Loading...

Follow Texanerin Baking - Healthier baked goods that don&.. on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

These peanut butter rice krispie treats are nice and chewy, naturally sweetened and incredibly quick and simple to put together! Gluten-free, 100% whole grain, vegan and with a nut-free option. With a how-to recipe video.

This recipe is the perfect solution to a peanut butter and chocolate craving. Just toss all the liquid stuff together in a pot, melt, and stir in the crisp rice cereal. Couldn’t be any simpler! My peanut butter oatmeal bars are also super easy and no-bake.

These healthier rice krispie treats use brown rice syrup + maple syrup in place of corn syrup or granulated sugar. I suppose sugar is sugar but still, I prefer using natural sweeteners over corn syrup.

I know brown rice syrup isn’t something most people have at home (I got mine at an organic shop but it’s also easy to get online) so I also tried these bars with honey, but the honey flavor was too strong.

I’m guessing you could use agave if that’s something you have on hand, but I haven’t actually tried it so I can’t say for sure (and probably never will since I don’t use agave).

I actually did try an all maple syrup version but they weren’t nearly chewy enough. It seems as though some type of thicker syrup is needed for chewiness. And chocolate peanut butter rice krispie treats without chewiness is just sad.

If you need these to be gluten-free, make sure you buy gluten-free rice cereal. Rice Krispies are not gluten-free due to malt flavoring (but I still call this recipe rice krispie treats because nobody googles peanut butter crisp brown rice cereal treats!).

I recommend this Crispy Brown Rice Cereal from Erewhon as it’s certified gluten-free. I’ve seen some other gluten-free crisp rice cereals but they were processed in facilities that also process wheat so I haven’t tried them.

And these bars are easy to make nut-free. Just use sunflower seed butter. I’ve made them that way and they taste pretty close to the peanut butter version! If you like using sunflower seed butter, be sure to try my gluten-free and vegan sunflower seed butter cookies or PB&J fudge.

I used homemade peanut butter and it worked great. Here’s a recipe + video on how to make peanut butter. I love making a huge batch of that and then I use it for these gluten-free peanut butter cookies, peanut butter fudge, and these protein balls.

If you’re after a classic version of rice krispie treats, try these chocolate dipped krispie treats from Allergylicious!

Questions about these healthier peanut butter rice krispie treats?
  • Can I use something other than peanut butter or sunflower seed butter? Those are the only two I’ve used but I’m assuming other types of natural nut butter, without any added fat or sugar, would work fine.

    Nut butters aren’t always exchangeable but since this a simple no-bake recipe where you just mix everything together, I think it’d be fine.

  • Can I use something else other than brown rice syrup? I’ve tried honey (for a non-vegan version) but the flavor was way too strong. I’ve also tried all maple syrup instead of part brown rice syrup + part maple syrup but then the bars weren’t sticky enough. Agave could possibly work!

  • Can I reduce the sweetener? You can definitely play around with this recipe. I tried it out a bunch of times and thought it was best as written below.

  • Can I use something in place of the crisp rice cereal? I haven’t tried it but oats might work, or a combination of shredded coconut and oats. Just keep adding a little at a time unless the consistency seems right to you.

Peanut Butter Rice Krispie Treats (vegan, gluten-free options)
  • Prep Time: 5 min
  • Cook Time: 0 min
  • Ready in: 5 min
  • Yield: 16 bars
Ingredients
  • 2/3 cup (174 grams) natural peanut butter or sunflower seed butter for nut-free (with just salt - no added sugar or fat)
  • 1/2 cup (150 grams) brown rice syrup
  • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of salt
  • 4 cups (120 grams) crisp rice cereal (make sure to use GF cereal, if needed)
  • For the topping:
  • 1 cup (170 grams) chopped semi-sweet chocolate (make sure to use vegan chocolate, if needed)
  • 6 tablespoons (96 grams) natural peanut butter or sunflower seed butter for nut-free (with just salt - no added sugar or fat)
Directions
  1. Line an 8"x8" pan with a piece of parchment paper.
  2. In a medium pot (one big enough for all the ingredients except for the chocolate) over low heat, mix together the peanut butter, rice syrup, maple syrup and a pinch of salt.
  3. Heat until the mixture bubbles (it shouldn't come to a full boil but should have some bubbles around the sides and in the middle, too), remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla.
  4. Add the cereal and carefully stir until the cereal is well-coated.
  5. Scoop the mixture onto the parchment paper and pat down so that the mixture is relatively compact.
  6. Let it cool for 10 minutes. Melt the chocolate and peanut butter together and spread over the peanut butter layer.
  7. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours and then cut into bars.
  8. Place in an airtight container and keep at room temperature (or refrigerate) for up to 1 week.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Wondering how to make strawberry jam? All you need to do is boil a few ingredients you probably already have! This easy, pectin-free and lower in sugar homemade strawberry jam can also be sweetened naturally and is paleo and vegan. With a how-to recipe video.

Every year after going strawberry picking, we come home and I immediately get started making this amazing strawberry jam recipe. It’s so simple and is a great way to use up a few pounds of strawberries.

Not a fan of strawberries? Then try my honey-sweetened apricot jam! Everything I say in this post is valid for that recipe. Meaning you can also make it with maple syrup, it’s pectin-free, etc.

You can also use other types of berries or stone fruit but you’ll almost definitely have to increase the sweetener – especially for fruit that’s not too sweet, like raspberries or apricots.

Unlike most of the other strawberry jam recipes I’ve seen, this one doesn’t have an absurd amount of sugar. It’s really very little!

But keep in mind that if you don’t use sweet and flavorful strawberries, your jam isn’t going to be very good. I’ve tried this recipe with frozen strawberries, which were lacking in both taste and sweetness, and the result was almost bitter.

For two pounds of strawberries, there’s only 1/4 cup of sweetener called for so you need to use naturally sweet strawberries or add more sweetener. Other recipes use 2 pounds of strawberries and up to FOUR cups of granulated sugar!

It makes me wonder if I’m crazy and I don’t know what strawberry jam is supposed to taste like. But I promise you, this is delicious! As long as you use sweet berries. ;)

I usually use honey to sweeten this strawberry jam but for a vegan version, you can use maple syrup. I recommend using the lighter Grade A variety instead of a darker, more maple-y type so that the maple flavor doesn’t overshadow the strawberries.

If you’re worried that this homemade strawberry jam won’t taste as good as a granulated sugar-sweetened recipe (you can also use granulated sugar in this recipe, if you prefer!) – don’t be! When you mix everything together, you can taste the honey or maple. After a few minutes of boiling, all you can taste is strawberries with a lemony zing.

And don’t leave out the lemon juice! It’s necessary due to the lack of pectin. Or at least that’s what I’ve read.

Whatever I don’t eat after about a week, I freeze in 1/4 or 1/2 cup portions and use in recipes like these strawberry white chocolate cheesecake bars and strawberry oat bars. This baked strawberry French toast also looks tasty!

Questions about how to make strawberry jam?
  • Can I use another type of sweetener? I don’t think the slightly caramel-like taste of coconut sugar would blend so nicely with the strawberries and lemon. Brown rice syrup (for a non-paleo version) would be great. I think dates or date syrup would be odd. And I unfortunately have no clue when it comes to low-carb sweeteners.

  • Can I use another type of juice / zest? I think any citrus juice + zest would be great!

  • Can I use another type of fruit? Another type of berry or stone fruit should work just fine. But you’ll likely need to increase the amount of sweetener quite a bit, unless you’re using something that’s really sweet, like peaches. I actually have made spiced peach jam using this recipe, and still had to increase the honey to 1/3 cup.
  • Can this homemade strawberry jam recipe be canned? I have to admit that I don’t know a thing about canning. Here’s a step-by-step guide on canning that might be of some help to you!

