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This vegan cheesecake recipe is rich, creamy and so delicious! It’s also paleo and no-bake.

I’ve tried a lot of vegan cheesecake recipes and never really liked them (exceptions would be like paleo chocolate cheesecake and paleo strawberry cheesecakes. Maybe I have too much of a sweet tooth but a lot of them have hardly any sweetness and don’t taste like much.

This is not that recipe! There’s lots of flavor and enough sweetener to make it taste like dessert. You can of course reduce the maple syrup if you want but I think it’s perfect as is.

I’ve been working on a vegan cheesecake recipe for a few years but didn’t like any of them enough to post. I have to really, really love something before posting. And this one was a huge hit!

If you’ve never had vegan cheesecake before, I feel like I should say it doesn’t taste just like regular cheesecake. It’s definitely different but still incredibly delicious.

At least in one of my freezers it didn’t. We recently bought a second freezer (because European fridges come with small freezers!) and in that one, it was more of a challenge to cut.

This cheesecake is soft and kind of mousse-like when refrigerated and firm but not rock hard when frozen. I’m not sure which way I prefer. Both are amazing!

Be warned that it takes a long time to freeze. You can cut it at 9 hours but it’s still a little soft. At 12 hours, it was totally firm.

The exact times will depend on the size of your pan and your freezer. If you’re in a hurry, you can use an 8″x8″ pan and I think they’d only need about an hour in the freezer!

I don’t recommend refrigerating it after preparing it because I feel like you’d be waiting around FOREVER getting it to firm up.

No-bake vegan desserts often (almost always?) use date and nut-based crusts. The ones I’ve tried usually don’t taste like much. The crust blends right in with the filling and the crust doesn’t add anything (in my opinion) other than calories.

This one definitely tastes like something. :) It’s chocolaty but not so chocolaty that you can’t taste the cheesecake. It’s nicely balanced.

For more no-bake treats, try these vegan no-bake peanut butter pies or vegan paleo raspberry cream pies. These paleo lemon bars are also cashew-based and super refreshing!

Substitution questions about this vegan cheesecake recipe?
  • What can I use in place of the cashews?

    I think any nut would work for the crust. For the filling, I don’t think there’s a good sub. Has anyone ever used something in place of cashews in vegan desserts?

  • Can I use something instead of dates?

    I haven’t tried it but perhaps prunes would work. I’m not sure how different they taste but I think with all that cocoa powder, it’d cover up any unusual taste.

  • Can I use X type of cocoa powder?

    Anything should work!

  • Can I use something other than coconut milk?

    I think any milk would work but it won’t be quite as rich, creamy or thick.

  • Can I use something other than maple syrup?

    Any liquid sweetener would probably work (that you would use as a 1:1 sub for maple syrup or honey).

  • Can I use something other than coconut oil?

    I’ve only tried this vegan cheesecake with coconut oil but think any solid fat would work.

  • Can I use something other than lemon juice?

    Unfortunately not. It’s needed to give the cheesecake it’s slight zing. Without it, the cheesecake tastes kind of flat.

  • Can I use a different sized pan?

    Definitely! Your cheesecake will just be thinner. Think about the crust, though. If you want an 8″x8″, you’ll probably want to double the crust. If you use a 6″ springform, you’ll have a little too much for the pan and will need to put the leftover filling in something else.

  • I don’t have a food processor or high-speed blender. What else can I use?

    Sorry to say that you need one of those. You can’t chop up the dates finely enough without one. And because of more importantly – the filling. I really, really recommend a high-speed blender (not a regular blender!) over the food processor. It’ll get the filling perfectly smooth and creamy. I can’t say that all food processors will do the same (though I’m sure some would!).

Vegan Cheesecake Recipe (paleo, grain-free, gluten-free)
  • Prep Time: 30 min
  • Cook Time: 0 min
  • Ready in: 9 h
  • Yield: 12 slices
Ingredients
    For the crust:
  • 2/3 cup (93 grams) raw cashews
  • 2/3 cup (140 grams) pitted dates, firmly packed
  • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons (19 grams) cocoa powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • For the filling:
  • 3 cups (435 grams) raw cashews
  • 3/4 cup (180 ml) full-fat canned coconut milk
  • 2/3 cup (160 ml) maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (56 grams) coconut oil
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • To garnish:
  • blueberries, raspberries and blackberries (or whatever you want!)
Directions
    Prepare the crust:
  1. Line the bottom and sides (all the way to the top) of a circular 7"x3" springform pan (if a little smaller, you can pour the leftover filling in a small dessert glass / bowl) with a piece of foil or plastic wrap.
  2. In the bowl of your food processor using an S-blade, pulse all the crust ingredients until it starts to come together. Depending on your food processor, this will take 1-3 minutes. Pinch a bit of it together - it should stick together easily. You can also use a high-speed blender (the small jar used to make nut butter). Process it on high for about 20 seconds or until no large chunks remain. It might look very dry but once you pinch it, it'll come together.
  3. Press firmly onto the bottom of the lined pan and press it down so that it's compacted.
  4. Place the pan in the freezer while you prepare the filling.
  5. Prepare the filling:
  6. Get out a high-speed blender and make sure it's large enough to fit all the ingredients. The filling yields about 5-6 cups. Add all the filling ingredients, in the order listed, and blend for about 30-60 seconds, or even longer, depending on your blender, or until totally smooth and no lumps remain.
  7. Pour the filling over the crust and place the cheesecake in the freezer for 9-12 hours or until the filling is frozen. Depending on your freezer, you might be able to cut it straight from the freezer. If not, you might need to let it sit at room temperature for 20 minutes or so.
  8. Top with berries before serving.
  9. Freeze for up to a month or refrigerate for up to 4 days.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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This paleo pancake recipe is like a cross between typical fluffy American pancakes and crepes! They’re also grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free.

