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Face masks are a fun and effective way to pamper your skin. This Seaweed and Cucumber Face Mask is full of skin-loving ingredients and suitable for a variety of skin types. It’s created by emulsifying oils with water, and then adding a mixture of dry ingredients like sea clay and spirulina powder.

The oils in this mask were chosen for their light texture and nourishing properties. Cucumber seed oil is an excellent moisturizer and absorbs quickly. The seaweed extract is dispersed in fractionated coconut oil, which is also light on the skin. They leave the skin feeling hydrated but not oily.

The seaweed extract is part of the new Seascape Collection. It includes a variety of fragrance oils, exfoliants, powders, and more. Click here to explore the entire collection.

The mixture of kaolin clay and sea clay create a thick but spreadable texture that is not overly drying. This mask is good for normal and combination skin. If you have dry skin, you can use less clay as shown in the DIY Lavender Clay Face Mask. If you have oily skin, increase the amount of clay as shown in the DIY Sea Clay Mask.

Spirulina powder is added for color and skin benefits – it’s an algae rich in vitamins, nutrients, and antioxidants. It has a deep green hue, which gives this face mask a beautiful color. If you’ve worked with it before, you know spirulina does have a fishy odor. We found the ginger essential oil in this recipe covered it up nicely.

A few notes about recipe substitutions and changes:

  • Polawax Emulsifying Wax is a highly reliable and strong emulsifier. It can be substituted for the generic version, Emulsifying Wax, if you prefer, although this recipe was not tested with it. Due to the clay in the recipe, we splurged and used Polawax Emulsifying Wax to avoid any chance of separation.
  • This recipe calls for avocado and cucumber seed oil. Other oils can be used instead if you prefer; we recommend staying with liquid oils that absorb easily into the skin. Changing the total amount of oil in the recipe will change the overall texture of the mask.
  • Because this recipe is essentially a lotion and contains a large amount of water, a preservative is necessary to prevent mold and bacterial growth. We chose Optiphen, but other preservatives like Phenonip will work. Learn more about preservatives here.
  • Increase the total amount of clay if you want it to be better suited for oily skin, or decrease the amount to make it better for dry skin. Decreasing the amount of clay may create a thinner product.
  • If you prefer to use different clays, feel free to swap them. Clays have different absorbing properties, which will affect how the mask feels on the skin. Learn which clay is right for your skin here.
  • If you have very sensitive skin, fragrance and essential oils can be irritating. Omit from the recipe if you prefer.
  • Seaweed extract can be substituted with a different extract if you prefer. Find more extracts here.
Seaweed & Cucumber Face Mask DIY

What You’ll Need:
Seaweed and Cucumber Face Mask Label Template
Four 8 oz. Bail Jars 
21.4 oz. Distilled Water
1 oz. Cucumber Seed Oil
1.3 oz. Avocado Oil
1 oz. Polawax Emulsifying Wax
0.8 oz. BTMS-50 Conditioning Emulsifier
5 oz. Kaolin Clay
2 oz. Sea Clay
0.4 oz. Spirulina Powder
3 mL Ginger Essential Oil
0.5 oz. Seaweed Extract
0.2 oz. Optiphen

Click below to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

EQUIPMENT PREP: Disinfect your utensils by dipping them in a 5% bleach water solution and allowing to dry. This includes mixing containers, your stick blender, and any spoons or spatulas that may come in contact with your mask. Your products must be as free of germs, bacteria, and microbes as possible. To be safe, bleach water all your utensils.

ONE: In a medium container, measure 5 ounces of kaolin clay, 2 ounces of sea clay, and 0.4 ounces of spirulina powder. Mix them together thoroughly.

TWO: In a heat-safe container, combine 1.3 ounces of avocado oil, 1 ounce of cucumber seed oil, 0.8 ounces of BTMS-50, and 1 ounce of Polawax. Heat the container in the microwave using 30-60 second bursts until the waxes have fully melted. Be careful when removing the container, as it will be quite hot. Set aside.

TWO: In a separate large container, heat 21.4 ounces of distilled water in the microwave (or on the stove top) until it reaches about 160-170 ° F. Once the water reaches the correct temperature, some of it may evaporate. Remeasure and add more distilled water if necessary until you have 21.4 ounces of hot water.

THREE: Check the temperatures of both containers. Each container should be about 160° F. If the oil and wax have cooled, reheat in the microwave. Place the stick blender into the water and burp it to help get rid of bubbles. Pour the oil and wax mixture into the water and use a spatula to make sure every little bit is added. Begin pulsing the stick blender. The mixture will take on a milky appearance once the water, oil, and waxes have begun to emulsify. Continue to pulse and stir for about a minute.

FOUR: Add heaping spoonfuls of the clay mixture and pulse the stick blender until combined.

FIVE: Continue stick blending for about 1-2 minutes. Use a spatula to scrape down any clay that may be on the sides of the bowl. Check the temperature of the mixture. Once the mixture is about 130-140°F, add 0.2 ounces of Optiphen, 3 mL of ginger essential oil, and 0.5 ounces of seaweed extract. Stick blend (don’t forget to burp the stick blender) the ingredients until fully mixed.

SIX: Pour the mixture into the bail jars. Tap the jars on the counter to help get rid of bubbles. You can also spritz with alcohol to help get rid of bubbles. Allow the containers to cool for several hours with the lid open to prevent condensation.

Once fully cooled, the mixture will be a thick, lotion-like texture. To use, apply a medium layer to dry, clean skin. Avoid the immediate eye area. Allow the mask to sit on the skin for at least 15 minutes. Use warm water to rinse off. There is no need to wash the skin after, but you can if you prefer.

 