  • I didn’t use sweet berries and now my jam isn’t sweet enough. Can I add more sweetener now? I haven’t actually tried this but I’m pretty sure it’d be ok.

  • Can I use frozen strawberries? Definitely! As long as they’re actually tasty + sweet. I make this all the time using berries I froze after berry picking. I’ve also made it using store-bought frozen strawberries (that weren’t any good to begin with) and it was awful.

  • Homemade Strawberry Jam (naturally paleo and vegan)
    • Prep Time: 15 min
    • Cook Time: 45 min
    • Ready in: 1 h
    • Yield: A 600ml (20oz) jar
    Ingredients
    • 2 pounds (907 grams) (~6 1/2 cups smashed) rinsed, hulled really sweet strawberries
    • 1/4 cup (80 grams) honey or Grade A maple syrup for a vegan version (1/3 cup or 67 grams granulated sugar for a non-paleo version also works but you'll need less cooking time)
    • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
    • 1/4 cup (60 milliliters) freshly squeezed lemon juice
    Directions
    1. Place the strawberries in a large pot and crush with the bottom of a glass. Add the sweetener, lemon zest and lemon juice and heat over medium high.
    2. Boil, stirring every now and then, until the mixture thickens. With my really soft and juicy strawberries, this took about 45 minutes. It could take more or less time depending on your strawberries.
    3. To test, put some of the jam on a clean spoon and then put the spoon on a plate in the freezer. Let it sit in there for five minutes and then take it out. If the jam doesn’t fall easily off the spoon when you turn it to the side, it’s ready and you can take the pot off the heat. If it does pour off easily, continue cooking for another 5 minutes and try the test again.
    4. Let cool and then pour into jars and store in the fridge and for up 1 week. Freezes great.

    Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These gluten-free cinnamon sugar donuts, which are vegan and dairy-free, are easy to throw together and can also be made with white whole wheat or all-purpose flour for a non-gluten-free version. They’re baked, not fried, which cuts down on the mess!

I’ve been posting an awful lot of chocolate goodies lately. I figured it was time for a change!

If you missed my recent chocolaty posts, check out my paleo chocolate cheesecake, this vegan chocolate pudding or these chocolate coconut flour cookies.

So here’s something different! They’re not really healthy or even made healthier but they are gluten-free, vegan and dairy-free. If that sounds good to you, also be sure to check out my vegan gluten-free blueberry coffee cake!

If you don’t need these vegan cinnamon sugar donuts to be gluten-free, they don’t have to be! White whole wheat and all-purpose flour work great.

I’ve tried making a number of other gluten-free donut recipes, but I didn’t really like them. And the fried ones are generally so time-intensive!

This baked alternative is quick and easy to throw together and most importantly – super delicious. Just like these paleo gluten-free pumpkin donuts, which are also covered in cinnamon sugar!

On a random note – if you’re like me and always taste the batter, don’t panic when you taste the batter for these donuts. The batter is awful. Once baked, though?! SO good!

Questions about these gluten-free cinnamon sugar donuts?
  • Can you taste the olive oil? I used extra-virgin olive oil and you can taste it in the batter. The batter is actually pretty disgusting.

    But once they’re covered in cinnamon sugar, you don’t taste it. If you’re worried about it, use light olive oil (the light refers to the taste and not calories).

  • Can I use another oil other than olive? You can use canola oil, vegetable oil, grapeseed oil, etc. Anything neutral tasting. I haven’t tried coconut oil but if you do, I’d recommend using refined coconut oil unless you want some coconut taste in your donuts.

  • Can I use butter? I’m guessing you could use butter in these donuts (for a non-vegan version) but they wouldn’t be as moist because butter is 80-82% fat and oil is 100% fat.
  • Can I use a different gluten-free flour mix? I used Bob’s Red Mill 1-to-1 gluten-free baking flour. It’s my favorite! If you have another brand that works as a sub for all-purpose flour that you usually use, then you could probably use it here. I can’t say the texture would be as great as with the flour mix I used.

  • Does they taste gluten-free? If you use the flour I did, these gluten-free donuts taste like they were made with all-purpose flour!

  • Can I use a non-gluten-free flour? White whole wheat or all-purpose flour work. I don’t recommend regular whole wheat flour unless you’re okay with the donuts tasting wheaty.

  • Can I use almond / coconut / other flours? Unfortunately not. Nut flours, coconut flour, etc. that aren’t interchangeable with all-purpose flour won’t work here.

  • Can I reduce the sugar? You could take it down to 6 tablespoons but I wouldn’t reduce it by much more.

  • Do I have to coat them in butter / coconut oil? Nope! But if you don’t, make sure that the donuts are still warm when you roll them in the cinnamon sugar. It helps the sugar stick.

  • I don’t have a donut pan – what can I use?

    You can use a regular muffin pan. I believe this recipe would yield 8 muffins and that you’d need to bake them for 15-20 minutes.

  • Click below for a how-to recipe video for these gluten-free donuts! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

    Gluten-free Cinnamon Sugar Donuts (vegan, dairy-free)
    • Prep Time: 15 min
    • Cook Time: min
    • Ready in: 15 min
    • Yield: 6 donuts
    Ingredients
      For the donuts:
    • 1 cup + 2 1/2 tablespoons (161 grams) Bob's Red Mill 1-to-1 Gluten-free Baking Flour or for a non-GF version, white whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 cup (100 grams) granulated sugar
    • 2 teaspoons baking powder
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
    • 2/3 cup (160 grams) unsweetened applesauce
    • 1/3 cup (78 milliliters) milk of choice1 (but not canned coconut milk)
    • 1/3 cup (78 milliliters) canola oil or another neutral tasting oil
    • 4 teaspoons maple syrup
    • For the cinnamon sugar coating:
    • 2 tablespoons (28 grams) melted refined coconut oil (or butter for a non-vegan and non-dairy-free version)
    • 1/2 (100 grams) granulated sugar
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
    Directions
    1. Preheat the oven to 375 °F (190° C) and grease a 6-cavity donut pan very well with baking spray or coconut oil.
    2. In a medium mixing bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt and cinnamon.
    3. In a large mixing bowl, mix together the applesauce, milk, oil and maple syrup.
    4. Add the dry mix to the wet and stir just until combined! Over stirring will result in tough donuts.
    5. Fill the cavities completely full and bake for 12 minutes (if using wheat flour, you'll probably need a few fewer minutes) or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a donuts comes out clean.
    6. While the donuts are baking, mix together the sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl.
    7. Immediately turn the donuts out onto a wire rack (if you let them sit too long in the pan, the bottoms get soggy). If you have difficulties with this, use your hands to carefully remove each one from the pan. While the donuts are still warm, brush each donut with the melted coconut oil and then dip in the cinnamon sugar until well coated.
    8. Serve immediately and refrigerate any leftovers in an airtight container for up to 5 days. Donuts that haven't been dipped in oil and cinnamon sugar can be stored at room temperature in an airtight container for a few days. If you want to make the donuts in advance, make them and then dip in the oil and cinnamon sugar before serving. Yields 6 donuts.
    Notes
    1. You can use almond, soy, oat, etc. milk but not canned coconut milk because it's too thick. For a non-vegan version, you could use cow milk.

    Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These chocolate coconut flour cookies have the perfect texture and taste just like regular double chocolate cookies! This recipe is paleo with vegan and low-carb options. Scroll to the bottom of the post for a how-to recipe video! Thanks to Bob’s Red Mill for making today’s post possible.

I was kind of sad once I posted my coconut flour cookies recipe because it meant that I was done testing them and no longer had an excuse to make them every week.

