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Learn why recruiters need a “best of breed” solution to win the war for talent from our expert webinar with Glassdoor and SmartRecruiters.

Companies often push their talent acquisition (TA) team to use the recruiting module of the human capital management (HCM) system already in place to manage employee facing administrative tasks like payroll, benefits, and performance tracking. On the surface, it seems like a good idea.  IT is happy because there are no further integrations needed, and finance thinks it will be better for the bottom line. However, time and again, we see that the costs greatly outweigh the benefits.

For a deeper understanding as to why HCM solutions aren’t the software answer for recruiters, we turn to four takeaways from our “Hire Smarter” webinar with experts Rob Symons, VP of Northern Europe at SmartRecruiters and Ravi Edwards, sales leader for EMEA at Glassdoor.

  1. Scale: Recruitment happens on a scale more comparable to sales or marketing than employee management. For example, the Royal Post hires 30,000 temporary employees every year around Christmas. In order to hit this target, they have to receive one-million applications, and one can imagine that the number of marketing touches has to be exponentially greater. Companies who chose to use HCM recruiting modules may think they are saving money only to be surprised by rampant server expenses.
  2. Interface: Employees may deal with clunky systems (when it’s crucial to their job function), but candidates (and many hiring managers) certainly will not. Sixty percent of candidates abandon job applications midway through because they are too complicated. A consumer-grade user interface (UI) is a must, that means the system uses design philosophy to ensure little or no training is needed to navigate the platform (think Facebook or eBay).
  3. Compliance: The newly enacted General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) in Europe, and similar legislation in England and California, are elevating the level of concern around the proper handling of candidate information. A system without compliance at its core forces teams to create timely manual solutions that negatively impact productivity.
  4. Complexity: Recruiting is a complicated process with many moving parts. Most hires are made with a minimum of 15 resources. For example email, text, social media, job boards, psychometrics, background checks, video interviews, digital signature, and the list goes on. The recruiting system needs to support these applications, and HCMs just can’t.

The bottom line is, HCM  is an internal-facing system that cannot keep pace with the recruiting demands of today’s talent economy. TA needs more than applicant tracking systems (ATS), they need dedicated talent acquisition suites (TAS) in order to remain competitive.

To learn more watch the recording below, or join us live for our next webinar “New Rule Book of Talent Acquisition: How to Select the Right Tech, the Right People, and Whether to Trust Your Gut” with Assess First, November 8th, 2018 | 10 am GMT. Register here!

How to Hire Smarter (in partnership with SmartRecruiters) - YouTube

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With all the small steps it takes to make a hire, it can be hard to pinpoint where the process is dragging, we did some digging and this is what we found!

Last year the average time-to-hire was 23.8 days, up from 13 days in 2010 according to Glassdoor findings. This lag time is a problem because it costs your company revenue, and makes for a bad candidate experience. Though a variety of factors play a role in the time-to-hire metric, including low unemployment and a lack of skilled workers, or just workers in general, there are steps your organization can take in order to reduce that time and stop costing themselves precious resources, not to mention their reputation.

Costs of protracted time-to-hire:

  • Loss of revenue: Every day a job goes unfilled you lose the revenue that employee would have generated.
  • Internal Resentment: Burning out current employees who have to cover the work of the open position.
  • Bad Candidate Experience: Candidates feel nervous, frustrated, or in the dark.
  • Opportunity Loss: Candidates may take your slowness as a sign of poor company communication, and take another offer.

To identify an action plan for more efficient recruiting we went to the numbers! Hiring is a multi-step process, involving many departments, so we looked at 30,000 hires to isolate each step and locate the problem area. Here’s what we found: There are four basic steps in the talent acquisition flow – view application, review candidates, interview, and offer. And it’s these two final steps that are causing TA teams to stall out.

So who did we survey?

