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He becomes the second player to commit in two days.

Three-star cornerback Rashad Battle of Fairburn, Georgia, announced his commitment to Maryland football on Tuesday afternoon.

Committed‼️ #TerpTakeover pic.twitter.com/vuJ4ThJujl

— 15 (@RashadBattle15) June 4, 2019

Battle, the No. 46 cornerback in the Class of 2020, visited College Park this past weekend after visiting Georgia Tech and South Carolina just a few days before. Other schools involved in this recruitment included Iowa and Louisville.

Standing at 6’2, 187 pounds, Battle provides an excellent frame at the cornerback position. His size alone will allow him to battle bigger receivers and make plays. That playmaking ability jumps off of the tape, as he has a keen ability for reading a quarterback’s eyes and then attacking the ball in the air.

Battle joins Devyn King to become the second defensive back committed in the Class of 2020. With Maryland set to graduate Tino Ellis and Marcus Lewis, cornerback is definitely a position of need for Mike Locksley and his staff to build up during this cycle.

Battle’s rating on the 247Sports Composite (0.8627) matches Ruben Hyppolite II as for the highest-rated recruit on board in the class, which now features eight members. With this commitment, Maryland’s class jumps up to 32nd in the nation, but remains seventh in the Big Ten.

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This is the Maryland Minute, a short story followed by a roundup of Terps-related news.

Back in 2002, Steve Blake and his Maryland basketball teammates joyously celebrated after defeating Indiana 64-52 to bring the school its sole national championship. Now the former Terp has landed his first full-time coaching job as an assistant coach for the Phoenix Suns under new coach Monty Williams, as reported by Peter Vecsey on Monday.

After a career at Maryland in which he set the program record for assists, Blake spent 13 years playing in the NBA for eight different teams. During that span, he had three different stints with the Portland Trailblazers, during one of which Williams was an assistant coach. The Blazers then hired Blake in 2017 as a coaching intern — his first professional experience behind the clipboard.

Blake, now reunited with Williams, will help try to rebuild the Suns organization, which hasn’t made the NBA Playoffs since 2010. Randy Ayers, who has been an assistant coach in the league for nearly two decades, also joins the coaching staff. The team has some promising young talent in guard Devin Booker and 2018 first pick Deandre Ayton, and will have the sixth pick in this year’s draft.

In other news

Three-star offensive tackle Santana Saunders committed to Maryland football on Monday. He is the seventh player to commit to the 2020 class.

Former Maryland football linebacker E.J. Henderson was named to the 2020 College Football Hall of Fame Ballot. Henderson, who played for the Terps from 1998-2002, is the only two-time consensus First Team All-American in program history.

Former @TerpsFootball LB @56ejhenderson among impressive names on 2020 @cfbhall Ballot!

Full Ballot: https://t.co/6zKYStXs3u

Join the NFF and receive a vote: https://t.co/3nfIaLVtdt pic.twitter.com/NqxrPQxS5z

— Football Foundation (@NFFNetwork) June 3, 2019

In even more Maryland football news to come out Monday, defensive tackle Adam McLean confirmed on social media that he has entered the transfer portal.

Thank you Terp Nation for all your support over the last few years. Growing up so close to College Park, playing at Maryland was a dream come true. UMD will always be home but I’m looking forward to the next steps towards finishing my education and football career #Forever91 pic.twitter.com/J3Cf3ZS31U

— JUICE MCLEAN (@GodsGift_42) June 3, 2019

The Big Ten is set to announce its newest commissioner today, and it was reported Monday night that Kevin Warren has been hired. Warren is the Chief Operating Officer of the Minnesota Vikings and will be the first African-American commissioner of any Power 5 conference.

The Big Ten Conference is expected to name Kevin Warren to replace Jim Delany as Big Ten Commissioner tomorrow morning. Warren, 55, is the Chief Operating Officer of the Minnesota Vikings, the highest-ranking African-American executive on the business side of any NFL team.

— Mully And Haugh (@mullyhaugh) June 4, 2019

Maryland women's lacrosse’s Megan Taylor made history as the first ever goalkeeper to win the Tewaaraton Award. Check out Wes’ piece on her prolific senior season.

Maryland men’s lacrosse had many of its key defensive players graduate this spring. Henry wrote about how the program could fill those holes before next season.

The 2019 MLB Draft continues today. Here is Alex’s article on where Maryland baseball players could fall.

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The Terrapins lock up their seventh Class of 2020 commitment.

Three-star offensive tackle Santana Saunders of Springdale, Maryland, has committed to Maryland football, according to InsideMDSports.

The C.H. Flowers High School product received an offer from the Maryland coaching staff after attending the Terps’ “Big Man” camp this past weekend, and it took less than a day for Saunders to accept.

Measuring at 6’5, 270 pounds, Saunders continues to show a trend in Maryland head coach Mike Locksley’s recruiting preference of big, tall linemen. He is listed as the No. 41 player in the state of Maryland, but the lackluster numbers could be attributed to not playing for a private, local powerhouse.

