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The luxury condo’s at Buckhead, Atlanta, are home to some people who clearly love their cars. Yet, this story is a simple reminder of why you should never leave your Ferrari unlocked, even at home! 

One unlucky Buckhead resident found his black Ferrari – the model has not been released by the police – missing from his garage on Sunday morning. Also gone were his key fob, a handgun and $300 in cash. The robbery was first reported by the owner’s brother at 6.30am.

Police have not named the owner, but have released surveillance video footage showing the car being slowly driven out of its garage.

High Value Car

The video also shows a man who is described as a ‘person of interest’ in relation to the theft. The man dressed in a red hooded shirt and red pants, is seen on the video being confronted by a doorman at the condo building. This happens just a few moments before the Ferrari is stolen.

Atlanta police have confirmed this man is wanted for questioning. The car itself remains at large, unseen since the incident. Yet, a distinctive black Ferrari is not going to remain hidden forever. 

The public are asked to call Atlanta police if they see the vehicle, with a $2000 reward on offer for information leading to its recovery.

The entry-level Ferrari in the USA costs around $200,000 (£160,000 at the time of writing) but we do not know if the Ferrari was new, pre-owned, or what model it is. 

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Ghia is not a design house that instantly springs to mind when we think of Ferrari. Indeed, it’s latterly been associated with Ford, who bought the once-notable coachbuilding firm some years ago. In the early years of Ferrari it was not unusual for various coachbuilders to produce their own interpretation of the Maranello models, hence the presence at the upcoming Sotheby’s auction, at Monterey in California in August, of this quite spectacular one-off show car Ferrari 375MM.

To the knowledgeable eye, the distinctive swathes along the side and familiar frontal treatment can only be 1950’s Ghia, and to the layman, it’s simply a glorious Ferrari that is one of a kind. What’s the story behind the 1955 Ghia Ferrari 375MM Coupe Speciale? It’s one of glamour, of speed, of beauty and excitement – and nostalgia.

Sold to the USA

Displayed at the 1955 Torino Motor Show – then one of the premier automotive events in the world – the 375MM Coupe Speciale was soon snapped up by a friend of Enzo Ferrari, an American by the name of Robert C. Wilke. Wilke was a notable collector of Ferrari’s, and it’s entirely possible that Ghia in fact had its eye on him as a potential buyer from the word go.

Wilke owned the Leader Card Company, a specialist stationery company that made him very rich indeed, and was also a fan of motor racing. He financed an Indycar team from the very early days of the sport, and his cars won the prestigious Indianapolis 500 – one of the great races – no fewer than three times. 

His love of speed extended to his love of beautiful, fast and luxurious cars – hence this particular, unique and very stylish 375MM was ideal for his collection. In fact, at one point, Wilke owned not one but seven unique, custom-built Ferraris, and drove them daily around his home city of Milwaukee.

The Last Ghia Ferrari

Notably, this car – chassis 0476AM – would be the very last Ghia Ferrari. The car remained in the Wilke family – passing on to son Ralph – until 1974, and today retains its original colour scheme and unique Ghia interior. We’re happy to say this is one car that has not been over-restored; the patina throughout is simply superbly nostalgic, and it still wears the original V12 engine – a gem if ever there was one, pushing out 340bhp – plus the same gearbox and drivetrain. It is Ferrari Classiche certified, and has done under 14,000km.

The rock-solid provenance of the Ferrari 375MM Coupe Speciale by Ghia makes this one of the most historically important of the marque to come up for sale, and the history of its ownership only adds to that. We hope that, as Wilke and latter owners have, whoever buys it uses it, for this is a spectacular car that deserves to be seen.

Sotheby’s Monterey auction takes place on 17th of August, 2019, and is one of a number of Ferraris in the sale. The estimate? No mention is made, but if you have to ask, you probably can’t afford it!

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It is unusual days like this when you need the perfect Ferrari Portofino. Why days like this you may ask? Well, Britain is experiencing something of a phenomenon at the moment. Summer. If you are reading this from your villa in the South of France, you will experience plenty of it.

Britain is known for its rainy summers and foggy winters, so when the sun comes out, we take notice. It’s a miracle of God that we manage to host Wimbledon each year, and this year we also decided to host the Cricket World Cup. Even one of the Semi Finals was just split over two days because of rain.

Yup, this is our summer.