We looked at 30,000 hires from SmartRecruiters last year from small, large or enterprise companies in Financial Services, Education Management, Health Care, Retail, and Information/Technology Services. In the interest of delivering the most relevant information, we omitted the extreme outlier cases. You may notice that our average time to hire is 4.8 days shorter than the average gleaned from Glassdoor, this is most likely because all our data comes from organizations using an applicant tracking system (ATS), whereas the above survey includes teams working without this technology

Let’s go to the numbers:

Average: 19 days

  • 1 day to see an application
  • 3 days in review
  • 9 days to  interview
  • 6 days to make an offer

Fastest 25 percent: 5 days

  • Less than 1 day to see an application
  • Less than 1 day in review
  • 3 days to interview
  • 1 (next) day to make an offer

Slowest 10 percent: 85 days

  • 11 days to see an application
  • 18 days in review
  • 30 days to interview
  • 26 days to make an offer

Interviews are the slowest step no matter what type of company. Quicker alternatives to multiple in-person interviews could be phone screenings, video interviewing, and/or online assessments! A quick win for hiring managers using Smartrecruiters was making use of the mobile app, which cut the hiring process by an average of two days when compared to those using their desktop computer exclusively!

Surprising takeaways and expert commentary:

Lengthy hiring processes could be hurting more than helping when it comes to tech talent! As expected high-volume low-skill hiring, like retail, is done much faster than information/technology services, however, that time could be hurting you more than you think. Engagement expert from WilsonHCG, Paul Dodd says.

“In regards to tech, there are a ton of aptitudes, skills, and knowledge that needs to be verified, and depending on the latest & greatest profile, with things like java stack or hadoop, your talent pool is small. Any, one professional would possibly have two or three offers so if you aren’t fast enough, the opportunity cost for not having them on your team could be significant.”

Internal and referral candidates take longer to hire. Internal candidates spent an average of 14 days in the interview stage and referrals 17, while the offer stage took 8 days for internal candidates and 4 days (which is actually below average) for referrals.  Perhaps the familiar nature of these candidates make the time factor seem less urgent, but “This is a huge miss,” warns Katherine Moening, marketing manager for Click Boarding.

“Current employees can make, or break, your hiring game. Provide them with the same level of care and attention as new hires during the hiring and onboarding process – and they’ll become champions for your business and your brand. Treat them as less urgent, and they’ll go find someone that’ll treat them better.”

It takes more time to reject a qualified candidate, who was interviewed, than to make the hire by a factor of over 3 days. When you have your pick of qualified candidates it can be hard to tell one they didn’t make the cut, but remember timely communication is key to keeping rejected candidates in your candidate relationship management system (CRM) talent pool for the next position that opens up!

Learn more about this survey by reading our in-depth unpacking in “Terminal Velocity: Where Most Hiring Time is Spent, Stalled and Saved“.

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Your team is ready to select a CRM, but are you really? Here are four points to discuss to get the most out of your tech investment.

To begin, a candidate relationship management system (CRM)  is all about creating a great relationship between your company and candidates – even before they know they’re candidates. It’s not as creepy as it sounds! As part of a Recruitment Marketing strategy, a CRM allows your recruiting function to create talent communities and deliver targeted messaging that builds and nurtures relationships with passive candidates.

So, when it comes time to fill an open position, you already have a pool of vetted talent waiting to apply.

However, much like a treadmill, a CRM only works if you use it correctly. Everyone has seen how a mighty exercise device can quickly become a clothing rack in the garage… it may still have a purpose, but it’s a degraded one. And, if a laundry place is truly what you needed, then you could have spent $5, instead of $300.

Unfortunately, without the right strategy, a similar fate often befalls business-tech solutions. An organization makes a big investment in a new tool, and expects it to solve everything, and, when results are lagging, people get frustrated and use the system at a diminished capacity or not at all.  

But “strategy” is an intimidating word, and we often think of it in the wrong way. So, before we get started, let me tell you three things it doesn’t mean:

  • Strategy doesn’t mean magically predicting the future.
  • Strategy doesn’t mean making every decision right now and you can never change.
  • Strategy doesn’t mean finding the one right way.

Don’t get overwhelmed by the buzzword and get back to the basics of strategy, define why you want this tech, what you want to get out of it, who will do what, and when will take time to assess/adjust.

Why CRM?

Talent is key to business growth, but it’s also scarce.

In a 2017 survey from GlassDoor, 76 percent of hiring managers found it difficult to attract the attention of qualified candidates. Given there has been a predicted labor shortage since the early 2000s, the only reason we are experiencing its effects so late is a consequence of the 2009 financial crises, which caused both a hiring slump and forced many baby boomers to delay retirement.  