On film, Saunders does exceptionally well as an edge blocker. He does a great job with his immediate impact blocking and has a knack for disrupting edge rushers in the passing game. Without any excess weight, he also shows some speed on top of his power blocking downfield.

The Terrapins signed just three offensive linemen in their 2019 class, but Saunders joins Jordan White and Ja’Khi Green as the three offensive line commitments early in this cycle. Offensive line depth is something that Locksley and his staff will need to build up in order to set the new offense up for success down the road.

Maryland now has seven commitments on board for the Class of 2020, including four players from the state of Maryland. Though Locksley and his staff are not afraid to go elsewhere to find talent, the foundation of the class is still being formed in the DMV.

Saunders’ pledge moves Maryland up seven spots to 35th in the nation and up one spot to seventh in the Big Ten. Many recruits will be making decisions on their futures throughout the summer before senior seasons begin in the fall, so a wave of changes could be coming soon.

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With Curtis Corley and other defensive pieces graduating, the Terps will have to rely on some new faces in 2020.

Entering the 2019 season, head coach John Tillman led Maryland men’s lacrosse into what many expected to be a transitional year for the program. Having lost several key stars from across the roster, the Terps needed players to step up all across the roster. Some did just that, while others fell short of expectations, and Maryland’s season finished with a 12-5 record and a trip to the NCAA quarterfinals.

We’ve already touched on how Maryland’s attack and midfield positions played this season, and we’ll cap things off with the defensive and goalkeeping units.

Close defense

From Greg Danselgio to Matt Dunn, Tim Muller and Bryce Young, Maryland’s defensive units have always been anchored by strong senior leaders. Curtis Corley inherited that role this season, anchoring the Terps’ close defense and leading it to a top-25 finish in scoring defense. Corley routinely shadowed every opponent’s best attacker, going toe-to-toe with the likes of Mac O’Keefe, Matt Moore and Brendan Sunday week after week. He finished his senior year with 19 ground balls and eight caused turnovers and earned a spot on the All-Big Ten first team as well as being Third Team All-American.

Backing up Corley, junior Jack Welding returned to the starting lineup after making 18 starts in 2018. The junior appeared in all 17 games this season, totaling six ground balls and causing two turnovers, but began to lose playing time late this season. In both of Maryland’s NCAA Tournament games against Towson and Virginia, Tillman elected to start short-stick defensive midfielder Thomas O’Connell at close defense over Welding, citing O’Connell’s leadership, experience and lacrosse IQ as why he made the switch. Welding had a fine season aside from a few lapses here and there, and should be line to start next season, but Tillman’s wariness to use him in certain spots might not make his spot guaranteed.

Freshman Brett Makar rounded out the close defense and lived up to his recruiting hype. He came in as the No. 2-ranked defender and No. 4 overall prospect in the Class of 2018, and became the first Terps freshman since 2012 to start multiple games at close defense, nabbing 25 ground balls and causing four turnovers in 17 starts. Makar looked wise beyond his years in his first season with Maryland, and figures to be a fixture on the defense going forward.

Defensive midfield

With Maryland losing one of its top long-poles in Matt Neufeldt after last season, 2019 became the year where senior Nick Brozowski could take a majority of the long-stick midfielder reps. As a fifth-year senior, Brozowski played an important role for Maryland’s defensive midfield this season, being the first pole off the bench in all 17 games and causing nine turnovers to go with 32 ground balls.

Sophomore Matt Rahill played a good deal of time at LSM as well, appearing in every game after being a reserve last season. He scooped 22 ground balls and also flashed some offensive skill at times, showing his ability to whip the ball into the back of the net with two rocket-like goals this year.

POLE GOAL
POLE ASSIST

Matt Rahill scores the first goal of his first career on the feed from Corley!

Q4 8:17 | #Terps 15, UM 9 pic.twitter.com/3m7TTR6VKQ

— Maryland Lacrosse (@TerpsMLax) April 6, 2019

LONG POLE GOAL ALERT

Matt Rahill comes in clutch for @TerpsMLax.#NCAALAX Q1 | MARYLAND 3 | TOWSON 1 pic.twitter.com/voogX9IeT3

— NCAA Lacrosse (@NCAALAX) May 12, 2019

Sophomore Roman Puglise was Maryland’s top short-stick defensive midfielder for the second straight season. After contributing immediately his freshman year—25 ground balls, three caused turnovers—the Virginia native built on his success with an even better performance this year. Puglise almost doubled his ground-ball total with 47, and he contributed on the offensive end as well with seven goals, including a game-winner to beat Penn on the road.

Another OT winner as Roman Puglise calls game for Maryland.@TerpsMLax defeats @PennMensLax 13-12 pic.twitter.com/4RvGdy2ssL

— Inside Lacrosse (@Inside_Lacrosse) February 16, 2019

Joining Puglise in the defensive midfield were seasoned vets Wesley Janeck and Thomas O’Connell. Janeck enjoyed his most productive year since coming to Maryland, snatching the third-most ground balls on the team with 47. He also stepped in at faceoff and had what Tillman called “the greatest 3-of-11 faceoff performance ever in the history of the sport” when he was able to get Towson’s Alex Woodall out of his rhythm in the NCAA Tournament. O’Connell didn’t show up as much in the stat book in comparison, posting only five ground balls and one caused turnover, but his experience and versatility made him a valuable asset.

