention to the type of dementia known as younger-onset or early-onset Alzheimer's, which affects individuals under age 65. In addition to the loss of memory and thinking abilities and ultimate decline for the person with the disease, Alzheimer's is infamous for the emotional and financial toll it can take on loved ones. Alzheimer's experts emphasize the importance of education and strongly encourage caregivers to reach out to local and national agencies and organizations for information and support. The artist for this stamp was Matt Mahurin. Art director Ethel Kessler designed the stamp.
Sold at a price of 65 cents per First-Class™ stamp, this stamp is a semipostal. The price of a semipostal stamp pays for the First-Class™ single-piece postage rate in effect at the time of purchase plus an amount to fund causes that have been determined to be in the national public interest. Net proceeds from this stamp are distributed to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
For a closer look or to order the Alzheimer semipostal stamps, visit the online Postal Store® at
or call 800-STAMP-24.
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I went to visit my mom and stepdad's final resting place on Christmas Day, and it was emotional for me. I mean in a matter of four years I lost everyone in my immediate family. I went through the daunting task of going thru my loved ones things and came across a trunk full of accomplishments that my mom and stepdad had over their lifetime. There were diplomas, certificates, letters of recognition old photos, etc Just a cornucopia. of things that just showed what amazing individuals they were.
I thought to myself WOW. Now I knew my mom was amazing of course, but I had said after all that life's work, a disease like dementia can come in and take you away so ruthlessly. My stepdad had a purple heart in the military. One of the last things he said to me that if he passes away know that he had a great life. I'm sure that I don't know half of the accomplishments he had over his lifetime. Look it happens to most of us. We work so hard to accomplish so much, so we can get good jobs, make our family proud, take care of everyone else, or to get to that next plato in life. When your gone it's memories of course, but in this world that we live in it seems like it's just stuff of a life well lived.
Sometimes, people don’t learn the most interesting attributes and experiences about a person until the funeral. So, the while your living celebrating those accomplishments offers a time to really learn about the “whole life” of a person. Today, people lead such splintered lives spread far apart in many cases from their birthplace and their families. It takes a death to unite people from distant locals in one place. Having a celebration today maybe the last time a loved one joins with all those he or she loved and experienced life with and vice versa.
Yes, accomplishments matter in life. They should be celebrated because in death they are important memories but for the person who passed it can no longer serve them but it serves as a part of their legacy. I remember my mom celebrating every one my birthdays until she couldn't remember. she rejoiced at my solos at my dance recital, my accomplishments on my job, my graduation from college, and my first apartment. You may not think that it's a big deal but now that I'm older I cherish those memories. I wasn't their for a majority of her accomplishments but we celebrated her retirement and her marriage to my stepdad.
I will tell you the old saying "Bring me flowers while I can still smell them" same goes for taking time to pat yourself on the back. In fact, why not treat yourself to something special to acknowledge your accomplishments? Celebrate you and your loved ones past successes over the years as well, while you and your loved one is still here you both deserve it! Accomplishments. No matter how small those small wins are what makes you who you are today.
Holding a celebration for your loved one that focuses on their life, instead of their passing, can be a great way to celebrate the memories, experiences, and liveliness of your loved one. To celebrate your loved one’s life, you need nothing more than a time, a place, and friends and family that knew your loved one. Though, there are other things, such as food and music, that can make the celebration more lively. Get together with family and friends while look at old VHS / BETA tapes, yes anyone that's old enough know what those were, bring out the old photos and share stories I usually get them from the Elders LOL the folks that knew your loved one when they were younger you will be surprised to hear some of the nicknames and stories behind the photos.
I encourage everyone especially if you have a loved one with a life threating illness, to take time outside of the caregiving responsibilities to talk to them about their life while their still able to share all of the exciting and challenging things that they went through from their perspective. Ask about their parents, grandparents etc, as it's important to know about your family from each generation.
It's all too common to move on to the next task at hand and keep doing more and more without stopping to recognize what you've achieved. Celebrating your accomplishments today can actually give you a boost of confidence and lead to even more success. So go ahead and live it up! I challenge you to you set your 2019 goals by looking back at 2018 and documenting all you’ve achieved and accomplished this past year. Remember these will be the memories that you will look back on when your older.