Seaweed & Cucumber Face Mask DIY
 
Cook time
30 mins
Total time
30 mins
 
This recipe uses new seaweed extract, which is hydrating and ideal for all skin types.
Author: Soap Queen
Recipe type: Face Mask
Serves: 4 jars
Ingredients
  • Seaweed and Cucumber Face Mask Label Template
  • Four 8 oz. Bail Jars
  • 21.4 oz. Distilled Water
  • 1 oz. Cucumber Seed Oil
  • 1.3 oz. Avocado Oil
  • 1 oz. Polawax Emulsifying Wax
  • 0.8 oz. BTMS-50 Conditioning Emsulifier
  • 5 oz. Kaolin Clay
  • 2 oz. Sea Clay
  • 0.4 oz. Spirulina Powder
  • 3 mL Ginger Essential Oil
  • 0.5 oz. Seaweed Extract
  • 0.2 oz. Optiphen
Instructions
EQUIPMENT PREP: Disinfect your utensils by dipping them in a 5% bleach water solution and allowing to dry. This includes mixing containers, your stick blender, and any spoons or spatulas that may come in contact with your mask. Your products must be as free of germs, bacteria, and microbes as possible. To be safe, bleach water all your utensils.
  1. In a medium container, measure 5 ounces of kaolin clay, 2 ounces of sea clay, and 0.4 ounces of spirulina powder. Mix them together thoroughly.
  2. In a heat-safe container, combine the avocado oil, cucumber seed oil, BTMS-50 and Polawax. Heat the container in the microwave using 30-60 second bursts until the waxes have fully melted. Be careful when removing the container, as it will be quite hot. Set aside.
  3. In a separate large container, heat the distilled water in the microwave (or on the stove top) until it reaches about 160-170 ° F. Once the water reaches the correct temperature, some of it may evaporate. Remeasure and add more distilled water if necessary until you have 21.4 ounces of hot water.
  4. Check the temperatures of both containers. Each container should be about 160° F. If the oil and wax has cooled, place back into the microwave until fully melted. Place the stick blender into the water, and burp it to help get rid of bubbles. Pour the oil and wax mixture into the water and use a spatula to make sure every little bit is added. Begin pulsing the stick blender. The mixture will take on a milky appearance once the water, oil and waxes have begun to emulsify. Continue to pulse and stir for about a minute.
  5. Begin adding heaping spoonfuls of the clay mixture and pulsing the stick blender until combined. Continue to add the clay to the mixture and blend in small amounts until all the clay is added.
  6. Continue stick blending for about one to two minutes. Use a spatula to scrape down any clay that may be on the sides of the bowl. Check the temperature of the mixture. Once the mixture is about 130-140°F, add 0.2 oz. of Optiphen, 3 mL of ginger essential oil, and 0.5 oz. of seaweed extract. Stick blend (don’t forget to burp the stick blender) the ingredients until fully mixed.
  7. Pour the mixture into the bail jars. Tap the jars on the counter to help get rid of bubbles. You can also spritz with alcohol to help get rid of bubbles. Allow the containers to cool for several hours with the lid open to prevent condensation.
  8. Once fully cooled, the mixture will be a thick, lotion-like texture. To use, apply a medium layer to dry, clean skin. Avoid the immediate eye area. Allow the mask to sit on the skin for at least 15 minutes. Use warm water to rinse off. There is no need to wash the skin after, but you can if you prefer.
3.3.3077

 

The post Seaweed & Cucumber Face Mask DIY appeared first on Soap Queen.

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We have new items that are sure to inspire your summer projects. The Seascape Collection features crisp scents, natural exfoliants, and beautiful shades of blue. Shop all the new products here.

Pacific Pearl Fragrance Oil
As soon as you smell this bright and uplifting scent you’ll want to add it to all of your DIY bath products.

Sea Salt Fragrance Oil
The notes of seaweed and cucumber in this unique scent will remind you of a morning walk on the beach.

Coastal Rain Fragrance Oil
The mix of ocean mist, Argentina lemon, and white tea in this scent is hard to beat.

Midnight Waters Fragrance Oil
If you love deep and complex scents, pick this one up. It has notes of orange, lilies, and deep sea water.

Seascape Fragrance Collection
Keep the creativity flowing and try all four new water-inspired scents.

Pumice Sand
This powerful exfoliant will leave your skin feeling fresh and clean. Try it in DIY soap and scrubs.

Icelandic Black Sand
This product comes from the South Coast of Iceland. It has a beautiful natural color and mild exfoliation.

Pearl Powder
Set your recipes apart with pearl powder. It’s packed with nutrients like calcium and minerals.

Jagua Blue Extract
This colorant creates a stunning midnight blue shade in DIY bath products.

Seaweed Extract
This ultra-hydrating extract is ideal for all skin types. Try it in your soap, lotion, or facial skincare.

Sugar Pearls
Sprinkle a few of these cute pearls on top of DIY bath products.

White Foam Pump Bottle and Clear Foam Pump Bottle
This must-have product gives liquid soap a light and foamy texture.

Sea Sponges
These sponges are the perfect addition to handmade soap. They create amazing lather.

Pearl Bath Bomb Kit
Create adorable bath bombs with this kit, which comes with supplies and printed instructions.

Foaming Liquid Soap Kit
You only need a few ingredients to create this fun foaming soap.

Full Seascape Collection
Add all of the new Seascape items into your Bramble Berry cart. They can be used in handmade products like soap, lotion, and bath bombs. With this collection you can try one of each.

We can’t wait to see all the fresh designs you create with this collection. Share using the tag #BrambleOn.

The post Introducing the Seascape Collection appeared first on Soap Queen.

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Colorants add a beautiful look to handmade soap. Before getting started, it helps to know which ones work best for your recipe. Learn more about Bramble Berry colors below.

What type of colorants does Bramble Berry carry?
We carry pigments, micas, LabColors, and color blocks. They’re skin safe and can be used in soap and cosmetics.

Does Bramble Berry carry natural colorants?
Pigments are considered nature identical. That means they’re the exact same chemical structure as the platelet minerals found in the earth, but they’re created in a lab to remove impurities like lead and arsenic. Industrywide, they’re considered natural because they don’t contain synthetic dyes. Learn more about natural products here.

Some micas are considered natural and some aren’t – it depends on if they’re made with FD&C dyes. Coral Mica contains FD&C Red 40 Lake so it’s not considered natural, while Aqua Pearl Mica is because it’s made with mica, titanium dioxide, iron oxide, and chromium oxide green. Learn more in the Sunday Night Spotlight: Mica Colorants post.

If you want colorants that are derived straight from the earth and not synthetically created, check out the herbs and botanicals section. It includes natural options like spirulina, rose clay, tomato powder, and activated charcoal.

What is a bleeding colorant?
Bleeding colorants are usually dyes or FD&C colors that migrate into other layers of your soap over time. You can work the bleeding into your design, as seen in the Layered Lavender Cold Process Soap. If you’re not a fan of that look, make sure to use non-bleeding colorants.

Pigments

Cold process

  • Mix 1 teaspoon of pigment with 1 tablespoon of a lightweight oil like sweet almond or avocado. If you’re making a larger batch, you can increase that to 2 teaspoons into 2 tablespoons, or 3 into 3. Add 1 dispersed teaspoon at a time at trace until you get a color you like. We recommend about 1 dispersed teaspoon per pound of soap.

Melt and pour:

  • Mix 1 teaspoon of pigment with 1 tablespoon of glycerin or 99% isopropyl alcohol. Add ¼ teaspoon of dispersed color to the melted soap until you get a color you like.
  • Add shavings of color blocks to the melted soap until you get a color you like. Color blocks are essentially super concentrated melt and pour, so they incorporate more easily into soap than loose pigments.

Micas

Cold process

  • Make sure to check the testing notes on each product page before use. Certain micas morph or fade in cold process soap.
  • Mix 1 teaspoon of mica with 1 tablespoon of a lightweight oil like sweet almond or avocado. If you’re making a larger batch, you can increase that to 2 teaspoons into 2 tablespoons, or 3 into 3. Add 1 dispersed teaspoon at a time at trace until you get a color you like. We recommend about 1 dispersed teaspoon per pound of soap.

Melt and pour

  • Add the mica straight to the melted soap and stir well. If you see bubbles forming, spritz with alcohol and continue mixing. You can use up to ½ teaspoon per pound of soap.
  • Mix 1 teaspoon of mica with 1 tablespoon of 99% isopropyl alcohol. Add ¼ teaspoon of dispersed color to the melted soap until you get a color you like. This method helps the color mix in more quickly.

LabColors

Cold process and melt and pour

  • They need to be diluted with distilled water and a preservative before use. Learn how to do that in this post.
  • Using a dropper, add the diluted colors to fluid melt and pour or thin trace cold process soap. The usage rate depends on the color and how much it’s diluted. A good place to start is about 1/2 mL per pound of soap.
  • LabColors work best with gel phase. Learn more about insulating soap here.

