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In business, sometimes making the wrong decision is worse than making no decision at all. This is especially true when it comes to the customer service industry. With customers being the foundation of so many businesses, going against their needs can be a make or break decision. And, in the fast-paced technology age we live in, making the wrong call is costlier than ever before.

With this said, here are six common customer service mistakes to avoid at all costs so you can put your company in the best position to be successful…

1) Only having a surface-level understanding of your customers – Too many businesses think of their customers as dollar signs and nothing else. Take the time to get to know your customers, including what specifically they do and what their corporate culture is like. The more you know about them, the better equipped you’ll be to tailor your customer service to fit their unique needs.

2) Forcing customers to use a specific channel – Everyone is different and has their own communication preferences. To accommodate your wide customer base, it’s essential to offer as many customer service channels as you can reasonably handle. Limiting your communication channels is suicide because your competition likely provides omnichannel freedom and mobility.

3) Only having customer conversations when something is wrong – A customer shouldn’t always have to be the one to initiate a dialogue. Don’t be one of those businesses that waits around until something breaks to speak to their customers. This is called reactive service and it’s a way to lose business. Instead, take a more proactive customer service approach and keep building positive customer relationships. It’s great to be directly invested in making your customers more successful.

4) Leveraging a tiered customer service model – When a customer does contact you, they want to know the person they are speaking with is knowledgeable. Or, even if your employee doesn’t immediately know the answer to their issue, they know how to go about finding it. Routing a customer to a new, low level agent right away who can handle only the simplest of issues is not a good customer experience. Instead, deploy a collaborative customer service model so agents can work together in real-time to learn and solve problems faster.

Click here to download our tiered support is dead whitepaper for tips on how to improve your customer support and resolve issues faster!

5) Failing to provide a consistent customer experience – If your service team is quick to pick up the phone but you can’t get your IT team to respond to emails, then you have a fragmented and inconsistent customer experience. Every single customer interaction should be timely and relatively consistent across channels with an attitude towards positively helping the customer. This builds trust with each customer and they know that when they contact you with an issue, regardless of the channel or department, you’ll be there to help them work through whatever problem they’re having.

6) You aren’t making data-driven service decisions – The “I’ve got a hunch” era of customer service is over. Now, leading teams leverage all different types of customer service data to make better decisions on how to properly allocate their time. Customer service software is an excellent data analysis solution for not only customers (i.e. measuring sentiment and distress levels) but also for internal team evaluation. You can see which agents work well with certain customers and place them in positions for both the customer and the agent to have a successful interaction.

To summarize, avoid inconsistent, isolated, and uninformed customer service conversations. Have your team work together to solve problems, leveraging data as needed to proactively take your correspondence to the next level. Keeping customers happy is the key to any successful business, and by avoiding these common customer service mistakes you’ll be in a better position to increase customer satisfaction across the board.

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Customer relations are very important to all businesses. Having a positive relationship with your customers can do wonders, because customers want to have a positive relationship with you, and if you're lucky they will actively work to maintain it Of course, businesses also put in considerable time and effort into making a relationship rewarding and enriching for both parties. Problems can still arise, but customers are more likely to be patient with businesses that they like and trust. Every interaction a business has with a customer shapes the attitude the customer has towards that business, even if it seems like an inconsequential instance. Businesses can control many aspects of their relationships with customers, but the one thing they cannot control is the customers themselves.

A business simply can't afford to drive customers away, especially when bad customer experiences can spread across the globe in a matter of minutes. To help ensure that interactions with all types of customers can be positive and enriching, Fundera has created this infographic that describes 11 different types of difficult customers. It goes into detail on each type and provides tips on how to best handle them. Dealing with difficult customers doesn't have to be difficult, especially once you know how to do it well!

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The concept of a KPI (Key Performance Indicator) is common in the business world, yet for some customer support teams it may be new terminology. A KPI is a measurement of your operations that you can compare over time to see how your business has changed. With more companies realizing that customer support is a profit center and not a cost center, measuring KPIs in the industry has been a hot topic. Some of the more traditional customer support KPIs – like abandonment rate and first response time – are classic KPIs borrowed from departments like sales that aren’t always a natural fit.