I think that’s the only recipe that I’ve experienced that with. Not because the others are less delicious, but because I’m usually just so darn frustrated by the end of the process.

The cookies are so quick to make and I could easily make fourth batches, which is a lot simpler than making the same pie 14 times. Which is why I rarely post pies. ;)

So I figured that I’d make another version of those coconut flour cookies. It was a good excuse to make them a few more times. I added some cocoa powder, made a few other adjustments and, voilà, here we have these amazing chocolate coconut flour cookies!

One of the commenters on the original recipe mentioned that her cookies didn’t hold together and that she even weighed the ingredients. I was stumped as to what the problem could have been because I’ve made those cookies SO many times – both the regular egg and the vegan chia egg versions.

But then I checked out the reviews for the type of coconut flour she said she had used. Someone said that the coconut flour they had received was grainy and didn’t absorb liquid the right way.

I don’t know if that was the cause of my commenter’s problem but it would definitely explain it! I’ve often had that issue with almond flour and sometimes coconut flour.

I used random German brands of coconut flour in those coconut flour cookies because I had run out of Bob’s Red Mill. Since I live in Germany, I sadly can’t just run to the store and buy more.

By the way, if you live abroad (which I know is a tiny fraction of my readers, but still!), you can order so much Bob’s Red Mill stuff from iHerb at ridiculously low shipping rates. I actually got free shipping when I ordered two bags of coconut flour. I have no idea how it works but I’m not complaining. :D

It’s also where I order Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour, which is hands down my favorite gluten-free all-purpose flour. I use it all the time, like in this gluten-free carrot cake or this gluten-free cornbread.

So I ordered some more coconut flour from Bob’s Red Mill to confirm that the cookies held together well.

And they did! They had an amazing texture. You can definitely see the difference when you use other brands of coconut flour that aren’t as powdery. Sometimes they’re a little greasier or crumbly.

So I can definitely recommend getting yourself a bag of Bob’s and making these cookies! And then my paleo coconut flour brownies, which are seriously just as delicious as the regular wheat- and dairy-based version!

I also tried out a low-carb version this time! My taste testers thought that they were really good but I want to point out that they weren’t nearly as chewy as the coconut sugar version.

I also think they were best hot from the oven, which is a little weird because I thought the opposite for the coconut sugar version.

They also didn’t really spread out. At all. So be sure to press those into shape!

If you’re making these cookies for a paleo friend, ask if they’re okay with sugar alcohols. I don’t consider low-carb sweeteners to be paleo but some people do so be sure to ask to be on the safe side.

By the way, my body doesn’t like low-carb sweeteners, which is why I’ve never offered a low-carb option before. It’s not because I’m lazy or don’t want to be helpful. :)

If you try these cookies out, I’d love to hear how you like them!

Substitution questions for these chocolate coconut flour cookies:
  • Can I add a whole egg instead of an egg yolk?

    You could but the texture would be more cakey and might not hold together as well.

  • What can I use instead of the egg or chia egg?

    Those are the only two I’ve tried. Coconut flour recipes are usually more finicky than wheat-based or even other gluten-free recipes where you can often use whatever egg replacer you’d like. Flax eggs would probably work, but I haven’t tried.

  • Can I use something instead of coconut sugar or erythritol + monkfruit sweetener?

    Brown sugar would work if you don’t care about these being paleo. Using a liquid sweetener wouldn’t work.

    I’ve only tried the one low-carb option. I’m most definitely not a low-carb baking expert so if you want to try out another sweetener, I honestly have no idea how it’d work. I would love to hear how it goes if you experiment!

  • Can I use something instead of coconut flour?

    Nope! There’s no sub for coconut flour – especially in a recipe like this where it’s the only flour and there’s not just a tablespoon or some small amount.

  • Can I use X type of cocoa powder?

    You can use any kind of unsweetened cocoa powder. I almost always use Dutch-process because I like the dark chocolaty taste but natural cocoa powder (like Hershey’s unsweetened) or raw cacao powder should work, too.

  • Can I use butter / ghee in place of the coconut oil?

    Butter will work. Based off of what people have told me, ghee should work (but I haven’t tried it!).

  • Can I use something instead of almond butter?

    For a nut-free version, you can use sunflower seed butter. I can’t say for sure that these chocolate coconut flour cookies would come out as well as they did with almond butter. Whatever you use should be free of added fat and sugar if you decide to give it a try.

  • Can I freeze the dough / baked cookies?

    Absolutely! Let the dough thaw overnight in the fridge. You can also freeze the balls and just add a few minutes to the baking time. The baked cookies only take about 10-20 minutes to thaw at room temperature.

  • Click below for a how-to recipe video for these chocolate coconut flour cookies! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

    • Prep Time: 15 min
    • Cook Time: 13 min
    • Ready in: 2:18 h
    • Yield: 12 cookies
    Ingredients
    • 7 tablespoons (56 grams) Bob's Red Mill Coconut Flour
    • 1/3 cup + 4 teaspoons (48 grams) Dutch-process cocoa powder
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • 7 tablespoons (98 grams) coconut oil
    • 3/4 cup (150 grams) coconut sugar, very tightly packed (it's best to weigh this) or 3/4 cup Lakanto Classic for a low-carb version
    • 6 tablespoons (98 grams) natural almond butter (the kind with just almonds and salt)
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 1 egg + 1 egg yolk or 1.5 chia eggs for vegan1
    • 1 cup (170 grams) semi-sweet chocolate chips (make sure to use low-carb or paleo chocolate, if needed), divided
    Directions
    1. In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the coconut flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt. Set aside.
    2. In a large mixing bowl with an electric hand mixer or using a stand mixer, beat together the coconut oil, sweetener, almond butter and vanilla at medium speed until well combined, about 1 minute. The low-carb version might be a little crumbly at this point.
    3. Beat in the egg and egg yolk on low and mix until well incorporated. Stir in the flour mixture until well combined. Then stir in 3/4 cup (128 grams) chocolate chips. Chill the dough for about 1-2 hours or until the dough is firm. If making the low-carb version, they might not need to chill.
    4. Preheat the oven to 350 °F (175 °C) and line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper.
    5. Roll the dough into 12 (54-gram) balls and place the remaining 1/4 cup (43 grams) of chocolate chips on the top and on the sides of the dough balls. Place 4" apart on the prepared baking sheet. Press the balls slightly down with the palm of your hand. If making the low-carb version, press the balls flat as they won't spread.
    6. Bake for 10-13 minutes or until the surface of the center of the cookies no longer appears wet. They'll be very soft but will continue to cook as they sit on the cookie sheet.
    7. Let cool completely on the baking sheet. They'll still be quite soft but will firm up after several hours, when they become kind of like brownie cookies (at least the coconut sugar version does - the low-carb version isn't as chewy). The coconut sugar version doesn't taste very good straight from the oven and needs some time to sit. The low-carb version, on the other hand, is best hot from the oven. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days.
    Notes
    1. To make a chia egg, mix together 1 tablespoon of ground chia seeds and 2.5 tablespoons water. Let sit 5-15 minutes or until goopy like an egg. So for this recipe with 1.5 chia eggs, you'd need 1.5 tablespoons of ground chia eggs and 3 tablespoons + 2 1/4 teaspoons water.

    Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This vegan chocolate pudding is also paleo but you’d never know it! It’s super rich, tastes like regular pudding and is coconut sugar or maple-sweetened.

Like I mentioned in my last post, these peanut butter oatmeal bars, I finally have some new recipes ready to go. And this paleo chocolate pudding is one of my favorites!

I’ve posted some other healthy pudding recipes like this chocolate raspberry pudding and this chocolate peanut butter pudding, but this time I wanted regular pudding! Without avocados, dates or bananas.