But today it all changed. Yesterday it was beautiful blue skies, and an amazing 26 degrees! (Californians can stop laughing now). 

That’s why the Ferrari Portofino is the perfect car for today.

Ferrari Portofino – Perfection in Rosso Corsa

Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not one of these people who thinks that a Ferrari has to be red. Of all my cars only two out of five were red, and actually I love Blue Ferraris for every day. 

But for summer, roof down, music off, car winding through the hills, and sunshine beating down on the bodywork means Blue just won’t cut it. It has to be Rosso Corsa.

Today’s example is for sale at Slades Garage (such a cool name!) in England. Here is what they say about the car:

“Finished in Rosso Corsa With Contrasting Nero Hide with Filo Special Rosso special stitching, Rosso Embroidered prancing horse on headrests, JBL High Power Hi-Fi System, Front and Rear Parking Sensor, Rear Parking Camera, Carbon Fibre Zone with LEDs, Carbon fibre center bridge, Magneride Suspension, Passenger Display, MIR3 Electrochromic rearview mirror, CALY Gallio Modena brake caliper, Ferrari Scuderia Shield, Yellow rev counter”

There is so much to like about the car, but these are my top 5 things I love about this Ferrari Portofino:

  1. Rosso Corsa Exterior – Yes, it’s flash in your face, but it’s also a great colour for the summer. Also seeing a red Ferrari in the winter always puts a smile on people’s faces.
  2. Carbon Fibre Interior – The interior is such a special place, but this one is perfected with the carbon interior. Makes it all the more special.
  3. Driver LEDs – Ferrari is no pretender. The driving experience has to be perfect, and the LEDs just add to all the drama. In reality you know EXACTLY when to change gear because the engine just shouts back at you.
  4. Passenger Entertainment – As if the passenger ride in the Ferrari Portofino was not enough, they also have their own display to tell them just how quickly they took the straight! It’s amazing that the car still needs a stereo, but I guess you need something for those tame moments.
  5. A splash of Giallo – Whoever spec’ed the car paid attention. Giallo (yellow) shields, Giallo callipers, and a Giallo rev dial. Perfect contrast to a Red exterior and the Black interior.

 

Ferrari Portofino – How much?

So, there you have it. The perfect Ferrari Portofino. 

Take my £180k now!

https://www.slades-garage.co.uk

The Ferrari Portofino Gallery

This car is available at: Slades Garage.

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The stunning sight of more than 100 Ferrari’s on the majestic and evocative roads of Italy must have had locals filled with national pride. This was the scene created by the 8th annual Ferrari Cavalcade, an event in which drivers of Maranello’s finest join together to cover a route taking in magnificent roads and amazing scenery.

Heading out from the Amalfi State Road, otherwise known as the SS 163 and regarded by many as one of the finest and most spectacular driving roads in Italy, the cars passed through the quite wonderful towns of Sorrento and Positano, heading towards the slopes of Vesuvius and the amazing landscapes of the Campania region.

Surprise Throughout

The Cavalcade set out on 18th June, the 100-plus Ferrari’s taking pride of place on the Corsa Garibaldi in beautiful Benevento. Admired by public and owners alike, it’s a rare occasion when one can find a super-rare LaFerrari Aperta alongside the mainstay Ferrari Portofino, but there it was in all its glory.

Day two took the cars – complete with over two hundred drivers and companions – through the Salerno waterfront and the Amalfi Coast, while the third day saw the quite stunning Cavalcade descend upon the historic and beautiful city of Naples, and again they attracted crowds who were wowed by so many of the marque’s finest models displayed together.

Exclusive Capri

Capri is usually closed to drivers other than those who live there during summer months, but the organisers of the Ferrari Cavalcade had managed to get permission for the cars to traverse this absolute gem of an island. The roads on the island are revered for there twisty, tight hairpin bends and glorious driving conditions, which were duly enjoyed by entrants from as far away as the USA, Australia and New Zealand, plus the Far and Middle-East countries.

Indeed, collectors and enthusiasts from more than 20 countries brought their Ferrari La Ferrari, Portofino, 488 Pista and – perhaps the most admired of all at the many stops along the way – magnificent, thunderous Ferrari Enzo’s for an opportunity to enjoy some of the greatest roads in the world in the home of the legendary Prancing Horse.

