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Bangkok, 19 July 2019 – The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) has obtained the latest guidelines from the Ministry of Public Health, prepared in collaboration with the public and private sector partners, on what to do in case of a jellyfish sting.

According to the Ministry of Public Health, although a jellyfish sting is not that common on Thai beaches but in the case one does happen, these are the recommended steps:

  • Bring the injured person out of the sea to a safe place and immediately call an ambulance (Tel. 1669). Do not leave the person unattended.
  • Calm the person down and make him/her remain still to prevent further spread of toxin and do not rub the wound.
  • Pour vinegar continuously over the wound for at least 30 seconds (do not use fresh water), which will initially help in most cases.
  • Observe the injured person for 45 minutes and watch for at least one of these signs/symptoms:
  • severe pain on the wound, back, trunk or head.
  • restlessness or confusion.
  • sweating, chills, nausea or vomiting.
  • palpitations, chest pain or chest tightness.
  • breathing difficulty, rapid breathing or panting.
  • pale face or bluish or purplish discolouration of the hands or feet.

If the injured person is unconscious, perform CPR before pouring vinegar continuously over the wound for at least 30 seconds.

To help prevent against jellyfish stings when swimming, wear a lycra suit or a long-sleeved shirt and pants that cover all skin surfaces.

Always keep a look out for jellyfish warning signs that may be posted at a beach.

It’s a good idea to carry a bottle of vinegar with you.

The post What to do in the case of a jellyfish sting appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 19 July 2019 – The Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) is delighted to announce that in Travel + Leisure magazine’s The World’s Best Awards 2019, Thailand has performed impressively well with its destinations, hotels and resorts winning numerous spots on multiple Top 10 and Top 15 lists.

Four Season Resort Chiang Mai

Most notable was Thailand’s domination of the ‘Top 15 Southeast Asia Resort Hotels’ category, with 10 places going to Thai properties. These were Six Senses Yao Noi in Phang Nga Bay ranked 2nd, Anantara Hua Hin Resort in 3rd place, Chiang Rai’s Anantara Golden Triangle Elephant Camp & Resort ranked 4th, Six Senses Samui as 5th, Four Seasons Resort Chiang Mai in 8th place, Anantara Chiang Mai Resort as 9th, Four Seasons Resort Koh Samui ranked 10th, Anantara Mai Khao Phuket Villas in 13th place, Anantara Phuket Layan Resort & Spa as 14th and JW Phuket Resort & Spa ranked 15th.

Grand Krathong Procession in Yi Peng Festival, Chiang Mai

In ‘The Top 15 Cities in the World’ category Chiang Mai was named in 3rd place and Bangkok in 15th, while in ‘The Top 10 Cities in Asia’ Chiang Mai took 2nd place and Bangkok 7th.

For the Thai capital, Bangkok, it was the 10th consecutive year of being voted onto ‘The Top 10 Cities in Asia’ list and as such it was named a WBA Hall of Fame honouree.

Bangkok Aerial Photograph and Chao Phraya River, Bangkok

Ko Lanta earned itself 9th place in ‘The 15 Best Islands in the World’ and 5th place in ‘The Top 10 Islands in Asia’ followed by Ko Samui in 8th place.

In ‘The Top 100 Hotels in the World, 14th place went to Six Senses Yao Noi, 47th place went to Anantara Hua Hin Resort, Anantara Golden Triangle Elephant Camp & Resort was placed 52nd, Six Senses Samui was placed 71st, and 90th place went to Lebua at State Tower in Bangkok.

Lebua at State Tower also featured on the list of ‘The 10 Best City Hotels in Asia’, where it was voted into 5th spot.

Six Senses Yao Noi

In ‘The Top 15 Resort Hotels in Asia’, Six Senses Yao Noi was named in 4th place, Anantara Hua Hin Resort in 9th place and Anantara Golden Triangle Elephant Camp & Resort in 11th place.

The World’s Best Awards are based on an annual reader survey, in which Travel + Leisure readers vote in airline, airport, destination, hotel, cruise and other categories.