Mr. T referred to today’s recipe as “as good as grocery store pudding.” It’s a huge compliment from him because boxed pudding is one of his favorite things. He thinks the no-cook kind totally fascinating.

I think, and I’m guessing a lot of you would agree with me once you try it, that this pudding is way better than store-bought pudding. It doesn’t taste the least bit healthy (or, well, this isn’t really healthy but it is made with what I consider healthier ingredients) and doesn’t taste coconutty, either.

He also kept suggesting I use this pudding in other recipes. But I have no idea what! Maybe to fill cupcakes? Anyone have some ideas?

Something else he wanted to do was add booze to it. This pudding is so thick you could probably add a few tablespoons after it’s cooked (which would also de-paleoify this pudding).

Or you could not use the full amount of coconut milk (maybe 2-4 tablespoons less, depending on what kind of alcohol you use) and then add that amount after it’s cooked to the pudding.

Like a lot of my recipes tend to be, this pudding recipe is super thick and rich. Light desserts aren’t my thing.

If you’re like me, check out my vegan chocolate ice cream or paleo chocolate cheesecake some for more ultra decadent chocolate desserts.

Since this vegan chocolate pudding doesn’t have dates or bananas, it’s got quite a bit of sweetener. Like 1/2 cup. But it yields 2 cups of pudding and given how rich it is, I think saying that it’s 4 servings is reasonable.

Two tablespoons of maple syrup or coconut sugar for some insanely delicious pudding doesn’t seem that bad! I remember seeing a cupcake recipe once that had 13 tablespoons of sugar in each cupcake. I’m sure it was delicious but holy moly. So much sugar!

For another healthy pudding that’s light on the sugar, try this chia seed pudding from Belly Full! I enjoyed my pudding for breakfast but I suppose this is a healthier option. ;)

Questions about this vegan chocolate pudding?
  • What can I use in place of the canned coconut milk?

    Canned coconut milk is somewhere around 24% fat, which is way more than almond or any other kind of milk. So I don’t think any kind of milk (dairy or non-dairy) would work. For a non-vegan and non-paleo version, you could use whipping cream, which is around 30% fat.

  • Can I use a different sweetener?

    I’ve only tried this chocolate pudding recipe with maple syrup and coconut sugar. Both resulted in a totally normal tasting pudding (meaning there was no aftertaste).

    Honey would work for a non-vegan version. Whether or not you’ll be able to taste the honey depends on what kind you use, as well as what cocoa powder you use. So if you use honey, keep in mind that you might be able to taste it a bit.

  • Can I use X type of cocoa powder?

    You can use any kind of unsweetened cocoa powder. I used Dutch-process because I like the dark chocolaty taste but natural cocoa powder (like Hershey’s) or raw cacao powder will work, too. But I highly recommend Dutch-process. :D.

  • Can I make this less rich?

    You could use a combination of canned coconut milk and almond milk. I think maybe use all but 1/2 cup of the canned coconut milk and use almond milk in its place. I haven’t tried it but that’s my guess!

  • Can I make this thinner?

    Use 1 tablespoon of arrowroot instead of 1 1/2 tablespoons. Also see above.

  • Can you taste the coconut?

    This tastes 100% like regular pudding (at least it did with the coconut milk and cocoa powder I used). I would say the difference is that this is richer and a bit thicker.

Click below for a how-to recipe video for this vegan chocolate pudding! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

Vegan Chocolate Pudding (paleo, dairy-free)
  • Prep Time: 5 min
  • Cook Time: 15 min
  • Ready in: 20 min
  • Yield: 2 cups
Ingredients
  • 1 14-ounce (400-gram) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons arrowroot starch / powder if using maple syrup or 1 tablespoon if using coconut sugar (or cornstarch for a non-paleo version)
  • 1/2 cup (55 grams) Dutch-process cocoa powder
  • 1/2 cup (120 milliliters) maple syrup or 1/2 cup (100 grams) very tightly packed coconut sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3/8 teaspoon salt
  • chocolate curls or chocolate shavings for garnish
Directions
  1. Add all except about 1/2 cup of coconut milk to a small saucepan. To the pan, add the cocoa powder, maple syrup, vanilla and salt. Whisk together, turn the heat to medium and continue to whisk occasionally.
  2. Meanwhile, mix the remaining 1/2 cup coconut milk with the arrowroot starch in a small bowl until well combined. It may appear lumpy at first but keep stirring and it'll combine.
  3. As the mixture on the stove starts to get hot, whisk more frequently, making sure it doesn't burn or clump together on the bottom. Once it starts to bubble, whisk in the arrowroot and coconut mixture while stirring constantly. Whisking constantly now, cook until thickened. Do not walk away and do not stop whisking! This will take 1-10 minutes depending on how hot the mixture was before adding the arrowroot. Do not let it continue cooking more than one minute after it's thickened - this can cause the arrowroot to break down and will make the pudding runny. It'll thicken a little more once chilled.
  4. Let cool until room temperature, stirring frequently so that a skin doesn't form, and then refrigerate in an airtight container. Garnish immediately before serving.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These peanut butter oatmeal bars are super quick, easy, no-bake and naturally gluten-free and 100% whole grain. With a vegan option.

So it’s been three weeks since I last posted and that was a re-post of an old recipe. And here’s another – with new pictures and a video. Sorry to my long-time readers!

Our little guy is 5 months old and I get a few minutes at a time, maybe 30 all together throughout the day, in the kitchen. That’s been making recipe testing nearly impossible.

I like to use those few minutes to actually eat. :) But luckily I do have some new recipes on the way!

These peanut butter oatmeal bars are basically candy bars using healthier ingredients. And it couldn’t be any easier!

You just melt a bunch of stuff together, put it in a pan, chill and cut into bars.

I love honey and peanut butter together so that’s what I used but I’ve also tried these with brown rice syrup and it works just as well for a vegan version!

I haven’t tried these with maple syrup. It’s a whole lot less thick and sticky than honey and brown rice syrup so I can’t say for sure that it’d work.

You can use more or less oats or coconut depending on what you want. You could also add in other healthy stuff like nuts or dried berries.

Just don’t go so crazy with the add-ins that the mixture no longer holds together easily.

Want a less sweet version? Use dark chocolate. Want a slightly naughtier version? Add in some peanut butter chips (which aren’t vegan / dairy-free)!

Don’t want to use peanut butter? Almond butter and chopped almonds are a delicious alternative! I also like to add a little almond extract to that version.

Hope you’ll enjoy them!

Questions about these peanut butter oatmeal bars?
  • Can I use something else in place of the coconut oil? Butter should work fine! Not olive oil or any liquid oil.

  • Can I use something other than peanut butter? Almond butter works great! I’m assuming other types of natural nut butter, without any added fat or sugar, would work fine.

    Nut butters aren’t always exchangeable but since this a simple no-bake recipe where you just mix everything together, I think it’d be fine.

  • Can I use something else other than honey or brown rice syrup? Granulated sugars wouldn’t work. Maple syrup might work but it’s less thick and sticky than honey and brown rice syrup so I’m not 100% sure.

  • Can I use white chocolate instead of semi-sweet chocolate? I haven’t tried it but I’m thinking it’d be a little too sweet.

  • Can I reduce the sweetener or amount of chocolate? You can definitely play around with this recipe. I tried it out a bunch of times and thought it was best as written below.

    I’m guessing omitting the 3 tablespoons of honey would be ok for a less sweet version. I think it’d still hold together fine.

  • Can I omit / use something instead of coconut? Together with the oats, the coconut forms the bulk of the recipe. So I wouldn’t just omit it, but I can’t think of a good sub. Maybe more oats?