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The Ferrari F12 Berlinetta is a certain type of supercar. With its classic V12-engine sitting in front of the driver, and rear wheel drive, think of it as a modern-day ‘Daytona’, a Grand Tourer of the highest order. In production for 5 years from 2012 onwards, the F12 is a car that you need to drive with respect – which is what you don’t see in the accompanying video!

With 6.3-litres of muscle pumping some 730bhp to the back wheels – no turbochargers here, by the way, it’s a classic Ferrari normally-aspirated brute of an engine – you’d think taking care would come naturally to anyone driving one of these, especially on wet roads. Have a look at the guy somewhere in China, who manages to get it all wrong, and hit barriers on both sides!

Ferrari F12 Loses Control And Smashes Into Barrier - YouTube

Traction Control

Like most cars in its class – that is out and out supercars – the 211mph Ferrari F12 does feature traction control and other stability aids. Yet, this Ferrari F12 crash clearly didn’t benefit from those, and it’s most likely the road was too wet. It does appear, however, that whoever was at the wheel simply gave it too much of the right pedal – at the wrong time!

This is what happens when you apply that much power to a rear-wheel driver machine of this type; the back end simply gets away from you, and you are a passenger at the wheel. Once it had been lost, it would never have come back to the driver, no matter how skilled.

It’s notable that the Porsche in the lane to the left manages to avoid the sliding Ferrari – that would have been an expensive tangle of exotic automobiles – but that’s one seriously damaged Ferrari F12 at the end of the accident.

The moral of the story is, as we said, if you’re going to drive your very expensive, rear-wheel drive, V12 Ferrari in the wet, please be careful!

Big Lebowski Crash Scene - YouTube

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There are some cars that are very rare – with only limited production runs that make them highly collectable – and then there are cars like the quite spectacular Ferrari 512S Modulo, which were never intended for production, and remain unique.

Built in 1970 to showcase the futuristic design abilities of legendary design house Pininfarina – a long-time Ferrari partner – the Modulo, with its stunning low body and large glass areas, looked like no other car in the world when it made its debut at the Geneva Motor show of that year, and instantly became a crowd favourite.

After all, if this is what future Ferrari’s were going to look like, things would get very exciting indeed! Of course, with its enclosed wheels and space-ship like design cues, there would not be a Ferrari as wild and outlandish as this, but it did show what designers could do with a Ferrari 512 chassis and engine.

Where is it Now?

Ferrari fanatic and collector James Glickenhaus managed to achieve what many thought impossible, and convinced Pininfarina to sell him the car in 2014. Design houses are not keen on selling prized models such as this, hence all-round amazement when he bought it. No word has been mentioned as to the price paid for the Modulo, but Glickenhaus set about having it restored to drive.

With its mighty 5.0 litre 12-cylinder engine sitting behind the driver in classic mid-engined configuration, and pushing out a reputed 550bhp, this 3-foot high machine is said to hit 60mph (100kmh) in just 3.0 seconds – although notably, that has never been proven.

After displaying the restored Modulo, moving at last under its own power, at the prestigious Villa d’Este Concours in May where it wowed the crowds, Glickenhaus intended to show it elsewhere. Last week, however, an exhaust fault caused a fire at the rear of the Modulo, and photographs of the damage show a scorched and blistered bodywork. 

Fortunately, during restoration Glickenhaus had taken the precaution of fitting a fire-suppression system; this did its job, and the damage is – according to the owner – ‘no big deal’. Apparently, he checked the bodywork, and continued on his way.

Enthusiasts such as Glickenhaus should be applauded, we think, for keeping such wonderful examples of the automobile designers art in the public eye. The car will be fully repaired and restored once more.

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Today we are drooling over not one but two potent Ferraris. It appears that a collector in the states has decided to sell two matching, high-performance vehicles at once: one 2015 458 Speciale Aperta to go with a 2017 F12 TDF. And their loss is about to be someone else’s spectacular gain. Even though they are only a few years old at this point, this matching pair of Ferraris represent an era that could very well be gone for good in the near future. That’s because these are high-strung, naturally-aspirated performance cars. No turbochargers or hybridization to spoil the fun here. 

Let’s first discuss the 458. In creating the Speciale Aperta, Ferrari upgraded the 458 Italia’s 4.5-litre V8 to produce 596 bhp at 9000 rpm – an increase of 35 bhp over the standard car. That’s enough grunt to propel the Speciale A to a top speed of 199 mph. Distinct forged wheels, spoiler, bonnet, and bumpers help set the Speciale A apart from its less “special” 458 kin. 