I normally eat leftovers for breakfast but sometimes I like something that’s more of a treat, like these paleo blueberry muffins, banana pancakes or these paleo pancakes!

The first time I made this paleo pancake recipe, I used regular dairy-containing buttermilk and butter. It worked great. Then I needed to test them a whole bunch and eventually ran out of buttermilk.

So I figured I might as well make these pancakes dairy-free with homemade “buttermilk”, which also turned them into paleo “buttermilk” pancakes! All you do is add vinegar or lemon juice to whatever dairy-free milk you wish to use.

You really can’t tell any difference between the store-bought buttermilk and homemade dairy-free buttermilk version. The stack you see here is actually a mix of the two.

The thickness is kind of different than what you’re probably used to. They’re not thick like regular American fluffy pancakes, but they’re not nearly as thin as crepes.

They’re just hanging out in the middle – but they’re still pretty awesome! Especially for people like me who don’t like their pancakes to be too bready.

I used a mix of blanched almond flour and tapioca flour, which is also called tapioca starch. I’ve been doing a lot of grain-free and nut-free cooking recently and have been using tapioca quite a bit, like in these healthy muffins for kids I posted last week.

If you’d rather have coconut flour-based pancakes, try these light and fluffy coconut flour pancakes. They look amazing!

These paleo pancakes are perfect smothered in maple syrup or in this honey sweetened strawberry sauce. I make that sauce every year after coming home from strawberry picking (along with this 2-ingredient strawberry applesauce)!

One of winter’s highlights, as sad as that may be, is coming across a long-forgotten bag of this sauce. Seriously. Winters here are ridiculously dreary and a little piece of summer is a cause for celebration!

You can make the sauce with frozen strawberries but I’ve never found store-bought frozen strawberries that even come close to freshly picked strawberries. However, if you use strawberries that taste like nothing, the sauce will probably come close to tasting like nothing. In case that wasn’t clear. ;)

If you want something thicker, these paleo blueberry pancakes look perfect! Or if don’t need a grain-free version, try these delicious looking gluten-free buttermilk pancakes.

I tried making these pancakes with chia eggs once but they didn’t come out very well. If someone tries making these vegan, please share how you did it in the comments!

Questions about this paleo pancake recipe?
  • Can I use something other than almond flour? You can use almond meal if you don’t mind the bits of skins from the almonds. You can also use any other nut flour / meal that you’d like.

  • Can I use something other than tapioca flour / starch? I believe arrowroot flour / starch would work well but I haven’t tried it. I don’t think anything else would work.

  • What can I use instead of coconut sugar or honey / maple syrup? You can use whatever granulated sugar you want in place of the coconut sugar or even omit it. You can use any liquid sweetener in place of the honey / maple syrup.
  • Can I use something other than eggs? I tried them with chia eggs and wasn’t successful. I doubt other egg replacers would work well here.

  • Can I use something other than coconut oil? Whatever fat you want to use should probably work.

Paleo Pancake Recipe (grain-free, gluten-free, dairy-free)
  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 30 min
  • Ready in: 40 min
  • Yield: 10 pancakes
Ingredients
  • 1 1/3 cups (315 milliliters) non-dairy milk of choice (or regular buttermilk for a dairy-containing version), room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar1
  • 1 1/2 cups (150 grams) blanched almond flour
  • 1/2 cup (58 grams) tapioca flour / starch
  • 1 tablespoon coconut sugar
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder (make sure to use grain-free baking powder, if necessary)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 3 tablespoons (42 grams) coconut oil (or unsalted butter for a dairy-containing version), melted
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Directions
  1. If using store-bought dairy-containing buttermilk, skip to Step 2. Otherwise, prepare the dairy-free buttermilk. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice to a 1-cup (240-milliliter) measuring cup and fill up with dairy-free milk. Add 1 teaspoon lemon juice to a 1/3-cup (80-milliliter) measuring cup and fill up with dairy-free milk. Let sit for 5 minutes while preparing the rest of the recipe.
  2. In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the dry ingredients (almond flour through salt). Set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, stir together the wet ingredients (buttermilk through vanilla extract).
  4. Gradually add the dry mixture to the wet and stir until no lumps remain.
  5. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat.
  6. Pour 1/3 cup of batter into the pre-heated pan and cook for about 2 minutes or until bubbles form and the bottom has lightly browned.
  7. Flip the pancake over and cook for another minute or two.
  8. Repeat with the remaining batter.
  9. Serve immediately and keep any leftovers refrigerated for up to 4-5 days.
Notes
  1. Omit if using store-bought buttermilk!

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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This paleo pancake recipe is like a cross between typical fluffy American pancakes and crepes! They’re also grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free.

I normally eat leftovers for breakfast but sometimes I like something that’s more of a treat, like these paleo blueberry muffins, banana pancakes or these paleo pancakes!