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While you are looking forward to spending the holiday season with family and friends, it may be a little different this year. Perhaps a parent, grandparent or even a dear friend suffering from a form of Dementia is in a nursing home this time around. You may be questioning yourself how to celebrate the holiday festivities with them in this situation or even if you should do it at all.
Some elderly individuals know that they can’t spend the holidays in their own home, and that can be difficult. If your elderly loved one does not want to talk about it respect their decision. Just don’t pretend that the holidays are not coming.
First things first before you plan to celebrate the holidays or any other special occasion in a nursing home, make sure you check with the nursing home staff. It may be okay to have holiday celebrations in the nursing home, most of them embrace it and want to have their residents happy, but there some nursing homes have stricter rules regarding celebrations.
Even having a Christmas tree in rooms may not be allowed especially if that particular facility has patients who require intensive medical care or have Dementia. Having certain decorates such as pinecones or fake fruit could be mistaken as food for someone who is suffering from Alzheimer's. So keep the decorations simple. Here is what you can do to bring the holiday cheer to your loved one in the Nursing Home.
Bringing them a home cooked meal that is familiar. The food will remind your loved one of a time that they used to make that excellent dish if it was one of their unique family recipes from their past. Make sure that the food meets their current dietary restrictions if they are on medications, have unique health needs, or is unable to eat specific foods because of their dementia.
Music is important. Traditional Christmas music can be very nostalgic, bringing back memories of younger years. Be sure to sing songs like “We wish you a Merry Christmas” or “The First Noel” that you and your loved one can enjoy.
Dementia varies from person to person, so it’s important not to have expectations of how an activity or experience will go. Often during the holiday things won’t go as planned, but it will be joyful at points of time. It’s these special moments that, if you notice them, will make the whole experience meaningful and worthwhile.
Timing is crucial an individuals that suffer from a form of dementia experience sundowner’s syndrome – a condition causing increased agitation and confusion in the evening and nighttime hours. So because of this, it’s best to plan your event earlier in the day. A holiday brunch or lunch will allow for the most quality time together. If the celebration has to be in the evening because of family obligations, keep the area of the event well lighted and let your loved one get rest if he or she is showing signs of fatigue.
While being flexible will be essential, it’s important to remember that a person with dementia will very often rely on a regular daily routine to feel secure and comfortable. Visiting friends or family outside of their usual environment, and taking part in unfamiliar activities, could cause anxiety. Try to stay as close to their scheduled routine as possible.
Celebrating the holidays in a nursing home does not have to be uneventful, but if you go in with a plan and can be flexible, it will be enjoyed by all.
Happy Holidays to you and your loved one.
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For the individuals that had to take a long break from their career to become a full-time caregiver the prospect of re-entering the workforce can be intimidating. Most likely you will find unique challenges that may make it difficult to land the job that you want. There are some ways that you can prepare for success.
Before you apply to the same types of jobs you held a year ago, consider the person you are today and determine if the career that you once had is a good fit for you now. One way to avoid doubting yourself and increasing your confidence back is to “identify what’s important to you at this point in your life, and What is your purpose? Caregiving can change you more than you know, and you will most likely look at life differently. Once you answer those questions, moving on to the practical task of pinpointing which skills you had developed before you left the workforce or in the year since then that employers might want will be easy. You may also consider using this opportunity to change career paths as well.
The job market can change in a few months. While caregiving there is a chance that you haven’t kept up with changes in your field, and that may make you fall behind the competition. Keeping your skills relevant will improve your chances of landing a job when the time comes. Consider taking classes, reading books, and search the Internet for information on the latest trends in your industry.
When updating your resume, do not try to hide your employment gap. Be honest and transparent about why you left your job in the past can be helpful. Initiate open discussions of why you stopped working. That will demonstrate your confidence, honesty, and resolve. Employers will understand and may want to assist you.
Caregivers who cared for a loved one who had a form of dementia might never have thought about how their caregiving experience could help in the job field. If you are currently a caregiver for a loved one, think about if you would want to do it professionally. As our population rises in the future, many people will need compassionate care. If you enjoy providing care for other people, you may want to look into becoming trained as a nursing aide or health aide.
Networking is essential for any job search. Casual conversations with others about your search for employment could help. A friend or family member might have information on the opportunities you may have missed and may be able to refer you, which will increase your chances of success.
Getting back into the workforce after a long absence can be tough, but it is not impossible. Keep your skills current and strategize carefully, and you can succeed in re-entering the workforce no matter how long you’ve been away.
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So you have a friend, and they are currently a caregiver. You see them struggle daily to make it every day. Caregivers have to juggle responsibilities for everyone including themselves. Some of them have full-time jobs, or they are someone’s parent of young children. They are someone’s secretary making medical appointments, they are the legal counsel going over important paperwork deciding on their loved one's well-being, and they are the nursing assistant feeding and giving baths to their loved one, leaving no time for themselves. Their lives for the most part has made a complete 180 degrees turn from their regular day to day.
I remember taking care of my mom making sure she was put together when she was still able to go out and about, and I ended up going outside with my shirt on backward. Caregivers who most of the time take on this role out of love knowing that no payment would be received nor a thank you.
Have you ever asked yourself what you can do to support a friend who is a caregiver? If you don’t know depending on the situation ask your friend or colleague what can I do to help? Here a few ideas you can start with.
1. Be Empathetic
Your friend is going thru something painful, if their loved one has a life-threatening disease like dementia, they worry every day how long they have left with their loved one. I grieved every day as my mom went further along in the disease. When she passed away, I was just emotionally exhausted. These feelings are normal. You may not have gone thru something like that yourself but being there is showing a sign of support. Call and check on them now and then, and don’t take their irritability personally as they are in a stressful situation.
2. Help out
Caring for a loved one is a 24/7 365 day a year job, and as the disease progresses, it’s even more draining. Help out around the house maybe cook or bring a meal over their home or assist them in cleaning up the house. If they have kids take them out to the movies to give your friend a break.
3. Family Gatherings
As we approach the holiday season, this can be very difficult for the caregiver. Depending on the family dynamic. The caregiver may get unsolicited advice from both family and friends, and this can make them feel like their best isn’t good enough. This likely comes from the family member that’s not even helping no less. If your friend is open to it, let the visiting family stay with the person who needs care so you to can maybe go for a walk for an hour or two. Be their sounding board if they want to vent.
4. Self-Care
It’s important for caregivers to ensure that they take care of themselves. As a former caregiver myself, this isn’t easy to do, but I didn’t manage to get some self-care in. You can help your friend by surprising them with a gift of getting some paid medical professional to come in for a couple of hours. If your friend doesn’t want to leave their loved one alone with someone unfamiliar, stay home and watch a movie together.
As a friend of someone who is a caregiver, even small gestures of support can make a big difference during their caregiving journey. Caregiving is a job you do with love, so reflect that love back to them. Tell them that they are not alone and you have their back.
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Yes, I’ve said this to myself many of times, you love your parent, but you don’t think that you have it in you to be a caregiver. What do you do when you don’t have a choice? Well, I had two options like many of us do place my mom in a Nursing Home or step up to the plate a provide care to the woman that gave me life and was my number one supporter. I chose to step into the caregiver role. Fortunately, I had help her Husband and his daughter who was a medical provider who guided me along the way but if help isn’t available what do you do? What do you do when the "family" disappears from all forms of responsibility?
These thoughts come into someone’s mind when their parent develops a form of dementia. Like most people, you are not a medical care provider. Your parents, who were once very active, your hero if you were lucky has become more like your child. Most caregivers live in a different state not close enough to check in on them, so we worry about them falling, driving somewhere and getting lost or in an accident, and other things that lead to dangerous situations. Those concerns can be overwhelming. This stress can significantly contribute to poor health and poor mental state of ourselves.
So you sit there thinking of what to do. I can’t do it, so I’m going to place my parent in a nursing home. This is when most of the judgment comes. From other family members from friends who don't even want to help, and co-workers who may have never personally experience this in their family. I get it. I used to say why would someone put their parent in a nursing home or assisted care facility until my mom had dementia. I know ignorance is bliss, I didn’t know that much about dementia before I was a caregiver myself. That is why I tell everyone to advocate to educate people about Alzheimers. Don’t allow their attitudes make you feel guilty most people don’t know how hard being a caregiver is. It’s not like your mom or dad have a choice. That would be different. When your parent has dementia, they are entirely dependent on you. When the disease progresses through the various stages, it becomes a 24/7 365 days a year job that you don’t get paid for. This caregiving job is not pretty it's hard as hell. You can’t have a conversation with your loved one; you have to bathe, feed, dress, and in the worse case after all that, they don’t even know who you are, and that's heartbreaking. So you hear it's rewarding and it is but you don't really feel or see that while your in the mists of caregiving your mostly likely trying to keep yourself going day to day and hour by hour.
I heard of stories of siblings disappearing when their parent has dementia, and one sibling is left with the weight on their shoulders. You are angry and frustrated, but it’s important to see both sides of the story if you are the one holding that weight. Truth is when the caregiving need arises people start scattering. Their busy or they can't because of xyz fill in the blank. You need to think about the struggles that other family members my face on a daily basis. I'm not saying that your life is a bunch of daises everyone has their struggles. Some folks are not emotionally prepared to take on the responsibility that it takes to be a caregiver. That in itself to even admit it instead of running away is important. Some may have health issues themselves or have young children with little time to provide care for their parent. People may have just huge problems going on that you're not even aware of. So does that give them an excuse? No, but it's important that even though you are not up to the challenges that a caregiver faces keeping your loved one at home. Take part in the conversation of your parents care.
For me being a caregiver for my mom was an honor, but it was hardly easy it was downright difficult and painful. It affected my health, my work, my relationships, and it was depressing. Do you think that your mom or dad would want you to be ill? No, they want you to prosper and exceed in life. Dementia is nothing that anyone would want to acquire; it comes like a thief in the night and it's relentless in it's attack.
I can’t speak on this as a professional, but I can only provide my opinion on this. If you love your parent and don’t think you can do it, talk it out with the rest of the family. If your the primary caregiver and family does not want to help, you have to let it go. Decide upon yourself what you can handle. Pray or meditate on it. This dementia journey can be long and the later stages can burn you to your core. It will change you. Don't let the resentment eat away at you. There are ways that they can help if they can’t be the caregiver full time. Those family members should focus on what they can do to help take the weight off the primary caregiver. No one is a perfect caregiver even paid professionals. We are dealing with the unknown disease with no cure currently we are all learning.
At the end of the day as children we need to ask ourselves what is best for your parent, then ask yourself if you are a qualified enough or have the right assistance to provide care. Isn’t your parent important enough to make an informed decision about receiving appropriate medical care? Whatever your choice is, I wish you well.
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Over time the dark days outweigh the good days. Although you want to don’t want to admit it, you feel that you can no longer take on the caregiving responsibility. Placing your loved one who has dementia in a nursing home is never a decision you should take on lightly but, here are some signs that caregivers visually and physically experience to recognize that maybe it’s time to consider it:
1. Wandering. As dementia moves into the later stages, the risk of wandering becomes more significant. Your loved one can wander off even if you leave them out of your sight for a moment to go to the bathroom and the probability of falls and injuries increases. I must admit when my mom wandered out of the house in her pajamas almost going into a busy street before she was brought back home terrified me and I had started to consider it then. We as a family did decide to keep her home but hid the door keys and put the house alarm on during the day.
2. Sundowning. I would describe it as your loved one’s biological clock makes them more confused in the evening than early in the morning or afternoon. This behavior can take a toll on caregivers, and when it begins to disrupt routines, this may also be a sign that the caregiving burden is too hard to handle. I remember my mom pacing back and forth through the house during the night. I decided to take her out for walks during the day when she was still able to do so, and not let her nap as often during the day so she would sleep through the night, but as the disease progressed the sundowning would increase.
3. Aggressive behavior. Verbal, physical, and even sexual aggression often happen in those who have dementia, As a caregiver, you may suffer from this behavior and begin to feel resentful. This aggression would make it difficult to bathe, clothe, and feed your loved one. Despite your best efforts, even the most experienced caregiver will have a time when your loved one’s behavior will begin to escalate, and the situation will demand a quick response before things spiral out of control.
4. Safety issues at their place of residence. Ask yourself honest questions about your loved one's health and your abilities to care for them. Is your loved with dementia becoming unsafe at home? If you're in a house or an apartment with stairs or a basement, there is an increased chance of an injury by falling to happen. My mom and her husband lived on a flat so I didn't have to worry about stairs. You can find a whole checklist on home safety by clicking here
5. Accelerating health care needs. Is the health of your loved the one with dementia at risk? Is your loved one’s care’s care needs beyond your physical abilities? If you’re answering yes to these questions, it might be time to have that difficult, family conversation. Most likely as a caregiver you are not a healthcare professional. As your loved one’s health deteriorates can you provide the best care that they need?
6. Caregiver exhaustion. Stress is a symptom that a caregiver experiences. Your declining health indicates a need for help as the five other signs above become more frequent. I remember when my health declined. I lost weight and was mentally and physically exhausted. I felt like I had a lack of control of the whole situation at the time. When you're in the throes of caregiving, you don’t have many resources available to you nor do you have the time to research those resources, and caring for your loved one is costly.
Nobody wants to witness these signs and come to the realization that you may want to think about placing your loved one in a Nursing Home or a Memory care facility. There is nothing that a caregiver should feel guilty about, but you want to think about it if you can handle this journey. You can always go to a support group near you by going on the Alzheimers Association support group page for help coping with the caregiving journey near you, and some of these places have the training to help.
Stay Strong and Encouraged
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The time has come when you feel that you can’t provide your parent the best care at home. You have dreaded this choice, but think that it’s best for all parties involved. There are things that you should consider when making this decision. In the brief moment that I considered placing my mom in a Nursing home as a last resort, I've heard the horror stories about mistreated patients but, there are good Nursing homes you have to do your research. I did some research myself even though we decided to keep mom at home.
First things first, get yourself a notepad because you need to do your research. Start by writing down what type of care that your loved one needs? Talk to their current physician if they have one about what kind of care they require. If they didn’t have a current physician take them to a medical professional for a checkup and also use your feedback as a caregiver, you have the most input to add because you are with your parent more than the doctor, so the information you provide is valuable. Not all nursing homes have the same skills for each need.
Money, Yes you knew that this was coming. Find out what you can afford. Check into your loved one's insurance. Medicare might cover a few weeks or months of short-term care, but long-term care may not. Medicaid and private insurance may pay some of the costs, but most of the financial burden usually ends up the families responsibility. If you are not sure what you can afford, talk to a financial advisor.
Choose a few Nursing Homes to Visit. When I did my search around the area where my mom and her husband lived, it was far for me, but I knew that he wanted to be close to her if we decided to do this. I also checked that it met my specific requirements of having a memory care section. Read both the inspection reports and reviews for every facility you are considering. If your loved one can’t make their own decisions, discuss the nursing home options with the rest of the family and listen to everyone’s opinion.
Visit the Nursing Homes you selected. Talk to the administrators, the staff, and make sure you say hello to the residents. You may not want to but if there are family members there I would ask them for their thoughts on the facility, and if their parent seems happy and safe. Ask to see the private sections as well as the public ones. Arrive with questions to ask, and make sure that you get all your questions answered while your there.
The final thing to consider is to sit down with your family review the notes you have gathered about each nursing home. Include inspection reports, and consider doing a litigation search as well. Once you have all the answers, you can make an informed decision. This list is not all-inclusive. Putting your loved one in a Nursing Home is very stressful, and it’s easy for you to feel guilty about it. Caregiving is hard, and it’s not for everyone. Just know that you have it in your heart to see that you can’t take on that task and you want to leave it to the medical professionals. So take plenty of time researching facilities to make the best decision for your loved one. Hopefully, this will leave you with a peace of mind.
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Hello everyone. I haven’t posted a blog in a while I know, but I’m slowly making it back on the scene. Everyone that has had a loss of a loved one and or was a caregiver for your loved one can relate to wanting to take time to recover from the heartache and exhaustion. It’s a lot, and you shouldn’t apologize for that.
When I lost my brother from cancer in April 2015 after six months after his diagnosis, my heart was broken he was my hero. I couldn’t even grieve with my mom because of her dementia, so I grieved and moved forward as a caregiver for her. Then my mother passed away from suffering for ten years from vascular dementia in June 2017. That was devasting because it was something that I couldn’t help, I just watched as she suffered and no matter how much care I provided she couldn’t get better. Lastly my stepdad in June 2018 from a combination of being my mom’s caregiver, heartbreak from her passing, and kidney failure this year I was spent. Being a caregiver has a way of breaking your whole being down, and my health went into a tailspin.
I was just numb; there isn’t anyway else to describe it. Life is funny that way I guess. Walking down the street shortly after my mom passed seeing people going on with their day to day lives as my little portion of the world was in a tailspin. I honestly didn’t think that the pain would go away, but as time passed, it got better. I knew that my mom and my brother were no longer in pain and that gave me solace. My stepdad went so quickly and unexpected. He loved my mom so much I believe that he was ready. He always told me if anything happened to him he had a good life.
I’ve always been a loner. Since my brother was ten years older than me, I learned to entertain myself. I hang out when I want with my friends, but I relish my time alone. It’s helped me a lot. My home is my sanctuary. Yes, friends will reach out to you, and that’s great to laugh and listen when you want to talk but let me tell you why alone time is necessary too. When you get around your friends and family, you don’t get a chance to grieve and be alone in your thoughts. Same for work. Going back to work is helpful, I must admit being busy helped me, but I still put in my me time. Sometimes people will act like they care when they don’t primarily in the workplace at times so be careful not to use work as a crutch. The “noise” of others although comforting doesn’t allow you to take in your thoughts in your mind in my opinion. You have to embrace the pain that comes from grief not pack it away.
Self-care! Self-care! Self-care! I can’t say it enough how for a recovering caregiver is so important. Whatever that is for you make sure you do that. But you must grieve. Mediate, write, and or workout anything that will be good for you and your body, mind, and soul.
So that it’s guys, I’m okay, and if you’re going through it, you will be okay too. Continue to stay strong and encouraged as a caregiver or any challenges you face in your life. You can get through it and when you do share your testimony, as I do through my quotes on my Instagram page or through my blog. You’re not alone.
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African-Americans are twice as likely as Caucasian people to get Alzheimer's. Although the cause of Alzheimer's disease is not known, studies have shown that persons with a long history of high blood pressure or high cholesterol are twice as likely to get Alzheimer’s disease. Another risk factor is diabetes. All these risk factors are higher in African-Americans.
To be honest, I'm terrified of this being that both of my parents passed away from different forms of dementia. My mom passed away in June 2017, and my dad passed away in July 2009 from a combination of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Now by no means, I'm going to claim that as my fate. I have to realize and be honest with the possible reality that I may suffer the same fate.
We wonder why African Americans are more susceptible to this disease. Many factors have shown that it's hereditary, that they are due to medical conditions since African American's are prone to having high blood pressure. It’s true that the lack of education can add negative influences in during childhood such as the use of home remedies past on thru generations, High fat diet, and just the historical suspicion of the medical system as well as religious or cultural beliefs on health care. Those with higher education with trust and access to medical care, able to have a healthier diet and exercise, have a better chance of earlier diagnosis and to hopefully slow the progression of the disease.
Alzheimer’s has always been taboo in the African American community. People don’t ever want to think of their loved ones as being forgetful or suffering from this disease. They would rather not know. It happens a lot in our community. I remember growing up, and if someone was scatter-brained they were getting old, and it wasn’t seen as a big deal.
What can we do as African Americans to help find a cure? We need to keep the conversation flowing and open. Let's not turn our backs as it will go away. We should continue advocating to make surveys, clinical trials available to us. Let's be real we should as a people participate in social groups, Alzheimer's walks, etc. Honestly, we are the only race including Hispanics, and I don't see enough of our faces out there.
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