  • Can I use something else in place of oats? Maybe quinoa flakes? I personally don’t like them but they should work. If you can have gluten, spelt flakes, emmer flakes, or whatever-flakes should work! I haven’t tried any grain-free alternative.

Click below for a how-to recipe video for these peanut butter oatmeal bars! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

Peanut Butter Oatmeal Bars (gluten-free, vegan option, whole grain, dairy-free)
  • Prep Time: 3 min
  • Cook Time: 2 min
  • Ready in: 5 min
  • Yield: 24 bars
Ingredients
  • 1/4 cup (56 grams) coconut oil
  • 3/4 cup + 2 tablespoons (234 grams) natural peanut butter (just peanuts + salt, no added fat or sugar)
  • 3 tablespoons (60 grams) honey or brown rice syrup for a vegan version
  • 1 cup (180 grams) semi-sweet chocolate chips (make sure to use vegan / dairy-free chocolate chips, if n)
  • 1 cup (85 grams) shredded unsweetened coconut
  • 1 3/4 cups (164 grams) rolled oats (gluten-free oats for gluten-free)
  • 1/2 cup (60 grams) roasted peanuts
  • To sprinkle over the top:
  • 3 tablespoons chopped peanuts
  • 2+ tablespoons shredded unsweetened coconut
Directions
  1. Melt the coconut oil in a medium pan or pot over medium-low heat. Add in the peanut butter and honey and when thoroughly combined, add in the chocolate chips.
  2. When melted, add in the coconut and oats. Let cool for 5 minutes and then stir in the peanut butter chips or peanuts.
  3. Line an 8" x 8" pan with a piece of parchment paper or wax paper. Press the candy into the pan and top with the extra peanuts and coconut, if desired.
  4. Let chill for about 2 hours or until firm and then cut into bars.
  5. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator. The bars will stay good for several weeks.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This Italian lemon almond flour cake (also known as torta caprese bianca) is full of lemon flavor and has a lovely texture! It’s also gluten-free and grain-free.

I posted this cake recipe six years ago and am reposting it today with new pictures (you can see the old one at the bottom of the post) because the old ones didn’t do it justice and because hardly any of my readers were around here back in 2012.

It’s gotten tons of reviews and everyone seems to love it so I thought you all needed to see it, too. :) It’s been a hit for gluten and non-gluten eaters alike.

If you’re tired of carrot cake for Easter, this would be a great option for Easter dessert! If you’re not tired of carrot cake, then I can highly recommend the gluten-free carrot cake I posted last week. Or these paleo carrot cupcakes!

One thing that people keep asking about this almond flour cake is if you can omit or replace the 1 cup + 3 tablespoons of chopped white chocolate. Unfortunately that’d be a no.

That’s a whole lot of something to omit from a recipe! It’s not an add-in. It’s needed for sweetness and the structure of the cake.

A few reviewers have experimented with it, but I haven’t. So please check out the reviews if you’re interested in that.

This almond flour cake really isn’t one of my regular healthy (or at least healthy-ish) recipes. If you’d prefer something without all the sugar, try my paleo lemon cookies or these paleo lemon bars. Both are also vegan!

The traditional Italian torta caprese, which I have yet to make, is made with semi-sweet chocolate. This one uses white chocolate but weirdly enough, the chocolate flavor isn’t really apparent.

I can’t really even tell it’s in there. If you dislike white chocolate, I think you’d have no problem with this lemon cake!

And although I thought the cake was lemony, it wasn’t extremely lemony. Normally I don’t do subtle.

If I want something lemony, I want the lemon flavor to punch me in the face and not just be hanging around in the background. But it worked here.

If you cut into it and it looks a little underdone in the middle, don’t panic! That’s how it’s supposed to be.

You can see what that looks like in the bottom picture. You can’t really see it in the new pictures.

A few random things – you don’t have to refrigerate the cake, but it tastes much better that way. And this recipe halves wonderfully! Use a 7″ cake pan and bake for 30 minutes.

Also, since this almond flour cake recipe was converted from an Italian one, the cup measurements are a bit unusual. If you have a scale, I recommend using it! I know I always say this but it’s especially helpful for this recipe.

Questions about this Italian lemon cake?
  • Can I omit the white chocolate? You unfortunately can’t just omit 19 tablespoons of an ingredient from a cake recipe and expect it to work. One commenter did that and said that original version is better.

    Other commenters have tried out other things in place of the white chocolate so check out the comments if you’re interested. I’m not listing any of them here because I haven’t tried them and have no idea how they compare to the original!

  • Can I reduce the white chocolate? I’m guessing a reduction down to 3/4 cup would be okay and not have a huge effect on the outcome but again, I haven’t tried it!

  • Can I use semi-sweet chocolate instead of white chocolate? I’ve been meaning to try that but haven’t gotten around to it yet! I think it’d work but am not positive. If you try it out, please let us know how it worked out. :)

  • Can I omit the eggs / use an egg replacement? Nope. You’re beating the yolks and whites separately for this recipe and it’s important for the texture.

  • Can I use another type of flour? I’ve only tried this with almond flour. Another type of nut flour / meal might work but I can’t say for sure since I haven’t tried it. I don’t think any other nut flour, except maybe cashew, would go with the lemon very well!

    All-purpose gluten-free flour, wheat flour, rice flour, etc. will not work here. If you want something with a different type of flour, try this gluten-free lemon pound cake!

  • Can I use something else in place of the lemon zest, extract and juice? Lime sounds tasty! Or orange.

  • Can I use a different sized pan? Yes, but you’ll just have to watch it and take it out when you think it’s ready. I have absolutely no idea of baking times until I try it myself. Sorry I can’t be more helpful! I do know that you can use a 7″ cake pan and bake for 30 minutes.

  • Can I use something else in place of the sugar? The Italian recipe uses granulated sugar but I tried it out with coconut sugar. If you use coconut sugar, your cake will be darker than the pictures but will still be delicious! Liquid sweetener won’t work and as always, no idea how to make this low-carb (which isn’t even really a possibility anyway with all that white chocolate!).

  • Can I use something else in place of the butter? If you want to use coconut oil, I’d recommend using 10 tablespoons coconut oil + 3 tablespoons water. This is because coconut oil is 100% fat and butter is only 80-82% fat. Using the full amount of coconut oil (13 tablespoons) would make this cake too oily.

    I haven’t tried olive oil or any liquid oils and am not super optimistic about them.

Click below for a how-to recipe video for this Italian lemon almond flour cake! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

If you’re in more of a cupcake mood, try these gluten-free lemon cupcakes from What the Fork Blog!