Natural colorants

Cold process

  • Mix 1 teaspoon of the powder with 1 tablespoon of a lightweight oil. If you’re using clay, we recommend mixing with distilled water. Add 1 dispersed teaspoon at a time at trace. Check the product pages for usage rate suggestions.
  • You can also infuse natural colorants. To do so, heat the colorant and the oil of your choice in a slow cooker for 1-4 hours or place in an airtight container and leave at room temperature for 4-6 weeks. Learn more about infusing in this post.

Melt and pour

  • Mix 1 teaspoon of powder with 1 tablespoon of 99% isopropyl alcohol or distilled water. Add ¼ teaspoon of dispersed color to the melted soap until you get a color you like.

This post was updated in June 2018.

The post How to Color Handmade Soap appeared first on Soap Queen.

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If you prefer a shower to a bath, shower steamers are a great option. They’re made with baking soda and citric acid, just like bath bombs. But rather than placing them into a tub, the steamer is placed on the floor of the shower. The water activates the fizzing reaction and releases the essential oils into the air.

The scent creates a spa-like shower. This recipe has tea tree essential oil and Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil to create a relaxing and uplifting scent. The recipe does contain quite a bit of essential oil. Because they don’t come in contact with the skin, you don’t need to worry about using too much. These can’t be used like a bath bomb – the amount of essential oil could irritate the skin.

If you prefer another scent, feel free to swap it out. Citrus oils like 10x Orange or Red Brazilian Mandarin are great for a morning shower. Fragrance oils can also be used – Relaxing Fragrance Oil is perfect right before bed.

 

Lavender & Tea Tree Shower Steamers

What You Need:
6 Cavity Silicone Square Mold
20 oz. Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda)
10 oz. Citric Acid
18 mL Tea Tree Essential Oil
18 mL Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil
Witch Hazel in a Spray Bottle
Droppers

Click below to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

ONE: In a large bowl, combine 20 ounces of baking soda and 10 ounces of citric acid. To get rid of clumps in the mixture, you can push the powders through a sifter or break them up with your fingers. Citric acid has a tendency to take off nail polish, so wear gloves to protect your manicure. Thoroughly stir everything together.

TWO: Add 18 mL of tea tree essential oil and 18 of mL Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil. Use your hands to fully mix into the powder mixture.

THREE: Test the consistency of the mixture. The perfect consistency is similar to wet sand and holds its shape when squeezed. If it’s too dry, use one hand to spritz the mixture with witch hazel and one to mix. Continue spritzing until the mixture holds its shape.

FIVE: Firmly press the mixture into each cavity of the Silicone Square Mold. Allow the bath bombs to dry for several hours or up to overnight. Remove from the molds.

Lavender & Tea Tree Shower Steamers
 
Cook time
20 mins
Total time
20 mins
 
Start your morning off right with this recipe. It will fill your shower with a fresh mix of lavender and tea tree essential oil.
Author: Soap Queen
Recipe type: Shower Steamers
Serves: 6 shower steamers
Ingredients
  • 6 Cavity Silicone Square Mold
  • 20 oz. Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda)
  • 10 oz. Citric Acid
  • 18 mL Tea Tree Essential Oil
  • 18 mL Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil
  • Witch Hazel in a Spray Bottle
  • Droppers
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, combine 20 ounces of baking soda and 10 ounces of citric acid. To get rid of clumps in the mixture, you can push the powders through a sifter or break them up with your fingers. Citric acid has a tendency to take off nail polish, so wear gloves to protect your manicure. Thoroughly stir everything together.
  2. Add 18 mL of tea tree essential oil and 18 of mL Lavender 40/42 Essential Oil. Use your hands to fully mix into the powder mixture.
  3. Test the consistency of the mixture. The perfect consistency is similar to wet sand and holds its shape when squeezed. If it’s too dry, use one hand to spritz the mixture with witch hazel and one to mix. Continue spritzing until the mixture holds its shape.
  4. Firmly press the mixture into each cavity of the Silicone Square Mold. Allow the bath bombs to dry for several hours or up to overnight. Remove from the molds.
3.3.3077

The post Lavender & Tea Tree Shower Steamers appeared first on Soap Queen.

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This hot process soap is inspired by new Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil. With notes of ripe blueberries, rosemary, vanilla, and musk, it’s a modern take on a classic fruity fragrance. The scent is the perfect complement to these rustic hot process bars.

Embeds created with LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base and the Small 9 Ball Silicone Mold top each bar. Once the soap is removed from the mold, we used the Clean Up Tool to carve blueberry details in each embed. Poppy seeds are also sprinkled on top of the soap for interest.

The embed on top melted, creating an accidental blueberry drizzle. We liked it so much we left the bars just the way they are. If you’re not a fan of that look, you can make the embeds out of cold process soap.

Blueberry Hot Process Soap Tutorial

What You Need:
Embeds:
Small 9 Ball Silicone Mold
2 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base
Ultramarine Blue Color Block
Black Oxide Color Block

Base:
2  lb. Wood Loaf Mold
Silicone Liner for 2 lb Wood Loaf Mold
22 oz. Lots of Lather Quick Mix
3.2 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
7.3 oz. Distilled Water
1.3 oz. Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil
Ultramarine Blue Pigment
Poppy Seeds

[sq_products]

Click below to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

Make the Embeds

ONE: Chop 2 ounces of LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Place the soap and a shaving of Ultramarine Blue Color Block into a heat-safe container and melt using 5-10 second bursts. Because it’s such a small amount of soap, be careful to not burn it. Once melted, add more Ultramarine Blue Color Block if necessary. Then, add very small shavings of the Black Oxide Color Block to achieve a dark and saturated blue.

TWO: Carefully pour the soap into each cavity of the Small 9 Ball Silicone Mold. Each cavity should be filled to the very top. Allow the soap to fully cool and harden.

THREE: Once the soap is hard, remove each embed from the mold. Carve five points into the flat side of the embed to resemble a blueberry. We found the Clean Up Tool worked well for this step.
NOTE: We placed 6 blueberry embeds into the top of the soap, which created large bars. You can make more or fewer embeds depending on how large you want the bars to be. 

Make the Base

If you’ve never made hot process soap before, stop here. This post talks about how to handle lye safely, and this Soap Queen TV video goes over how to get started.

FRAGRANCE PREP: Measure 1.3 ounces of Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil into a small glass container and set aside.

COLOR PREP: Disperse 1/2 teaspoon of Ultramarine Blue Pigment into 1/2 tablespoon of lightweight liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get rid of clumps and set aside. Have poppy seeds and embeds nearby.

SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices. That means goggles, gloves, and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, other distractions, and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

ONE: Slowly and carefully add the 3.2 ounces of lye to the 7.3 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. Once cooled to about 130° F , add 0.7 ounces of sodium lactate to the lye water. Sodium lactate is used in hot process at 3% of the oil weight to help produce a smoother bar.