Goaltender

The Terps entered this season in unfamiliar territory, having to account for the departure of the seventh all-time saves leader in program history in Dan Morris. In the preseason, Tillman and the coaching staff held an open competition between the four keepers on the roster: sophomores Colin Miller and Drew Morris, senior Cameron Brosh and redshirt senior Danny Dolan.

Tillman ultimately decided to go with Dolan in cage, and the UMass transfer made his first start with his new team on Feb. 2 against Bucknell. Dolan went on to start all 17 games, finishing second in the Big Ten in both saves per game (11.24) and save percentage (51.5 percent). He also became just the first Terp since 2001 to post back-to-back 15-save performances, doing so against Johns Hopkins and Towson in consecutive weeks.

But his signature moment of the season came on the road against Penn, when Dolan made an incredible save in the final seconds to send the game to overtime, where Maryland would go on to win.

OH MY DOLAN

Danny Dolan with a CLUTCH save as time expires to force overtime!

Bonus lacrosse here at Franklin Field. #BeTheBest pic.twitter.com/gjkEA9dUxc

— Maryland Lacrosse (@TerpsMLax) February 16, 2019
2020 outlook

For the close defense, the duo of Welding and Makar are near-locks to hold down two of the starting spots, but that final spot should be up for grabs. Moving Rahill to the back line is a possibility, but doing so would likely create a hole at LSM with Brozowski graduating. Other options from the current roster include juniors Blake Carrara and Matt McIlroy, although that duo combined to make just five appearances this season.

The Terps will also add a four-star to the defensive unit next season in Kelan Duff (Culver Academy, Ind.), the No. 73 recruit in the 2019 per Inside Lacrosse. Other freshmen joining the fold are LSMs Justin Sherrer (Etowah, Ga.) and Connor Whalen (Bishop Shanahan, Pa.). Although Whalen ranks outside IL’s Top 100, Sherrer ranks No. 41 overall in his class and as the No. 2 LSM.

Another possibility as a potential defense-LSM swing for the Terps is Villanova transfer Michael Ubriaco. The Boys’ Latin alum and former teammate of attackman Logan Wisnauskas appeared in every game for the Wildcats last season, nabbing 25 ground balls and causing 13 turnovers while adding value offensively with three goals.

In goal, Colin Miller and Drew Morris will both return for their junior seasons and should compete for a starting spot that, again, is wide open. Morris likely has the early edge on Miller, given that Miller has yet to appear in a game for Maryland through two seasons with the Terps. Morris, the No. 2 goalie prospect in the Class of 2017, appeared in six games in relief of Dolan this season and registered three saves in his collegiate debut against Villanova.

Maryland is also adding one new face to the goalkeeping group (as of now) in 2019 recruit Logan McNaney (Salisbury, CT). McNaney is the 43rd-ranked recruit and the No. 2 goalie in the 2019 class, and he could be a factor in the competition as next season approaches.

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A few Terps and Terp commits will be taken off the board this week. Here’s who to keep an eye on.

Maryland’s baseball season ended about two weeks ago in Omaha, but Monday night is an important day for the program. Monday marks the beginning of the 2019 MLB Draft and the Terps are expecting a few names to get picked.

Last year, commit Nick Decker and junior Nick Dunn were picked in the first five rounds, and other high picks in recent years include now-big leaguers Brandon Lowe and Mike Shawaryn.

This year’s Terps aren’t expected to have as many players drafted so early, but several could hear their names called late. Here’s who to keep an eye on.

Hunter Parsons, RHP

After a horrid 2017 season where his ERA was north of 12, Parsons has turned a corner, with a 3.44 and 3.45 ERA in the past two seasons. In 193.1 innings pitched since 2018, the right-hander has given up 74 earned runs and held batters to a .225 and .232 average, respectively. This season, Parsons was 10-3 and threw 104.1 innings in 15 starts, an average of almost seven innings a start.

For a team that had a combined 5.42 ERA this season, having the Friday starter go that deep into games on a consistent basis was a huge way to start any weekend series. Parsons is a workhorse on the mound, throwing 100-plus pitches in 12 of his 15 starts, including numerous outings with pitch counts over 110 or even 120. Starters with that longevity are a valuable commodity in the pros.

Parsons hasn’t popped up in many mock drafts, but with his skill set and body of work, it’s easy to see a team taking a chance on him in the middle or late portion of the draft.

AJ Lee, SS

Despite some early-season injuries, Maryland’s everyday shortstop finished the season strong, having arguably his best season in college. Lee earned a Third Team All-Big Ten selection in 2019 after hitting .317/.443/.497 in 51 games with seven home runs, 36 RBIs, 13 doubles, 60 hits and 10 stolen bases. His .940 OPS was the second-highest on the team, and he was a big part of helping Maryland get back to the Big Ten tournament.