The post Thai destinations, hotels and resorts perform impressively in ‘The World’s Best Awards 2019’ appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 3 July 2019 – Renaissance Hotels’ new “Discover This Way” marketing campaign launched in May was inspired by the idea that every trip can be a tale, and reinforces the brand’s promise of delivering the unexpected. As such, Renaissance properties around the world are helping guests to explore and feel ‘the DNA’ of the local neighbourhood in the destination they are visiting, with fascinating experiences and exclusive perks to enjoy.

This includes the Renaissance hotels in Thailand, among them Renaissance Koh Samui Resort & Spa and Renaissance Bangkok Ratchaprasong Hotel.

When guests check-in they are given a Navigator map that will take them to hidden gems in the area, along with tokens to use at these local establishments. These participating partners help highlight the style, eats and beats of the destination.

The Renaissance Hotel Navigator, more than the typical concierge, is on hand to show guests how to discover the destination like a local by picking sights and sounds that can’t be found in the usual guidebooks.

At Renaissance Bangkok Ratchaprasong Hotel, centrally located in the Ratchaprasong shopping district and within a short walk of the city’s Skytrain elevated rail network, one of Thailand’s most notable archaeologists will help guests explore street art in Chalerm La Park, Lakshmi Shrine at Gaysorn Village, neon night markets and other discoveries. Back at the hotel they can enjoy a Thai Night Festival of arts and culture.

Lamai Beach (Photo Credit: Renaissance Koh Samui Resort & Spa)

Guests staying at Renaissance Koh Samui Resort & Spa on the famous island’s lovely Lamai Beach can start the evening off with the Bar Ritual – a punch bowl created by the hotel’s mixologists, feast on succulent seafood at signature restaurant TawaNN, dine on classic Thai cuisine in Navigator’s Table style and learn to cook Tom Yam Goong with guidance from the chef, rejuvenate with a 60 minute signature treatment at Quan Spa or take the Navigator’s Tour that starts at Silangu Temple built from red clay and also includes exclusive access to a coconut plantation.

The post Guests at Renaissance hotels in Thailand being shown ‘the DNA’ of their destination appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 18 July 2019 – In this interview, Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) Governor Mr. Yuthasak Supasorn highlights Thai society’s long-standing respect for nature and close relationship with the animal kingdom, and how TAT continues to build on its history of animal welfare and wildlife conservation, particularly in emerging and secondary destinations.

Q: What is the history of Thailand in relation to elephants?

The role of the elephant in Thailand has been a long one that we’re not really sure when it actually began. In various times in history, the Thais took advantage of the elephants’ sheer size and strength to protect the Kingdom in battle and also put them to work across the country for generations in lieu of machinery. The elephant is also the national symbol and has special spiritual significance with its deep associations with Buddhism and Hinduism. So, it must always be revered and well taken care of.

Q: What are examples of elephant conservation?

There are many conservation projects and sanctuaries around Thailand in all regions. Examples include but are not limited to the Elephant Hospital in Lampang, the Elephants World in Kanchanaburi, and Phang Nga Elephant Park in Southern Thailand’s Phang Nga province to name only a very few.

Q: What about other animals?

The Wildlife Fund Thailand (www.wildlifefund.or.th) conducts a Thai peacock conservation project in Lamphun province. Another is the Seub Nakhasathien Foundation (www.seub.or.th) that has a behavioural tracking project for goral in Thai forests. Also, the World Wildlife Fund for Nature (formerly World Wildlife Fund) (www.wwf.or.th) has operated in Thailand since 1995, ensuring that there is strong participation and support to conserve the country’s biological diversity.

Q: How is TAT currently promoting emerging secondary destinations to showcase how humans and animals live in harmony?

TAT’s research has identified the need to position 55 secondary provinces within the “big picture” of Thailand’s tourism development. The plan is to create conceptual models that are specific to each secondary province, especially rural areas where agriculture remains the primary source of livelihood for the locals. Even with the evolution of modern farm machinery, the bond between the Thai people and animals remains the strongest in the countryside. This is part of TAT’s “Local Experience” pillar that gives visitors an in-depth experience; such as, community-based tourism, lifestyle, wisdom, local identity and distinction of each area.

Q: How is TAT promoting special interest tourism; such as, the culinary arts, spa and wellness, and soft adventure experiences?

Thailand is known for its rich diversity of attractions, but the continuing development of the Kingdom’s tourism products means that there is still more awaiting discovery. TAT’s gastronomy tourism efforts put the spotlight on how regionally diverse Thai food is with each of the Kingdom’s five regions having distinct cuisine. Thailand also offers a wide range of spa and wellness options, and both Thai cuisine and wellness integrate the use of herbs and spices; some of which can be found in our forests. Soft adventure options blend with ecotourism in mountainous jungle terrain.

“What I have mentioned is only some of Thailand’s efforts to conserve our Kingdom’s nature, which will be maintained on a continual basis for future generations.”

The post Interview with TAT Governor Yuthasak Supasorn appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 18 July 2019 – Dr. Patrapol Maneeorn, Wildlife Veterinarian of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP) talks about the Thai people’s centuries-old bond with animals, and how he is always hopefully optimistic about the future conservation and welfare of animals, national parks, and wildlife in Thailand.

 

Q: What is your view on the current state of elephant/animal welfare in Thailand?

There are two major issues concerning animal welfare in Thailand. First is the conflict between wildlife and humans. These days humans and wild animals live in closer proximity than ever before due to the loss of wildlife habitat. Concerning factors include deforestation, the popularity of keeping wild animals as pets, and climate change. In our region (Asia), human behaviour like the illegal animal trade and consumption are also crucial factors. All together, these factors drive wild animals to conflict with humans.

Another issue is animal cruelty, which affects both society’s feeling and Thailand’s reputation. In the past, it has been much harder for us to investigate. But today thanks to technology, Thai citizens and tourists can help report their suspicions of animal cruelty to the government via social media or to the Wildlife First Aid Coordination Centre’s call centre (Tel. 1362).

When talking about wild animal welfare in Thailand, elephants are usually the first animal that would come to mind for most people.

Concerns about elephants in cities and Thai elephant’s status according to the law

There is obvious social concern when people see elephants walking in cities, questioning if their feet hurt from walking on hot concrete. The fact is elephants have footpads containing fat, which protect them from hot surfaces. They won’t feel the heat. But walking around the city increases the possibilities of getting hurt by stepping on nails or broken glass.

Definitely, letting elephants walk on city streets is not humane or proper. Moreover, they might get hit by cars, step into an open storm drain, or get injured from an electrical shock.

The reason why there are still some elephants in Thai cities is because by law the mahouts still have the right to do so. Thailand is the only country in Asia where elephants have two statuses: Wild Animal and Working Animal.

Wild elephants living in their natural habitat are classified as wild animals and protected by law. Domesticated elephants are classified as working animals just like other livestock, including buffalos, cows, sheep, goats or donkeys to name a few. If owners have legal livestock identification certificates for a domesticated elephant, they have a right to walk it on the street. Very few of them mistreat their elephants, the vast majority do not. So, when images appear online or in the news, it is more often than not a case of where one rotten apple spoils the whole barrel.

The relevant Thai government agencies are planning to remove elephants from the Working Animal list and give them special protective status in the near future, which might include new regulations on how owners can take care of and treat them.

Animal presentation: new trend in Thailand’s zoos

As a government officer and member of the Cruelty Prevention and Welfare of Animals Committee, I think that it is the duty of government agencies to educate Thai society on animal welfare.

People used to go to zoos or the circus to see so-called wild animals. But now, the old-style zoos and circuses, where animals live in stressful environments, or are forced to perform unnatural acts, are slowly disappearing.

More people, both Thais and foreigners, are well-educated on animal welfare, and they choose not to patronise these places. So, they must adapt change the way they do business, and this means no more animal shows. Currently, Thai government agencies are promoting a new concept for animal tourism called ‘Animal Presentation’, which is relevant to zoological park organisations all over the world. Zoological parks now focus on animal welfare, and how to replicate the animal’s natural environment as much as possible. We want them to live in a wide, enriched, natural environment, not in a small cage.

Q: Historically what has been the relationship between the Thai people and elephants?

Historically, there has been a strong bond between the Thai people and elephants. They are also part of our culture and life.

Mahout elephant training uses a reward system. It is a process that requires patience and understanding of each individual elephant’s personality traits and characteristics. Just like the way people train their horses, they are not tortured. People have to realise that these trainers love their elephants.

For other photos and videos, some of them are not a set up but are prior cases which were already investigated by government agencies. Sometimes, one photo can ruin a country’s reputation with the power of the Internet and social media. So, it is our duty to explain to the public, and people have to be aware before sharing news.

Q: How has the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation been active in animal welfare in Thailand?

Thailand’s government agencies have been trying to cope with the problem in many ways: policy-making, supporting research on wildlife, rehabilitating injured animals, and eradicating the illegal wild animal trade. After long, sustained efforts in many fronts, our hard work has finally started to pay off. The effectiveness of our work is the number of animals we have in the wild, and today the number of elephants, tigers, bantengs and many other wildlife is increasing.

There are currently an estimated 3,500 wild elephants and 4,500 domesticated elephants in Thailand.

In the past, it was not hard to make a fake animal permit. But now, every elephant is individually registered in our new electronic profile system containing each elephant’s photo, DNA and mahout profile.

Another strategy, which is very effective and played a very important role in protecting animals throughout these years is Social Boycotting. Travel businesses and individual tourists can help government agencies by boycotting businesses that do not take good care of animals. When there are no customers, some will close and some will change. If they choose to change, government agencies would help by providing training with professional specialists in order to upgrade and meet the required standards.

Today Thailand has legislated its own zoo standard called the ‘Thailand Zoo Standard’.

Worldwide there are many zoo standards; such as, the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) and South East Asian Zoos and Aquariums Association (SEAZA) standard. There are many different types of zoos in Thailand, and many small businesses are unable to follow the international standards because some regulations do not match their limited resources.

Thailand’s Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation also has its own veterinary team who regularly investigate every zoo to ensure they take care of animals properly.

Enforcing animal welfare

In order to possess any wildlife in Thailand, one must have a Wild Animal Possession Permit. The animals have to be born from domesticated breeding, not ones caught in the wild. Animal cruelty is illegal according to the Cruelty Prevention and Welfare of Animal Act B.E. 2557 (2014).

Q: How can Thailand promote its positive animal welfare practices and also raise awareness with the travelling public?

We are focusing on adopting an active strategy; such as, communicating directly with members of Thai society. This can be done via social media or otherwise to create an information network whereby the travelling public is engaged and updated on important issues to raise awareness. In my point of view, existing animal cruelty laws must be strictly enforced and the arrest of offenders publicised to build on the positive progress made so far.

Q: What role would you like to see the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation play in promoting animal welfare in Thailand?

I think we are moving in the right direction to promote animal welfare. What we are doing is collaborating with different organisations and sectors in Thailand to reduce and hopefully eliminate animal cruelty as much as possible. We are working with the Zoological Park Organisation, a state enterprise that is responsible for wildlife living outside their natural habitats. In collaboration with the Zoological Park Organisation, our aim is to research, breed and release more wildlife back into its natural habitat.

I believe that cruelty to animals in Thailand has dramatically decreased. As animal welfare and protection has improved, so has social consciousness of the general Thai public. While these are but a few very small steps in the right direction, they are the part of reason why I am very optimistic about the future of animal conservation and welfare in Thailand.

The post Animal welfare continues to improve in Thailand, says Thai wildlife veterinarian appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 18 July 2019 – Wildlife conservation and caring for animals is proving increasingly important as growing global populations gobble up more resources and exploit more land, but there are increasing efforts to save animals and preserve the habitat they need to live in. In Thailand, independent and government organisations, and individuals have made great strides to improve the situation.

A priority is preserving Thailand’s remaining forest cover and returning some developed areas back to a wild state.

Caring for the national symbol

About 3,000 majestic wild elephants live in sanctuaries and national parks in different parts of Thailand and their population is increasing. The number of domesticated elephants is also about 3,000.

The elephant is Thailand’s national symbol.

Large wild areas are needed for them to thrive, and there is renewed focus on that. To counter poaching, the government plans a database of every domesticated elephant’s genetic information that should stop poachers from taking wild baby elephants and claiming them as offspring of domesticated elephants. The government is also scrutinising elephant camps for any mistreatment of pachyderms.

The Thai Elephant Conservation Centre (TECC) has been caring for elephants in a forested area south of Chiang Mai since 1993. Conservation is the key, and TECC operates an onsite elephant hospital and manages a mobile clinic. It teaches tourists to appreciate elephants and has pioneered conservation and science.

It has an excellent natural breeding programme and shares its knowledge and extensive library housed in the National Elephant Institute of Thailand on the site.

Phang Nga Elephant Park, a family-run eco-business just north of Phuket, offers a unique experience to visitors. The elephants are treated with respect: no dancing and circus tricks. Public awareness about elephants is the aim. Through human-elephant interaction people learn to respect and practice responsible elephant tourism.

Among many other groups doing important conservation work for the Thai elephant include Elephants World in Kanchanaburi to raise awareness and funds for Thai elephants.

Wildlife Friends Foundation Thailand (WFFT) was founded in 2001 to help all captive animals in every way possible, including reintroducing them back into the wild when possible. Since 2006, it has also focused on reforestation, so the wild animals have habitat.

Feathery friends

The Bird Conservation Society of Thailand founded in 1953 is perhaps the country’s oldest conservation NGO. It organises field trips and projects to conserve birds and bird sanctuaries.

A dog’s life

The Soi Dog Foundation started in Phuket in 2003 to help the street dogs and cats on the island. Their efforts continue to provide a humane and sustainable solution to the stray population and has expanded nationwide. It also campaigns for improved animal welfare rights across Asia.

Work includes rescue, sheltering, medical treatment and vaccination of strays. Finding them homes and neutering, too. Once 80% of a population has been sterilised the numbers living on the streets begin to decline naturally, according to global studies. Sterilisation is sustainable and humane and has been proven to work.

Swimming conservation

Thailand’s relationship with the sea makes protecting the oceans of paramount concern. The UN reports two-thirds of the global marine environment has been significantly altered by humans. Efforts in Thailand include reducing plastic waste and conservation of corals. Cleaning up trash and the control of invasive species, are others.

Some, like the Marine Conservation Project, invite volunteers to help in their conservation efforts.

Other conservation efforts

The World Wild Fund for Nature Thailand (WWF), Greenpeace and other conservation organisations are also working to preserve natural parts of Thailand.

The world’s largest independent conservation organization, WWF, was founded in 1961 and has operated in Thailand since 1995. It aims to build a future where humans live in harmony with nature.  Measures include conserving biological diversity, the sustainable use of renewable natural resources, reduction of wasteful consumption and stopping pollution.

Challenges remain, but a growing awareness and appreciation, and the host of organisations, government agencies, companies and individuals already involved, are pointing the way to preserving pristine parts of the kingdom and caring for its animals.

*Photo gallery: The Thai Elephant Conservation Centre, Lampang
(including the 4 photos above)

The post Thai wildlife conservation and animal care efforts are working appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 9 July 2019 – Gearing up to mark its 60th anniversary in 2020, the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) has reaffirmed its commitment to making travel and tourism the kingdom’s most economically promising, environmentally sustainable, and culturally vibrant sector in the years to come.

Addressing the Thai tourism private sector and media after the week-long Tourism Action Plan meetings, TAT Governor Yuthasak Supasorn said that the completion of the auspicious 5th cycle of life will be a time for reflection on past achievements and careful management of a new era of challenges set to emerge in a highly competitive and constantly changing global and regional environment.

“With the positive outcome in 2018, Thai tourism has clearly succeeded in fulfilling its mandate,” he said. “We will work even harder to maintain our brand image, preserve our competitive advantages, and ensure that the socio-economic benefits of international and domestic tourism are spread right across the country.”

In implementing this agenda, TAT will be closely aligning its strategies with the policies and plans of the National Economic and Social Development Board, Thailand’s national planning agency, whose Secretary General, Mr. Thosaphorn Sirisamphan is also the current Chairman of TAT’s Board.

The targets for 2020 are to boost total tourism revenues by 10% over the projection for this year. TAT has also set clear directions to move the Thai tourism industry out of mass tourism and towards responsible tourism with an emphasis on revenue-generating quality tourists. The idea of responsible tourism will be spread out through the channels of TAT in-house magazine named Osotho.

Governor Yuthasak said, “Also, TAT will launch a nationwide campaign to mark its 60th anniversary with core messages highlighting the importance of responsible tourism and being good hosts under the theme of “Next steps towards a sustainable Thailand”. This campaign will be delivered to three target groups: TAT staff, the Thai people, and Thai tourism stakeholders. Meanwhile, an “Amazing Thailand Week” is also planned for the international market by TAT’s overseas offices.

For the domestic market, TAT will categorise customers into various segments; such as, Gen X, Gen Y, family and millennial family, silver age, lady, first jobber, multi-gen, and corporate.

In the foreign markets, TAT will focus on specific quality markets and middle-upper income groups (Go High). It will seek first-time visitors in new markets and in the long-standing source markets (Go New Customer). It will also attempt to balance out the seasonality factor and generate more demand in the “Green Season” (Go Low).

Alongside efforts to build a strong image of Thailand in order to maintain its competitive advantages, other products will be developed and marketed; such as, homestays, walking streets and local cuisine (Go Local). Meanwhile, digital technology will be devised to reach the customers (Go Digital).

The core communication marketing theme will remain “Open to the New Shades” that focuses on providing positive and unexpected experiences. Following on from the long-standing Amazing Thailand slogan, widely recognised as one of the most impressive brand campaigns in Asia, the future advertising campaigns will continue to specific target groups and highlight the friendliness and hospitality of the Thai people.

Mr. Yuthasak said, “Next year is likely to be a testing year due to the impact of international developments; such as, global geopolitical friction and economic difficulties, increasing competition, a relatively strong Baht, and reduced spending power.

“The good news is that the global travel and tourism market is still vibrant and the Asia-Pacific region, the source of the vast majority of Thailand’s tourism visitors, is seeing the emergence of many different customer segments across all demographic categories and income groups.”

He added, “The past 60 years have seen Thai tourism go through many ups and downs, but always emerge strong and resilient. Our contribution to national social and economic development is now well-recognised. With the strong support of all Royal Thai Government agencies, our partners and friends abroad, as well as our energetic private sector, we will be doing our best to stay the course in the years ahead.”

To keep the position as a preferred destination, TAT will maintain to be 1 of top 6 countries that generated tourism revenue, and in the top 3 in the Loyalty Index in the Asia Pacific.

The post TAT target 10% growth in 2020 with quality markets and responsible tourism after turning 60 in 2020 appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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TAT Newsroom Short Documentary
The Seasons Episode 9: Green Island
Duration:  3 Minutes
Theme: Virgin Island
Location: Ko Pha Luai, Surat Thani

The Seasons Episode 9 Green Island - YouTube

EPISODE SYNOPSIS

For those wishing to escape from a hectic life, spend a peaceful getaway in the embrace of serene nature, and take lungfuls of pure air at a place unknown to most tourists, Pha Luai Island is an ideal destination.

With a population of only 180 households and situated in Surat Thani province’s Ang Thong Islands Marine National Park, just a stone’s throw from Samui Island, Pha Luai Island is officially recognised as Thailand’s first and only ‘Green Island’, which depends 100% on alternative energy sources.

By trekking around the island, a visitor will learn that every household’s facilities are powered by clean energy.  Electricity generated at a solar farm is used for interior lighting, maintenance of water sources, development of the traffic system, building construction, and general upkeep and restoration of the island’s environment.

None of these achievements would have been possible without the locals’ awareness of the value of clean energy, which has improved their quality of life.  The local islanders, therefore, commit themselves to developing their birthplace into an ecotourism attraction and further modifying it into a future learning centre for energy efficiency promotion.

About “The Seasons”

“The Seasons Episode 9: Green Island” is part of the 12- episode travel documentary series that reveal the untold stories of the unique way of life of the Thai people and the amazing scenery of natural attractions in different regions. There are four episodes for each of the three seasons that Thailand has in a year: rainy, cool and summer.

“The Seasons” follows the TAT Newsroom’s inaugural seven-part travel documentary series, titled ‘Insight Thainess’, to promote Thai values through the country’s unique way of life.

The post The Seasons Episode 9: Green Island appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 3 July 2019 – Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar, Thailand’s highest restaurant and bar is now open on the 76th and 77th floor of Bangkok’s landmark destination, King Power Mahanakhon.

Mr. Marc Begassat, Managing Director of King Power Mahanakhon, said: “Following the successful launch of Thailand’s highest observation deck last November, it is a pleasure to announce the opening of Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar, Thailand’s highest restaurant and bar.

“This new milestone is a result of our passion in creating an exceptional dining destination and key landmark within a location that truly celebrates the city. We look forward to welcoming local and international visitors to King Power Mahanakhon as we continue to add unique attractions to Thailand’s tourism landscape,” Mr. Begassat added.

Inspired by the Chaopraya river and the concept of an eclectic journey, Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar is Bangkok’s newest iconic dining destination with tastefully designed indoor and outdoor seating areas, along with exclusive VIP lounges.

Marrying French elegance with Thai-inspired patterns, the journey starts from the first step into a wooden panelled entrance. As visitors emerge into a more refined interior, a luxurious dining area is decorated with elegant lamps while floor-to-ceiling windows reveal an impressive view. Tales of an adventurous yet refined traveller are told through a large sculpture of a bull head, French antique books, Japanese ceramic pottery, and hand-painted vases that lead the way to an indoor white marble bar area. An outdoor terrace is transformed to resemble an urban jungle, surrounding guests in abundant greenery to evoke the feeling of a forest in the sky.

Designed by Tristan Auer’s world famous team at Wilson Associates, Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar is a journey that represents an urban escape for the modern city dweller and worldly traveller.

“The eclectic, yet elevated nature of this oasis in the clouds mirrors the style that our team is known around the world for bringing to our work,” said Auer, Principal of Wilson Associates’ Paris Atelier. “Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar was designed to be equal parts welcoming and energetic, and we are honored to have been selected as the team to bring that vision to life.”

The modern brasserie features a menu of sophisticated Western and Asian dishes along with signature creations by Executive Chef Joshua Cameron. Previously based in New York’s world-renowned Eleven Madison Park, the well-travelled US native finds culinary inspiration from his passion for travel and exploring international flavours. The menu is accompanied by an extensive list of classic cocktails and over 100 curated wines with an emphasis on natural wines.

Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar will be led by Johan Per Simon Davidsson, a legendary force behind the success of multiple unique concept venues in the Bangkok hospitality industry. With over 15 years of high profile management experience and a passion in cocktail innovations, visitors can expect spectacular beverage, entertainment and shows in the near future.

King Power Mahanakhon is located in the heart of Sathorn and directly connected to Chong Nonsi BTS station.  Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar is open daily for dinner and drinks from 17.00 – 01.00 Hrs.

The post Thailand’s Highest Restaurant and Bar now open at Mahanakhon Bangkok SkyBar appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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Bangkok, 3 July 2019 – The revamped innovative and creative content and business format of the 2019 Thailand Travel Mart Plus (TTM+) has proven to be a resounding success, as indicated by the post-event survey responses from buyers, sellers and participants.

Held between 5 – 6 June, 2019, at the Ocean Marina Yacht Club, the 18th TTM+ was highlighted by the participation of new buyers and media from new source markets, new exhibitors from Thailand’s new emerging destinations, a line-up of all-Thai speakers at the knowledge-sharing platform, new tours linking the Eastern Corridor of Thailand to neighbouring Cambodia, a product showcase for community-based enterprises, and total dedication to environmental preservation.

Mr. Yuthasak Supasorn, TAT Governor, said, “As this is an era of constant change, especially for travel trade shows, we decided it was time to change the entire concept of the TTM+ in order to ensure that everyone gets value for time and money. Thanks to the feedback from all the sectors,

Under the theme of “New Shades of Emerging Destinations”, the event was held for the second consecutive year in Pattaya to emphasise its new image as a tourist destination for families and luxury travellers with a broad diversity of tourism products and services.

TAT invited 338 buyers from 51 countries. In addition to top markets; such as, China (64), the UK (25), and India (23), the invitees included carefully-selected buyers from emerging source markets; such as, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Egypt, Estonia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Turkey and Ukraine.

To ensure the participation of serious buyers, all hosted buyers paid a US$ 300 registration fee, non-hosted international buyers paid US$ 200, and domestic buyers, US$ 100.

The number of exhibitors totalled 370, of whom 89 were first-timers to the TTM+. By category, the exhibitors included Hotels and Resorts (277), Emerging Destinations (20), Associations (9); Entertainment Businesses (12); Tour Operators/Travel Agents (23), private companies from the GMS countries (10); National Tourism Organisations from the GMS (10); and other travel services (9).

Sellers paid a registration fee of 35,000 Baht for 2 delegates.

The media list included 50 domestic and 84 international media from 26 countries including emerging markets; such as, Poland, Vietnam and Latvia.

Based on the online survey responses from 72% of the buyers and 38% of the sellers, the event was expected to generate 2.77 billion Baht worth of economic and business value. A total of 59% of the buyers and sellers said they entered into immediate business contracts, a strong indication that the trade show was attended by decision-makers on both sides.

Nearly all the buyers (99.18%) reported meeting new sellers; 97.92% said they had received more up-to-date information; 89.71% said they were satisfied with their participation, and 93.80% said they had achieved their business goals.

Moreover, 93% of the buyers felt the registration process was more organised and convenient; 92.47% felt that the sellers were of good quality, and 88.84% were satisfied with the products and services they saw.

Asked specifically about the potential of the “Emerging Destination Show Case”, 85.06% of the buyers felt that the products and services offered had the potential for inclusion in future tour programmes.

Most of the buyers (85.19%) intended to join the TTM+ in 2020.

Amongst the sellers, 90% said they were satisfied with the event and would join again next year.

Media monitoring indicated an estimate of 111 million impressions amongst readers and viewers.

TAT also invited 41 entrepreneurs from the emerging destinations in 17 provinces to attend as observers to learn more about the show and business opportunities.

The TTM+ Talk focussed on the entire new theme “Making the World a Better Place through Travel”. It included a line-up of 10 speakers, thinkers, entrepreneurs, designers, media, IT specialists and historians to provide new perspectives on how change can positively contribute to society and the environment.

The post-tour programme was designed to cement the land links between Thailand and the Greater Mekong Subregion countries. One of the tours was a five-day, four-night itinerary covering Pattaya – Rayong – Chanthaburi – Battambang – Siem Reap, showing that it is possible to go all the way to the famed temples of Angkor Wat.

The TTM+ was also a heavily environmental conscious event with reduced usage of plastic and non-degradable materials; such as, plates, bowls, forks, water tubes, etc., drinking water available from water dispensers, waste separation, use of an e-Directory and e-Survey to reduce paper usage, open-air activities in some areas to reduce energy consumption, zero usage of plastic bags, and reusable neck-straps. All the waste materials were recycled.

Community-based enterprises showcasing their products included the tie-dye fabric at Banmatjai Homemade, Phrae province; Varni Handicraft, Phatthalung province; indigo-dyed fabric, Sakon Hed Group, Sakon Nakhon province; folk charm dyeing fabric, Loei province; Doister ethnic products, Mae Hong Son province, and hand-dyed indigo fabric products, Keep Kram from the Northeast.

This year, the five co-sponsors were the Chon Buri Provincial Administration, King Power International PCL, Thailand Convention and Exhibition Bureau (TCEB), Bangkok Airways PCL and the Airports of Thailand PCL.

The post Revamped, innovative format of TTM+ 2019 proves to be a resounding success appeared first on TAT Newsroom.

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