TWO: Fully melt the entire bag of Lots of Lather Quick Mix until it’s completely clear and there’s no cloudiness. Shake the bag to mix up all the oils. Measure 22 ounces into your Crock-Pot and turn it on.
NOTE: The heat setting you use may vary depending on your cooking vessel. We’ve cooked hot process soap on low and high heat with equally good results. For this recipe, we used the high heat setting for a faster cook time. If you’re making hot process soap in your cooking vessel for the first time, start with the low setting. Next time try the high setting and see which you prefer. 

THREE: Slowly add the lye water to the oils. Make sure the mixture does not fill up more than half of the pot or cooking vessel. Tap the stick blender on the bottom of the pot to release air bubbles and begin to blend.

FOUR: Mix with the stick blender until a thick trace is achieved.

FIVE: Put the lid on the Crock-Pot and allow the soap to start cooking. After about 10 minutes, check the soap. Starting from the outside, the texture and color of the soap will start to change into a glossy, slightly Vaseline-like texture. Stir the soap to ensure even cooking. Place the lid back on and allow it to cook for another 5-7  minutes.
NOTE: Don’t be surprised if the soap starts to grow in volume. Don’t leave your soap unattended in the first 10 minutes of cook time for this reason. If the soap gets too high in the pot, wearing gloves, take the pot off heat and stir like crazy.

SIX: The batch is ready when it’s the texture of glossy mashed potatoes. This may take up to three more 5-10 minute sessions, depending on how hot your Crock-Pot is. When you think it’s ready, use a pH strip to test the levels. Place a small amount of the soap into a cup of distilled water and stir. Dip the pH strip into the water – it should be below 10. Be sure not to overcook the soap, you don’t want it too dry for the next steps.

SEVEN: Add 1/2 teaspoon of dispersed Ultramarine Blue Pigment directly to the soap and stir until it’s fully combined.

EIGHT: Add all of the 1.3 ounces of Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil and stir to fully combine.

NINE: Working quickly, spoon the soap into the mold. Tap the mold on the counter firmly to help it settle. Once all the soap is in the mold, use a spoon or gloved hands to smooth the top.

TEN: Insert the blueberry embeds into the soap. We used 6 embeds, which created nice thick bars. Depending on how many embeds you make, you can place them closer together to create smaller bars.

ELEVEN: Working very quickly, sprinkle poppy seeds on top and use your hands to press them into the soap. Sprinkle on more than you want, because some will fall off when the bars are cut.

In the photo below, you’ll notice that the melt and pour embeds started to melt. Melt and pour soap begins melting at about 120-125 degrees F, and this soap is quite hot. We predicted this may happen, but decided to give it a shot anyway. Our embeds continued to melt enough to actually run down the mold. In the end, it looked like a blueberry drizzle.

TWELVE: Allow the soap to stay in the mold for at least 24 hours. Unmold and cut into bars. This soap is ready to use right away, but will last longer in the shower after at least a 2 week cure time.

Blueberry Hot Process Soap Tutorial
 
Cook time
2 hours
Total time
2 hours
 
This hot process soap is inspired by new Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil.
Author: Soap Queen
Recipe type: Hot Process Soap
Serves: 2 pounds of soap
Ingredients
Embeds:
  • Small 9 Ball Silicone Mold
  • 2 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Ultramarine Blue Color Block
  • Black Oxide Color Block
Base:
  • 2 lb. Wood Loaf Mold
  • Silicone Liner for 2 lb Wood Loaf Mold
  • 22 oz. Lots of Lather Quick Mix
  • 3.2 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 7.3 oz. Distilled Water
  • 1.3 oz. Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil
  • Ultramarine Blue Pigment
  • Poppy Seeds
Instructions
Make the Embeds
  1. Chop 2 ounces of LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Place the soap and a shaving of Ultramarine Blue Color Block into a heat-safe container and melt using 5-10 second bursts. Because it’s such a small amount of soap, be careful to not burn it. Once melted, add more Ultramarine Blue Color Block if necessary. Then, add very small shavings of the Black Oxide Color Block to achieve a dark and saturated blue.
  2. Carefully pour the soap into each cavity of the Small 9 Ball Silicone Mold. Each cavity should be filled to the very top. Allow the soap to fully cool and harden.
  3. Once the soap is hard, remove each embed from the mold. Carve five points into the flat side of the embed to resemble a blueberry. We found the Clean Up Tool worked well for this step. NOTE: We placed 6 blueberry embeds into the top of the soap, which created large bars. You can make more or fewer embeds depending on how large you want the bars to be.
Make the Base
    FRAGRANCE PREP: Measure 1.3 ounces of Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil into a small glass container and set aside.
      COLOR PREP: Disperse ½ teaspoon of Ultramarine Blue Pigment into ½ tablespoon of lightweight liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get rid of clumps and set aside. Have poppy seeds and embeds nearby.
        SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices. That means goggles, gloves, and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, other distractions, and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.
        1. Slowly and carefully add the 3.2 ounces of lye to the 7.3 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. Once cooled to about 130° F , add 0.7 ounces of sodium lactate to the lye water. Sodium lactate is used in hot process at 3% of the oil weight to help produce a smoother bar.
        2. Fully melt the entire bag of Lots of Lather Quick Mix until it’s completely clear and there’s no cloudiness. Shake the bag to mix up all the oils. Measure 22 ounces into your Crock-Pot and turn it on. NOTE: The heat setting you use may vary depending on your cooking vessel. We’ve cooked hot process soap on low and high heat with equally good results. For this recipe, we used the high heat setting for a faster cook time. If you’re making hot process soap in your cooking vessel for the first time, start with the low setting. Next time try the high setting and see which you prefer.
        3. Slowly add the lye water to the oils. Make sure the mixture does not fill up more than half of the pot or cooking vessel. Tap the stick blender on the bottom of the pot to release air bubbles and begin to blend.
        4. Mix with the stick blender until a thick trace is achieved.
        5. Put the lid on the Crock-Pot and allow the soap to start cooking. After about 10 minutes, check the soap. Starting from the outside, the texture and color of the soap will start to change into a glossy, slightly Vaseline-like texture. Stir the soap to ensure even cooking. Place the lid back on and allow it to cook for another 5-7 minutes. NOTE: Don’t be surprised if the soap starts to grow in volume. Don’t leave your soap unattended in the first 10 minutes of cook time for this reason. If the soap gets too high in the pot, wearing gloves, take the pot off heat and stir like crazy.
        6. The batch is ready when it’s the texture of glossy mashed potatoes. This may take up to three more 5-10 minute sessions, depending on how hot your Crock-Pot is. When you think it’s ready, use a pH strip to test the levels. Place a small amount of the soap into a cup of distilled water and stir. Dip the pH strip into the water – it should be below 10. Be sure not to overcook the soap, you don’t want it too dry for the next steps.
        7. Add ½ teaspoon of dispersed Ultramarine Blue Pigment directly to the soap and stir until it’s fully combined.
        8. Add all of the 1.3 ounces of Blueberry Thyme Fragrance Oil and stir to fully combine.
        9. Working quickly, spoon the soap into the mold. Tap the mold on the counter firmly to help it settle. Once all the soap is in the mold, use a spoon or gloved hands to smooth the top.
        10. Insert the blueberry embeds into the soap. We used 6 embeds, which created nice thick bars. Depending on how many embeds you make, you can place them closer together to create smaller bars.
        11. Working very quickly, sprinkle poppy seeds on top and use your hands to press them into the soap. Sprinkle on more than you want, because some will fall off when the bars are cut.
        12. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for at least 24 hours. Unmold and cut into bars. This soap is ready to use right away, but will last longer in the shower after at least a 2 week cure time.
        3.3.3077

        The post Blueberry Hot Process Soap Tutorial appeared first on Soap Queen.