Now let’s turn our attention to the F12 TDF. The naturally-aspirated engine in this one is a V12 and it produces an incredible 769 bhp at 8500 rpm. Like all F12 TDFs, this one uses an improved version of the F12 Berlinetta’s 7-speed dual-clutch transmission, which allows this GT car to accelerate to 62 in a mere 2.9 seconds. In fact, the F12 TDF is so fast that it’s official Fiorano lap time came in at barely more than 1 second behind the incredible LaFerrari hypercar.

Both of these blue dreamboats are being offered for sale by Merit Partners in Atlanta, GA. Here is a little taste of what they have to say about these Ferraris:

The Speciale Aperta has long been one of our top 5 cars in the world not only to drive but for investment potential as well … Being likely the last of the numbered naturally-aspirated front engine Ferrari’s we will see, the TDF is a sure collector car with a raucous character that makes it so satisfyingly fun to drive.

With just 499 458 Speciale Apertas and 799 F12 TDFs ever made, it’s not every day that we find even one of these vehicles for sale, to say nothing of encountering a pair. With matching blue exteriors and red interiors, picking up both of these cars would make for quite a statement in anyone’s garage. Of course, not just anyone will be able to purchase these masterpieces in automotive performance. Combined, these mint-condition Ferraris cost nearly $1.7 million (£1.34 million). But what else would you expect from automotive perfection like this?

The Ferrari F12 TDF & 458 Speciale Aperta Gallery

This car is available at: Merit Partners.

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If you’re looking to buy your first Ferrari, or perhaps grow the collection with another Ferrari, first of all congrats! There’s an old saying that you will always remember the first Ferrari you buy, and sadly you’ll always remember selling it too. That is actually true, but that’s another story for another time.

Right now, there are probably a hundred questions running through your mind before you have even got your wallet out. How much does it cost to actually buy a Ferrari? What is the cheapest Ferrari you can buy? Are Ferraris expensive to maintain? How reliable are Ferraris? 

Maybe your buying reasons are different, and you are looking to buy a Ferrari more as an investment.  Perhaps you know what you want, but not sure how to actually go ahead and buy a used Ferrari at all. All of these questions are valid, but ultimately what it comes down to is knowing what type of experience you are actually looking for.

To help you along with the buying process, I’ve put together a list of 9 things you should consider when buying any Ferrari, some of which you may never have even thought about!

1. New vs Old?

The answer to this question might depend on your budget, which is great. But as you will see it’s not necessarily as straightforward as that. If you have the financial means then you may just decide that you have to have a new Ferrari. Kudos if that’s the case, and the model is probably the main choice you need to make. 

But for most people it is a serious question to ask, as new cars are out of reach of most enthusiasts. Enter the used supercar market for the rest of us. But as you are probably finding out, it is not just budget that impacts the decision process, especially when it comes to Ferrari.

Unlike most cars a used Ferrari can, and quite often does cost more than a new Ferrari. In some cases much, much more, with some cars selling for in excess of $50 million! The classic Ferrari market has never been stronger with Ferrari prices being broken year after year.

 So as you can see, budget is not the most important question. Far from it in fact, and we will come back to the budget later. New and used Ferraris give massively different experiences, and the used market can be broken down further:

 These are not official categories, but more how I view the breakdown of models over time. For a full view of the different models, check out our Wiki section.

2. Two-Seater or Four-Seater?

When most people think of Ferrari, they will automatically think of a two-seater car. Tell them that Ferrari also make four-seater cars and they are surprised. The reality is that a significant chunk of Ferraris actually has 4 seats, or 2+2s as they are commonly known. 

When I purchased my first Ferrari 2+2 I had no choice, as I had a wife and son to accommodate, and another child on the way. If I didn’t buy a 4-seater, the Ferrari would never get used. So for me it was only the 2+2 Ferraris that were an option. My friends never had that dilemma, so they were 2-seater all the way!

So, you need to decide what is it that you’re looking for. Do you need to have that extra seats? What luggage requirements do you have? Is it something that you are going to use on a day-to-day basis and therefore needs to be practical? Yes, a practical Ferrari would you believe.