Italian Lemon Almond Flour Cake (Torta Caprese Bianca - grain-free, gluten-free)
  • Prep Time: 15 min
  • Cook Time: 45 min
  • Ready in: 1 h
  • Yield: One 10" cake
Ingredients
  • 320 grams (this is about 3 cups + 3 tablespoons) almond flour (not almond meal) or blanched almonds, ground into almond flour
  • 200 grams (1 cup + 3 tablespoons) white chocolate, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons whipping cream or milk (I used 1.5% milk)
  • 180 grams (3/4 cup + 1 tablespoon) unsalted butter, softened
  • 130 grams (about 2/3 cup) granulated sugar or coconut sugar1
  • zest of 4 lemons, about 2 tablespoons
  • 4 large eggs, separated
  • 1 teaspoon lemon extract
  • 40 grams (about 2 tablespoons) of limoncello or lemon juice
  • berries and powdered sugar as garnish, optional
Directions
  1. Preheat your oven to 350°F / 176°C and grease a 10" / 26cm pan or line it with parchment paper. If using blanched almonds instead of almond flour, process them in the food processor until they're pretty finely ground. If you grind them too much, they'll release oil and become almond butter.
  2. Combine the white chocolate and milk / cream in a microwave safe bowl.
  3. Heat in 30 second increments and stir after every 30 seconds. Set aside to cool while you prepare the rest. Beat the butter with 100 grams of sugar and beat until fluffy.
  4. Add the lemon zest, egg yolks and lemon extract and beat until well combined. Then add the almond flour / ground almonds and the melted chocolate. Add the limoncello / lemon juice and beat until combined.
  5. In a separate bowl with spotlessly clean beaters, beat the egg whites until soft peaks form. Gradually add the remaining 30 grams of sugar to the egg white mixture. Fold the egg whites into the almond batter until well combined. Spoon the batter into the greased pan and bake for 40 - 45 minutes. If making half the cake, use a 7" / 18cm pan and bake for 30 minutes. The cake will puff up in the oven, but when cooling, it'll fall back down.
  6. Let it cool completely in the pan and then invert the cake onto a plate, and then flip that back into the pan or onto another plate (so that it's not upside down). Sprinkle on some powdered sugar if desired and top with berries, but only before serving. Cake can be stored at room temperature for up to 3 days or refrigerated (I think it's best that way) for up to 5.
Notes
  1. If using coconut sugar, blend in a coffee grinder first so that it's basically like powdered coconut sugar. I'd be worried about how well non-grinded coconut sugar would do with the egg whites. I'm guessing not well. Please note that your cake will be brown and not yellow! It's unfortunately not possible to use coconut sugar and have the cake come out yellow.

Adapted from Dolce Mania - Torta Caprese Bianca

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This gluten-free carrot cake is perfectly spiced, fluffy and doesn’t taste at all gluten-free!

First of all, if you prefer a grain-free recipe, try my paleo carrot cake cupcakes! They’ve always been a big hit and the reviewers love them. These paleo lemon bars would also be an excellent choice for Easter!

When it comes to carrot cake, I’m normally all about the cream cheese frosting but this cake is delicious enough to eat on its own. I’ve never had a better carrot cake and it tastes like it was made with all-purpose flour (which you can actually use if you don’t need it to be gluten-free!).

But a bit of cream cheese never hurt so of course I slathered it on! How could I not?

I don’t just make this at Easter. I make this gluten-free carrot cake year-round to bring to get-togethers. German cakes, at least the ones I’ve had, aren’t very moist, spicy, or fluffy [no offense to my lovely German readers ♥♥♥ To be fair, I should say that Germany does other stuff like bread WAY better than the US.].

This carrot cake is like the opposite of a German cake. And the Germans I’ve served it to have flipped for it. So have the Americans. Everyone can love this cake together!

I don’t know why (maybe sleep deprivation?) but I’m not feeling very wordy today. It’s one of my favorite recipes on the site – one that I’ve been making since before I even started the blog – and I really hope you’ll try it out. The end. :D

Questions about this gluten-free carrot cake? Fat
  • Can you taste the olive oil? I used extra-virgin olive oi and you can taste it in the batter and while the baked cake is still hot. Once it cools, you can’t taste it. If you’re worried about it, use light olive oil (the light refers to the taste and not calories).

  • Can I use another oil other than olive? You can use canola oil, vegetable oil, grapeseed oil, etc. Anything neutral tasting. I haven’t tried coconut oil but if you do, I’d recommend using refined coconut oil unless you want some coconut taste in your cake.

  • Can I use butter? I bet you could use butter in this cake but it wouldn’t be as moist (butter is 80-82% fat and oil is 100% fat).
  • Flour
  • Can I use a different gluten-free flour mix? I used this 1-to-1 gluten-free baking flour. If you have another brand that works as a sub for all-purpose flour, then you could probably use it here. I can’t say the texture would be as perfect as with the flour mix I used, though.

  • Does it taste gluten-free? This carrot cake honestly tastes like it was made with all-purpose flour. At least with the gluten-free flour mix I used and after it’s cooled a bit.

  • Can I use almond / coconut / other flours? Nope. If you want a grain-free recipe, check out the beginning of the post for another gluten-free carrot cake recipe (it uses almond and coconut flours). If you want to use other flours like rice flour, buckwheat, whatever – you’ll have to experiment. There’s no direct sub for gluten-free flour mixes.

  • Sweeteners
  • Can I use a liquid sweetener? Unfortunately not without experimenting! Sorry I’ve already said this three times in this post but it’s true.

    You could use a little honey or maple syrup for part of the sugar, but you’d have to reduce the liquid in the cake. I don’t recommend trying unless you’re ready for failure. Does that sound too negative? Just trying to be honest and save your time, ingredients and money. :)

  • Can I reduce the sugar? This carrot cake recipe already calls for less sugar than a regular cake. You can reduce it to 1 cup (from 1 1/2 cups) but I wouldn’t go further than that. Reducing sugar also reduces moist-ness so unless you want a dry cake, don’t go overboard and reduce it to 1/2 cup or some small amount.

  • Frosting
  • How can I make the frosting dairy-free? You could use dairy-free cream cheese and butter in the below recipe or you could make my vegan cream cheese frosting (it doesn’t actually use cream cheese!).

  • Does the cream cheese frosting pipe well? You can pipe it if you double the amount of butter.

  • Random
  • Can I use a different sized pan?

    Here’s a super handy pan conversion chart that should be able to help. Looks like a 9″x13″ should work well, though I haven’t tried it.

  • Can I make this recipe into cupcakes? Yes! This recipe will yield 24 cupcakes. Bake for 15-20 minutes. Use the smaller amount of frosting found in the recipe notes (the one that uses 12 ounces of cream cheese and not 16). This will yield about 2 cups so that means 4 teaspoons of frosting per cupcake.

  • Can I freeze the layers / frosted cake? Freezing the layers would definitely work. Freezing frosted layers, though? I’m not too sure about that. Does anyone know if freezing cream cheese frosting works well?

  • Can I add pineapple, walnuts, etc.? Walnuts wouldn’t be a problem but I’m a little doubtful of crushed pineapple or anything liquid-y. The cake is already so moist that I’d be afraid that pineapple would make it soggy. I could be wrong, though! If you try it out, please let us know in the comments and I’ll update this. :)

  • Click below for a how-to recipe video for this gluten-free carrot cake! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