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        The Bramble Berry customer service team gets about 2,300 emails, chats, and phone calls a week. That number jumps to more than 5,000 during the busy holiday season. They answer questions about everything from goat milk soap to starting a small business. We asked the team what posts they share most often, as well as their best advice for beginners. Find their answers below.

        Tina


        How long have you been with Bramble Berry?
        7 years in July

        What blog posts do you share with customers most often?

        What advice would you give to someone just starting out?
        Mistakes are part of the fun! Be open and okay with everything not turning out as you envisioned. Sometimes things turn out better. Also, maybe start with a basic recipe with a few ingredients first rather than jumping in with a 100% coconut oil cold process soap with a swirl design and raw honey as an additive.


        Carla


        How long have you been with Bramble Berry?
        6 years

        What blog posts do you share with customers most often?

        What advice would you give to someone just starting out?
        Anyone can do it! Trust yourself, have patience, and pay attention to the recipe.


        Terah


        How long have you been with Bramble Berry?
        4 years

        What blog posts do you share with customers most often?

        What advice would you give to someone just starting out?
        Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Even if you’re following a recipe, there can be some trial and error before you get into the groove of things. We’ve all had failed batches, even after we become experts!


        Matt


        How long have you been with Bramble Berry?
        2 years

        What blog posts do you share with customers most often?

        What advice would you give to someone just starting out?
        Don’t be afraid to experiment with your creations. You don’t always have to “soap inside the lines” – learn how to formulate a recipe and make changes to it, how to resize your batches, and get creative!


        Chloe


        How long have you been with Bramble Berry?
        Almost 2 years

        What blog posts do you share with customers most often?

        What advice would you give to someone just starting out?
        For a beginner soapmaker my best advice would be to measure everything twice because once you make your soap you can’t go back – like baking a cake!

        The post Advice from Our Customer Service Team appeared first on Soap Queen.

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        People ask us about superfatting all the time. This Soap Queen TV video is a good place to start – Bramble Berry CEO and Founder Anne-Marie explains what it is around 3:26.

        How to Make Cold Process Soap: Basic Terms, Episode 2 - YouTube

        Soapmaking is a science at heart. When you add color and fragrance, it turns into an art. Each oil has its own saponification value, or the amount of lye it takes to turn 1 gram of oil into 1 gram of soap.

        When we make cold process soap, it’s a mathematical formula that looks like this: (oil amount) x (SAP value) = lye amount needed. Find a list of SAP values in this post. An example is (10 oz. olive oil) x (.134) = 1.34 oz. lye. So, it takes 1.34 ounces of lye to turn 10 ounces of olive oil into soap.

        Using the exact amount of lye you need to make the exact amount of soap with nothing leftover is a 0% superfat or lye discount. Many makers like to have some leftover oils in their recipe that aren’t bound to lye, which can be anywhere from a 1-20% superfat.

        There are a few ways to calculate superfat. The easiest method is to plug your recipe into the Lye Calculator. All you have to do is select the percentage you want and it will calculate for you.

        You can also use the following equation: (1 – % superfat you want). So, if you want to superfat your olive oil soap in the above example by 4%, it would be: (1.34 oz. lye) x (1 – .04) = 1.29 oz. lye. You can also simplify that – for a one pound batch of soap, a 5% superfat works out roughly to 0.8 oz. of extra oils per pound of soap.

        We almost always superfat our recipes at 5% because it adds luxury to the soap without making it too soft or inhibiting lather.

        That said, superfat is a totally personal thing. Some soapmakers go up to 15% and swear by it. It also depends on the recipe. For instance, we recommend superfatting coconut oil soap at 20% so it isn’t too harsh on the skin. Experimenting with a few different superfats is the best way to find the amount you love.

        This Coconut Oil and Annatto Soap is superfatted at 20%.

        This post was updated in May 2018.

        The post Superfatting Soap – An Explanation appeared first on Soap Queen.

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        As soon as we smelled new Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil, we knew it was perfect for bath bombs. These Raspberry Jam Bubbling Bath Truffles are part bath bomb, part bubble bar, and part bath truffle. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil gives them a sweet, fruity, and completely delicious scent.

        This recipe consists of baking soda, citric acid, and SLSA. The baking soda and citric acid create a mild fizzing reaction. The SLSA creates small, creamy bubbles. Because this recipe contains plenty of shea butter, cocoa butter, and a touch of raspberry seed oil, it doesn’t create large and fluffy bubbles. If you’re after more bubbles, this recipe may be more up your alley.

        This recipe is a very slight twist on the recipe used for the Salted Caramel Bath Truffles, Mermaid Bubble Bath Truffles, and the Rainbow Bubbling Bath Truffles. In this batch we added more butter and oil, as well as more polysorbate 80 to help emulsify it.

        With these changes, we found the dough was a little bit softer. This means the bars don’t crumble when cut, which is great. But they are a bit more tricky to shape. We found gently shaping each bar with your hand helped prevent a flat truffle.

        Raspberry Jam Bubbling Bath Truffle

        What You Need:
        25 oz. Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda)
        7 oz. Citric Acid
        13 oz. SLSA
        2.5 oz. Cream of Tartar
        5.5 oz. Cocoa Butter
        5 oz. Shea Butter
        1 oz. Raspberry Seed Oil
        1.5 oz. Liquid Glycerin
        1 oz. Polysorbate 80
        0.5 oz. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil
        1 tsp. Raspberry Mica
        1/2 tsp. Poppy Seeds

        Click below to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

        ONE: In a small heat-safe container, add 5 ounces of shea butter, 5.5 ounces of cocoa butter, and 1 ounce of raspberry seed oil. Place the container in the microwave and melt using 30-60 bursts. Be careful when removing it from the microwave, as it may be very hot.

        TWO: Add 0.5 ounces of Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil, 1 ounce of polysorbate 80, and 1.5 ounces of liquid glycerin to the melted butters. Use a spoon to thoroughly incorporate. Set aside.

        THREE: Place a fine mesh sifter over a large container. Press 25 ounces of baking soda, 7 ounces of citric acid, and 2.5 ounces of cream of tartar through the sifter into the bowl. Use a whisk to mix the ingredients together. Very carefully, add 13 ounces of SLSA to the large container (do not put it through the sifter). We recommend adding the SLSA very last because it’s extremely fine and it can become airborne very easily, which can cause irritation. You may want to wear a mask during this step to avoid breathing in any SLSA. Once everything’s added, slowly mix together the dry ingredients.

        FOUR: Add about 1/3 of the oil mixture to the dry ingredients. The oil is still hot, so put on gloves and use your hands to incorporate the liquid and powder ingredients together.

        FIVE: Continue adding the liquid ingredients in 1/3 increments to the dry and mix together until fully incorporated. The final texture will be very similar to bread dough – soft, workable, and slightly sticky. The texture of the mixture depends on the temperature of the butters. The warmer the dough, the softer it will be. We found a dough temperature of about 90 ° F is a nice, soft texture that still holds its shape.