The first time I made this paleo pancake recipe, I used regular dairy-containing buttermilk and butter. It worked great. Then I needed to test them a whole bunch and eventually ran out of buttermilk.

So I figured I might as well make these pancakes dairy-free with homemade “buttermilk”, which also turned them into paleo “buttermilk” pancakes! All you do is add vinegar or lemon juice to whatever dairy-free milk you wish to use.

You really can’t tell any difference between the store-bought buttermilk and homemade dairy-free buttermilk version. The stack you see here is actually a mix of the two.

The thickness is kind of different than what you’re probably used to. They’re not thick like regular American fluffy pancakes, but they’re not nearly as thin as crepes.

They’re just hanging out in the middle – but they’re still pretty awesome! Especially for people like me who don’t like their pancakes to be too bready.

I used a mix of blanched almond flour and tapioca flour, which is also called tapioca starch. I’ve been doing a lot of grain-free and nut-free cooking recently and have been using tapioca quite a bit, like in these healthy muffins for kids I posted last week.

If you’d rather have coconut flour-based pancakes, try these light and fluffy coconut flour pancakes. They look amazing!

These paleo pancakes are perfect smothered in maple syrup or in this honey sweetened strawberry sauce. I make that sauce every year after coming home from strawberry picking (along with this 2-ingredient strawberry applesauce)!

One of winter’s highlights, as sad as that may be, is coming across a long-forgotten bag of this sauce. Seriously. Winters here are ridiculously dreary and a little piece of summer is a cause for celebration!

You can make the sauce with frozen strawberries but I’ve never found store-bought frozen strawberries that even come close to freshly picked strawberries. However, if you use strawberries that taste like nothing, the sauce will probably come close to tasting like nothing. In case that wasn’t clear. ;)

If you want something thicker, these paleo blueberry pancakes look perfect! Or if don’t need a grain-free version, try these delicious looking gluten-free buttermilk pancakes.

I tried making these pancakes with chia eggs once but they didn’t come out very well. If someone tries making these vegan, please share how you did it in the comments!

Questions about this paleo pancake recipe?
  • Can I use something other than almond flour? You can use almond meal if you don’t mind the bits of skins from the almonds. You can also use any other nut flour / meal that you’d like.

  • Can I use something other than tapioca flour / starch? I believe arrowroot flour / starch would work well but I haven’t tried it. I don’t think anything else would work.

  • What can I use instead of coconut sugar or honey / maple syrup? You can use whatever granulated sugar you want in place of the coconut sugar or even omit it. You can use any liquid sweetener in place of the honey / maple syrup.
  • Can I use something other than eggs? I tried them with chia eggs and wasn’t successful. I doubt other egg replacers would work well here.

  • Can I use something other than coconut oil? Whatever fat you want to use should probably work.

Paleo Pancake Recipe (grain-free, gluten-free, dairy-free)
  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 30 min
  • Ready in: 40 min
  • Yield: 10 pancakes
Ingredients
  • 1 1/3 cups (315 milliliters) non-dairy milk of choice (or regular buttermilk for a dairy-containing version), room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon lemon juice or vinegar1
  • 1 1/2 cups (150 grams) blanched almond flour
  • 1/2 cup (58 grams) tapioca flour / starch
  • 1 tablespoon coconut sugar
  • 1 3/4 teaspoons baking powder (make sure to use grain-free baking powder, if necessary)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 3 tablespoons (42 grams) coconut oil (or unsalted butter for a dairy-containing version), melted
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Directions
  1. If using store-bought dairy-containing buttermilk, skip to Step 2. Otherwise, prepare the dairy-free buttermilk. Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice to a 1-cup (240-milliliter) measuring cup and fill up with dairy-free milk. Add 1 teaspoon lemon juice to a 1/3-cup (80-milliliter) measuring cup and fill up with dairy-free milk. Let sit for 5 minutes while preparing the rest of the recipe.
  2. In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the dry ingredients (almond flour through salt). Set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, stir together the wet ingredients (buttermilk through vanilla extract).
  4. Gradually add the dry mixture to the wet and stir until no lumps remain.
  5. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium heat.
  6. Pour 1/3 cup of batter into the pre-heated pan and cook for about 2 minutes or until bubbles form and the bottom has lightly browned.
  7. Flip the pancake over and cook for another minute or two.
  8. Repeat with the remaining batter.
  9. Serve immediately and keep any leftovers refrigerated for up to 4-5 days.
Notes
  1. Omit if using store-bought buttermilk!

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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These healthy muffins for kids get all their sweetness from bananas and sweet potato. Perfect for little ones! They’re also paleo, vegan, gluten-free and nut-free.

I’ve made my son a few date-sweetened muffins so far but he doesn’t seem to really like them. These are the first muffins that he really went for! And I really like them, too.

They’re not the most beautiful muffins ever, but you know… they’re banana-sweetened. And made with sweet potatoes, tapioca flour / starch, coconut flour and coconut oil.

With ingredients like that, I don’t really care what they look like. My son has never had a regular muffin like these paleo chocolate banana muffins or paleo blueberry muffins so he also didn’t care. :)

I’ve made these as mini muffins, regular muffins and in cake form. It’s easiest for my son to handle them as mini muffins and figure it may be the same for other kids, so that’s what you’re seeing today.

If making them as regular muffins, it takes a loooong time. Like 40 minutes. Same with cake. I actually only made a 2″x2″ (I use such a small pan to test fourth batches of brownies, like my favorite gluten-free brownies!)

I’ve also tried these muffins with pumpkin instead of sweet potato, thinking that obviously it would work, but nope. It’s still hard for me to believe that it didn’t work but the possibility that I just screwed up the measurements is a possibility (and very easy to do when making an eighth of the recipe!).

The texture is different than your regular wheat-based muffin but still really good! If you refrigerate them, make sure to microwave them a little first or let them come to room temperature. They’re super dense when cold.

I love the ingredients in these. I’ve only made them with tapioca flour / starch but I’m pretty sure arrowroot would work. I’m doubtful anything else would.

Maybe cornstarch? I try to avoid corn (except in this gluten-free cornbread which I must make for Thanksgiving!) so I haven’t tried it.

I also like that they have quite a bit of healthy fat in them. This is pretty much the only good on-the-go snack that my son enjoys with some good calories and fat in it.

He usually just eats vegetables, fruit and cheese. I think I’ll make him my gluten-free cheese crackers soon but they’re soooo absurdly addictive. Any other healthy snack ideas without added sugar?

I was really surprised after trying the first muffins. Banana-sweetened baked goods so often taste cardboardy! Hot from the oven, they’re kind of creamy / mousse-y but once they’ve cooled, they’re more like normal muffins.

It’s hard to describe what they taste like, though. They don’t taste very much like sweet potatoes, bananas or cinnamon. Just a nice blend of everything, I guess!

Make sure to use really ripe bananas (riper than what you see in the video). I’ve made them with just ripe bananas and they weren’t nearly as tasty.

The only downside to these muffins is that they stick badly to regular paper muffins. They slid right out of the silicone liners and the waxed paper ones were fine but just regular paper ones were problematic.

If they stick, let them sit for several hours and then try to remove the wrappers. It should be much easier!

I also made them without any liners and without greasing the pan, which was a non-stick pan, and they came out pretty okay. If you’re patient enough, you could grease all 24 muffin molds but I was too lazy for that.

You can make these muffins with either raw or cooked sweet potato. If using raw, you need to use a food processor or high-speed blender to process together the coconut oil, sweet potato and banana until it’s a puree and then add the rest of the ingredients.

When I made them with cooked sweet potato, I cut them into 1.5″ chunks and cooked in a pressure cooker at high for about 10 minutes. There are lots of ways to cook sweet potatoes and you can use whatever method you normally use.

Questions about these healthy muffins for kids?
  • Can you taste the coconut? Nope!

  • Can I reduce the oil? You could use a little less.

  • Can I use something other than coconut oil? Any type of butter or oil should work!

  • What can I use instead of bananas? I don’t recommend experimenting with this. They’re needed for the sweetness, flavor and for bulk.
  • Can I use something other than sweet potato? I tried pumpkin and failed. I’m not sure what else could work. Anyone have some ideas?

  • Can I use something other than tapioca flour / starch? Arrowroot flour / starch probably works but I haven’t tried it. I don’t think anything else would work (perhaps cornstarch but I’m not positive!)

  • Can I use something other than coconut flour? There’s no sub for coconut flour, unfortunately. It absorbs so much more liquid than any other type of flour.

  • Do I have to use a food processor / high-speed blender? If you use raw sweet potato, you do. This recipe also works with cooked sweet potato. If using that, you can just mash the sweet potatoes and bananas together in a bowl.

Healthy Muffins for Kids (vegan, paleo, gluten-free)
  • Prep Time: 15 min
  • Cook Time: 30 min
  • Ready in: 45 min
  • Yield: 24 mini muffins
Ingredients
  • 1/2 cup (113 grams) coconut oil, melted or at least very soft (not hard and solid)
  • 170 grams (without the peel) very ripe banana (this is 3/4 cup puree or about 1 1/2 medium bananas but please weigh it!)
  • 1 1/2 cups (210 grams) raw chopped sweet potato or cooked sweet potato
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar, white vinegar or lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 6 tablespoons (45 grams) tapioca flour / starch
  • 6 tablespoons (48 grams) coconut flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoons salt
Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 °F (175°C) and line a mini muffin tin with 24 muffin liners. Silicone or waxed work best. See post for more details.
  2. If using cooked sweet potato, skip Step #3. In a large bowl, mash the bananas and sweet potato together until pureed. I like to use the bottom of a glass to mash it. Then stir in the coconut oil. Go to Step #4.
  3. If using raw sweet potato: In a small food processor or a small jar of a high-speed blender (like the one used for making nut butter), process coconut oil, banana and sweet potato (added in that order) at high speed until totally pureed and smooth.
  4. Pour into a large bowl and stir in the vinegar and vanilla.
  5. In a medium bowl, stir together the remaining ingredients. Add this to the wet mix and stir just until combined.
  6. Fill the liners full and bake for 30 minutes or until they're no longer squishy and seem firm.
  7. Let the muffins cool for 5 minutes in the pan and then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.
  8. Place in an airtight container and store at room temperature for up to 4 days or refrigerate for about a week. They also freeze well. Reheat in the microwave before serving the chilled muffins.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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This vegan chocolate frosting is super easy and just requires three ingredients! Can easily be made paleo and vegan.

This is the same frosting I used on my vegan chocolate cake, which has been a big hit both online and with my friends and family.

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These vegan no-bake peanut butter pies are made a little healthier with the help of bananas, coconut milk and maple syrup. With a paleo option.

I sure love my mini pies. My favorite are these key lime pies and these raspberry cream pies are also pretty amazing (and both are paleo + vegan!)

Before I got started working on this recipe, I thought peanut butter pie without cream cheese just wasn’t possible. I had tried the kind with tofu but it was just a little too unusual for me.

So I found a new base – bananas! It may sound a little odd but once frozen and slightly defrosted, these peanut butter pies have a great texture! And they taste pretty close to regular peanut butter pie.

The only less-than-awesome thing about them is that they need to be kept frozen and then defrosted a bit before serving.

Surprisingly (at least to me), the bananas don’t overpower the peanut butter flavor. It’s a nice balance! My bananas weren’t overly ripe so if yours are very spotted or almost blackened, like what you’d use for banana bread, the pies will probably have a much stronger banana taste.

I’m thinking that you actually shouldn’t use overly ripe bananas in these! You’re risking messing with the balance of flavors.

The coconut taste is also pretty subtle, though if you dislike coconut, you may want to use whipping cream (for a non-vegan version) in place of the coconut milk.

And if you need these pies to be paleo, just use cashews or sunflower seeds in place of the peanuts and cashew or sunflower seed butter instead of peanut butter. I’ve tried it and it’s delicious that way!

The first time I made these pies, I used a high-powered blender to make the filling. I definitely don’t recommend that! It resulted in an unusual gluey texture. Use a food processor, which you’ll also need for the crust.

For the topping, I used my healthy peanut butter fudge recipe, which specifically calls for refined coconut oil. You can use unrefined if you prefer, but it results in quite a strong coconut flavor and I don’t like anything messing with my peanut butter flavor, so… refined it is for me. :)

Just make sure to pour the fudge over the pies right before serving! It tends to firm up quite quickly. If you pour the fudge over the pies straight from the freezer, you’re going to end up with a layer of practically frozen fudge, making the pies a bit difficult and messy to eat.

If you’re looking for some more yummy vegan peanut butter treats, try these vegan peanut butter cookies (one of my very favorite recipes!) or this peanut butter fudge!

Vegan No-bake Peanut Butter Pies (paleo option)
  • Prep Time: 20 min
  • Cook Time: 0 min
  • Ready in: 20 min
  • Yield: 12 mini pies

For paleo, sub the peanuts with cashews and peanut butter with cashew butter.

Ingredients
    For the crust:
  • 1 cup (160 grams) salted roasted peanuts
  • 1/2 cup (100 grams) pitted dates (about 16 regular-sized dates)
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • For the filling:
  • 1 1/2 cups (384 grams) natural peanut butter (the kind with just peanuts and salt)
  • 3 ripe medium bananas (320 grams peeled bananas)
  • 1/2 cup (120 milliliters) full-fat canned coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) maple syrup
  • salt to taste
  • For the topping:
  • 1/4 cup (56 grams) refined coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup (64 grams) natural peanut butter (the kind with just nuts and salt)
  • 5 tablespoons (34 grams) cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • salt to taste
  • 3 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 1/3 cup (53 grams) chopped peanuts
  • 1/3 cup (60 grams) mini chocolate chips (use vegan / paleo-friendly chocolate chips, if desired)
Directions
  1. Line a muffin pan with 12 muffin liners.
  2. Using a food processor fitted with an S-blade, process the peanuts and dates until finely ground. Add the vanilla and pulse a few times. The mixture should clump together when pinched. If it doesn't, add in a little more vanilla or water until the mixture holds together well.
  3. Divide the crust mixture between the liners, using about 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon (20 grams) per liner. Use the bottom a shot glass to firmly press the crust down over the bottom of the liners. Use your fingers to compact the areas around the edges.
  4. Use a paper towel to wipe out the food processor and then add all the filling ingredients. Process until uniform.
  5. Divide the mixture between the crusts, using about 1/4 cup of filling per muffin liner. Place the pan in the freezer.
  6. Freeze for at least 4 hours or until frozen.
  7. Remove from the freezer and take off the liners. If they're too difficult to remove now, remove them after defrosting. Defrost the pies at room temperature for 10-20 minutes or until they're about as soft as ice cream. If you let them defrost too long, they'll be too soft to serve. Remove any pies from the pan that you're not eating straight away and freeze in an airtight container.
  8. While the pies are defrosting, prepare the topping. Melt the coconut oil in a small pot or pan over low heat. Add the peanut butter, cocoa powder, vanilla extract and salt and stir until combined. Take the pan off the heat and stir in the maple syrup until well combined.
  9. Let the fudge sit for about 5 minutes and then pour 1 tablespoon of fudge over each mini pie right before serving. Top with chopped peanuts and mini chocolate chips.

Source: My post on Gluten-free on a Shoestring – No-bake Peanut Butter Pie

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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This strawberry rhubarb crisp has a thick layer of oat-based topping, is gluten-free, whole grain and can easily be made dairy-free and vegan!

I’ve made this strawberry rhubarb crisp every spring for the last few years and people always rave about it. Normally I’m all about the topping in crisps, crumbles and cobblers but the fruit layer in this crisp is really amazing.

Nevertheless, this crumble is pretty topping heavy – just the way I like it! You can use 50% more fruit if you want it a bit more balanced.

So many people have told me that it’s the best crisp topping ever and I absolutely agree. Hence the large amount of it loaded on top of the fruit. :D

If you need a grain-free version, try my paleo strawberry rhubarb crisp, which is also vegan and even AIP-friendly!

If rhubarb isn’t your favorite or if it’s not in season, just use more strawberries or another fruit (like in this gluten-free apple crisp). Just note that the baking time will likely be different.

I don’t like rhubarb on its own but whenever it pops up at the store, I grab some to make this rhubarb crisp.

I was thinking that rhubarb’s tartness would require a little more sugar than most crumble recipes, so I took a look at some other strawberry rhubarb crisp and crumble recipes. Most of them used double or even more sugar for the same amount of fruit that I used here.

My strawberries hardly had any sweetness to them and I still found 1/4 cup to be enough. All that topping helps sweeten things quite a bit!

The almond extract makes this crisp totally irresistible. When baking anything with berries, I almost always add some lemon zest and extract but almond extract is definitely the yummiest alternative here, I think.

By the way, if you want to make something for a gluten-free friend but don’t want to invest in expensive gluten-free flours, this is the recipe for you! You just need some gluten-free oats and you’re good to go.

To make oat flour, you can grind rolled or quick oats in a coffee grinder, small food processor or high-powered blender like a Vitamix or Blendtec until it resembles flour.

This strawberry rhubarb crisp also easy to make dairy-free and vegan! Just use coconut oil in place of the butter (but notice that you use a different amount). I’m assuming vegan butter would also work in place of the butter.

I know I’m a little late in the rhubarb season to be posting this strawberry crisp but I hope I’m not too late! If I am, give this paleo blueberry crisp or this vegan blueberry crisp a try.

Strawberry Rhubarb Crisp (vegan gluten-free, whole grain)
  • Prep Time: 20 min
  • Cook Time: 45 min
  • Ready in: 1:05 h
  • Yield: 8-12 servings
Ingredients
    For the fruit:
  • 2 cups (250 grams) rhubarb, cut into 3/4" pieces
  • 2 cups (282 grams) strawberries, hulled and cut into 3/4" pieces
  • 1/4 cup (50 grams) granulated or raw sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon almond extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch (or tapioca starch)
  • pinch of salt
  • For the topping:
  • 3/4 cup + 1 tablespoon (75 grams) oat flour (use GF oat flour, if necessary)1
  • 1 1/4 cups (115 grams) rolled oats (use GF oats, if necessary)
  • 2/3 cup (132 grams) light brown sugar or raw sugar
  • 2/3 cup (149 grams) butter or 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon (126 grams) coconut oil, melted and cooled slightly (use coconut oil for vegan / dairy-free)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and grease a 1-quart, 8"x8" or another similar sized baking dish.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, stir together the sugar, almond extract, vanilla extract, cornstarch and salt. Add the chopped fruit and stir to coat in the mixture. Let sit for at least 10 minutes while preparing the topping.
  3. In another large mixing bowl, stir together the oat flour, oats, brown sugar, melted butter or coconut oil and salt until well combined.
  4. Spoon the fruit mixture into the pan and top with the topping. Place the dish on a baking sheet to catch any spills.
  5. Bake for 40-45 minutes or until the topping is firm and the fruit is bubbling. The topping will appear to be quite runny around 25-30 minutes but firms up in the last 10-15 minutes of baking. The filling may also appear runny while warm but thickens as it cools.
  6. Let cool for 30 minutes and serve warm or room temperature. Cover and store at room temperature for up to 2 days.
Notes
  1. To make oat flour, grind rolled or quick oats in a coffee grinder or small food processor until it resembles flour.

Source: My book, The Sweet Side of Ancient Grains

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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These vegan oatmeal cookies are crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside and taste just like traditional oatmeal raisin cookies! Can be made gluten-free, whole wheat or with all-purpose flours. Thanks to Bob’s Red Mill for making today’s post possible!

I really, really love my oatmeal cookies. I’ve posted so many other oatmeal raisin cookie recipes before and figured I might as well be thorough and post a vegan version today. :)

I do have these vegan no-bake oatmeal cookies, which are great for those of you already dealing with high temperatures, but today’s vegan oatmeal cookie recipe is more traditional.

There are lots of flour options! You can use:

  • All-purpose flour
  • Whole wheat or whole spelt for a whole grain version
  • Bob’s Red Mill 1-to-1 Gluten-free Baking Flour or a homemade gluten-free mix (found in the notes section of the recipe) for a gluten-free version

The really amazing thing is that all versions taste the same. The only difference is that the gluten-free version has a slightly sandy texture when still hot from the oven. Once cooled, they’re just as delicious!

I usually use chia eggs in my vegan recipes, but I recently wanted to make some cookies for a friend who can’t eat eggs or seeds.

Luckily, I happened to have some Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-free Vegan Egg Replacer on hand and it worked wonderfully in these vegan oatmeal cookies. So why’d I pick this specific egg replacer?

I like baking with the very best, so I chose Bob’s Red Mill, knowing that the egg replacer would work just as well as regular eggs and be made of quality ingredients.

Egg replacers sometimes consist of some funky ingredients. This one just contains potato starch, tapioca flour, baking soda and psyllium husk fiber (and is therefore paleo-friendly!).

Some also contain wheat or are processed in facilities that also handle products with gluten. And just like all of Bob’s Red Mill’s gluten-free products, their Gluten-free Vegan Egg Replacer is mixed and packaged in their dedicated gluten-free facility.

Like all the other egg replacers I’ve come across, Bob’s Red Mill’s Gluten-free Vegan Egg Replacer doesn’t work in recipes that require you to beat eggs to stiff peaks (like angel food cake or meringue) but it’s worked in everything else I’ve tried.

If you need to eat egg-free, I definitely recommend it! If you can eat regular eggs, go ahead and use them in these cookies for a non-vegan version. Chia eggs work (I tried those for myself) and I’m fairly certain that flax eggs work, too.

As for the egg replacer, I’m going to try these soft and fluffy gluten-free cinnamon rolls with it next. It keeps the rolls soft for a few days without them needing to be heated to soften (as opposed to the egg version!). The same is also true of these gluten-free dinner rolls, which look amazing!

Questions about these vegan oatmeal cookies?
  • Can I use something other than the listed flours? I’ve tested and listed 5 flour options. Those are the ones that I know will work and they’re the only ones that I think will work. You could try a different 1-to-1 GF baking mix but I can’t say it’d work as well. You for sure can’t use any grain-free flour as a substitute but I do have a paleo oatmeal cookies recipe which is grain-free!

  • Can I use something other than coconut oil? Butter works for a non-vegan version and I’m assuming vegan butter would work, too, but the cookies are chewier with coconut oil.

  • Can you taste the coconut oil? Neither I nor my other testers could taste any coconut flavor and I use unrefined coconut oil!

  • Can I use something other than the egg replacer? Regular eggs work great for a non-vegan version. Chia eggs also work and I think flax eggs would, too!

  • Can I use something other than the listed sugars? You can probably use another granulated sugar that you’ve used in place of regular white granulated sugar. Liquid sweeteners wouldn’t work as they’d make the dough too wet (there’s no milk or anything to reduce to make up for the added liquid for the sweetener).

  • Can I reduce the sweetener / oil? I used the least amount that I thought was enough so I don’t recommend it. The less sugar / oil you add, the more cakey and crumbly the cookies will be.

  • Can I use different add-ins / add more of them? You can use nuts, dried fruit or candy. But don’t add much more or the dough won’t hold together! I know because I tried. ;)

Thanks again to Bob’s Red Mill for sponsoring today’s post! Be sure to check out their site for coupons and more recipes.

Vegan Oatmeal Cookies (gluten-free, whole wheat, all-purpose flour options)
  • Prep Time: 15 min
  • Cook Time: 12 min
  • Ready in: 27 min
  • Yield: 18-20
Ingredients
  • 1 1/2 cups (190 grams) whole wheat flour, whole spelt flour, all-purpose flour or for a gluten-free version: 1 1/2 cups (208 grams) Bob's Red Mill 1-to-1 Gluten-free Baking Flour or the homemade gluten-free mix listed below1
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3/4 cup (168 grams) coconut oil, melted
  • 1 1/3 cups (266 grams) raw sugar, coconut sugar or brown sugar
  • 2 prepared Bob's Red Mill Gluten-free Vegan Egg Replacer eggs, chia eggs or 2 large (50 grams each, out of shell) eggs for non-vegan
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 2 3/4 cups (260 grams) quick oats (make sure to use GF, if needed)
  • 1 1/4 cups (190 grams) raisins
Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 °F (190 °C) and line a cookie sheet with a piece of parchment paper.
  2. Stir together the dry ingredients in a medium mixing bowl and set aside.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, stir together the melted coconut oil, sugar, replacement eggs or regular eggs, and vanilla and stir just until combined. It's okay if the oil starts separating. Don't try to recombine it.
  4. Add the dry mix to the wet mix and stir just until combined. Add the oats and raisins, again stirring just until combined.
  5. Form the dough into compact2 75-gram balls, about two inches or slightly over 1/4 cup in size, and place 4" apart on the prepared baking sheet. Press the balls down slightly with the palm of your hand.
  6. Bake for 13-15 minutes or until the middle appears to be set and the cookies have evenly browned.
  7. Let cool completely on the baking sheet. Remove to a wire rack and let sit for another few hours until they've firmed up completely. Store in an airtight container up to 5 days.
Notes
  1. Homemade gluten-free mix:
    • 1 cup (140 grams) white rice flour
    • 1/3 cup (52 grams) potato starch
    • 2 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons (20 grams) tapioca flour
    • 1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum
  2. If the dough balls aren't compact, the cookies will come a little apart during baking. If that happens, press them back into shape after taking them out of the oven.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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Paleo coconut macaroons that are chewy on the inside and crisp on the outside! They taste like regular macaroons but are vegan and maple-sweetened.

These macaroons (not to be confused with French macarons are one of the easiest cookie recipes I have! They’re probably tied with my gluten-free peanut butter cookies recipe.

The require just maple syrup, coconut butter, shredded coconut, vanilla and sugar. And the result is some vegan and paleo coconut macaroons that really taste just like the regular kind!

No eggs or refined sugar and they’re still amazing. I think they’re a perfect healthier Easter dessert. Just like these paleo cupcakes.

Some macaroons I’ve had are sickeningly sick but not these. They’re just sweet enough.

I first tried making these with coconut oil, knowing that way more people have that on hand than coconut butter, but it was a huge mess.

Please do not use coconut oil! It won’t work.

Store-bought coconut butter is usually pretty expensive so I make my own. And it’s super easy!