Lee’s glove will need work if he is to establish himself in the pros. Over the past two years, he has committed 29 errors at short and third, recording a .937 and .936 fielding percentage at those positions, respectively. However, his success at the plate could be enticing enough for a late-round selection.

Taylor Wright, 3B

Wright had his best season with Maryland as a senior, batting .290 in 2019 with 67 hits, 20 doubles, four home runs, 31 RBI and 12 stolen bases. He was tied for the team lead in steals and was second in hits and average. After batting just .230 in 2018, Wright raised his average by 60 points and his OPS by 152 points.

At third, he’s a reliable fielder with an above-average arm and average range. His .940 and .942 fielding percentages aren’t great, but he has enough skill to improve on those numbers. Wright came to Maryland as a JuCo transfer and hasn’t always drawn attention from scouts, but he has a chance to earn a selection this week.

John Murphy, RHP

“The Sheriff” had a tough season on the mound despite becoming the third closer in program history to record double-digit saves in a season. Murphy recorded 11 saves for Maryland in 2019, but it was to the tune of a 4.32 ERA, giving up 16 earned runs in 33.1 innings over 27 appearances. The senior allowed three earned runs in three different outings this season, which is where most of the damage came from (take those three games out and he has a 2.12 ERA this season).

Murphy allowed a .286 opponent average and walked 17 batters in 33 innings, both poor numbers for a closer. However, he made up for it with 54 strikeouts, third-most on the team. His stuff could help give him a late-round look in the draft, but he’ll need to be more consistent at the next level.

Ryan Ramsey, LHP, Pascack Hills

Ramsey is a left-handed pitcher from Montvale, New Jersey. His fastball sits 88-90, topping out at 91. He also throws a curveball in the low-mid 70s and a changeup in the high-70s, low-80s. In 2018, Ramsey was named the NJ.com Pitcher of the Year, going 9-1 with a 0.45 ERA and 120 strikeouts and 19 walks in 60.1 innings.

NJ.com has Ramsey projected to go between rounds 7 and 12. If he’s picked in that range, the question becomes whether he elects to turn pro or attend Maryland. Two Terps commits last year—Nick Decker and Jack Herman—signed with the teams that drafted them.

Bobby Zmarzlak, OF, Westhill HS

Scouts are high on the outfielder from Stamford, Connecticut. Zmarzlak was given a 10 grade by Perfect Game, the highest in their Player Rating System, given to a “potential very high draft pick and/or Elite level college prospect.”

Zmarzlak has the highest PG grade of Maryland’s recruits, and one mock draft has him getting drafted in the sixth round. What impressed scouts most was his raw power. His exit velocity was clocked at over 100 mph, in the 99.74th percentile according to Perfect Game. His max barrel speed and 60-yard dash time are also in the 95th percentile or higher.

Troy Schreffler, OF/RHP, Central Dauphin HS

Schreffler is arguably Maryland’s second-best recruit, given a 9.5 grade from Perfect Game. He’s currently a two-way player in high school, and as one would expect for a pitcher, his arm translates to the outfield. He’s been clocked at over 90 mph from the outfield.

Schreffler’s bat has also impressed scouts, with 94 mph exit velocity and 83.3 mph max barrel speed, ranked in the 93rd and 99.87th percentiles, respectively. He has the ability to really break out in professional ball, depending on where he gets picked. His raw power, much like Zmarzlak, is a hot commodity.

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Thanks to an incredible postseason, the senior became the first goalie to ever win the Tewaaraton Award.

Maryland women’s lacrosse put together a championship season in 2019, but the final weekend involved the shining of its brightest star. Senior goalie Megan Taylor not only won a second championship and the 2019 NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player award, but put herself on a pedestal for the entire game of lacrosse to recognize.

After a dominant season, Taylor became the first goalkeeper, in men’s or women’s lacrosse, to win the sport’s most prestigious honor, the Tewaaraton Award. She managed to beat out reigning winner Sam Apuzzo, who led the nation in goals and helped bring Boston College to the title game.

Taylor’s 2019 campaign included 23 starts, a .551 save percentage, 217 saves and just an 8.44 goals-against average. She also reached the 700-save mark for her career and set the record for most conference player of the week awards with six in a row from March 5 to April 9.

For the first time ever, all five finalists for the award played on championship weekend, and the three opposing finalists had to go through Taylor to get the prize. Against Northwestern, Taylor tied her season high with 14 saves, including two against Northwestern’s Selena Lasota — one of the finalists for the award. With the convincing 25-13 win, Maryland seemingly ended all hope for Lasota despite her three-goal performance that Friday evening.

The national championship game shaped up as the battle between No. 1 Maryland and No. 2 Boston College, as well as four Tewaaraton finalists — Apuzzo, Dempsey Arsenault, Jen Giles and Taylor — going head-to-head. Taylor was the standout, finishing with 10 saves and only 10 goals surrendered. She saved 5-of-9 shots sent her way by Apuzzo and Arsenault, and a 7-for-10 start allowed Maryland to build a lead it never relinquished.