Let’s refresh the customer support KPI concept and look at what indicators are emerging in the industry…

1) Customer Distress (CD) or Customer Happiness - Customers are the lifeblood of a business and keeping them happy is a top priority. Leverage software that can easily tell if you if a customer is distressed or getting there based on factors such as their ticket volume and the tone of their messages. Some solutions have a Customer Distress Index (CDI) built in for quick information, and sentiment analysis to identify potential dissatisfaction. You can even factor in customer value and longevity as well to understand exactly how much attention a support team should pay to a specific customer.

2) Cost Per Ticket (CPT) – This is the total cost of running a customer support team divided by the number of tickets received. Arguably the largest impact on this KPI is an efficient team that is well-structured and has employees with a variety of complementary skills. You don’t want a team with glaring weaknesses, such as a lack of agents that are good on the phone. In addition, collaboration with team members on difficult customer tickets helps to resolve issues faster and keep customers happy.

3) Monthly Ticket Volume (MTV) – Sure, MTV might have been a television station you watched decades ago, but ticket volume is serious business. Track the total number of tickets received monthly and compare them not only to the previous month but also on a YoY (year over year) basis. Spot trends via customer support reporting and understand how the volume directly correlates to business decisions being made in other departments. This metric is also very valuable for staffing and recruiting as some companies do have seasonal volume fluctuations.

Click here to download our eBook on the influence of reporting and metrics in B2B customer support!

4) Average Response Time (ART) – This KPI is represented by a single question… How long does it take to respond to customers? Evaluating this indicator closely is a good indicator of customer happiness because nobody likes to wait for a reply. It can also show you the complexity of the requests you are receiving from customers, with highly complicated issues taking longer to solve. It’s essentially an evolved and more exhaustive version of the “first response time” KPI.

5) Average Ticket Severity (ATS) – Lastly, the ATS indicator lets you understand how different issues within your business are directly affecting support. You can calculate this by assigning a number to each ticket severity level (i.e. 3 = critical, 2 = high, 1 = normal), adding them up, and dividing by the total number of tickets. If there is an influx of critical or high severity issues, it likely means that other departments aren’t doing their job well enough and support is needing to pick up the slack. Too many months with a high ATS may indicate support needs to speak up to business leadership because some major problems are present in the company.

We hope these KPIs help in monitoring the success of your customer support operation. The more actionable metrics customer support leadership can bring to the table, the more likely they are to prove their worth and value to the company. By keeping your KPIs focused on your customers, it can only help to create an environment that adds value to the bottom line.

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There’s a chance that your business, and subsequently your help desk, has grown organically and at a rate that outpaced your internal processes. While growth is exactly what you’re after, it can mean there are a few opportunities where you can get your arms around more efficient ways to do things.

Your help desk should be two things: easy to use, and focused on communication and customer satisfaction. A ticketing system is an ideal solution for triaging issues among the help desk team and can assist in resolving concerns quickly.

If you feel that the effectiveness of your help desk isn’t what it should be, and the user experience of your customers is being affected, it may be time to consider a totally new help desk ticketing system. How do you know for sure? Here are five signs.

1) You Have an Overcrowded Ticket Inbox

At first your team may have had individual email addresses for tickets. However, as you grew, this solution became cumbersome because there was no “big picture” visibility to all the requests coming in to the department. Thus, the shared inbox was born. While this may have worked for a while, you may be finding that the increasing volume means many tickets are getting lost, ignored, or forgotten. A sophisticated help desk ticketing system eliminates the need for a shared inbox, while logging customer inquiries along with which team members are addressing them.

2) You’re Manually Assigning Tickets

Though quite confusing, manually assigning tickets may be somewhat “doable” to a point. However, no matter what size your business is, it’s still a waste of time to look at each inquiry and determine who on the team is available and which person’s skill set makes them the most qualified to respond. The longer it takes to assign tickets, the longer a customer sits frustrated that they’re losing productivity. Consider automating inquires based on the issue and which help desk agents are best suited to handle them.

Want to better understand ticket triaging and optimizing ticket processes? Click here to download our eBook explaining the ticket triage process!

3) You Have No Historical Log of Tickets

While Excel has its place, it’s simply inefficient to manually track every ticket in a spreadsheet. What’s worse is not tracking them at all! Not only is it helpful to keep a historical log of tickets so you can refer to past inquiries, but it also provides you with the opportunity to conduct analysis. With an extensive ticket management system, you can figure out which issues are more frequent and how long it’s taking to address them. This provides an opportunity for employee education on common issues, which in turn allows your team to solve them faster. For example, when you connect your ticket data to your HR and performance management software through a business intelligence software, your historical analysis may find staffing and customer issues that can be fixed quickly.