    Gluten-free Carrot Cake
    • Prep Time: 30 min
    • Cook Time: 22 min
    • Ready in: 52 min
    • Yield: 12 slices
    Ingredients
      For the cake:
    • 2 cups (272 grams) Bob's Red Mill 1 to 1 GF Baking Flour (you can use whole wheat or all-purpose flour for a non-gluten-free version)
    • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
    • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
    • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
    • 2 teaspoons baking soda
    • 3/4 teaspoon salt
    • 4 large eggs (50 grams each, out of shell), room temperature
    • 1 1/2 cups (300 grams) granulated sugar
    • 3/4 cup (183 grams) unsweetened applesauce
    • 1/2 cup (118ml) olive oil (another vegetable oil like canola oil would work but I don't recommend coconut oil)
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 14.5 oz (410 grams – about 3 1/2 to 4 cups) grated and peeled carrots
    • For the frosting: (see note below)1
    • 18 ounces (510 grams) cream cheese, room temperature2
    • 4.5 tablespoons (63 grams) unsalted butter, room temperature
    • 1 1/2 cups (180 grams) powdered sugar
    • pinch of salt
    • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
    Directions
    1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C) and line the bottom of three 8″ pans with parchment paper and grease the sides.
    2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.
    3. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs and then add the sugar, applesauce, oil and vanilla and mix until combined.
    4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and stir just until combined.
    5. Then fold in the carrots, again only until combined.
    6. Bake for 19-22 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the middle comes out clean.
    7. Let cool for 5 minutes in the pans, and then turn onto a wire rack to cool.
    8. Frost when completely cooled.
    9. Prepare the frosting.
    10. In a medium mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese and butter together with an electric hand mixer at medium speed until well combined. It's okay if it looks a little crumbly.
    11. Gradually beat in the powdered sugar until totally combined and then beat in the salt and vanilla. Frost the cake with about 1/2 cup to 2/3 cup per layer and the remaining frosting on the sides. If you bake the cake and prepare the frosting in advance and want to refrigerate the frosting, note that it gets quite firm, like a cream cheese tart filling. If that happens, just bring it to room temperature, stir and then frost. The frosting firms up once refrigerated so if you want the softer frosting texture (rather than a cream cheese tart filling kind of texture), let the cake come to room temperature before serving.
    12. Store the iced cake in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or the un-iced layers wrapped in plastic wrap at room temperature for up to 3 days.
    Notes
    1. This is enough to frost it like in the pictures, with about 2/3 cup on top of each layer and some frosting for the sides. If you just want to frost the top of each layer, use 12 ounces cream cheese, 3 tablespoons butter, 1 cup of powdered sugar, a pinch of salt and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla.
    2. We have a different type of cream cheese in the US than the rest of the world (as far as I know) that's firmer and meant for baking, rather than for toast, like in Europe. For 8 ounces (225 grams) of cream cheese, buy a 300-gram package (the stuff at Aldi, Lidl, etc. works just as well as Philadelphia), put it in the center of a clean tea towel or cheesecloth, and squeeze out the liquid until you have 225 grams of cream cheese. You can now make cream cheese frosting without issue. So for this recipe, buy 675 grams of cream cheese and squeeze out the liquid until you have 510 grams.

    Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

These coconut flour cookies with chocolate chips have the perfect texture and taste just like traditional chocolate chip cookies! This recipe is paleo with a vegan option.

So it seems like people are loving the coconut flour brownies I posted a few weeks ago. All the reviews have been super positive so go check them out if you need convincing!

I’ve been asked for an all coconut flour version of my chocolate chip paleo cookies pretty much since I first posted them and I’ve always said there was no way to sub coconut flour for the almond flour. Which is true. Kind of!

But after trying off and on for about a year, I finally got it! What I did was use an additional 1/4 cup coconut flour in place of the 1 cup of almond flour and I added an egg yolk. For the vegan version, I used 1.5 chia eggs total.

And oh my gosh are they good! The texture is more like a traditional buttery chocolate chip cookie than the one with almond flour + coconut flour.

They’re super soft right out of the oven but they firm up as they cool. Then they’re crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside. They’re perfect.

The next day, they’re soft – inside and outside. Like the most amazing soft batch chocolate chip cookies ever.

Coconut flour baked treats usually require a bunch of eggs that result in a weird (to me) texture. That isn’t at all the case with these coconut flour cookies!

All you need is an extra egg yolk and it definitely doesn’t do anything funky to the texture.

I think using egg replacers in all coconut flour goodies is not that easy so I was thrilled when 1.5 chia eggs worked out so well. I’m not vegan but am always happy when I can list a vegan option!

I was also super excited by the taste. They taste exactly like a regular (extremely delicious!) chocolate chip cookie, as long as you use refined coconut oil.

When you use refined coconut oil, you can’t taste the coconut taste at all. If you want to taste the coconut, and quite strongly, you can use unrefined coconut oil.

Want a nut-free cookie? You can use sunflower seed butter in place of the almond butter! But know that the cookies might turn green. I have some tips on how to avoid that in my paleo peanut butter cookies post.

Also make sure to use a nut / seed butter that’s free of added sugar and fat. I have no idea how or if these would come out if using it. I used homemade. Here’s how to make almond butter if you haven’t tried making your own yet!

I think I prefer these coconut flour cookies over the original but I’d love to hear what you think! :)

Substitution questions for these chocolate chip coconut flour cookies:
  • Can I just add an egg instead of an egg yolk?

    You could but the texture would be off. They were too cakey and couldn’t really be held when I made them with 2 eggs rather than 1 egg + 1 yolk.

  • What can I use instead of the egg or chia egg?

    I’m hesitant to recommend any other egg replacers in this recipe because I haven’t tried them but I’m guessing a flax egg should work. Coconut flour recipes are more finicky than wheat-based ones where you can often use whatever egg replacer you’d like.

  • Can I use something instead of coconut sugar?

    Brown sugar would work if you don’t care about it being paleo. Subbing in a liquid sweetener won’t work. And I have no idea how to make these low-carb. I usually get some helpful comments concerning that so check those out. :)

  • Can I use something instead of coconut flour? (Yes, someone will ask this at some point ;))

    Nope! Even the original recipe I based this off of uses 1/4 cup coconut flour so there’s no way around it.

  • Can I use butter / ghee in place of the coconut oil?

    Butter will work. Ghee is super expensive so I’ve never baked with it so I can’t say. Anyone want to chime in here? Does it work well most / all of the time / rarely in place of butter?

  • Can I use something instead of almond butter?

    For a nut-free version, use sunflower seed butter. I haven’t tried any other nut butters so I can’t say for sure that these coconut flour cookies would come out as well as with almond butter. My guess is that they wouldn’t. Whatever you use should be free of added fat and sugar.

  • Can I freeze the dough / baked cookies?

    Yes! Let the dough thaw overnight in the fridge. The baked cookies only take about 10-20 minutes to thaw at room temperature.

  • Click below for a how-to recipe video for these chocolate chip coconut flour cookies! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

    Chocolate Chip Coconut Flour Cookies (paleo, vegan option)
    • Prep Time: 15 min
    • Cook Time: 11 min
    • Ready in: 26 min
    • Yield: 12 cookies
    Ingredients
    • 1/2 cup (64 grams) coconut flour
    • 1 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • 6 tablespoons (84 grams) coconut oil
    • 3/4 cup (150 grams) coconut sugar, very tightly packed (it's best to weigh this)
    • 6 tablespoons (98 grams) natural almond butter (the kind with just nuts and no added fat / sugar)
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
    • 1 large egg + 1 large egg yolk or 1.5 chia eggs for vegan
    • 1 1/4 cups (213 grams) semi-sweet chocolate chips, divided1
    Directions
    1. In a medium mixing bowl, stir together the coconut flour, baking soda and salt. Set aside.
    2. In a large mixing bowl with an electric hand mixer or using a stand mixer, beat together the coconut oil, sugar, almond butter and vanilla at medium speed until well combined, about 1 minute.
    3. Beat in the egg and egg yolk on low and mix until well incorporated. Stir in the flour mixture until well combined. Then stir in 1 cup (170 grams) chocolate chips. Chill the dough for about 1-2 hours or until the dough is firm.
    4. Preheat the oven to 350 °F (175 °C) and line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper.
    5. Roll the dough into 12 (54-gram) balls and place the remaining 1/4 cup (43 grams) of chocolate chips on the top and on the sides of the dough balls. Place 4" apart on the prepared baking sheet.
    6. Bake for 12-14 minutes or until the surface of the center of the cookies no longer appears wet. They'll be very soft but will continue to cook as they sit on the cookie sheet.
    7. Let cool completely on the baking sheet. On the first day, they'll be crisp on the outside. On the second day, the outsides soften. Store in an airtight container for up to 3 days. If the cookies are too soft for your liking, chill in the refrigerator for a firmer cookie.
    Notes
    1. Make sure to use vegan / paleo chocolate chips!

    Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Wondering how to make almond butter? Here’s your ultimate guide covering everything you need to know. You just need almonds and a food processor (or high-speed blender)! In about 10 minutes, you’ll have your own homemade almond butter at a fraction of the cost of store-bought.