You just need shredded coconut and a high-speed blender or food processor. Here’s how you make homemade coconut butter. Then you can also make these peanut butter coconut Rice Krispe treats with the leftovers!

And on a personal note – we finally have a babysitter! Only took 3 months to find someone. :) Hopefully she’ll stick around so I can bring you more new recipes!

Questions about these paleo coconut macaroons?
  • Can I use something other than maple syrup? I’m guessing another liquid sweetener would work fine but since I haven’t tried, I can’t say for sure.

  • Can I use something other than coconut butter? Unfortunately not. There’s no sub for coconut butter and coconut oil will absolutely not work.

  • Can I use something other than shredded coconut? These won’t come out properly if you don’t use shredded coconut. I don’t think flaked coconut (those are the longer strands) would work and coconut flakes / chips definitely wouldn’t work. Desiccated coconut probably would.

  • Can I reduce the maple syrup? I used the least amount that I thought was enough. You could try reducing it by a little, but the macaroons will be drier and more crumbly. They might not even hold together. So I really don’t recommend reducing it!

  • Do I have to let the dough sit? When I didn’t let them sit, they didn’t hold their shape as nicely. The edges were overbaked and the cookies were overall kind of greasy. I also tried chilling them to speed things up but letting them sit at room temperature for 30-60 minutes was better.

Vegan Paleo Coconut Macaroons
  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 21 min
  • Ready in: 31 min
  • Yield: 12
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup (80 grams) coconut butter – not coconut oil!
  • 6 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 cup (120 grams) shredded unsweetened coconut
Directions
  1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, mix together everything except the coconut. Stir frequently until everything is melted and well combined. Remove from the heat.
  2. Stir in the coconut. Let the mixture sit for 30-60 minutes at room temperature.
  3. Preheat the oven to 325 °F (163 °C) and line a cookie sheet with a piece of parchment paper.
  4. Use a 1.5 tbsp cookie scoop (the scoop is important so they have the right shape – if you don't care about the shape, you can roll them into balls and flatten slightly with your palm) to form 12 25-gram balls. Place at least 2" apart of the cookie sheet. If any bigger bits of coconut are sticking out, pat them down so that they don't burn.
  5. Bake for 21-23 minutes or until the cookies are lightly browned. Let cool on the cookie sheet and let cool completely before storing in an airtight container. They should stay good for up to 4 days.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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Lemon curd is sandwiched between soft and chewy paleo lemon cookies in this dairy-free treat!

It’s been awfully dreary and rainy lately. During times like these, I’m all for lemon goodies.

Some of my favorites are this Italian lemon almond flour cake (it has white chocolate in it but I’m working on a paleo version!) and these paleo lemon bars. Just a bite of either are enough to cheer me up.

The lemon cookies in these cookie sandwiches are actually vegan, but because of the curd, the cookie sandwiches aren’t. I tried to come up with an alternative vegan filling but couldn’t make anything as delicious as the curd. Have any of you made any tasty vegan lemon curd?

So the cookies on their own are already soft and the curd softens the cookies even more. It makes them totally irresistible.

I used this honey sweetened lemon curd as the filling since I had to do something with it after making a huge batch and I don’t especially like it on bread. Or by the spoonful.

If you don’t have any curd handy and don’t want to make any, the cream cheese filling I used in my chewy ginger sandwich cookies with lemon filling would work well here but the lemon curd just adds so much zing!

Why make a regular lemon cookie sandwich when you could have little citrus explosions in your mouth? :D

This recipe has lemon extract, lemon zest, and lemon curd. Switch all of that out to lime or orange if that sounds better! After writing that, I think I need to try a key lime version ASAP.

Another thing to note is that this recipe yields relatively few cookies. You know, portion control issues. So double it if you have a friend to share with. ;)

So, just like usual, it’s been a long time since my last post. The babysitter I mentioned that would be starting the next day hasn’t started yet and probably won’t until the end of the month. She got sick on the day she was supposed to start.

We are having extraordinary luck with childcare. ;) So I can’t really work but on the upside, Björn is tons of fun to play with. :D

Paleo Lemon Cookie Sandwiches (grain-free, dairy-free)
  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Cook Time: 10 min
  • Ready in: 20 min
  • Yield: 12 sandwich cookies
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup (56 grams) refined1 coconut oil, melted
  • 1/3 cup (107 grams) maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon extract
  • 1 1/3 cups (133 grams) almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons (17 grams) coconut flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 - 1/2 cup lemon curd
Directions
  1. In a large bowl, mix together the coconut oil, maple syrup, lemon zest and lemon extract.
  2. Add the almond flour, sifted coconut flour, baking soda and salt.
  3. If the dough is too soft to roll into balls, refrigerate for 30 minutes or until firm.
  4. Preheat the oven to 350°F (176°C).
  5. Line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper or a Silpat.
  6. Roll the dough into twenty-four 3/4" balls and place 1" apart on the prepared baking sheet.
  7. Press the balls down slightly and bake for 10 minutes. The cookies should crackle a little.
  8. Let the cookies cool for 5 minutes on the baking sheet and then remove to a wire rack to cool completely.
  9. Once the cookies are cool, assemble the cookie sandwiches by placing 2 teaspoons of curd between two cookies.
  10. Place the cookies in an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 5 days.
Notes
  1. Using unrefined coconut oil would yield cookies with some coconut flavor. If you want truly lemony cookies, you have to use refined coconut oil.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

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