The reality is though the V8 two-seat Ferraris are by far the most popular choice. Cars like the F355, the F430, the 360 Modena, the 458 Italia, and now the 488 GTB are all great choices. They are usable to an extent and reliable, which we will come to in a moment.

But if it needs to be a four-seater and you are looking for something fairly modern, then anything newer than a Ferrari 456 will be a great choice. The newer the model, the better as the development over the last 20 years has been staggering. 

I drove a 1999 Ferrari 456M GTA for a number of years as a daily driver. It was perfect for us simply because it would accommodate my family and luggage too. As a bonus I could driver and park it everywhere too. Something that I might not be so comfortable with in a newer model.

3. V12 Engine or a V8 Engine?

For some, this question doesn’t matter. However, for others this is perhaps the only question that matters!

Traditionalists will probably say a front engined V12 is the only type of Ferrari one should buy. It is a valid point, as after all Enzo himself wanted the V12 engine placed at the front of the car. It wasn’t until 1971 that the mid-engined V8 or V12 road cars hit the road with the Ferrari 365 GT4 BB.

The world is now focussed on environmental issues, and it seems likely that the V12 will be assigned to the history books. The V12 question is probably more valid today than ever before! Grab one while you can.

For others there is only one choice, and it has to be a mid-engine V8. Very few people will argue against the fact that the V8 cars generally speaking the better looking with a sportier look. As a bonus, aurally the engine and exhaust of the V8 also sounds better too. 

Don’t get me wrong I’m not saying get a V8 over a V12. That’s something that you have to choose for yourself. Purchasing a Ferrari is a very personal choice. There is plenty out there, but you need to pick the car that’s right for you. 

4. How often and how will you want to use it?

We touched on this point earlier when we spoke about the practicality of the car, but there are other factors to be considered too. 

For some people the engine has to be a V8 with just two seats, so practicality doesn’t come into it at all. They may only want to drive the Ferrari a few times a year, or maybe just once a year. So you will need to consider how much you’re going to use it. 

One of the reasons why it’s so important to consider this question is due to reliability. We will talk about that in a moment, but if you are looking to use it regularly then clearly it needs to be reliable. 

Also looped into this is the practicality which we spoke about earlier. If what you are looking for is a great experience on an irregular basis, then you need not tie up a huge sum of money in a car that you won’t actually use that often. 

Linked to this is also knowing what you are going to use it for? Ferrari is quite unique that they are good to drive on the road, but better on the track. If you anticipate doing a lot of track time in the car, picking a car that has great power and handling is essential.

For example, the Ferrari F355 is considered to be one of the most beautiful cars of all time. It also happens to be a great handling car too, and is hugely enjoyable to drive. A Ferrari 456 is of the same era, with a bigger engine and more power, but it is more suited to long trans-continental drives rather than track driving. 

Different cars of similar budgets give very different experiences. These are important factors, but ultimately the choice is yours.

5. How reliable does it need to be?

If you have never owned a Ferrari, you need to understand this of the earlier cars: You should never take reliability for granted. I have personally witnessed a $10 million-dollar Ferrari fail to start to the embarrassment of its keeper. It just would not start! Video on that coming soon.

If you’re the type of person who needs the car ready and running every single time, then you only have one choice. You need to buy something modern. 

Does that mean avoid any classics? Of course not, but the classic Ferrari needs to be really well maintained. For that you will also be paying top dollar.

However if you’re the type of person who likes to lift the hood and fiddle with the engine, then reliability is much less of an issue. The older Ferraris are easier to work on, with less electrics to contend with.

I carried out a major service on my own Ferrari 456M GTA, and as a complete novice I never even knew how to carry out an oil service before that! I made a series of YouTube videos on the whole process. You can check it out here: Servicing a Ferrari 456M GTA with Cambelt Change.

There are plenty of resources out there including Forums to refer to, and find lots of information direct from owners who maintained their own Ferraris. Whatever you decide, you are not by yourself.

6. Who will be driving it?

This might seem like a bit of a silly question, but trust me it’s not. When I purchased my first Ferrari I knew that I was going to be the sole driver, so it was nice and easy.

However, by the time it came to Ferrari no. 4, I wanted my wife to drive it too. A heavy clutch manual was just not going to be an option, so we knew it had to be either an F1 or an Auto gearbox. We also wanted easy steering, so that ruled out anything prior to around 1990, as we needed to have power steering.