4) You Have No Self-Service Option

Today’s tech-savvy customer prefers a self-service option so they can troubleshoot their own issues, especially simple things they can fix easily. Not only does it solve problems faster by getting customer issues resolved without losing too much productivity, but it also lessens their frustration at jumping through too many hoops. In addition, self-service saves your help desk team additional time by freeing them up to work on more complex issues.

5) You Can’t Help Customers from Mobile Devices

Employees are becoming more tech-savvy and today’s workforce seems to always be "on the clock". Having a mobile help desk option where employees have visibility into customer issues when they’re not at the office can be a game changer. Being able to alter and respond to a ticket on the fly improves customer communication and increases satisfaction. It also can greatly improve internal communication and overall efficiency.

We hope by identifying these five signs that we helped in your assessment of your own help desk solution. Always remember productivity is key for both your customers and your help desk team. Look at ways to provide mobile and self-service options as needed, and also consider automating any processes you are able to.

***

Jessica Barrett Halcom is a writer for TechnologyAdvice.com, with specializations in human resources, healthcare, and transportation. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay and currently lives in Nashville, TN.

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Attending an industry conference can sometimes feel overwhelming. Juggling session schedules, facility maps, and EXPO hall navigation isn’t likely something you’re going to master the first time. Add this to what’s likely an already busy workload can lead to long days. And here you thought a few days out of the office would be a nice break!

Despite the negatives, attending a conference in the customer service industry in particular can be extremely valuable to the future of your business. Here’s our quick guide on attending customer service conferences and how to get the most out of your time at these events.

Plan ahead and schedule accordingly – If a conference publishes its sessions online (most do nowadays), take the time to review who is speaking and the topics discussed. Depending on the conference, you may need to pre-register for sessions to make sure you get a spot in that key breakout discussion you really want to attend. Because only so many people can be allowed in specific rooms (due to fire codes), you don’t want to be shuttled off to a satellite room to watch it on a TV or miss out altogether.

Overwhelmed by what sessions to focus on? Click here to download our new infographic on customer service trends to get an idea of hot topics in customer service!

Ask the speakers one-on-one questions after a session – One of the best parts of attending a customer service conference is all the speakers understand the importance of meaningful customer interaction. These shows aren’t super technical and usually don’t boast famous, closed-off speakers. Most speakers would be happy to chat individually with you after their session to offer advice on how their topic may impact your unique business needs.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your peers – These conferences can have some down time, and while many people work during these moments, meeting new colleagues can have huge benefits. Professionals in the customer service industry are generally chatty people, so don’t hesitate to strike up a conversation if the moment is right. One of the best things about attending a conference is it gets you out of your own workplace to have real business conversations with your industry peers. It’s a great way to get information and advice from someone who understands what its like to be in your shoes.

Make at least one trip through the EXPO hall floor – Even if you’re a busy executive, take a half hour out of a day while you’re at the conference to walk the EXPO hall. You’ll find a lot of great information, from new products in the industry to how specific companies are positioning themselves for their target audience. For example, if you are a B2B company, you can keep an eye out for products and services marketed specifically for B2B customer service. There are two main strategies when walking the EXPO hall; either start early and chat with people at your own pace, or show up around lunch and “blend in” to avoid pushy sales conversations. Either way, arriving later in the day isn’t advised as employees on the floor are often tired and not as invested in what you have to say.

We hope this brief guide on attending customer service conferences was helpful. Plan a little in advance, be ready to strike up conversations, and come with a willingness to learn. You’ll have a great time!

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We’ve all seen or heard about a customer success team that’s just “missing something”. Maybe the agents are a little slow to follow up, or they just can’t seem to get your issue requests in the hands of the right person. Mistakes like this happen for even the best teams, but when it’s a recurring issue it’s time to take some action.

For many teams, this means switching to a customer success software solution that features extensive ticket automation capabilities. Let’s look at the value of ticket automation in customer success and how it can improve an entire business…

Automation saves time and money – Many customer success teams that don’t utilize automation have what is called a “routing agent”, or basically an agent that evaluates all inbound tickets and sends them on to the appropriate person. Once fully configured, a sophisticated ticket automation solution can essentially replace this role in a company and, best of all, every ticket is instantly routed. Many companies deploying or updating their automation solution either choose to save money and eliminate the “routing agent” role altogether or reassign them to work directly with customer tickets. Either way, your company works more efficiently and closes tickets faster with automation.