I know almond butter isn’t the most exciting recipe to post. It’s actually pretty boring. But for those of you who don’t already make homemade almond butter, I hope this post is useful!

While almond butter on its own isn’t that fun, I have oodles of recipes you can make with it, like these no-bake oatmeal cookies and my favorite paleo chocolate chip cookies.

I go through huge amounts of nut butter when developing a recipe. There’s no way I could afford to do that if I were using store-bought almond butter. So I learned how to make almond butter early on my blogging days.

I get almonds from Aldi or Lidl, which, by the way, are from California and are so much cheaper than they are in the US! It’s bizarre. I can’t understand why they’re cheaper here in Germany. But anyway.

I roast them, toss them in the food processor, and then I have my almond butter for a fraction of the price of what I can find in stores or even online.

For a while, I was making almond butter in my high-speed blender but our neighbor actually complained to the super. It was disturbing his peace, apparently. And his dog’s.

So now I take my food processor, go to the pantry, close the door, and make almond butter.

Making it in the blender was indeed really loud but what I really didn’t like was that I could only grind 1 or 1 1/2 cups at a time. And even then, I’d have to take lots of breaks.

And even with the breaks, the almonds that were room temperature when I began would become really steamy! I was worried that my blender would die.

It’ll depend on your food processor, but I can make SO much more at a time now. Instead of 1 cup of almonds, I can do more like 6.

I thought about all the possible questions that might arise when making almond butter. If I’m missing something, let me know!

Everything you need to know about how to make homemade almond butter: Equipment:
  • Can I use a regular blender?

    Unfortunately not. Please don’t try! You need something like a Blendtec or Vitamix.

  • What kind of food processor do I need?

    My food processor is 1,000 watts and does a great job but one with at least 700 watts should work. It might work in one with fewer watts. Before you buy one, I recommend reading the reviews and searching to see what people have said about making nut butter.

    Happy Happy Vegan has a guide on the best food processors for nut butters that I highly recommend checking out!

    I’ve read a few different guides and it seems like most people recommend this Cuisinart.

Nuts:
  • Can I use another type of nut?

    For peanuts, read my post on how to make peanut butter. You can use the recipe below for walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts and cashews, but you’ll probably need to adjust the roasting time. If you want to use hazelnuts, you’ll probably want to get rid of hazelnut skins first.

    For hazelnut butter, you can use my recipe for paleo chocolate hazelnut butter and stop after step 3.

    How long you have to process the nuts depends on the type of nut. Almonds take way longer than the above-mentioned nuts.

  • Can I use pre-roasted or flavored almonds?

    Yup! Technically it works. But that would be some expensive almond butter!

  • Do I have to roast the nuts?

    I think almond butter tastes WAY better after roasting the nuts but you don’t have to. When the nuts are warm, it’s also much quicker to process them.

  • How full should I fill the food processor? What if I only want a small amount?

    If you don’t fill the processor enough, you won’t get anywhere. You need enough nuts so that the blade is fully covered, and then add some more. If you don’t need much, then see the questions in the storage section below.

  • How much does X cups of almonds yield?

    1 cup of almonds = about 120 grams. 1 cup of almond butter = 256. So you need about 2 cups + 2 tablespoons of almonds for 1 cup of almond butter.

Adding things to the almond butter:
  • Can I add liquid stuff like honey, vanilla, etc.?

    If you add anything liquid other than oil (which you do not need!), then the almond butter will seize. It’ll be clumpy and pretty much ruined. So please don’t try that!

    In this maple cinnamon almond butter recipe, I roasted the nuts in maple syrup first (so that they were basically candied) and then added cinnamon after processing. And it’s incredibly delicious!

  • Can I add spices and salt?

    You can! If you want vanilla, use the seeds of a vanilla bean. A little cinnamon is also nice.

    My recommendation is to make your almond butter and once it’s your desired runniness, pour some almond butter in a little bowl, add a little of whatever you want to add, and see if it works. This is a much better way than adding something to your almond butter and ruining your whole batch!

  • Don’t I need to add oil? Lots of other recipes say to add oil!

    You don’t need a fancy new food processor to make almond butter. I used to use one from the former East Germany [meaning it was really old]. I have no idea why some recipes call for oil. Just keep processing, take breaks if necessary, and don’t give up!

    Do you see how runny my almond butter is? I’ve never needed oil to get to this consistency!

    If you want to add oil, you certainly can.

Storage:
  • Does homemade almond butter have to be refrigerated?

    Definitely refrigerate it! The oil can go rancid. I read that you can store opened almond butter on the shelf for up to 3 months but I don’t think I’d recommend that, especially since homemade almond butter doesn’t have any preservatives.

    I don’t leave mine at room temperature for longer than 1 week. It’s just safer to keep refrigerated.

  • How long does it stay good?

    I’ve left my almond butter in the refrigerator for embarrassingly long periods without anything funky happening to it. But I’m going to say 3 months to be on the safe side.

    Also be sure to always use a clean spoon. If you use something that was previously in jam, your mouth, whatever – your almond butter will mold in no time. Also make sure to not use almonds that were about to expire if you want your almond butter to last for a while.

  • Can I freeze almond butter?

    Yes! For up to 4-6 months. Make sure to use an air-tight container.

  • Does it separate like some natural almond butters?

    I’ve had that happen a few times. When the jar gets lost at the back of the refrigerator for half a year. But even if it doesn’t visibly separate, you should stir it before every use to make sure the oil is evenly distributed.

  • How will I know if it’s gone bad?

    You’ll be able to smell it. It’ll smell like oil paint, paint thinner, or something along those lines. You’ll know! Throw it out immediately. And if you didn’t notice a smell but it tastes bitter, that also means it’s rancid and time to throw it away.

Troubleshooting:
  • My almond butter isn’t coming together! What can I do and what did I do wrong?

    Are you sure your food processor can handle making nut butters? If you are, you just need to be patient. Some food processors take longer than others.

    Also, did you process the nuts while still warm (but not hot?). That helps the process along. Using room temperature almonds takes a lot longer. If your processor is getting hot, take a break. Remove the bowl from the base, open the lid, and let sit for 10-20 minutes or until it’s cooled quite a bit. We don’t want you to kill your food processor!

Click below for a video on how to make almond butter! (if you’re reading this from the newsletter, you have to visit the blog post to see it)

How to Make Almond Butter
  • Prep Time: 15 min
  • Cook Time: 0 min
  • Ready in: 15 min
  • Yield: 1 1/2 cups
Ingredients
  • 3 cups almonds (the amount depends on the size of your food processor – see the post for a tip on how full to fill it)
Directions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F (175°C) and roast the almonds on a baking sheet for 8-12 minutes or until fragrant, stirring after every 5 minutes.
  2. For the food processor:
  3. Let cool for just 5-10 minutes, and then transfer the nuts to the food processor and process until creamy, scraping the sides of the bowl as needed, about 6 to 12 minutes. Do not overheat your food processor! Take breaks if your food processor starts to warm up too much. In the first stage, you’ll have something that looks like almond meal. Then it’ll form a thick mass. Then it’ll break down into a liquid. After that, blend for another minute so it’s easily pourable.
  4. If using a high-speed blender like a Blendtec or Vitamix:
  5. You’ll only be able to use about 1 1/2 cups of almonds. Roast the almonds using the above directions and let cool completely. Then use the smaller Twister jar (or the equivalent) and process at medium-high speed for 1-3 minutes. If your blender gets too hot, take breaks. Let the blender and ground almonds cool a bit, then blend again. Do not overheat your blender!
  6. Make sure it's room temperature or cold before using in a recipe.

Recipe by Texanerin Baking | www.texanerin.com

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview