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Today I’m going to get a little deep-stay with me. I want to discuss a more spiritual whole-person approach to breastfeeding through the lens of life practices, a mantra, or the golden rules that challenge one to live with true freedom and on their own path. I want to discuss the Four Agreements. Have you heard of them? They are:
Be Impeccable with Your WordDon’t take Anything PersonallyDon’t Make AssumptionsAlways do Your Best
They sound deceptively simple, right? But these agreements can fly in the face of modern day life and adhering to them can be challenging in terms of all that we are faced with in parenthood and breastfeeding. If you’re not familiar, the Four Agreements were introduced by don Miguel Ruiz in his book “The Four Agreements: A Practical Guide to Personal Freedom, A Toltec Wisdom Book” as a means to creating true freedom, happiness, and love in one’s life. It's a continual process and a worthy one in my opinion.
I recently visited this spiritual concept in my personal life and it left me wondering how it could also be applied to parenthood and more specifically to breastfeeding. After all who doesn’t want more freedom, happiness and love in the postpartum and along the journey of breastfeeding?! So, let’s look at each one of the agreements more in-depth.
Be Impeccable with Your Word
“Speak with integrity. Say only what you mean. Avoid using the Word to speak against yourself or to gossip about others. Use the power of your Word in the direction of truth and love.”
Negative self talk is real and can be downright debilitating. In the early days of breastfeeding it's easy to get lost in your own head as you tell yourself that you can't do it, you can't succeed and breastfeeding just isn't for you. What if, instead, you followed this practice of only using your word for self love? What if you were meaningful in your search for support during this challenging time? We encourage you to ask for explicit help with chores, with infant care, self care, and of course breastfeeding, and then take the help that's given! Let others know exactly what your feelings are around breastfeeding-it can help them to understand and be helpful supporters.
Don’t Take Anything Personally
“Nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream. When you are immune to the opinions and actions of others, you won’t be the victim of needless suffering.”
This is *your* breastfeeding journey. How you choose to feed your baby here and now is entirely up to you and the opinions of others (including family members) simply don't matter. Breastfeeding is the foundation of life and staying immune to negative opinions of it will help you create a firm foundation for years to come. Let your reality and your parenting truths guide you.
Don’t Make Assumptions“Find the courage to ask questions and to express what you really want. Communicate with others as clearly as you can to avoid misunderstandings, sadness and drama. With just this one agreement, you can completely transform your life.”
This goes along with the agreement above. Be clear in your concerns about your baby and about your breastfeeding goals. Ask for help when you need it and decline unsolicited advice. This agreement also ties into asking questions of all your and your baby's healthcare providers when it comes to treatment plans. What are the qualifications of your breastfeeding supporter? Why is the pediatrician recommending formula supplementation or why is it necessary to alter your diet? Having clarity during breastfeeding (ask all the questions!) can be a game changer.
Always Do Your Best“Your best is going to change from moment to moment; it will be different when you are healthy as opposed to sick. Under any circumstance, simply do your best, and you will avoid self-judgment, self-abuse, and regret.”
We know you are doing your best and you should know too. Once your baby is born you are launched like a rocket into parenthood and your baby's sole survival is on your shoulders. That is a huge responsibility! The transition into matrescence is wrought with numerous challenges to overcome and obstacles to face. Let's be honest, breastfeeding is one of them. Do your best with this. Doing your best will not always look the same from day to day and that's ok. When physical and emotional exhaustion are in the picture your best may be simply waking to feed your baby while everyone else cooks, cleans and tends to rest of life. Avoid self-judgment, self-abuse, and regret. Your best is enough. You are enough.
Want to chat more about this or are you ready to schedule a lactation consultation? Schedule online or send us an email. We'd love to work with you!
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Sweet Songs Breastfeeding by Mary Unangst, Bs, Ibclc - 8M ago
I’m not. Nope, notat all. Not as a lactation consultant and certainly not as a mother.
Let me back up. Why am I writing about this? At a recent home consultation I was working with a mother who had delivered by cesarean birth. When I casually commiserated about the abdominal pain and difficult recovery following a cesarean birth she stopped me. “You had a cesarean birth?! You?! I thought you likely had a non-medicated home birth with no interventions and no complications and breastfeeding was super easy and amazing!” That’s when it hit me. My clients often think I come to this work from a place of perfection or ideal motherhood. It is quite the opposite. I come to this work because I’ve been where you are. I had the birth center transfer turned hospital cesarean. I had the epidural that caused numbness to my ears, speech slurring and interruption to breastfeeding. I’m human. I’ve been there. I come to this work in hopes that I can be empathetic. I come to you as a trained lactation professional, but also as a plain ol’ mom who has had her best plans changed by life!
At yet another recent consultation, as I was explaining safe formula preparation, I casually spoke about feeding my son formula. The mom stopped me mid sentence. "Wait, what?! You should lead with that. I feel so much better with supplementation knowing you did it too," she said relieved. Yep. I finger fed formula to my first child as I wept, nipples bleeding, milk dripping from my breasts. I had unexpected curveballs with both my babies!
While I won't say I've been in every same situation as the families I serve, I share some common first time parent experiences. And I'm confident I can say the same for my partners, Amy and Trish.
So next time we are chatting at your consultation, please remember that I hold no judgement, and certainly no perfection or superiority. I come to you with an empathetic ear, an open mind and professional expertise to help you meet your lactation and parenting goals!
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Baby Showers are super fun. At least I think so! When you get that invitation, you first look at their baby registry for gift ideas, of course, but you might also think outside the box for a gift if you know your friend intends to breastfeed. With all the parenting gadgets and so-called “must haves”, we’ve taken the guess work out of finding the right gift. As IBCLCs we’ve seen what has worked and what hasn’t over the years. So we’ve gathered a few ideas for breastfeeding-friendly gifts for your mom-to-be. We think she’ll like them!
1. Comfy pajamas.
Now comfy pajamas might be appropriate for just about every mom on the planet, and especially those in the early postpartum when you still have that bump, but nursing-friendly jammies are so useful when you feel like you might never leave the couch or house again!
2. A water bottle and basket of snacks.
It’s likely that your friend already has a water bottle, but one that has a sweet and encouraging saying or one that holds a TON of water (she’ll be thirsty!) is especially thoughtful. In addition to fluids, a basket of favorite snacks will keep her well-fed while she tends to her little one would be much appreciated.
3. A couple favorite frozen meals pre-portioned.
A meal train, frozen meals or a meal service are all good ideas for gifts for parents-to-be. We like to take this one step further and get those meals pre-portioned. Simple, nutritious food is key to keeping energy up during all those feedings.
4. A prenatal breastfeeding class.
We are partial to our 100% online course, but you might look around for in-person versions too. If mom has some real concerns a 1-1 private course may be helpful, too. As a bonus this helps mom identify her breastfeeding resources before birth.
5. A gift card for a nursing bra.
There are so many nursing bras out there these days and we love that! However, finding the right fit is incredibly individual. Your body changes so much that first month or so as your milk supply stabilizes. Target and Motherhood Maternity are great options for a gift card to find the perfect fitting nursing bra.
6. A journal.
Hear us out on this one. Those early weeks in the postpartum can be a blur. Remembering the details of feedings or first smiles is hard! A sweet journal that mom can track diapers and feedings or even just a place to put her feelings is so thoughtful and useful!
7. Lastly, but certainly not least, a gift card for a consultation with an IBCLC.
This goes back to having those breastfeeding resources handy before baby is here. Finding a lactation specialist when your baby is crying or you are deep into worries about milk supply can be very stressful. Take the guesswork out of it and give a gift certificate! P.S. We offer that too!
Happy gift hunting and enjoy that baby shower!
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Sweet Songs Breastfeeding by Mary Unangst, Bs, Ibclc - 1y ago
This past week we celebrated World Doula Week 2018.The purpose of World Doula Week (WDW) is to empower doulas all over the world to improve the physiological, social, emotional, and psychological health of women, newborns and families in birth and in the postpartum period. In an effort to highlight the work of doulas right here in the Tampa Bay community we set out to interview some of the leaders in labor and postpartum support. We are honored to share the passion, experience and words of wisdom from Taylor Bland of Trinity Calm Birth Services, Yamel Belen of One Love Doula Services, Cheryl Waterbury of Calming Presence Birth Services, Christie Collbran of Buddha Belly Birth and Jessy French-King a labor doula.
AsIBCLCs we are passionate about breastfeeding and we know doulas can make a huge differencewhen it comes to birth and breastfeeding outcomes. We have some great relationships with doulas serving mutual families already, but it's great to know who all is out there so we can better collaborate.
We hope you enjoy reading about the doula support options in our community and how with their support, knowledge and experience you can enjoy positive breastfeeding outcomes. Happy reading!
Welcome everyone! Thanks for taking the time to participate. We know you are all experienced and passionate birth workers. Our first question is about you! What kind of doula work do you specialize in and what brought you to this work?
Taylor: "I specialize in birth, bereavement and post-partum doula work, also offering placenta services! What brought me to be a doula was having a traumatic birth experience myself. I was luckily able to still deliver naturally, but to my disbelief, my midwife was not the person I thought she was, when it came to being there for me during my birth. Despite my poor experience, I am blessed to say that it encouraged me to educate myself more on the birth community, education and more, and I wanted to help as many women as possible have a POSITIVE experience, when they look back on their birth. All women deserve that! Bereavement called to me because I feel that there is a lack of education and support internationally for grieving parents, and something needs to be done about that lack thereof!
Yamel: "I am an RN and doula. I specialize in labor/birth support as well as postpartum doula support which includes loads of lactation support."
Cheryl: "The majority of my clients choose to birth in hospitals. It's not necessarily what I set out to do, but I have become very comfortable in the hospital setting and feel this is the environment where birthing people meed the most support. In second place is supporting births at birth centers. I rarely am invited to support home births. I have been to every hospital in Tampa Bay so far, except Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel. I became a doula as a second career, after retiring from being a teacher of the Deaf. The births of my own children were amazing and empowering and ever since those experiences I had a secret passion for birth (in the 1980s). But it wasn't until considering a career change that I considered birth work as a realistic way to earn a living. Over the years I heard so many births stories from friends and colleagues that were vastly different than my own positive stories. I wanted a way to educate expectant parents about their option and help them achieve the kind of births they wanted."
Christie: "Thank you for inviting me to participate. I am a birth & postpartum doula, but more so I am the co-owner of Buddha Belly Birth Services, a doula agency that provides many services including labor doula support, postpartum doula support, childbirth education, placenta encapsulation, lactation counseling, belly casting and more. Our team of doulas are passionate about helping families have a better birth and postpartum experience. My love for this field grew after I took a 12 week childbirth education class when I was pregnant with my first son. I realized there was so much information to know and that families needed this knowledge. I became a doula in 2009 and have been working in this field ever since."
Jessy: "I am a certified labor doula, CLC and photographer, all of which I am very passionate! In 2007 I gave birth to my first baby and a passion was lit inside of me. I want all women to have the support, education, and respect they deserve during their pregnancy, labors, postpartum and breastfeeding journeys."
As IBCLCs we know prenatal breastfeeding education is very important. Do you find many of your clients are interested in breastfeeding and if so, what kind of education are they receiving? Do you offer prenatal breastfeeding education? Do you recommend it?
Taylor: "I absolutely recommend breastfeeding and every one of my clients so far has been very adamant and successful with breastfeeding, (YAY!). I discuss it with my clients and encourage them to build relationships with IBCLCs and CLCs during their pregnancy so they have someone to go to if they have issues that come up after delivery with their breastfeeding journey. I offer as much evidence and experience based knowledge that I have but I am certainly not an expert and while I further my education to offer more breastfeeding knowledge and help to my clients, I connect with as many professionals in my community as possible to make sure they get the all-encompassing help that they need."
Yamel: "I would say 100% of my clientele is interested in breastfeeding. They are receiving education via literature either books they have heard of or items we recommend. Furthermore, we go over breastfeeding during our prenatal visits, as well as immediately post birth to get that successful first latch and then I make sure and revisit how they are doing in regards to BF during our postpartum visit (this is my favorite) this gives me the opportunity to identify my clients needs, struggles, and be able to provide further tools or if necessary reach out to my peers such as an IBCLC or pediatric dentist for further evaluation if I identify an issue. I find that prenatal education combined with immediate postpartum intervention helps for a long lasting breastfeeding relationship."
Cheryl: "Nearly 100% of my clients choose to breastfeed, at least initially. Prenatally, I encourage them to attend a prenatal breastfeeding class. I also offer to teach a stand-alone class. If they are also taking my CBE, it is included as a 90 minute segment. If they don't take official classes, I provide handouts and discuss the basics during a prenatal meeting. The majority of my clients attend a class, not taught by me, prenatally."
Christie: "We find that vast majority of our clients are interested and planning to breastfeeding. We highly recommend prenatal breastfeeding education and offer a private prenatal breastfeeding class, as well as cover the topic of breastfeeding in our comprehensive private childbirth classes."
Jessy: "I absolutely agree that breastfeeding support and education during pregnancy is a wonderful jumpstart to breastfeeding. I do not offer breastfeeding classes, but I do always recommend for my clients to take a breastfeeding class, read breastfeeding material that I recommend to them and attend a local breastfeeding support group led by IBCLC’s even while pregnant. It is a great way for them to connect with other moms, listen to their questions, and learn, all while still pregnant."
How might you explain your role in establishing breastfeeding in the first week of life? What services do you offer to help get breastfeeding off to a great start?
Taylor: "I consider my role in breastfeeding to continue being that support person and be as helpful as possible in getting the information they need for the problems they are having, if any, right away. If that is asking for the Lactation Consultant at the hospital to visit them each day, several times a day, until they are discharged, or helping them arrange to go to breastfeeding support group nearby right away, anything that I can do to facilitate an easier transition into learning how to breastfeed, I will do! I talk to them during pregnancy and post-partum about establishing supply, why supplementing should be avoided unless absolutely necessary, what cluster feeding is, what a good latch looks like, indicators of a lip or tongue tie and how that can be corrected, and more!"
Yamel: "We offer all support necessary during the postpartum visit, furthermore clients have full access to me electronically and telephonically and if they request or I note they require another home visit we schedule this as well. I make sure to keep the lines of communication open because at times women are experiencing difficulties but have trouble verbalizing since they are in fact nursing a newborn 24/7. So reaching out and asking some open ended questions really helps to identify how they are doing in those first weeks."
Cheryl: "Immediately postpartum, it is actually difficult to give much support, as the nurses pretty much take over and most clients do not resist their interventions. But once the client and baby are transferred to the postpartum unit, or go home, I become available and they will call, if needed. I also follow up closely during the first week to see if they need any help prior to our postpartum visit. I am also a CLC. Two weeks of breastfeeding support is included in my doula package. In-person assistance required beyond 2 weeks is an additional fee, or I refer to someone more experienced in their particular area of need."
Christie: "In additional to offering a prenatal breastfeeding class, many of our birth doulas and nearly all of our postpartum doulas are certified lactation counselors with lots of breastfeeding experience. They can answer questions and provide evidenced based information about breastfeeding before and after birth. Our birth doulas are present at the birth and immediately after the baby is born for a few hours postpartum. This is a crucial time in the breastfeeding relationship. During this time our doulas encourage skin to skin, letting the baby self attach to his mother and preserving and protecting this special bonding experience. They can help mother with her first latch, first feedings, good positioning, resolving any discomfort or other issues that arise. The birth doula stays in touch regularly and does a postpartum visit within the first few days to check up on the new family and again provide any breastfeeding support as needed. If they are having a hard time, the doula helps them to resolve issues and get back on track. If she finds they need even more assistance beyond her scope she recommends a CLC or IBCLC consultation and follows up to ensure her client gets the help she needs. Our postpartum doulas provide support in the immediate postpartum period with day time or overnight shifts for as long as the family wishes to have her present. And just like the birth doulas, postpartum doulas can help answer questions, provide support and troubleshoot any breastfeeding issues that come up.
The major thing that I believe a doula brings that makes a huge difference is encouragement and confidence boosting which is so needed by a new breastfeeding Mom. Mom and baby are learning something new and there can be ups and downs. Our doulas will always be on Mom’s side and will do everything they can to help her achieve her breastfeeding goals. We hear from our clients that the support and care they received from their doulas was critical in their breastfeeding journeys. "
Jessy: "As their labor doula, I stay for the first 1-2 hours postpartum. One of my main goals after delivery is to watch and if needed assist my client with the first latch. Talking my clients through and answering any initial questions they have. I feel more than qualified, as a CLC to help with this initial part of the breastfeeding relationship. Before leaving my client after the birth and assessing the first latch, I always encourage my client to reach out for support. If it is a hospital delivery, I remind them that their is lactation support in hospital for them to take advantage of during their stay and to not hesitate to reach out during that time. Once they go home, I remind them that I can refer them to a local IBCLC if they need anymore support. We schedule a one week postpartum visit where we go over their birth, recovery, breastfeeding and anymore questions or support that they have or need."
How do you find birth preparation is related to breastfeeding outcomes? What labor interventions seem to make a difference?
Taylor: "I do find that birth preparation and the type of birth that a mama ends up having does usually impact the start of the breastfeeding relationship. The use of an epidural, Pitocin, having a Cesarean Section, do all seem to make a difference because there is a risk that it can impact your bond, your hormones, your body and your baby’s body’s natural cues. When a mom is left to birth naturally, the way that she wants, in a calm setting without stressors being placed on her, it is easier for her body to recognize and process her delivery and allow those hormones to flow to facilitate the beginning of a healthy breastfeeding relationship."
Yamel: "We discuss how interventions can impact breastfeeding relationships, items such as suction or the lack of immediate skin to skin can hinder breastfeeding. Being that we discuss this and other items, families have he tools and they have it in their head what they do and don’t want in their labor in order to breastfeed as soon as possible after delivery."
Cheryl: "Clients who have long, stressful labors with lots of interventions seem to have the hardest time breastfeeding. I'm not really sure which interventions make a difference, as I've never really purposely considered this aspect. But if I had to consider a few clients who really struggled with breastfeeding, I'd say it was a combination of prodromal labor, AROM, pitocin augmentation, epidural, and assisted delivery. By the time all of that is done, client is exhausted and emotionally unable to focus on nurturing baby."
Christie: "There are so many factors that affect breastfeeding outcomes and so much that we don’t have control over as mothers. Birth is a dynamic event and it’s important to remain flexible. All the preparation in the world can often still result in a totally different outcome than hoped for due to medical reasons. But there is no doubt that being prepared, taking birth/breastfeeding classes and getting your questions answered in relation to your birth wishes or preference is always a good idea. Knowing whether your birth location, care provider and pediatrician are supportive and knowledgeable about breastfeeding is helpful as well. Interventions can have an affect on breastfeeding, but with good support and determination interventions do not have to be detrimental in the long term. For example IV fluids in labor can result in swelling in the body/breasts which can affect efforts to latch the baby on. Cesareans can sometimes result in a delay between the time baby is born and when skin to skin and bonding/breastfeeding can occur. Working with a doula that is also a trained lactation professional can be helpful when navigating these situations."
Jessy: "I find that when my clients are more prepared for their birth, as far as education, hiring a doula and choosing the birth that they feel is best for them, correlates to a more positive birth experience. Which I do believe flows over to the breastfeeding experience they are about to embark upon. That being said, as far as interventions. Factors such as induction, which may lead to being on IV fluids if pitocin is used and the possibility of unplanned c-section may affect the initial stages of breastfeeding for a few different reasons, one being the swelling from the fluids. Which in turn could cause more interventions while working to breastfeed the first few days, such as pumping, nipple shield, supplementing, bottle feeding etc. I believe that when women have taken classes, have a doula, hired an IBCLC or postpartum doula, the support and tools they will have help them succeed with or without any obstacles that may come their way."
What has been your experience with breastfeeding outcomes in the hospital setting vs. a birth center or home birth? What about with medicated births vs. drug-free births?
Taylor: "I notice that a birth center and home birth naturally have less interventions and medications involved, so of course, the breastfeeding success will typically follow that. A mom is able to relax and bond with her baby skin to skin and learn how to nurse together, without interruption, more often in a birth center or at home, than in a hospital."
Yamel: "My experience in regards to hospital vs. birth center or home birth has been success in breastfeeding. It seems I frequent a breastfeeding friendly hospital so they are practicing baby friendly techniques both during labor and after birth as well as staff that is well educated in breastfeeding and thankfully I haven’t had any negative encounters which have caused a negative breastfeeding experience. In regards to medication that can impact the alertness of Baby it does add an added item of concern but certainly not an area that can be overcome with good support."
Cheryl: "I have had many clients successfully breastfeed following births in hospitals, as well as birth centers. The opposite is also true. I haven't ever analyzed all those conditions, so it's hard to answer this question accurately. I do frequently see breastfeeding negatively impacted by circumcision. The first day or 2 went perfectly smoothly, then as soon as the baby is circumcised and sent home, serious problems arise."
Christie: "The local birth centers and home birth midwives in Tampa Bay are extremely supportive of breastfeeding and provide excellent support. They regularly refer their clients to CLC or IBCLCs when additional help is needed. One difference with these options is that once you are home you are not visited by nurses and lactation staff on a daily frequent basis like you are during your hospital stay. If you need additional assistance, this is a great time to hire a postpartum doula or a home-visiting lactation professional. Don’t go it alone and wait too long when things are difficult. Help is available! In regards to hospitals, it really depends on the hospital in question. There are some local Tampa Bay hospitals (Tampa General Hospital, Morton Plant & Mease Countryside) that have achieved Baby Friendly status and they strive to promote and foster healthy breastfeeding relationships. They have a team of resources to help breastfeeding women and get better outcomes as a result. Other local hospitals that do not have IBCLCs or CLCs available have lower breastfeeding outcomes. Pain medication in labor is not completely without risks and side affects but in our experience medicated and unmedicated mothers have pretty similar outcomes. The choice to have an unmedicated or medicated birth is very personal and we support woman no matter what they choose in this regard. For some women the stress of labor can be so traumatic, that they are more relaxed and able to bond, connect and breastfeed their baby after birth due to the medicine they received than they would have been without it."
Jessy: "In my experience, there is higher breastfeeding success with clients who deliver at a birth center or at home. Again, in part because these women have also taken the steps prenatally to prepare and educate themselves, as well as having a wonderful support system from their care providers, doula, IBCLC. That is not to say women who choose to have a hospital birth will not succeed in breastfeeding, just as those women can also have a natural birth in a hospital. The support they need just may not be optimal in all hospitals."
We have an amazing birth network in Tampa. We love working with doulas to provide the best clinical lactation care possible to shared clients. When breastfeeding complications arise, what’s the plan? Do you have your “team” to refer to? What’s been your experience collaborating with IBCLCs? How could we work together to better serve Tampa Bay families?
Taylor: "I don’t have one specific place that I always refer clients to, it usually depends on their location, the availability of the provider, costs, what specific services that provider offers, etc. There are a lot of factors that go in that I look at before I recommend them to someone specific. I have loved every IBCLC I have come across in the Tampa Bay area thus far. I think the support classes and workshops are an amazing resource for new parents, honestly, it lets them see that they are not alone in their struggles!"
Yamel: "As an RN I am very familiar that collaborative care and continuous care aids in better outcomes. With that being said, I have no issues with reaching out to someone I trust and have good rappor with in the community. If a Mom and baby are struggling and I have used all my personal resources it’s time to get a second opinion or additional assessment. I do have IBCLC’s that I refer to, as well as preferred dentists for tongue and lip tie identification and revision when needed. We could work together in a better way by caring for families with no judgement of how others work. The last thing a family needs to hear is a professional bad mouthing another (yes this happens) should someone reache out to me because they have a concern about another doula (for example) or they are unhappy with the service they received I don’t discourage them from venting but I don’t harp on what they share, nor do I share what this client shares with me with anyone else. After all we are all professionals and we are doing this work because we love and want to support growing families."
Cheryl: "I try my best to provide support myself, but when the problems persist or are beyond my scope of information, I ask an IBCLC for guidance, or refer the client to them for direct support. I also refer clients to peer support groups, online groups, or medical consultation, depending on the situation."
Christie: "Yes, we have a wonderful list of IBCLCs, including Sweet Songs Breastfeeding, that we refer to. When breastfeeding complications arise we first call on our all of our amazing CLCs at Buddha Belly to support our clients to the best of their abilities. If the situation requires advanced knowledge we refer out to the local IBCLCs in our community to ensure that our clients get the level of support they need. We also have dentists that we have established great relationships with who we refer to for helping families that may be struggling with possible lip or tongue tie issues affecting breastfeeding. Our experience collaborating with IBCLCs has been fantastic. We send our clients to the IBCLCs on our referral list closest to them since we serve the greater Tampa Bay Area including: Hillsborough, Pinellas and Pasco counties. Many of our clients have been referred to Sweet Songs Breastfeeding and we are so grateful for the excellent care they’ve been given."
Jessy: "As both a doula and CLC I have the knowledge to both recognize a breastfeeding hurdle as well as know when an IBCLC is needed. I prefer my clients to see an IBCLC when complications arise and I always refer them. I remind my clients that reaching out and seeing their IBCLC continually is a great way to succeed in their breastfeeding journey."
Lastly, what do you want to tell moms when it comes to breastfeeding? What advice, words of wisdom or otherwise do you want to share?
Taylor: "You are not, in any..
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Today's blog post is all about exercising in the postpartum. You know you can do that, right?! We get so many questions about this topic and specifically about breastfeeding and exercise. To expound on the subject, I thought I'd ask Tamara Rouseff of Mother Earth Strength a Birthfit coach local to Tampa Bay. You can read more about her here; she's pretty amazing. Happy Reading!
Every person, mothers included, should have something that is their stress reliever and makes them happy. For me, that important self-care activity is exercise. I used to be very heavy, but have gotten healthy through proper nutrition and exercise and this love for moving my body has grown into more than a hobby. Over the years, I decided to expand my knowledge and become a coach, helping others see their potential physically and help them meet their goals.
When I got pregnant, I continued to learn how to move. With each trimester, new modifications were used, but I got comfortable with moving my pregnant body. It was fun to keep exercising throughout my pregnancy! Every day was different and sometimes only yoga felt right but other days I could continue to weight lift as I had done pre-pregnancy. I had worked with prenatal moms in the past so I confidently worked out throughout my pregnancy.
Once I had my daughter, things definitely changed. I spent the initial postpartum period soaking up the time bonding with my daughter, but yearned to get back into working out. I jumped back in too soon, but luckily didn’t injure myself. This lack of knowing when to come back prompted me to learn more. As a coach, and a lifelong learner, I wanted to learn more about training the postpartum body in general. I sought out training and obtained certifications from two different programs, Birthfit and Fit for Birth, both of which are great resources. This training has helped me know how to train myself and other prenatal and postpartum moms. I wish I had this knowledge for my first pregnancy!
My favorite approach to training is the Birthfit program. This movement stands on four pillars of importance to moms in the motherhood transition: Fitness, Nutrition, Chiropractic and Mindset. Birthfit believes that all four pillars need to be functioning optimally for the mom to be in balance and I firmly believe that as well. Fitness means moving with intention through the preconception, prenatal and postpartum periods. And guess what, postpartum lasts forever after giving birth!
Breastfeeding has easily worked into my workout routine. I generally like to work out in the morning. Realistically, this doesn’t always happen. If my daughter has been up the night before, I may feel sleep is more important than getting up an hour early to workout. Sleep really is THAT important! Easier said than done as parents, I know. However, sleep repairs muscles and tissues used in working out and without adequate repair time your body can not recover from your workout. So if sleep is decent, I’d get up before her morning feed and workout and be showered and ready for the morning feed before work. (Now as a toddler, our breastfeeding is minimal so working out around feedings is no longer an issue.)
Earlier in our breastfeeding relationship, I had to work around feedings more. As a working mother, working out happens before or after work so if I worked out after I would make sure to feed her around that schedule. For my daughter though, she always ended up hungry right after I worked out. Even sweaty and gross, she wanted to nurse. I always joked she like a salty boob, haha! Each child will have their own preference and if you nurse on demand, their own schedule. Flexibility is key. It is helpful to have workouts you can do at home or workout classes you can bring the baby to. Birthfit and other postpartum moms’ classes allow nurslings to attend and be cared for as needed. These are the best types of classes to go to as a new mom because you will be welcomed to take your time and feed your baby as needed. Many movements I teach can be done with baby in a carrier while nursing!
Another thing to think about when working out and breastfeeding. Very tight bras can restrict milk flow. I have found the best type of bra for high impact movements are those with underwire but that aren’t too tight. However, every mom is different. Sometime underwire can irritate as well. In the initial postpartum period of working out 6-12 weeks, or longer depending on the mom, looser bras are perfectly fine for working out as the movements should not be high impact during this time. Most movements during this time are working on reconnecting with our core and establishing proper breathing techniques.
Movement is important for recovery for the postpartum mom. However, this period should also be honored and “getting back into it” should not be rushed. Consulting with a prenatal and postpartum trainer is always recommended. Birthfit is an amazing movement with trainers throughout our area. I personally coach with Mother Earth Strength offering classes in North and south Pinellas County.
Please reach out hereor here if you have any questions!
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