Automation improves efficiency in many ways – Not only does automation route tickets instantly, but it means one less person that is “touching” each ticket. Simply put, the fewer agents that interact with a ticket – even if it’s just to forward it on to someone else – the better because it lowers the chance of human error when working with customers. Machines don’t make mistakes like forwarding tickets to the wrong “Dennis” by accident, only to have them be ignored and receive an angry and lengthy phone call at the end of the day. An automated ticketing system streamlines communication by removing people from the equation.

Automation is easy to track and understand – Like them or not, foundational rules such as who handles what tickets are cornerstones of a great customer success team. They can also be a source of truth for an entire business operation. For example, looking at automation in the B2B industry, a sales leader may be working to upsell a current customer and wonder which customer success rep is designated to handle their tickets. Instead of bothering someone on an evening or weekend, they can use the customer success software to see that the automation rule for this customer has three agents – Betty, Jim, and Patricia – who evenly split all tickets. Sales can now reach out to these three agents directly to get their input on what to focus on for the upsell instead of navigating through middle management for the answer.

Working in the B2B industry and want learn more about your customers? Click here to download our eBook on customer experience in B2B!

To summarize, ticket automation is tremendously valuable to a customer success team. It saves them time and money through better work processes and improves efficiency by reducing human error. Automation even benefits other departments with its simplicity by streamlining communication and improving internal conversations. Ticket automation is here to stay, and more customer success teams are making it a core component of their operation.

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Companies will go to great lengths to find out what customers think about their business. From expensive surveys to focus groups and everything in-between, customer information traditionally isn’t obtained overnight or on a shoestring budget.

But, with this information now being so vital to customer success teams, a standardized method of obtaining real information at an affordable price has emerged. Known as the Net Promoter Score (NPS) it asks customers one simple question…

On a scale of 0-10, how likely is it that you would recommend my brand/product/service to a friend or colleague?

To calculate your NPS score, you subtract the percentage of promoters from detractors. The "passives" are considered neutral and do not affect your NPS score. For example, if out of 100 NPS responses, 38 were promoters, 29 were passives, and 33 were detractors, then the equation would be… 38% - 33% = 5%. Thus, your overall NPS score is 5. Not a great score!

Now that the math and explanation is out of the way, what exactly is the relationship between customer success and NPS? Here are the key details… 

NPS is a direct measurement of honest customer success – One of the key selling points of the NPS score is its lack of personal influence. A respondent isn’t coaxed into answering a specific way based on how a person asks the question. Your NPS score is a great starting point to understand in a simplistic way what your customers think about your company and entire operation. To facilitate NPS scores, companies are leveraging customer success software so that the score and all customer conversations are in a single location.

Utilize NPS to follow up for more specific information – A customer success team can look at NPS scores and immediately see who should be the focus of their efforts in reaching out to reduce net churn. If they gave your company a high score, float the idea of a testimonial out there to help attract new customers. If the score was low, have a retention specialist follow up and see what can be done to resolve their concerns and subsequently boost their score in the future.

Want to leverage even more data in constructing your customer conversations effectively? Click here to download our whitepaper on utilizing customer support metrics!

NPS can be a key planning metric for customer success leaders – Three things that are great about NPS results is they are easy to interpret, easy to measure, and they can change over time. With this said, it’s important for a customer success team to leverage this data for developing future plans. If your overall NPS score is low, it may be time to be aggressive to raise it in the short-term by focusing on projects that will have a more immediate impact. If the score is already great, understand what you’re doing right and ensure you can maintain the high bar you’ve set with customers.

To summarize, the relationship between customer success and the Net Promoter Score (NPS) continues to evolve. Because NPS scores can (and do) change, the metric is a great way to benchmark yourself on both a customer level and on a grander scale with your entire business efforts.

NPS as a whole continues to increase in popularity and credibility, so if you haven’t already, make sure you get started with the tracking process sooner than later. Start with a small sample of customers and expand from there into a rolling program where scores from every customer arrive on a recurring basis (quarterly, bi-annual, or annual). From here, you’ll have a valuable information point to truly drive customer success decisions and see your business prosper in the future!

