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As a female photographer myself, I also find inspiration in other women street photographers. I can connect somewhat emotionally and relate also as a woman not just as a photographer. I would like to share my ideas in this new series called PhotograpHER. This is a series where I will be talking about women photographers that inspire me and the ways that I connect with them. In this first installment, I will be discussing Mary Ellen Mark. In the following weeks, I will be discussing photographers such as: Diane Arbus, Vivian Maier, Helen Levitt, Susan Meiselas, Diana Markosian, Carolyn Drake and Bieke Depoorter. So stay tuned!

Introduction

Mary Ellen Mark (http://www.maryellenmark.com/) (20 March – 20 May) is the first photographer I will be speaking about in my addiction diary, as I mentioned before.

Mary Ellen Mark was an American photographer well known for her photojournalism, her portraits, her commercial photography and of course, my favorite, her documentary photography. She documented prostitution and circuses in India, homelessness in the United States, mental institutionalization and orphanages, refugees camps in Ireland and much more.

Her work spans over almost five decades. The fact that she was active for so long, makes her work so much more interesting, as you can see in her photos how her style evolved throughout the years but also how the world has changed. In 1962 she got her degree in photojournalism and a BFA award. Her first book called “Passport” was published in 1974.

In 1977 she became a MAGNUM photographer for a period of 5 years, but decided to leave as she felt constrained. Mary Ellen Mark liked working on her own, not being part of any organisation and not copying other styles. She was self motivated, self driven and unique.

“If you can shoot on the street you can shoot anything”

I think that this a clever quote because it is true. On the street it can be so difficult photograph. You have to be quick, decisive and able to think fast. Training yourself in street photography is a great way of evolving as a photographer.

Photos done in Istanbul from “Passport”. Some of Mary Ellen’s first photos My addiction for Mary Ellen Mark

I must say I really have an addiction for her, that I have looked through her photos so many times, I have watched her presenting her work, and read a lot read about her. I am truly hooked. For me, her being a female photographer and being able to travel so much and be so brave as a documentarist inspired me a lot.

Her projects from India are so fantastic I could look at them over and over again. I love the series “Indian Circus”. The fact that she could capture so many intimate moments of the circus life at that period of time, her passion and love for these places she documented is pure beauty to the eye.

Mary Ellen was the kind of photographer that took great interest in every frame she composed, she thought that every photo should stand alone, not necessarily be part of a wider story. I like that about her so much, it shows that even though you don’t know the story or have no time or interest in it you can still appreciate a single photo very much. This is what I try to do as a photographer too, and I think it is a good direction to follow.

I also love her interest for her subjects. Mark was the kind of person that would work for years to gain the trust of people she was photographing before capturing moments that were all together spontaneous and stirring. Not many people would choose to go and live with workers from the circus in India, or in prostitutes homes, or think about staying in hospitals. Mary Ellen did all this, and she has done it with grace and love. This is something that can easily be felt just by looking at her work.

Photos from “Indian Circus”

“I fell in love with the Indian circus at the same time that I fell in love with India. It was 1969, my first trip there. I was in Bombay with a friend and we went to see a circus at ChurchGate. I was immediately struck by the beauty and innocence of the show. I vividly remember seeing a huge hippo in a pink tutu being coached to walk around the ring with his mouth open. At the end, he (or she) was rewarded with an enormous cotton-candy cone that matched the tutu.”

Her love for the subjects she photographed, the patience she demonstrated and the fact that she was a woman, kind of makes me as a female photographer feel more brave.

I also love her chromatic choices when shooting in colour. For example, I adore her prostitute photos from India. The red and green combinations, a primary contrast used by Mary Ellen Mark that adds so much tension to her frames revealing so much of the atmosphere in the places these women lived, making the viewer sense the carnal desires these subjects felt .
Painters and especially impressionists used this colour contrast to express sometimes the violent passion of people. I find myself, picking contrasts that would make the frame more powerful when using color in my photos.

Mary Ellen Mark has all the right ingredients for becoming an addiction to me. I would like to add just one more thing. I like her love for capturing strong and real moments, and not those Photoshop and post processing tricks that could make one’s photos stronger than they really are. In my opinion a good photographer is someone that can capture the best possible moments with his camera. Post production is just a way of enhancing what already exists there. You can’t make a bad photo look amazing just by having great post processing skills. The photo has to truly be good to “speak” to its viewers.

From time to time I also tend to use analog, although I must admit that digital comes handy. But I feel that analog cameras have something special. When you shoot with film you slow down and take more time to think of how you will compose a scene. It teaches you about patience and you could say it helps you become more organized with your work. And a good photographer should have both these qualities.

“I like the idea of being able to capture a moment in time, but all that has changed now with people being able to Photoshop images so much. You don’t know what is real any more and what isn’t. But I am an analog photographer and it is about capturing the moment of reality. It hasn’t changed for me: I shoot film and I will continue to shoot film. I think it is more beautiful. It is the reason I became a photographer. I am not an illustrator; a lot of the digital, Photoshopped photography is what I would call illustration, not photography. With that kind of work the post-production guy is probably the most important guy in the process.”

Conclusion

In conclusion, Mary Ellen Mark became a beautiful addiction to me. She is a photographer from whom I have learned a lot and I still feel I can learn even more from. I learned about the love for your subjects, about the importance of every single frame having an aesthetic value, about the power of chromatic choices in expressing our feelings towards our viewers, I also learned about persistence, courage and believing in myself.

The post The PhotograpHER addiction diaries – Mary Ellen Mark appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Iris Maria Tusa.

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NOTE: This is a Guest Blog post written by Timothy Lunn exclusively for www.streethunters.net.

Street photographer Craig Reilly Interview - Composition: Creating something meaningful - YouTube

Craig Reilly from Street Photography International shares his background in street photography and offers advice for those struggling to compose a street shot.

Sombreness and Serenity

Three years ago, Craig Reilly was walking through Peckham Rye, London.

Before he co-founded Street Photography International, before was published in TimeOut, and before became an Olympus Ambassador, he was just an amateur photographer, hopping jobs, moving flats and growing desperately tired of his (very) occasional landscape photography.

Something had to change.

Out of the mist reared a tree. It spread its near-empty branches through the empty park, withered and stark. Beneath it cycled a man, barely visible beneath the branches.

Craig clicked the shutter.

This photo marked the start of his career in street photography, the first photograph that combined a human form with an urban landscape – and it was a fine example at that.

The composition was exact, the tree positioned in the centre of the image, the darkness of the trunk contrasted with the sheer white of the mist. The figure was weighted perfectly, balanced against the enormous scale of the tree. And the mist lent some depth to the image, receding into the edges of the frame.

More than anything, the composition was meaningful – it wasn’t just pretty, it created a feeling, an atmosphere. Craig explains,

‘It was the serene mood, the quietness of it. It was very sombre. Maybe I felt quite alone at that moment of my life.’

Posting the photo online, Craig felt less alone, as he began to discover the genre of street photography – its community and its figureheads – as well as the joys of composing photographs on the street. Around this time, he also discovered the work of the Swiss photographer, René Burri.

Photo of Magnum Photographer, René Burri

Burri was a kindred spirit who worked for Magnum in the 1950s, streethunting across the world in countries as diverse as Brazil and Cuba. Both photographers, past and present, sought to master the complex art of composition.

Men on a Rooftop

Four men pass across a square of light. One wipes his face, another swaggers with a bouncing gait. The third and fourth rest their hands in their pockets, coolly stepping toward the edge. Camera left, the city of São Paulo bellows below, smoke rising steadily.

This photograph, Men on a Rooftop, counts among Burri’s most famous compositions. It was a key influence on Craig’s early work, for like the amateur photographer standing before a tree in mist, Burri well understood the difficulties of composition.

An early student of Cartier Bresson, he worked hard to match the formal precision of his master. In an interview with Phaidon Press, he commented:

‘ … Henri aggravated me very often. Why? He would look through your contacts upside down! He did this because he always wanted to see the composition.’

Men on a Rooftop by René Burri

Of Bresson’s comments, Burri need not have worried. Men on a Rooftop displays the same perfection of form as Bresson, whichever way round you look at it.

Notably, the frame itself is split across thirds, our eye moving between them. We start with the men in suits, their shadows occupying the brightest third of the frame, silhouetted against the white tiles of the rooftop. Then our eye is dragged to the duller light of the city streets; we follow the traffic up and down, picking out the details of cars and buses. Finally, and after much scouring, we rest in the final third of the frame: glum shadows, repeating rectangles, smoke.

And somewhere, between all these elements, questions arise. Craig explains:

‘What I feel composition needs to do is get you to ask questions. With Men on a Rooftop, the questions I was asking were what are they doing? Is there something sinister about them? Is it completely innocent?’

Photo by René Burri

Studying Burri’s work, Craig began to develop his own experiments in composition, to tell his own stories, to take photographs that experimented with ‘perspectives’ and ‘geometries’ and that raised ‘more questions than answers’.

Craig Reilly Craig Reilly – Street Photographer

Fast forward 3 years. Craig’s work has taken off, Street Photography International have hundreds of thousands of followers and exhibited in numerous galleries. On his Instagram feed, one image in particular stands out.

A man folds his hands behind his back, walking across the bright burn of an orange square. Who is he and why does he appear expressionless? Where is he going and what lies in that white lit room beyond? Where is this, and are we in a real place or an imaginary state of limbo?

By now, Craig’s photos have mastered the art of asking questions – and his compositions have grown accordingly. Red squares, white rectangles, reflections, leading lines, figure, ground and gestalt –we could go on.

In fact, his compositions are so successful, that he now leads the Street Photography International workshops on them. Here he often reminds students:

‘As an amateur, your main focus is the subject, but you totally forget to look at the background, the edges of the frame. In street photography, you’ve got no control over it, so you have to take control by studying a scene and framing it.’

Given Craig’s ability to frame compositions and ask questions with photography, we decided to ask him some of our own.

Here Craig Reilly shares his top tips for composition in street photography.

A Guide to Composition

Shapes feature heavily in your work. Triangles, Circles and Rectangles abound. Why are shapes such a central part of your composition?

Shapes catch my eye the most when I walk the streets. Early on it was people engaging with each other or in their own thoughts, so a lot of my work was candid portraits with eye contact, shot in black and white.

But composition was another way of seeing things, something different from focusing on those moments of emotion or interaction. It felt like I was moving up and developing – and now composition has become my focal point.

Many amateur photographers will struggle to find these shapes on the street. How do you use a location and its architecture to help construct this geometry?

Once a particular location has caught my eye, I will study the scene by looking at it from different angles (high, low, left, right) and make minor adjustments each time, either with my camera’s position or my own.

In particular, I like to look for straight edges, triangles, rectangles and squares. I’ve often used windows – from office blocks to train doors – to create internal frames and interesting shapes. In Spain, I even used the round circles of a gate! Anything can be used to create shape on the street.

You also use architecture to construct leading lines. What are the importance of leading lines, and why do you incorporate them into your images?

Well I’ll also use shapes to create a leading line, and when I’m happy with how it’s composed, I look to see where I want to capture my subject in the scene. I wait until they hit the point and then take the shot.

I always try and make my work look as clean as possible, with as few distractions as I can. Having a leading line helps the viewer to see the image how I want them to view it. I want them to know exactly what and who I’m trying to show, and a leading line helps with that.

Landscape photographers have rivers, tracks and those famous jetties leading into water; what leading lines do street photographers have?

We have everything the street offers! It’s up to us as creatives to determine how we use our landscape in that way.

Whether it’s a banister, line of trees, cars, benches, row of buildings, cracks in a pavement, steps, bricks in a wall. It really can be anything – it’s just a case of looking closely.

Light is a separate topic, but you also use highlights and shadows to guide the eye around an image. What kind of light helps build such a composition?

Hard light works best for the high contrast shots. Of course, there’s always natural light, such as sunlight coming through window lattices, creating reflections of light. But there’s also the overhead, artificial light of a city street.

I’ve even used Christmas lights and car lights before – anything works!

Pattern and Texture occasionally crop up in your work. The repetition of shapes, lines or colours can certainly appear visually appealing. But how do you find and create patterns on the streets?

For me personally it’s just a case of how I see the world around me, rather than finding them. On my workshops I show how I see things, and thankfully the attendees are able to pick it up as well.
But in particular, hoardings can be used as a background for patterns. I often use the hoardings with decorative shapes and patterns that are sometimes found outside building sites. For example, I found the above at Canary Wharf.

Some of your shots feature a balanced and centred subject. But many of your photographs leave a great deal of space around the subject, with a silhouette squished to the edge of the frame. How do you organise and frame your subjects? What mood or emotion is this framing you are trying to create?

It really depends on the scene. The available light, weather, location, and of course the subject are the most important factors to determine a mood or emotion. In terms of organising and framing the subjects, it’s purely working with what’s there and working it into..

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ATTENTION – Send us your camera bags!

If you want to participate, please read the rules of participation at the end of the post.
Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

Inside Neville Newman’s Camera bag! (Bag No177)

“G’day,

My name is Neville Newman and I shoot street as well as Aussie Rules footy in Hamilton, Ontario. Yes, they play footy in Canada. For street, I use only film. I don’t take a bag, only one of the cameras that I use: either a Rolleiflex TLR, an Olympus OM1 or a Yashica Electro35. A long-term project of mine is to draw the public’s attention to the scourge of poverty in our city. The pollies make a lot of noise about how awful it is, but the percentage of people, especially children, living in poverty keeps rising. At the same time, I try to capture the atmosphere of the street. I am mindful of Bruce Gilden’s assertion, that “if you can smell the street, it’s a street photograph”. Consequently, I am ruthless when it comes to choosing which photographs to post. I hope all of my street shots “smell”.

Items in my “bag”:”

Inside Neville Newman’s camera bag – Bag No.177 Contents:
  • Rolleiflex TLR
  • Olympus OM1
  • Yashica Electro35
Closing quote:
“A camera in your bag will never make an image.”
Link(s): 
Website: NFNphoto.com
 
Rules of participation

Each person that submits the contents of his bag will also be allowed 150 words to describe her / him self to the rest of the StreetHunters.net Readers via the www.streethunters.net website pages! We will even allow one link, back to your website! It will be loads of fun! Why? Well, because we will start to get to know each other through these small 150 word descriptions and of course through the contents of each one’s bags! Now, when we say Camera Bag, it doesn’t have to literally be a bag. It could be a pouch, a backpack, pockets of a jacket, whatever. All we need is the list of all the contents and a photo of those contents on a wooden or carpeted (preferably) floor from above. What must be included in the email you send us? Here is the list of things you need to provide us with in order to have a valid entry:

  • 150 word description of yourself and your Street Photography quirks, habits, tips, whatever. 150 words MAX.
  • Photo of the contents of your bag and your bag next to those contents on a floor, shot from 90 degrees above. High quality, big size.
  • List of items included in your camera bag.
  • Link to your website OR blog OR facebook page OR Instagram OR whatever.
  • A closing remark 20 words MAX. You can say for example something like Thank for letting me share the contents of my bag, now stop looking into my privates and go take some photos!

We thank you in advance for your participation and we are really looking forward to finding out what YOU are hiding in your camera bags! Send everything in at streethunters.net@gmail.com! Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

About “What’s in your camera bag Street Hunter!”

In June 2014  we started sharing the contents of the Camera Bag of one of you, one of our awesome StreetHunters.net Readers every week! All images and text in these posts are written by the Readers presenting their camera bags.

The post Inside Neville Newman’s camera bag – Bag No. 177 appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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ATTENTION – Send us your camera bags!

If you want to participate, please read the rules of participation at the end of the post.
Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

Inside Gabriel Dulinszky’s Camera bag! (Bag No176)

“Hi street hunters,

My name is Gabriel and I’m from Bucharest, Romania. I bought my first camera about 2 years ago and since then I bought 2 more cameras, including a vintage film camera.

I enjoy street photography as well as documentary photography both following and creating. For me street photography gives me that push that gets me out of my comfort and knowledge bubble I’m mostly in. And regardless if I get a shot or not, the experience always holds something for me.

The contents of my bag are as follows:”

Inside Gabriel Dulinszky’s Camera Bag – Bag No.176 Contents:
  • A Fujifilm XE2 camera with a Meike 35mm 1:1.7 manual focus lens.
  • The original Fujifilm X100.
  • Cleaning cloth.
  • Senzor / camera cleaning kit: air blower+brush.
  • Plain white paper notebook for taking note.
  • Fountain pen.
  • And last but not least, 3 spear batteries.
Closing quote:
“Photography for me is mostly about observing. Sometimes it does really matter if you take the shot or not.”
Link(s): 
 
Rules of participation

Each person that submits the contents of his bag will also be allowed 150 words to describe her / him self to the rest of the StreetHunters.net Readers via the www.streethunters.net website pages! We will even allow one link, back to your website! It will be loads of fun! Why? Well, because we will start to get to know each other through these small 150 word descriptions and of course through the contents of each one’s bags! Now, when we say Camera Bag, it doesn’t have to literally be a bag. It could be a pouch, a backpack, pockets of a jacket, whatever. All we need is the list of all the contents and a photo of those contents on a wooden or carpeted (preferably) floor from above. What must be included in the email you send us? Here is the list of things you need to provide us with in order to have a valid entry:

  • 150 word description of yourself and your Street Photography quirks, habits, tips, whatever. 150 words MAX.
  • Photo of the contents of your bag and your bag next to those contents on a floor, shot from 90 degrees above. High quality, big size.
  • List of items included in your camera bag.
  • Link to your website OR blog OR facebook page OR Instagram OR whatever.
  • A closing remark 20 words MAX. You can say for example something like Thank for letting me share the contents of my bag, now stop looking into my privates and go take some photos!