Right after taking down the Eagles, Maryland head coach Cathy Reese was quick to note Taylor’s impact. “She was fantastic and made some unbelievable saves to anchor our defense, which I think played the best that it has all season, especially against an offense that’s as high-scoring as Boston College has been this year,” Reese said.

No matter how good she performs in net, though, Taylor is always very quick to give all individual credit to the defensive line of Lizzie Colson, Julia Braig, Shelby Mercer and Meghan Doherty that played in front of her.

“[The defense] made my job so easy,” Taylor said after the championship win. “I’ve been saying it all year, I believe I play with, in front of me, all All-Americans, 100 percent.”

Though the defense may have helped Taylor reach these heights, the rest of the team would simply not be the same without her. Whether it was on the field or off, Taylor was always a bubbly force of positivity, which is something an award does not count. Team success does tend to play a role in individual accolades, and Taylor certainly played her role in making her teammates better players.

“She makes every single one of us better,” senior attacker Caroline Steele said. “I have to shoot on her every single fucking day and she stops me and gets me frustrated every day of my life, and I mean, that’s one thing I’m gonna miss. Like, I’m gonna miss getting stuffed by Megan Taylor because these past for years, playing with her and playing with the people beside me, have been the best four years of my life.”

With an impact like that, it’s easy to see why Taylor was deserving of this award outside of her statistics. Even though she made history and earned the top individual honor with an incredible senior season and championship weekend performance, Taylor, on the biggest individual stage possible, again honored her teammates.

“To my Terps ... I’ve been saying it all year, I don’t want any individual award because you guys truly made this season everything I could have ever imagined,” Taylor said as she closed her Tewaaraton speech. “This award is for you guys, and I hope you know that. ... For the past four years, you have impacted my life in more ways than you guys can ever imagine. ... I would give anything, and I mean anything, to step on the field with you guys one last time in a Terps jersey. I love you guys so much, and I just want to say, forever Terp time.”

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This is the Maryland Minute, a short story followed by a roundup of Terps-related news.

Maryland men’s lacrosse started its offseason with a pair of new additions over the weekend, dipping into both the recruiting and transfer markets.

Michael Uriaco, a long-stick midfielder who spent his freshman season at Villanova, could compete for playing time in College Park right away with Maryland long-pole Nick Brozowski graduating this spring. The Boys Latin product, who appeared in all 15 games as a rookie this season, will join high school teammate Logan Wisnauskas with the Terps.

Rising sophomore LSM Michael Ubriaco (@BoysLatinLax, Md.) will transfer from @NovaLacrosse to @TerpsMLAX. IL's No. 87 recruit played in all 15 games for the Wildcats, racking up three goals, 25 groundballs and 13 caused turnovers.

— Ty Xanders (@tyxanders) May 31, 2019

The Terps also added to their stable of faceoff specialists, flipping 2019 All-American Luke Wierman from his Fairfield commitment. Draws were a strength for Maryland in the regular season but a weakness in the NCAA Tournament, and with Austin Henningsen out of eligibility, several other players have a chance to join rising junior Justin Shockey in the rotation.

Luke Wierman ‘19, F/O, West Chester Henderson (Pa.) / @RoughridersPA flipped from Fairfield to Maryland. The athletic @Philly_Faceoff product was an All-American this year while leading his team in scoring. Also stood out with UA Philly last summer.

— Ty Xanders (@tyxanders) May 31, 2019

Maryland went 12-5 this season and reached the NCAA quarterfinals before collapsing against eventual national champion Virginia. The Terps return a strong core for 2020, though, and these additions make the roster that much deeper.

In other news

Our positional recap series for this year’s Terps started with the attack and .

The Premier Lacrosse League started play this weekend, and the Terp-filled Whipsnakes captured a 15-14 overtime win over Chaos to start their season. Here’s the last play, with one Maryland alum finding another.

GAME. WINNER.@dsnides23 pic.twitter.com/oELugqZKYi

— Whipsnakes Lacrosse Club (@PLLWhipsnakes) June 2, 2019

From Inside Lacrosse, Erica Evans bounced back from a season-ending knee injury at Canisius to raise a championship trophy in her final college season at Maryland.

And here’s The Washington Post on Bruno Fernando, who’s heading to the NBA but won’t ever forget his time at Maryland.

Maryland football 2020 commit Corey Dyches is already making impressive plays in the Maryland Stadium end zone.

I like @cdyches2 in that pretty end zone❣️ #futureterp #home #LOCKedIN ❤️ #TerpsFootball pic.twitter.com/HjpsHyESGc

— Dionne Dyches (@THATDionne) June 1, 2019

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Continuing our positional recap with the ups and downs in the middle this season.

Entering the 2019 season, head coach John Tillman led Maryland men’s lacrosse into what many expected to be a transitional year for the program. Having lost several key stars from across the roster, the Terps needed players to step up all across the roster. Some did just that, while others fell short of expectations, and Maryland’s season finished with a 12-5 record and a trip to the NCAA quarterfinals.

We began this series by profiling how the attack position fared earlier this week, and we’ll continue it with the midfield position and faceoff specialists.