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The size of a business can be a defining characteristic for any interaction. When it comes to sales, they will approach and speak with you differently based on how many employees and offices you have. With this said, customer support interactions and expectations also vary based on what growth stage a company is currently in. So, how should your company approach customer support at each unique stage of growth and what’s the best technology for you (both now and in the future)? Let’s break down the different growth stages and what you should be looking for in your customer support software solution…

Start-up (less than 10 employees) – The phrase “all hands on deck” never felt more appropriate than when it comes to customer support at a start-up company. Every single employee, including the CEO, is a part of daily customer support efforts and communication.

Look for… Ticket Management, Ticket Tagging, Cloud-based Software

Money is likely tight which means, although certainly not advised, customer communication is often tracked via email, spreadsheets, or other documents. Stop this habit before it becomes problematic. Happy customers are the key to business growth, so opt for cloud-based software to start organizing your tickets more efficiently.

Small (11-50 employees) – Companies this size likely have an individual or small team dedicated to customer support. Making the jump from start-up not only means your employee headcount may have double or tripled, but also your customer base.

Look for… Customer Tracking, Software Integrations, Ticket Automation

With an influx of new business, making sense of all the additional support inquiries can be a nightmare. Ensure your software organizes tickets not just by contact but also by customer to stay organized. Working smarter also becomes a higher priority, meaning a system with strong integration and ticket automation capabilities is a must.

Are you looking more information on how your growth can be impacted by customer support? Click here to download our whitepaper on leveraging customer service as a growth strategy!

Mid-size (51-100 employees) – Approaching the triple digit mark with employees means diversifying and optimizing as a business. This is when every employees isn't on a first name basis anymore and keeping communication tight is crucial. It’s also when companies truly begin planning for “what’s next” to keep the growth going.

Look for… Internal Communication Tools, Support Reporting, Products and Inventory

Internal communication tools, such as a general conversation area within software that users can ask questions for the larger team, is a great way to eliminate guesswork. Companies of this size also need to really start looking at their products and why they are successful. Focusing on key products with good support metrics helps to plan for the future.

Large (100+ employees) – Reaching triple digits as a company means it’s time to let go of some power in the customer support relationship (both internally and externally). You’ll have more “specialists” than ever before, and it’s important to make efficient use of their time. It’s also essential to evolve with your growing customer base by empowering them to help themselves while still being there when they need you.

Look for… Task Management, Customer Hub, SLA Management

Support software with a task management solution built in can be fantastic for larger teams as it allows multiple employees to work on different areas of one ticket at the same time. Launching a full-scale customer hub (with a Knowledge Base of information as its backbone) gives customers 24/7 access to answers, while managing SLAs directly within your support software boosts retention by ensuring critical issues aren’t missed.

 

Extra-Large (1000+ employees) – Companies this size are few and far between, yet there is still support software out there that adds value to their business. Finding a way to “group” employees internally is essential, and so is leveraging the huge customer base they’ve built over the years to create support content.

Look for… Internal Groups, Community, Customization

Creating different groups (by department or location) in customer support software is a must to keep issues localized and ensure the correct employees are responding. Adding solutions such as a community forum can take the concept of 24/7 knowledge even further by enabling your own customers to assist their industry peers. This “crowd sourcing” saves extra-large companies both time and money in the long run, and can also boost your brand.

We hope this stage-by-stage growth guide to customer support software features was helpful. At the end of the day, regardless of the size of your company, keeping the customer as the top priority is the most important aspect of support. Staying organized and working efficiently as a support team will go a long way in improving satisfaction and the impact support has on customer retention.

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Building a great team of any type takes time and patience. But, when it comes to taking care of the most important asset of a business (your customers), making sure you have the right people in place to manage these complex relationships is essential. Here are 5 tips to keep in mind when building a customer interaction management team…

1) Look for excellent conversationalists – This won’t always show up on a resume, so make sure to interview potential team members in person to see how well they pick up and react to different types of language. Observe their reactions not only to what you say but also your body language and tone of voice. Non-verbal communication is just as important in business as what people say through words.

2) Lean towards prospects with a strong technology background – Even the best conversationalists are now expected to be well-versed across multiple communication channels. Being only a smooth talker on the phone with customers isn’t good enough anymore, employers now seek out team members who are concise yet thoughtful in text-based mediums including email, chat, and messaging apps.