        SIX: You will have about 60 ounces of truffle mixture. Split the batch into two equal containers. To one container, add 1/2 teaspoon of poppy seeds and mix with your hands.

        SEVEN: To the other container, add 1 teaspoon of Raspberry Mica. Mix until there are no streaks of color.

        EIGHT: Lay down a sheet of wax paper on the counter and sprinkle on a thin layer of baking soda. This prevents the bath truffles from sticking to the and and it also helps when you’re rolling the batch. Lay the pink mixture on the wax paper and begin forming it into a rectangle shape.

        NINE: Place the white mixture on top and use your hands to spread it evenly onto the pink. Create a flat rectangle shape – about 14 inches long by about 7-8 inches wide.

        NINE: Use the wax paper to roll the bubble bars. The bars may stick to the paper slightly, but that’s okay. You can use your hands to smooth out the roll if necessary.

        TEN: Continue rolling and use your hands to help create a smooth, even log.

        TEN: Once the dough is fully rolled, use your hands to shape the log. If you feel the log is a little skinny, you can push it from the ends. You can also use your hands to make it taller or shorter.

        ELEVEN: Use a sharp non-serrated knife to cut the log into bars. If it’s extremely soft, it can be a little sticky and needs to be handled very carefully. You can wait for about 30 minutes for it to harden slightly or cut the bars very gently.

        TWELVE: Once the bars are cut, place them gently on a piece of parchment paper or wax paper. Use your hands to give them a more uniform shape and smooth the edges. As the butters in the bath truffles cool, they become hard. It takes about 3-4 hours for the bars to firm, depending on your room temperature. It can be hard to wait, but be patient. To use, break up the a truffle under a running faucet and enjoy.

        Raspberry Jam Bubbling Bath Truffle
         
        Cook time
        1 hour
        Total time
        1 hour
         
        New Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil is the perfect fit for these creamy and bubbly bath truffles.
        Author: Soap Queen
        Recipe type: Bath Truffles
        Serves: 10-12 truffles
        Ingredients
        • 25 oz. Sodium Bicarbonate (Baking Soda)
        • 7 oz. Citric Acid
        • 13 oz. SLSA
        • 2.5 oz. Cream of Tartar
        • 5.5 oz. Cocoa Butter
        • 5 oz. Shea Butter
        • 1 oz. Raspberry Seed Oil
        • 1.5 oz. Liquid Glycerin
        • 1 oz. Polysorbate 80
        • 0.5 oz. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil
        • 1 tsp. Raspberry Mica
        • ½ tsp. Poppy Seeds
        Instructions
        1. In a small heat-safe container, add 5 ounces of shea butter, 5.5 ounces of cocoa butter, and 1 ounce of raspberry seed oil. Place the container in the microwave and melt using 30-60 bursts. Be careful when removing it from the microwave, as it may be very hot.
        2. Add 0.5 ounces of Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil, 1 ounce of polysorbate 80, and 1.5 ounces of liquid glycerin to the melted butters. Use a spoon to thoroughly incorporate. Set aside.
        3. Place a fine mesh sifter over a large container. Press 25 ounces of baking soda, 7 ounces of citric acid, and 2.5 ounces of cream of tartar through the sifter into the bowl. Use a whisk to mix the ingredients together. Very carefully, add 13 ounces of SLSA to the large container (do not put it through the sifter). We recommend adding the SLSA very last because it’s extremely fine and it can become airborne very easily, which can cause irritation. You may want to wear a mask during this step to avoid breathing in any SLSA. Once everything’s added, slowly mix together the dry ingredients.
        4. Add about ⅓ of the oil mixture to the dry ingredients. The oil is still hot, so put on gloves and use your hands to incorporate the liquid and powder ingredients together.
        5. Continue adding the liquid ingredients in ⅓ increments to the dry and mix together until fully incorporated. The final texture will be very similar to bread dough – soft, workable, and slightly sticky. The texture of the mixture depends on the temperature of the butters. The warmer the dough, the softer it will be. We found a dough temperature of about 90 ° F is a nice, soft texture that still holds its shape.
        6. You will have about 60 ounces of truffle mixture. Split the batch into two equal containers. To one container, add ½ teaspoon of poppy seeds and mix with your hands.
        7. To the other container, add 1 teaspoon of Raspberry Mica. Mix until there are no streaks of color.
        8. Lay down a sheet of wax paper on the counter and sprinkle on a thin layer of baking soda. This prevents the bath truffles from sticking to the and and it also helps when you’re rolling the batch. Lay the pink mixture on the wax paper and begin forming it into a rectangle shape.
        9. Place the white mixture on top and use your hands to spread it evenly onto the pink. Create a flat rectangle shape – about 14 inches long by about 7-8 inches wide.
        10. Use the wax paper to roll the bubble bars. The bars may stick to the paper slightly, but that’s okay. You can use your hands to smooth out the roll if necessary.
        11. Continue rolling and use your hands to help create a smooth, even log.
        12. Once the dough is fully rolled, use your hands to shape the log. If you feel the log is a little skinny, you can push it from the ends. You can also use your hands to make it taller or shorter.
        13. Use a sharp non-serrated knife to cut the log into bars. If it’s extremely soft, it can be a little sticky and needs to be handled very carefully. You can wait for about 30 minutes for it to harden slightly or cut the bars very gently.
        14. Once the bars are cut, place them gently on a piece of parchment paper or wax paper. Use your hands to give them a more uniform shape and smooth the edges. As the butters in the bath truffles cool, they become hard. It takes about 3-4 hours for the bars to firm, depending on your room temperature. It can be hard to wait, but be patient. To use, break up the a truffle under a running faucet and enjoy.
        3.3.3077

        The post Raspberry Jam Bubbling Bath Truffle appeared first on Soap Queen.

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        Loofah sponge is a natural product that scrubs away dirt and adds a unique look to soap. When they’re dry, they’re quite hard and brittle. Once they’re introduced to water, they soften and have a great scrubby texture for skin. Learn more about loofah sponges here.

        For this recipe, loofah sponges are soaked, cut, and placed in the 12 Bar Round Silicone Mold. Melt and pour soap colored with spinach and tomato powder from the new Farmers Market Collection is poured on top of each one. To complement the earthy look, it’s scented with Avocado Fragrance Oil.

        Garden Loofah Soap DIY

        What You Need:
        12 Bar Round Silicone Mold
        Loofah Sponge
        32 oz. Clear Melt & Pour Soap Base
        16 oz. White Melt & Pour Soap Base
        Spinach Powder
        Tomato Powder
        0.9 oz. Avocado Fragrance Oil
        99% Isopropyl Alcohol in a Spray Bottle

        Click below to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

        ONE: Prepare the loofah sponge. Bramble Berry’s loofah is flat until it’s dunked in water, then it softens and expands. We find that the sponges are easier to cut once they have expanded, as they are softer and it’s easier to see their shape.

        Dunk the loofah sponges in water until they expand. Because they are a natural product, some loofah sponges are larger than others.

        TWO: Squeeze out any excess water. Using a sharp pair of scissors, cut the loofah into round shapes. It helps to tightly squeeze the sponge to make it more compact while cutting. Try your best to cut the loofah so it’s slightly taller than the depth of the silicone mold cavities.

        TIP: If you cut it a little too thin, place a small piece of loofah into the mold cavity and set the thin loofah piece on top. This will help lift the loofah up so the soap doesn’t completely cover it. 

        THREE: Place each round into a mold cavity. If the loofah sponge is large, you may want to cut it in half. Place the mold on a cutting board and set aside.

        FOUR: Chop 32 ounces of Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base and 16 ounces of White Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Place all of the white soap into a heat-safe container. Split the Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into two heat-safe containers – each should contain 16 ounces.

        FIVE: In separate containers, disperse 1 teaspoon of spinach powder into 1 tablespoon of 99% isopropyl alcohol and 2 teaspoons of tomato powder into 2 tablespoons of 99% isopropyl alcohol. Mix together. Dispersing the colorants helps prevent clumps.

        SIX: Melt each container of melt and pour soap using 30 second bursts, stirring in between each one. Once they are all completely melted, add 0.3 ounces of Avocado Fragrance Oil to each container and mix in thoroughly.

        SEVEN: To the melted white soap, add 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed spinach powder. Then, add 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed spinach powder to one of the containers of melted clear soap. Finally, add all of the dispersed tomato powder to the last container of melted clear soap. Thoroughly mix in all of the additives.

        EIGHT: Pour each color of soap into 4 cavities of the mold. Each cavity will be filled to the very top. After each pour, spritz the soap with 99% isopropyl alcohol to help get rid of bubbles.
        TIP: The tomato powder tends to fall to the bottom if the soap is too hot and thin. To prevent this, pour the soap once it has cooled to about 120-125° F. 

        NINE: Allow the soap to cool and harden for several hours, up to overnight. Once they have cooled and hardened, remove them from the mold and enjoy. To help prevent glycerin dew, wrap the soap in plastic wrap.

         

        Garden Loofah Soap DIY
         
        Cook time
        1 hour
        Total time
        1 hour
         
        These bars are made with natural loofah sponges, tomato powder, and spinach powder. They cleanse and exfoliate at the same time.
        Author: Soap Queen
        Recipe type: Melt and Pour Soap
        Serves: 12 bars
        Ingredients
        • 12 Bar Round Silicone Mold
        • Loofah Sponge
        • 32 oz. Clear Melt & Pour Soap Base
        • 16 oz. White Melt & Pour Soap Base
        • Spinach Powder
        • Tomato Powder
        • 0.9 oz. Avocado Fragrance Oil
        • 99% Isopropyl Alcohol in a Spray Bottle
        Instructions
        1. Prepare the loofah sponge. Bramble Berry’s loofah is flat until it’s dunked in water, then it softens and expands. We find that the sponges are easier to cut once they have expanded, as they are softer and it’s easier to see their shape. Dunk the loofah sponges in water until they expand. Because they are a natural product, some loofah sponges are larger than others.
        2. Squeeze out any excess water. Using a sharp pair of scissors, cut the loofah into round shapes. It helps to tightly squeeze the sponge to make it more compact while cutting. Try your best to cut the loofah so it’s slightly taller than the depth of the silicone mold cavities. TIP: If you cut it a little too thin, place a small piece of loofah into the mold cavity and set the thin loofah piece on top. This will help lift the loofah up so the soap doesn’t completely cover it.
        3. Place each round into a mold cavity. If the loofah sponge is large, you may want to cut it in half. Place the mold on a cutting board and set aside.
        4. Chop 32 ounces of Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base and 16 ounces of White Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Place all of the white soap into a heat-safe container. Split the Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into two heat-safe containers – each should contain 16 ounces.
        5. In separate containers, disperse 1 teaspoon of spinach powder into 1 tablespoon of 99% isopropyl alcohol and 2 teaspoons of tomato powder into 2 tablespoons of 99% isopropyl alcohol. Mix together. Dispersing the colorants helps prevent clumps.
        6. Melt each container of melt and pour soap using 30 second bursts, stirring in between each one. Once they are all completely melted, add 0.3 ounces of Avocado Fragrance Oil to each container and mix in thoroughly.
        7. To the melted white soap, add 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed spinach powder. Then, add 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed spinach powder to one of the containers of melted clear soap. Finally, add all of the dispersed tomato powder to the last container of melted clear soap. Thoroughly mix in all of the additives.
        8. our each color of soap into 4 cavities of the mold. Each cavity will be filled to the very top. After each pour, spritz the soap with 99% isopropyl alcohol to help get rid of bubbles. TIP: The tomato powder tends to fall to the bottom if the soap is too hot and thin. To prevent this, pour the soap once it has cooled to about 120-125° F.
        9. Allow the soap to cool and harden for several hours, up to overnight. Once they have cooled and hardened, remove them from the mold and enjoy. To help prevent glycerin dew, wrap the soap in plastic wrap.
        3.3.3077

         

        The post Garden Loofah Soap DIY appeared first on Soap Queen.

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        We’ve been having a lot of fun creating food-inspired soap lately. For this recipe, we used a technique similar to the Horse Sculpted Layers tutorial. Thick soap is scooped out of the mold in a particular shape, and the negative space is filled with more soap. Because this carrot shape is not particularly complicated, it’s a great project if you’d like to try the sculpted layer technique for the first time.

        This recipe is a skin-loving blend of carrot seed oil, cocoa butter, and olive oil. The base is scented with new Avocado Fragrance Oil, and the carrot is scented with Orange 10X Essential Oil. The blend is fresh and bright, and it’s the perfect complement for this rustic yet cheery bar.

        If you give this soap a try, pay close attention to the lye instructions. First, a main batch of lye and oil are created. Once the lye cools, 25% of the batch is split into separate containers. The two batches are used to create the brown soap and the orange carrot soap.

        The reason for making two separate batches is the brown soap needs to harden for quite some time. The carrot soap needs to be poured while it’s still fluid. Creating two separate batches allows you to control the consistency of both, and not stress about the orange soap becoming too thick. Once the base is completed, another batch of soap is made to create the piped top. This project does have a few steps, but we think the end result is totally worth it.

        Carrot Cold Process Soap Tutorial

        What You Need:
        Soap Base
        Tall Narrow Wood Loaf Mold
        2 oz. Carrot Seed Oil (5%)
        1.2 oz. Castor Oil (3%)
        2.4 oz. Deodorized Cocoa Butter (6%)
        10 oz. Coconut Oil (25%)
        13.6 oz. Olive Oil (34%)
        10.8 oz. Palm Oil (27%)
        5.6 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
        13.2 oz. Distilled Water
        2 oz. Avocado Fragrance Oil
        0.6 oz. Orange 10X Essential Oil
        Nuclear Orange Pigment
        Brown Oxide 
        Walnut Shells
        Orange Peel Powder

        Soap Frosting Top
        0.7 oz. Carrot Seed Oil (5%)
        0.4 oz. Castor Oil (3%)
        0.8 oz. Deodorized Cocoa Butter (6%)
        3.3 oz. Coconut Oil (25%)
        4.4 oz. Olive Oil (34%)
        3.5 oz. Palm Oil (27%)
        1.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
        4.3 oz. Distilled Water
        Sodium Hydroxide Lye
        Disposable Frosting Bag
        1M Frosting Tip
        Green Chrome Pigment Oxide

        Click below to add everything you need for this project to your Bramble Berry shopping cart!

        SCULPTING TOOL PREP: First, you need to create the tool for the carrot shape. Cut a piece of sturdy cardboard into a “T” shape. Then, draw a carrot shape and cut it out. Ours ended up being about 2.5″ long from the bottom of the carrot to the top. Keep in mind that the exact size and shape doesn’t really matter. You can make it larger or smaller if you like.

        The top sides of the piece of cardboard will rest on top of either side of the mold. This will help keep the tool level throughout the process. If you’d like, you can also include a “lip” on the side (as seen in this tutorial). Because the carrot shape is less complicated and doesn’t need to be as precise, we didn’t include it.

        Once you’re happy with the size and shape of the carrot, wrap it in clear packaging tape. This helps make it stronger and more “soap-proof” as it’s moved throughout the mold.

        If you’ve never made cold process soap before, stop here. We highly recommend checking out our FREE four part SoapQueen.tv series on cold process soapmaking, especially the episode on lye safety. And if you’d rather do some reading, Bramble Berry carries a wide range of books on the topic, including Pure Soapmaking. You can also check out the digital downloads for that instant gratification factor.

        MOLD & TOOL PREP: Line the Tall Narrow Wood Loaf Mold with freezer paper with the shiny side up. For tips on how to line the mold, click here.

        FRAGRANCE PREP: Measure 2 ounces of Avocado Fragrance Oil into a small glass container and set aside. Measure 0.6 ounces of 10X Orange Essential Oil into a separate small glass container and set aside.

        COLORANT PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of the brown oxide into 1 tablespoon of sunflower or sweet almond oil (or any other liquid oil). Then disperse 1 teaspoon of Nuclear Orange Pigment into 1 tablespoon of lightweight liquid oil. Use a mini mixer to get rid of any clumps. Have 2 tablespoons of walnut shells and 2 teaspoons of orange peel powder nearby.

        SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices. That means goggles, gloves, and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, other distractions, and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

        ONE: Slowly and carefully add 5.6 ounces of lye to 13.2 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add sodium lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of sodium lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add 2.5 teaspoons sodium lactate.

        TWO: Melt and combine 2 ounces of carrot seed oil, 1.2 ounces of castor oil, 2.4 ounces of deodorized cocoa butter, 10 ounces of coconut oil, 13.6 ounces of olive oil, and 10.8 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning) into a large mixing bowl.

        THREE: Once the lye and water have cooled to about 130 degrees F, split off 10 ounces of the oil mixture into a separate container. Then, very carefully (with safety gear on), pour off 4.7 ounces of the lye solution into a separate container. Set these aside – they will be mixed together to form the carrot.

        FOUR: Slowly add the large batch of lye solution to the large batch of oils and stick blend until thin trace.

        FIVE: Add the 2 ounces of Avocado Fragrance Oil and use the stick blender to mix it in.

        SIX: Add all of the dispersed brown oxide and 2 tablespoons of walnut shells. Use a whisk to mix them in thoroughly.

        SEVEN: The soap should be a thin-medium trace. Give it a few pulses with the stick blender if it’s still quite thin. Pour all of the brown soap into the Tall Narrow Wood Loaf Mold. Tap the mold firmly on the counter to get rid of bubbles.

        EIGHT: Now, it’s time to wait for the soap to firm and harden. The soap should be firm enough to hold its shape but thin enough to be scraped out smoothly. It’s a little hard to know when you have that “perfect” texture. We tested every 3 minutes or so by scraping a small amount of the very top of the soap with the carrot tool.

        It’s better to start scraping out the extra soap sooner rather than later. If the soap is not thick enough to hold any shape, let it harden for a few more minutes. But, if the soap is too thick, there is no going back. For this recipe, we found waiting about 8-10 minutes was the perfect amount of time to start carving out the carrot. Your soap may require more or less time, so keep an eye on it.

        NINE: Once the soap is an appropriate texture, insert the cardboard carrot shape and begin pulling it through the mold. Place the extra soap into a separate mold to save it. The first few passes with the cardboard will be a little awkward and messy, but that’s okay!

        TEN: Continue sliding the tool through the mold. As you move the cardboard piece down the mold, lift it up and out and discard the excess soap. Continue to move the shaper down the length of the mold until you get about three-fourths of the way. Try your best to keep moving the carrot in the same spot over and over again, otherwise you’ll end up with a very wide carrot.

        ELEVEN: Once you’re almost to the other end, move the shaper in the opposite direction. Keep moving the carrot back and forth until it’s no longer catching soap.

        TWELVE: Once you’re happy with the shape, it’s time to mix the remaining lye and oils. Pour the lye mixture into the oils and stick blend until you reach a thin trace.

        THIRTEEN: Add the 0.6 ounces of 10X Orange Essential Oil and mix in with the stick blender.

        FOURTEEN: Add 1.5 teaspoons of dispersed Nuclear Orange Pigment and 2 teaspoons orange peel powder. Use a whisk to mix in.

        FIFTEEN: Gently pour the orange soap into the negative space in the mold. Continue to pour until it’s level with the top of the brown soap on the sides.

        SIXTEEN: We had a little bit of orange soap leftover. We let it thicken slightly, and poured it down the middle of the orange layer to build it up in the center.

        SEVENTEEN: Use a small spoon to smooth out the orange soap and create a rounded top. Don’t worry about it looking perfect. Set the soap aside while you prep the last batch.

        Make the Soap Frosting

        SAFETY FIRST: Suit up for safe handling practices. That means goggles, gloves, and long sleeves. Make sure kids, pets, other distractions, and tripping hazards are out of the house or don’t have access to your soaping space. Always soap in a well-ventilated area.

        FROSTING BAG PREP: Cut off the tip of the disposable frosting bag and insert the frosting tip. Set aside.

        COLORANT PREP: Disperse 1 teaspoon of the Green Chrome Oxide Pigment into 1 tablespoon of sunflower or sweet almond oil (or any other liquid oil). Use a mini mixer to get rid of any clumps.

        ONE: Slowly and carefully add 1.8 ounces of lye to 4.3 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add sodium lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of sodium lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add 1 teaspoons sodium lactate.

        TWO: Melt and combine 0.7 ounces of carrot seed oil, 0.4 ounces of castor oil, 0.8 ounces of deodorized cocoa butter, 3.3 ounces of coconut oil, 4.4 ounces of olive oil, and 3.5 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning).

        THREE: Once the lye and water have cooled to about 130 degrees F, slowly add the lye solution to the oils and use the stick blender to mix until they have reached a thin trace.

        FOUR: Add 1/2 teaspoon of dispersed Chrome Green Oxide Pigment to the soap, and whisk to mix in. Split off about 200-300 mL of the soap into a separate container. To the larger container of soap, add 1.5 teaspoons more of Chrome Green Oxide Pigment to achieve a darker green. Stick blend both containers of soap until you reach a thick trace.
        NOTE: The directions in this recipe have been altered from what is shown in the photos. This was done to decrease the amount of leftover soap. 

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