Editor’s note: Long-stick midfielders and short-stick defensive midfielders will be included in the defensive recap.

The midfielders

Unlike the attack position, which had the luxury of returning two key pieces in Jared Bernhardt and Logan Wisnauskas from the season before, the Terps’ midfield group had a good portion of its first and second lines depleted from players graduating. Losing leading point-scorer and Tewaaraton finalist Connor Kelly, along with Tim Rotanz and Adam DiMillo, Tillman was left with some major holes to fill with what he had left on the roster.

The lone returning first-line midfielder was sophomore Bubba Fairman, who started all 18 games as a freshman and tallied 35 points on 26 goals and nine assists. With Kelly graduating, Fairman was poised to have an even bigger year in 2019, which he did and didn’t have in some ways.

Fairman faced heightened attention as Maryland’s top midfield threat, often drawing either a long-pole defender or the opposition’s top short-stick defensive midfielder. This prevented him from building much on his goal total, as his 25 were one fewer than last season. Where Fairman did show some growth, though, was in his ability to put his teammates in position to score, dishing 17 assists to give him the fourth highest point total on the team.

With two seasons left College Park, being able to weather this extra defensive attention going forward will be an important factor in his development. But the Utah native’s ceiling is still sky-high, and he showed his potential as a high-volume scorer with his five-goal performance against Johns Hopkins late in the season.

BUBBA. FAIRMAN.

The sophomore is fired up after his FIFTH goal of the night!

Q4 11:26 | JHU 13, #Terps 10#BeTheBest pic.twitter.com/v95TyWtzVX

— Maryland Lacrosse (@TerpsMLax) April 28, 2019

Anthony DeMaio contributed here and there as a freshman in 2018, appearing in all 18 games with three starts at attack while adding 12 points on six goals and six assists. This season, Tillman moved DeMaio to the first midfield line, where he shined next to Fairman. The sophomore totaled 28 goals and 18 assists to finish third on the team in points. Although he might just as useful at his original position of attack, DeMaio clearly showed that he can be an effective piece going forward at the midfield.

Senior Will Snider capped his Terrapin career with his most productive season, serving as the elder statesman on the first midfield line along with Fairman and DeMaio. Snider finished the season with just 14 points on eight goals and six assists, but his experience made him a steady and stable presence in a midfield group mostly comprised of underclassmen.

While freshman Kyle Long didn’t start a game this season, he started to eat into Snider’s playing time as the year progressed. Long was a five-star recruit who immediately found a spot on the second midfield line, but his quick twitch and decision-making skills had him pushing for first-line minutes by the postseason. He had a breakout performance in Maryland’s first-round game against Towson with a goal and four assists, including assists on the the game-tying goal late in the fourth and winner in overtime. Barring a change of heart by the coaching staff, Long has done more than enough to position himself for a spot on the first line next season.

The faceoff unit

It was a historic final season for Austin Henningsen. After taking a backseat to Justin Shockey last season, Henningsen led the way at the X this year and took advantage of his opportunities.

The senior became the first player in program history to post two games of 22 or more faceoff wins in a single season or career, and put up one of the best faceoff performances in Division I history against Richmond by going 15-for-15 on draws. By the end of the season, Henningsen had become just the fourth player in Maryland’s history to win 500 or more faceoffs in a career, and will be headed to Major League Lacrosse to begin his career with the Boston Cannons after being drafted No. 4 overall in this year’s draft.

Shockey, meanwhile, was forced to take a lesser role this season, taking just 171 draws after leading the team with 245 in 2018. Shockey still ended up winning 50.3 percent of his draws for the Terps and will be the only returning player with significant faceoff experience, so unless someone else comes in and beats him out, its Shockey’s job to lose.

2020 outlook

Looking ahead to next season, most of the first midfield line should likely already be in place with Fairman, DeMaio and Long all returning. Where things will get interesting is how Tillman decides to fill out the depth behind those players given the openings on the second and third lines.

Maryland will be without one of its key second-liners next year with Christian Zawadzki graduating, but junior Russell Masci will be back for his senior season and will likely play a significant role on the second line. Also pushing for second-line time next season should be rising sophomore Chase Cope, who didn’t see much action this year but has potential to contribute. The Severna Park alum came to Maryland this spring after spending the fall at Navy Prep (R.I.), and was ranked No. 34 in Recruiting Rundown’s top 100 for the 2018 class. The second-line midfield has lacked punch in recent seasons, and someone stepping up will take some much-needed pressure off Maryland's top scorers.

In Maryland’s 15-man recruiting class joining the fold in 2020, five are listed at midfield and two are Top 100 recruits. Dawson Wynne (Salisbury School, Conn.) is the highes- graded recruit coming in, checking in at No. 83 in the Inside Lacrosse top 100, with four-star FOGO Conor Calderone (Smithtown, NY) joining the Terps next season as well. The Terps will also be adding FOGO Luke Wierman (Henderson, Pa.) after the Philly native flipped his commitment from Fairfield to Maryland earlier this week. Wierman was an All-American this past year and could be a key part of the faceoff stable next season.