You might not have this issue, but if like me you do then you need to consider it. But I’ll share a secret. The real kicker is that my wife never drove the car, so it didn’t matter at all!

7. How risk averse are you?

As with most things in life there is no one price for a used Ferrari for any particular model. The price varies depending on a number of factors, including condition, service history, specification, provenance, and many other factors.

No doubt you’ve already looked through the classifieds, looking at prices and thinking “Ooo that one’s nearly in my budget, maybe I should go for that one”. But then you realise that in actual fact it has no service history or it has a chequered past.

However, you need to consider about how risk-averse you actually are. I’ll give you an example. At the time of writing, a Ferrari 360 Modena will cost anywhere between £45,000 to £100,000 in the UK. A Ferrari F430 today will cost anywhere between £60,000 and £125,000. 

Now you might think that the Ferrari F430 is the better buy, considering it’s only £15,000 more than the older Ferrari 360 Modena. However, what you need to consider is that for £60,000 you can pick up a well sorted 360 Modena, but the starter F430 will get you into a car that has not been well maintained. Probably will need a lot of money spent on it too.

If you’re willing to do that maintenance yourself the F430 could well be a great purchase. You may well have reliability issues to deal with. But if you are willing to tinker, you can save a packet. But as I said, it depends how risk-averse you are.

 

8. How are you going to buy it?

Nope, still not talking about money here. We are talking about the different markets open to you to purchase the car. Still confused? Let me explain with a story.

When I purchased my first Ferrari I was looking for and found the perfect car. However, it was in France, and I was in England. I spoke to a friend who happens to be a Ferrari mechanic and he agreed to fly out with me to buy the car.  

With tools in hand, with flew out to France to check it out. We inspected the Ferrari in the airport car park, and drove it back to London that night. I did what most buyers would not, and I was able to pick it up for a good price.

On one end of the spectrum some buyers would only purchase through an authorised dealer for peace of mind. While at the other end of the spectrum there are some who will be willing to buy from auction, with a lot more risk as a result. 

Somewhere in the middle are those buyers who will buy from an existing owner. They may check out the car themselves, or get what is called a PPI, or Pre-Purchase Inspection. 

The PPI is usually carried out by a Ferrari trained mechanic, or one who is familiar with the cars, to assess all mechanical aspects of the Ferrari. Talking from experience, it’s worth spending the money on this. 

Going down the road of the used private market will save you thousands. But it won’t get you a warranty, and it will increase the risk involved.

9. Finally we talk money. How much is your budget?

Although for many people this is the most important question, I hope you realise that all of the other questions actually lead to this one. They determine what your budget will be. 

If you purchased a Ferrari based on budget alone, you will probably end up with a car that you just simply will not enjoy. A Ferrari is not just a mode of transport. It’s an experience, and you want to make sure you have the best of experiences!

It used to be the case that Ferraris were purchased cash. They were luxury items, finance was expensive, and as a result few cars were purchased through finance. 

In fact, it was only about 15 years ago that cash buyers were still turned their noses up at those buyers who financed their cars. Just check out the forums!

This has now all changed, and comprehensive finance packages are readily available.

The first bit of advice I can give when it comes to budgets is don’t spend all your money on the car. These are expensive cars and although the used prices might seem like bargains, the parts that are needed to maintain these cars are still hugely expensive. 

You can end up spending thousands, and I mean tens of thousands on a service on one of these Ferraris. Quite easily too! If the car cost you £30 or £40,000 to purchase in the first place, servicing could be a huge percentage of the overall budget.

If you don’t believe me as to how easy that is, I did a Podcast not too long ago about how I spent $20,000 on my Ferrari 456M GTA. That was a running car, and the cost was essentially for a service. Oh, and that included very little labour cost because I did most of the work myself!

I’m not going to dive into what finance packages are available, just simply because each market has different options that are open to them. You could get finance packages with balloon payments or even lease deals depending on the market that you’re in. Besides its a whole other topic we might cover in a future article.

Most reputable Supercar dealers will provide good finance packages. Also in the UK, Europe, and North America there a specialist finance companies who will be able to offer finance on any Supercar.

Ready to buy a Ferrari now? 

So, there you have it.  9 things that you really should consider before signing that cheque (or finance paperwork) for that Ferrari. 

These are the questions that either I asked myself, or wished I had! These cars are hugely entertaining, and ownership can be such a rewarding experience. 