We thank you in advance for your participation and we are really looking forward to finding out what YOU are hiding in your camera bags! Send everything in at streethunters.net@gmail.com! Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

About “What’s in your camera bag Street Hunter!”

In June 2014  we started sharing the contents of the Camera Bag of one of you, one of our awesome StreetHunters.net Readers every week! All images and text in these posts are written by the Readers presenting their camera bags.

The post Inside Gabriel Dulinszky’s Camera Bag – Bag No. 176 appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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Introduction

Dear Streethunters.net Readers,

This is my first attempt at reviewing a published photo book / magazine. I must admit that it feels like a much harder task than, lets say, reviewing a camera or an accessory. Gear is basically a WYSIWYG thing. You use it, check it, try it, compare it and you can form an opinion by analysing the facts that are presented to you. A book however is something totally different. Of course there are some practical points to examine such as the quality of the publication or the design, but basically the reviewer is called upon to offer his insight on the book and its contents, to determine the quality of the photos, how easy it is to read and how well it presents itself on multiple levels. Reviewing a book or zine in my opinion requires much more dedication and an open mind, which are tools that can help you also understand on another level the people behind the work presented. Up until a short while ago, expert book reviewer Andrew Sweigart would dissect any publication sent to us for review and share his thoughts with all of you dear Readers, but now that he has left the team for personal reasons,, it is time for me to give this book reviewing thing a try. I hope you enjoy it.

What is EYESHOT Magazine

The EYESHOT Magazine series was created by Marco Savarese in 2011 and it focuses on street photography in terms of language and as an art form. The issue we will be looking at now, FLASHGUN, is not the first magazine released by the EYESHOT team. You can see a list of all their mags in their portfolio section on their website. Before I continue, I would like to say that Streethunters.net is in no way affiliated with EYESHOT.

Review of the EYESHOT FLASHGUN limited edition magazine

Flashgun is the EYESHOT magazine issue that many would think is dedicated strictly to Flash in Street Photography as the name implies. However this isn’t the case. As the book’s foreword explains, it is about the super fast quickness of street, the flash. This is what you read when you turn to the magazine’s first page:

“Ever notice how quick the flash is on a camera? That’s how fast other types of flashes are, including the super-fast superhero The Flash.
Whether you’re talking about a flash of lighting or a flash of insight, a flash is quick and bright and sudden. There aren’t any slow, long flashes. Because flashes are so fast, the word is often used for anything that happens really quickly: a flash is as fast as a New York minute, the blink of an eye, a heartbeat, an instant, a jiffy, or a split second.”

This actually explains a lot, because when I first went through the pages of this issue I noticed that some photos were not flash photos and I was a bit confused, but after reading the foreword text I got it. As we proceed I would like to mention that this is a limited edition magazine. Once the printed edition has been sold out, EYESHOT will not be printing any more and only the digital version will be available. If you wish to purchase the magazine you can visit the official Flashgun page on the EYESHOT website. Let’s move on.

Book Cover

When I first picked up this magazine it felt as if I was holding a top quality soft cover photo book. If the guys at EYESHOT didn’t classify this publication as a mag, it could have easily fooled me for being a perfectly awesome book! The cover is printed on thick matted high quality paper, and the nice big black letters of the logo on the top are shiny and slightly protruding from the surface. The striking photo on the cover of the magazine shot by Michele Groskopf has a very good print quality so the guys at EYESHOT sure know what they are doing. Michele’s photo serves another purpose too. It is a precursor of the quality of images that are to follow inside the magazine. Just by looking at her striking shot you know you are in for a hell of a ride! That is what I felt when I first grabbed this issue in my hands. As I felt my grip tighten, I just knew that what I was about to experience would be intense, and I was correct!

Shelf life

I loved it when Andrew came up with this variable when reviewing books. “Shelf life”, meaning how long a book would stay on one’s shelf before it would be picked up again. The longer a book stays on the shelf without being picked up, the lower the “Shelf life” value. Even though I have only had this magazine for a few weeks, I have found myself returning to it quite often for inspiration. I have the highest respect for all the photographers included in this book, and some of them I am happy to say, are people I consider my friends, having shared with them joined street photography experiences and a beer or two throughout the years. The fact that all the work included in this magazine is by contemporary, highly active street shooters makes it even more valuable to me, because I feel that I am getting inspiration from the people who are in the now, making things happen as we speak. The freshness of the photos is what “makes this book whisper my name” when it rests on my shelf, and because I listen to that whisper that is why I find myself reaching for it quite often!

Easy to read

When handling the book with both hands I find that reading it comes naturally. With my left hand I hold the magazine open and with my right hand I turn the pages. But things change when I try to lay it on a table, on my bed or my lap. It gets noticeably harder to handle, especially if I want to use only one hand. The pages of the magazine tend to want to close shut. This makes one handed handling impossible. So, if you are thinking of laying the magazine on your kitchen table and going through the pages while enjoying a snack or a drink, think again. You will be needing both your hands to read through it.

Organization and content

Flashgun is organised in a very logical way. Already from page 4 the reader is greeted by a beautifully designed table of contents. The way the book is organised is by country and then by photographers. So for example if you want to see the work of a photographer from the United Kingdom, all you have to do is look for the UK, check the page number and the names of the photographers and then just jump to that page and check out the photos. Personally I find this type of organisation very good and practical, although I would not have minded if it had an additional, more traditional way of indexing based on alphabetical order of the photographers names. The reason is that I think that not all of us know the nationalities of all of our favourite photographers and even though the way the content is now organised is logical, I still miss the fact that there isn’t a more practical way to find photos by an alphabetical list with the photographers names. As for the actual content, as I mentioned in the “Shelf life” section of this review above, it is of the highest quality. A collection of truly amazing images shot by some of the best street photographers that are actively working today.

Quality

As I indicated at the beginning of the review, if EYESHOT didn’t classify itself as a magazine publication, FLASHGUN could have easily been considered a book. The quality of the print and the paper used, even though not the best you would find in other photo books or pricey magazines, is still great and offers the reader a very good experience. The cover is nicely put together, printed on high quality thick paper with a matte finish. The logo is slightly protruding and shiny giving it a more luxurious feel. The inside pages printed on Fedrigoni X-PER Premium White paper are of very good quality and the print work is also very good. Looking at the design of the magazine, I find it balanced and minimalist in style, with very clear focal points and nicely placed photographs that stand out. The fonts used are well defined and easy to read. All in all I would say that this magazine is definitely worth its money.

Closing

If you are interested in purchasing a print or digital copy of this limited edition magazine, you can visit the official EYESHOT magazine website and make your purchase from there. At this point I would like to remind you that we are in no way affiliated with EYESHOT and the link to their website is not an affiliate link, which means we will not be earning anything if you choose to make a purchase. However, we do recommend you do, it is well worth the read!

The post StreetHunters Bookshelf: Review of Eyeshot’s Flashgun Magazine appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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Introduction

Street photography, known also as candid photography, is the photography done in public places and is conducted for the art of enquiry that features unmediated chance encounters and random incidents. When talking about street photography we don’t necessary need the presence of the street or the urban environment. Street photography can be done just as well in rural areas or public buildings; while documentary photography usually refers to a popular form of photography used to chronicle events or environments both significant and relevant to history and historical events as well as everyday life. Documentary is typically covered in professional photojournalism, or real life reportage, but it may also be an amateur, artistic, or academic pursuit.

So street photography is not the same thing as documentary photography. Although they are linked, and some would say that they are similar to a certain point, they are certainly not the same thing. So, until which point could we say they are connected?

Documentary photography vs street photography

Upon first look they both are in a way a form of a social documentary, portraying the here and the now – people, places, cultures. But if we look at each one separately we notice the various differences, some obvious and some more subtle than others.

Documentary photography focuses on telling us the true story, has a clear storyline, takes place in a specific place depending on the documentary topic and the photographer restricts himself by photographing only what is related and relevant to his theme, trying as hard as possible to reveal the truth, of course the truth that is revealed is through his own artistic perspective, no doubt about that, but it is still more objective thaen street photography.

Street photography on the other hand tends to be more free, spontaneous, not caring to reveal or prove anything and for this reason the photographer can show more of his artistic and creative side.  

“Documentary focuses on telling us the true story while street photography tries to make its own story”

Street photography is a spontaneous act that takes place sometimes without premeditation, without a previous plan and it is mostly candid. What does candid mean? It means that the subject is not aware of the fact that it is being photographed. Most street photographers shoot people without them being aware. Like for example Vivian Maier, this iconic street photographer did most of her shots in a spontaneous way, just feeling the decisive moment.

Vivian Maier

Of course it is not always a spontaneous act. Sometimes the street photographer can find a place that he likes and wait there even for hours for something to happen. He waits in a spot for the perfect subject to walk into the scene and then takes his shot.

An iconic photograph shot in such manner was done by legendary photographer Henri Cartier Bresson in Greece, where he waited for hours for something to happen in a simply perfect location, having the perfect frame in his mind. And after a while it happened. A young girl runned into the chosen frame and made Cartier Bresson’s picture possible.

Henri Cartier-Bresson
Siphnos, Greece (Girl on Stairs)

Documentarists on the other hand establish bonds with their subjects, they get to know them, they ask questions and try to find out more about their story in order to shape the documentary, unlike street photographers who mostly photograph people that they don’t know. Street photographers don’t ask for permission for taking pictures of people on the street, that would ruin the hole idea of street photography but documentarist do. Their photos are based on the stories they want to unveil. For example documentarist Mary Ellen Mark had gained much trust from her subjects when she was documenting the life of prostitutes in India, or of those who worked in the circus. And like her are a lot of great documentarists that traveled and settled to a place just trying to better figure out the story that they wanted to document. Well known photographers documented the most intimate and precious moments of their subjects, and that needed patience, time and a special kind of bond.

Mary Ellen Mark
Flakland Road: Prostitutes of Bombay

While a street photographer does not familiarise himself with a subject and creates his own surreal reality, a documentary photographer finds himself deeply interested and motivated to research his subjects and their situation and to hear the evolution of their story.  

“Art is a lie that makes us realize the truth” – Pablo Picasso

Street photography is not interested in capturing the truth but focuses instead on the creative power of a photographer that can generate relationships within the frame that my not exist in reality. It stimulates the imagination through intentional juxtapositions, exaggerated angles, shadows and everything that would take a frame out of the ordinary day to day life and turn it into a surreal composition. So street photography is not concerned by life itself or the truth. However, there is the possibility that in time, a street photograph can gain documentary value due to the fact that various elements in the shot can be linked to a certain period in time.

Another difference is that while street photography focuses on the “decisive moment” being based on the unexpected and unpredictable, documentary focuses on the objective presentation of an ongoing activity that can take place through the course of a specific amount of time, ranging to anything from a few seconds to years.

Conclusion

Street photography and documentary photography are basically not the same thing as we explained previously. Even if they are linked somehow they are so different in many ways. In time photographers, amateurs as well as professional photographers will get more and more used to this difference. My worries are that for now not all know these differences and they mix up terminology as well as styles. What are your thoughts about this topic? Write in the comments below.

The post “Street photography vs documentary photography” – Why photojournalism and Street Photography are not the same thing. appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Iris Maria Tusa.

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2 day Street Photography Workshop in Athens with Gabi Ben Avraham and Yiannis Yiasaris: Beyond Snapshots

In Athens at the end of June, specifically on the 28th and 29th of June, 2 massive street photographers, Gabi Ben Avraham and Yiannis Yiasaris, join forces for a very exciting hands-on street photography workshop! At only €150 sans taxes for both days and both tutors I consider this workshop a great bargain, so don’t just sit there, register today!

Both Gabi and Yannis have been featured on our website before many times in the past. Just search for their names in the Streethunters.net search bar and you can find all the posts we have written about them.

But they are not only amazing street shooters, they are both good friends of mine and great guys! Not only will you get a chance to learn some of the coolest tips and tricks in street, but you will also enjoy spending time in the company of two creative, colourful, motivating and inspirational fellow humans. I promise you this will not be just a workshop, it will be an experience to remember!

If you want to find out more information about the 2 photographers, you can visit their respective portfolios. Links shared below:

This workshop is organised by our friends at the iFocus gallery in Athens. They are co-organisers for the PhosAthens festivals that take place every November in Athens.

So go ahead and register for the workshop! You can either visit the official workshop announcement page or contact Dora Lavazou at dora@iFocus.gr or info@ifocus.gr, Tel. +30 6942879879 or +30 210 3647088.

Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

The post 2 day Street Photography Workshop in Athens with Gabi Ben Avraham and Yiannis Yiasaris: Beyond Snapshots appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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A new documentary about contemporary New York street photography is in the works at the moment and I have to say I am very excited about it! Directed by Tim Huynh, “Fill The Frame” promises to be an inspiring film that will examine the art of street photography through the eyes of 8 New York based street photographers with different backgrounds and of varying styles.

However, in order for this film to be produced and released to the masses, it needs a boost from all of us! To achieve this, Tim has setup a Kickstarter page on which you can find all information about the documentary and details about the various ways you can contribute in order to make this project a reality. My personal favourite is getting my name in the credits for $75! How cool is that!?

In my opinion, this is a very good idea and I think we need more documentaries out there explaining what street photography is all about. As Tim himself mentions on his Kickstarter page:

“With the continuing rise of the digital age and popularity of social media, the genre of street photography has propelled like we’ve never seen before. Still there is more opportunity for street photography to be recognised and appreciated by the masses.”

The photographers that share their story in the documentary are Dimitri Mellos, Jonathan Higbee, Julia Gillard, Lauren Welles, Mathias Wasik, Melissa Breyer, Melissa O’Shaughnessy, & Paul Kessel. Also featured are Jeff Mermelstein, Richard Sandler, Matt Weber, Meryl Meisler, Colin Westerbeck (author of Bystander) and Sandra Philips (SF MOMA Curator), so this is going to be a very interesting film to watch!

Go ahead and check out the Kickstarter project and pledge your support, but hurry up there are only a few days left!!

Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

The post Pledge your support and help support this upcoming street photography documentary “Fill The Frame” by Tim Huynh! appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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Street Hunters by Spyros Papaspyropoulos - 1M ago
Introduction

As some of you might remember, not long ago I announced that Streethunters.net co-founder Andrew Sweigart and editor Digby Fullam had to depart from the team. Since announcing that my partners had to retire, I have received many offers from street photographers around the world wanting to help me by writing guest posts, sharing articles on their social network profiles and more. I am very grateful to everyone that reached out to me offering their assistance. It means a lot to me knowing that you guys care for Streethunters.net so much that you are willing to actively help.

Last week I was having a talk with a friend of mine about Streethunters.net and the future of the website and I could sense that she was looking for a creative outlet and a way to express her thoughts and ideas about street photography to the world, so I instinctively asked her if she would like to join me and start writing for the website. She loved the idea and agreed. That made me feel great! Not only was I going to be receiving the help of another photographer, but most importantly I was going to be receiving the help of a friend and that meant a lot to me! But enough of that, I would like to introduce her to you now.

Iris Maria Tusa Iris Maria Tusa – Editor at Street Hunters

It is with great pleasure that I announce today that Romanian Street Photographer, Iris Maria Tusa is joining Streethunters.net as an Editor.

Iris is an industrious photographer and is very passionate about her craft. She enjoys traveling to the far reaches of the world, capturing exciting moments. When she isn’t traveling, she finds herself participating in street photography events and festivals or preparing her next big project. To check out her work, you can either visit one of the many links provided in her profile page, or get yourself one of the books in which her work has been published. Her list of books is also located on her profile page.

Iris will be writing blog posts and helping with day to day tasks on our various Social Media pages. Personally I am looking forward to working with her. I am very excited to have someone with her experience and perspective on board and I can’t wait to take Streethunters.net into this new direction with her help. Thanks for joining Iris and welcome!

Stay Sharp & Keep Shooting!

The post Say hello to Iris! appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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Introduction

The 3rd London Street Photography Festival will be taking place on the 23-25th of August 2019 at “Stour Space” and “The Old Baths” in East London. For all of you that haven’t heard of the LSPF before, it is a non-profit international event that is based in London and showcases Street Photography. The goal of the Festival is to build a community and to establish and develop a platform for networking, learning and development through exhibitions, workshops, lectures, competition and associated events. In addition the LSPF aims to be closely connected to the community and young people and provide them with the world-class resources and experience in one of the most dynamic and popular genres of photography.

The London street Photography Festival 2019

The Festival will feature an extensive program of inspiring talks, enlightening lectures and brilliant exhibitions! One of the most long awaited events of the festival is legendary photographer Jeff Mermelstein’s 3-day workshop and keynote speech. Other speakers and judges include the amazing Matt Stuart, Sarah Gilbert (The Guardian), Diego Orlando (Burn magazine) and more. So you are all in for a hell of a ride!

Photo by Jeff Mermelstein The LSPF 2019 Contests

This year the London Street Photography Festival will offer 4 contest categories in which photographers can submit their work. Those are:

  1. Single Photograph,
  2. Photo Series,
  3. London Photograph and
  4. A special contest for under 21s which is free.
LSPF open Sell/Buy bookshop!

The LSPF will be organising an open photography bookshop! So during the festival all photographers are welcome to bring, sell and buy books and zines with no commission required from the organisers.

The Festival is free and everyone is welcome to attend. Photo by Gustavo Minas For more information, please contact:

Mary Timohova
Director of Communications
Info.lspf@gmail.com
lspf.co.uk

The post PRESS RELEASE: London Street Photography Festival 2019 appeared first on Street Hunters and was written by Spyros Papaspyropoulos.

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