The pieces are in place for this midfield group to dominate in 2020, and Maryland will have plenty to work with when filling out the rotation next spring.

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With over two dozen Terps taking part, there’s a lot to be excited for in the league’s inaugural season.

The Premier Lacrosse League kicks off its inaugural season on Saturday, and there are plenty of former Terps to go around.

Another professional lacrosse league, Major League Lacrosse (MLL), has been around since 2001 but didn’t pay players livable salaries and struggled to gain TV deals or national media attention, making the PLL the first of its kind. Three of MLL’s nine teams folded in April as a majority of the league’s best players moved over to the PLL. The new league is hoping to make lacrosse a more popular sport across the United States.

The PLL is sponsored by Adidas and has a multi-year broadcast agreement with NBC Sports, and games will be streamed on a variety of the network’s channels. Founded by lacrosse star Paul Rabil and his brother Matt, the league consists of six teams that will play tour style across the United States, with one leg in Canada as well.

The PLL is aimed at being player-first — players earn full-time wages and health benefits, and also receive an ownership stake in the league with equity compensation.

The PLL Commercial pic.twitter.com/0hOncGsz73

— Premier Lacrosse League (@PremierLacrosse) May 25, 2019
Meet the teams

Whipsnakes Lacrosse Club (aka Terps 2.0)

Coached by Jim Stagnitta, the Whipsnakes are basically the Terps reincarnated, as 20 former Maryland players are on the team.

There are seven players from the Terps’ 2017 national championship team, including Bryce Young (‘18), Connor Kelly (‘18), Dan Morris (‘18), Dylan Maltz (‘17), Matt Rambo (‘17), Tim Muller (‘17) and Tim Rotanz (‘18).

Also from the Tillman era are Brett Schmidt (‘11), Drew Snider (‘12), Jake Bernhardt (‘13), Kevin Cooper (‘13), Michael Ehrhardt (‘14), Mike Chanenchuk (‘14), Charlie Raffa (‘15), Jay Carlson (‘15), Joe Locascio (‘15), Kyle Bernlohr (‘16) and Matthew Dunn (‘16). Jeff Reynolds and Jeremy Sieverts, who both graduated in 2009, round out the Maryland players on the team.

Goalie @kbernlohr35 is thrilled to be back playing with his former @TerpsMLax teammates.

But now he's focused on establishing his team's new identity pic.twitter.com/5INPOcxD1M

— Premier Lacrosse League (@PremierLacrosse) May 30, 2019

With so many players used to playing together, and most under coach John Tillman’s system, the Whipsnakes come in with a huge advantage in terms of team chemistry. That showed in their preseason game against the Redwoods during training camp, which they won 14-10.

“We have guys that have all grown accustomed to a team first culture,” Kelly told PLL media. “Every team has talent but it’s the best TEAM that will prevail.”

In addition to the Terps on the team, the roster also features Yale Tewaaraton Award finalist Ben Reeves and First Team All-American Foster Huggins of Loyola, among others.

The Whipsnakes, whose motto is “strike without warning,” have their first game on Saturday at 4 p.m. ET against Chaos Lacrosse Club as the PLL begins its season in Boston.

Archers Lacrosse Club

Though the Archers are one of the few teams without a lot of college teammates, they feature a very strong offense and midfield core.

One of the best players on the team is midfielder Tom Schreiber, who went to Princeton and won multiple MVP awards in Major League Lacrosse — the sport’s other professional league. Also featured are attackman Marcus Holman, who went to UNC and is an MLL All-Star, and long-pole specialist Scott Ratlif, who won the 2012 NCAA championship with Loyola.

The club is full of selfless players, and it made teamwork and passing a clear priority over training camp.

Set the precedent NOW pic.twitter.com/y0IwATlUHg

— Archers Lacrosse Club (@PLLArchers) May 19, 2019

The Archers’ weakness is their defense, which doesn’t have as much talent as some of the other PLL teams. To help out with that, Maryland defender Curtis Corley (‘19) signed with the club earlier this week. Terp defender Goran Murray (‘15) is also on the Archers.

Atlas Lacrosse Club

Atlas is sure to be an instant rival for the Whipsnakes, given that there are seven players from Johns Hopkins and three from UNC on the squad. The team is coached by former Michigan head coach John Paul.

Atlas features PLL founder and Johns Hopkins midfielder Paul Rabil, as well as sharpshooter Ryan Brown, who played at Hopkins and has been a star for Team USA. The club also has one of lacrosse’s best defenders in Tucker Durkin, who was the William C. Schmeisser Award winner in 2012 while playing for Johns Hopkins and a star in the MLL, as well as many other big-bodied defenders. Maryland alum Pat Young (‘16) is also on the squad.

With a team motto of “A force to be reckoned with” and a 15-11 preseason win against the Archers to prove it, Atlas is sure to be a dangerous team.

The effort was there, @PLLArchers

Sincerely, ⠀@_JConcannon_ pic.twitter.com/qWQ6OJuUzG

— Atlas Lacrosse Club (@PLLAtlas) May 22, 2019

Chaos Lacrosse Club

Chaos, coached by Andy Towers, is sure to be one of the best transition teams in the league. The club is full of very fast players who handle the ball well and can score on the run.