3) Evaluate internal communication capabilities – One of the pillars of a strong customer interaction management team is actually having effective and efficient conversations with colleagues. Since many employees across various departments can interact with customers (especially in the B2B industry), it’s essential that two employees aren’t providing conflicting responses. Finding excellent internal communicators isn’t easy, but once you do you should hold onto these employees as the skill is rare and valuable.

Want to improve internal communication with employees even further? Click here to download our whitepaper on leveraging the collective knowledge of the team to provide better interactions!

4) Leverage a system to archive customer information – No matter how good your customer interaction management team is at creating engaging and impactful dialogue, they simply can’t remember each detail of every single conversation. A customer interaction management system that also acts as a repository for customer information is essential for ensuring conversations are frequent and effective. In addition, an archive of customer discussions is great for transitioning accounts should an employee get promoted or move to a different department.

5) Seek to hire people with different backgrounds and opinions – Most companies have a diverse customer base, meaning you should also have a diverse customer interaction management team. Try to find employees who are not only a good fit with your culture but also have unique perspectives created by their personal background and history. While lifelong “local” employees may be less transient, they also can sometimes have difficulty relating to customers from other areas of the country or even the world.

These tips will help you in creating a successful customer interaction management team. Seek out employees who can hold their own in a personal conversation yet are tech-savvy enough to converse effectively across multiple mediums. A diverse team that communicates well together and comes from different backgrounds is also vital to success, especially if you’re an international company. Lastly, and most importantly, having a customer interaction management technology system as the backbone of your communication holds the entire team together and prevents missteps with customers. Best of luck on building your team!

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With more companies discovering the value of customer support, and how it’s now a profit center and no longer a cost center, company executives are placing a higher value on support metrics. Data is king in modern business, with more decisions being driven by analytics than ever before. So, if you’re a customer support leader, how can you maintain accurate reporting and metrics in your customer support software? Here are some of the best tactics…

**Disclaimer: Make sure your support software matches your industry! This article is best suited for support leaders utilizing B2B customer support software.

Create accurate labels – When you’re configuring your support software, it’s essential to allocate time for creating fields that make sense. In general, you’ll want fields for the following at a bare minimum…

  • Channel (email, phone, etc.)
  • Department/Group (development, accounting, etc.)
  • Ticket status (open, closed, etc.)

That’s really just the tip of the iceberg and fields can vary greatly by company. Talk to your executives, understand what metrics they need to see, and define fields or custom fields to fit their requirements.

Create (and USE) relevant ticket tags – These can help at quickly tracking ticket volume for certain topics to determine what resources need to be allocated where. For example, if a specific feature created a problem but is fixed, you can click on the feature tag to see all tickets related to the issue. This makes following up with customers about the fix much easier. However, tags are only effective if your agents utilize them properly. Train them to always tag tickets accordingly to prevent additional work in the future.

Correctly configure CDI (Customer Distress Index) weights – Some customer support software solutions have a Customer Distress Index (CDI) that provides a 0-100 score indicating how happy a customer may be with your business. This score can be manually configured by providing weights to specific values. For example, if ticket resolution time is of high importance to your customers, you can weigh this more strongly than total number of tickets or another value. This score can be a great asset in building and maintaining positive customer relationships.

Want to understand take your reporting to the next level with the CDI and other features? Click here to download our eBook on customer support reporting and metrics!

Make sure every agent has their own software subscription – Sharing accounts in customer support software is highly discouraged and can really create a mess with reporting and metrics. It’s difficult to tell who is truly working on what, often creating internal chaos. In addition, sharing accounts discredits key agent metrics that can be used for internal evaluation and review. Providing agents with their own software subscription is essential for accurate reporting.

Configure product and inventory information to list all versions – This can take a little bit of time, especially if you have a lot of customer-related products and inventory, but it’s usually worth the effort. Companies who break down products by version find it valuable because they can pinpoint issues to a specific iteration of a product, saving time across the entire company and eliminating guesswork.

To summarize, maintaining accurate reporting and metrics in customer support software is much easier when you prepare in advance. Create accurate labels and tags right from the start, then use them appropriately to keep your information relevant. Take the time to properly set up your CDI, products and inventory, and individual users so you can get extremely granular with your data and find the high value insights your business needs. A customer support software system with excellent built-in metrics and reporting is worth keeping around because of the value it provides to your entire company.

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