But if you treat it like a regular car purchase, the experience can be disappointing. The number of times I’ve seen people buy a Ferrari, only to sell it on 6 months later. Maybe because the bug is out of their system, or maybe they picked the wrong car.

You can see numerous examples of this, just look at the log book of any used Ferrari. It might be 3 years old, but may have gone through 5 owners! That’s not uncommon.

Cars which have had the same owner for a long time are well sought after, as this usually means the owner is an enthusiast. They generally look after the car better, and importantly get service parts changed when it’s due.

Let us know if you have any other things that you consider when you purchase your cars in the comments section below. I’d love to get other opinions, and you can help new owners in the process.

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Cars formerly owned by celebrities often sell for exaggerated prices. Your writer remembers the story of a humble Ford Escort owned by Princess Diana before she was a Princess selling for silly money, and I recently saw a standard, ordinary Mini that had been in the ownership of comedian Spike Milligan with a price tag of just shy of £50,000.

So, you may expect a Ferrari F430, a 2005 manual model, formerly owned by celebrity chef and TV star Gordon Ramsey to command a ridiculous price. In fact, this particular model is up for sale with Silverstone Auctions with a guide price of between £115,000 to £135,000 which is just about where we would expect it to be.

Delivered new to Mr Ramsey, and one of around 100 of this specification that were sold in the UK, it is a rare car now, and also an important one in Ferrari history.

Last of the True Manuals

Rather than the celebrity provenance, the importance of this model is that the F430 was the very last of the V8 Ferrari line to be offered with a genuine, open-gate manual gearbox. As such, that makes it desirable to collectors, especially as this is a low-mileage model – it’s covered just 4,500 miles – and is in impeccable condition with a full service history.

Mr Ramsey sold the Ferrari in 2008, and it was subsequently owned by Charles Walker, of the Walker’s Shortbread company, before falling into the hands of the current – unnamed – owner, who has kept it as part of his private collection.

Finished in a stylish silver, the car still looks fresh today and is considered one of the most beautiful Ferrari’s of the modern era.

The auction takes place on the weekend of the 27th and 28th of July, 2019, at Silverstone as part of the Silverstone Classic weekend, and lots include various other Ferrari’s – among them a Testarossa, a 458 Challenge, a 1979 308 GT4 ‘Dino’ and a 328GTS – as well as many other fine classic cars.

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Back in 2010, when the Ferrari 599 SA Aperta was first introduced to us, only 80 lucky individuals were able to purchase one of these special machines. But wait, it gets even more special – of those, only 8 were made with right-hand-drive. It’s fun to imagine how exhilarating it must have been to have the chance to purchase one of these ultra-rare automobiles back then. And today’s drool car – this spectacular 599 SA Aperta – is giving one more person the opportunity to experience that feeling. That’s right, this Rosso (Red) Ferrari has apparently been hermetically sealed and untouched since rolled off the production line, because it has not accumulated any miles since then. Here’s a little background about the SA Aperta:

Instead of carrying over the standard 599 engine, Ferrari fitted the SA Aperta with the same 661-horsepower V12 used in the mighty GTO. And while they were at it, they pulled the drivetrain and gearbox from that car as well. That’s why, even though it appears to be just a convertible version of the 599 GTB, you can think of it more like an open-top GTO. And, juts as you would expect from a vehicle made to honour two famous Pininfarina designers, the car is absolutely stunning to look at. And, this being a drop-top, and extra-loud exhaust similar to the one used for the 599XX was fitted as well – listening to that soundtrack with the top down has to be quite the addicting experience.  

This pristine example of the Ferrari 599 SA Aperta is available for purchase at Joe Macari Performance Cars in London. Here are some of the more pertinent details listed in the advert:

Special 599 Aperta

Full GTO factory body

Triple layer paint

Delivery miles

UK RHD

So, count yourself lucky if you were one of the 7 billion or so people who were not able to purchase a factory-fresh Ferrari 599 SA Aperta before they sold out. Of course, you’ll need to scrape together some cash – £1.67 million, to be exact. If Joe Macari manage to sell this car for anywhere near that price, that means this 599 Aperta has appreciated by over £1 million in just 9 years. No wonder the previous owners were so careful with it!

The Ferrari 599 SA Aperta Gallery

This car is available at: Joe Macari.

The post Friday Drool – An Incredibly Rare Opportunity appeared first on SupercarTribe.com.

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