Some of the best players on the team are midfielder Myles Jones, who was a three time All-American and two time Tewaaraton Award finalist at Duke (‘16), and attackman and Albany great Connor Fields (‘18), as well as attackman Josh Bryne.

Our identity is coming together pic.twitter.com/DbvQDIBPTC

— Chaos Lacrosse Club (@PLLChaos) May 20, 2019

Chaos won its preseason matchup against Chrome Lacrosse Club 19-12, showing just how easily it can score goals by the bunches.

The club also recently added a 2019 Terp graduate to the roster, signing faceoff specialist Austin Henningsen earlier this week.

Chrome Lacrosse Club

Chrome is chock-full of dominant ACC players, featuring nine Duke alums and five Syracuse products. This team is sure to have added chemistry as well, given that 11 played on the MLL Rattlers.

The club has a great goalie in John Galloway, who was named MLL’s Brine Goalie of the Year in 2018 and set the NCAA record for goalie wins at Syracuse (‘11). Other stars on the team are midfielder Joel White, who was a two-time Tewaaraton Award finalist at Syracuse (‘11) and attackman Jordan Wolf, who was a four time All-American and two-time NCAA Champion at Duke (‘14).

Though Chrome lost its preseason matchup, the team is coached by Dom Starsia, who certainly knows how to win after coaching Virginia to four NCAA championships.

Redwoods Lacrosse Club

Redwoods if full of lacrosse veterans with experience to back up their game. Having senior leadership will be the club’s edge.

Midfielder Joe Walters, 34, has been playing professional lacrosse since graduating from Maryland in 2006 and is a big scoring threat. Midfielder Kyle Harrison, 36, was a Tewaaraton Award winner at Johns Hopkins in 2005 and a two-time NCAA Midfielder of the Year, and has also continued to play professionally since then.

Excited to finally play together and build our identity pic.twitter.com/AkCHs33aUB

— Redwoods Lacrosse Club (@PLLRedwoods) May 20, 2019

Though the Redwoods lost 14-10 to the Whipsnakes in the preseason, they clawed back from being down 10-2 and showed they have a lot of fight.

Schedule

The league starts in Boston at Gillette Stadium this weekend, with two games on Saturday and one Sunday. The tour comes to the DMV area twice, with games at Homewood Field in Baltimore on June 22-23, as well as games at Audi Field in Washington, D.C., on July 6-7.

An All-Star game will be played in Los Angeles on July 22. The first round of playoffs will take place on Sept. 6 and Sept. 7 in Columbus, Ohio, with the second round the following week in New York and the championship in Philadelphia on Sept. 21.

Here is the full detailed schedule.

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This is the Maryland Minute, a short story followed by a roundup of Terps-related news.

The 2019 college football season is three months away, and now we know a little more about Maryland’s schedule, as the school announced kickoff times and TV networks for several games Thursday.

Maryland’s first three contests of the season will all start at noon ET, which is looking like it’ll be the norm. Of the six kickoff times announced, five are noon games, with the lone exception the Friday night game in Week 5 against Penn State, which will start at 8 p.m. on FS1.

There’s a lot more diversity in network designations, though. Five Terps games now have TV channels, each on a different network. In addition to the FS1 game against Penn State, Maryland will host Howard on the Big Ten Network and visit Temple on CBS Sports Network. The Terps’ Week 2 matchup with Syracuse will be televised either on ESPN or ESPN2, while an Oct. 26 game at Minnesota is slated for either ESPN, ESPN2 or ABC.

Other kickoff times and TV channels will be announced in the weeks leading up to each game.

In other news

Megan Taylor is the Tewaaraton Award winner, becoming the first defensive player to ever capture college lacrosse’s highest honor.

Jared Bernhardt was a finalist on the men’s side, where Loyola’s Pat Spencer took home the award. Bernhardt led a dynamic Terps attack this season, and he’ll be back to do the same in 2020.

Former Terps pitcher Mike Shawaryn is the newest member of the Boston Red Sox after being called up Thursday. (He couldn’t make his debut last night, though, as Boston’s game at the Yankees was rained out.)

The tennis team will have a new head coach next season, as the school will not renew Daria Panova’s contract when it expires in June.

Maryland basketball has Anthony Cowan Jr. back, and Lila wrote about what he’ll bring and where he’ll need to improve.

We discussed Cowan’s long-expected decision to return, as well as the new women’s lacrosse national title, on our latest podcast.

Seventy-seven Maryland athletes earned Academic All-Big Ten honors for the spring semester.

And in somber news, former Maryland football player David Mackall was identified as the fatal victim of a shooting in West Baltimore. He was 28.

The Maryland Football family is deeply saddened to learn of the death of David Mackall Jr. Our thoughts and prayers are with his family, friends and former Terp teammates during this tragic time. pic.twitter.com/orJ68XHPE2

— Maryland Football (@TerpsFootball) May 30, 2019
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