And it’s not just a deficiency of skilled-workers, there just aren’t enough people in general. Even industries like hospitality and manufacturing are feeling the squeeze. Thomas Lee, head of research at Fundstrat Global Advisors, a private equity firm in New York, foresees the US to fall short by  8.2 million workers from 2017-2027.

All this means that employers have to work extra hard to be an employer of choice. The candidate is the new customer, and every touch-point has to be positive as well as purposeful so that your business can grow at pace with your goals.

 What do you want your CRM to do?

The desired capabilities and outcomes of implementing a CRM will be very personal to your team/organization. Once you’ve defined the need, this is a great time to bring your team together to ideate about wishes and goals. Here are a few common ones:

  • Boost communication: Information flow is going both ways, you are sending candidates updates about the company, as well as collecting refreshed data about them.
  • Activate talent communities: Without strategic campaigns, a talent community is just a dusty email list. Make sure you are nurturing candidates consistently with relevant information and check-ins. Have your team define what an active talent pool would look like to them with deliverable KPIs attached, like decreased time to hire or increased number of qualified candidates.
  • Track team efficacy: Once you have defined what success is, then you can start measuring your success. Pinpoint effective messaging and notice trends in your communities to make each campaign better than the last.

Who will do what?

Teams tend to break down CRM in two distinct ways, either sourcers manage the CRM and recruiters the ATS or sourcers build the talent pools and hand them over to recruiters to manage. There are pros and cons to both. Solution one works because recruiters tend to be more motivated by recs that are open now, and may find it hard to divert their attention to the groundwork of talent pool maintenance, which doesn’t have an immediate payoff. And solution two functions well because it asks the sourcers to do what they are best at, which is to scrape info and build talent pools, and doesn’t assume they are also marketers. Your solution will depend on the skills of your team, and remember, you can always adjust!

Learn more about native vs non-native CRM here!

When will you assess and how will you adjust?

Even if everything is going great, it’s still important to assess your progress with your team and give everyone a chance to say if they’re happy, and if they aren’t – why?

Don’t be afraid to experiment, but start small and get bigger. Now, that doesn’t mean small in terms of risk, it means small in terms of buy-in. If you are rolling out a new 10-page strategy every quarter, other departments, and even your team will start to ignore everything. So, if you want to change it up, find a few key stakeholders to run the test first and if it is successful, expand. That way you aren’t fatiguing the goodwill of your coworkers.

The final takeaway of these points is that you are investing in a tool for your arsenal, not a genie. So the best way to make sure CRM is effective is by getting your team to buy-in. Remember, these are the people who will use it every day so they have valuable insight into their needs and pain points, make sure to listen!

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The candidate experience is traditionally split into pre and post application, but does that really makes sense for how TA leaders work in the real world?

Today, there are tech solutions to enable every workflow under the sun, and most likely not just one – many! Want to track vacation days, plan work trips, onboard new employees, or even organize a gift exchange? There’s an app for that. In fact, the Human Capital Management market as a whole was valued at 14.50 billion last year, and it’s projected to grow by nearly 30 percent by 2022 to $21.51 billion.

This is great news in terms of innovation, but for talent acquisition leaders already trying to stretch 24 hours into 25, it means a deluge of SaaS decisions. That’s why we are answering one of the most pressing questions – ‘When do I go with a blanket solution and when do I specialize?’ and applying it to candidate relationship management (CRM).

CRM has become an imperative consideration in the current climate of talent scarcity. Unemployment in the US is at a 17-year low of 3.9 percent in May of this year, there is a predicted worker shortage of 8.2 million people from 2017-2027, with an increasing number of employers already reporting a lack of qualified candidates across multiple industries. Organizations with their sights set on growth will need to distinguish themselves as A+ employers at every point of contact.

Think of CRM as “keeping in touch at scale”. One of the top candidate complaints in the hiring process is a lack of communication, which is where CRM solutions step in. Without getting too technical, CRM helps nurture potential candidates, including passive ones, so that an organization has ready access to top-talent ahead of demand. That means resurfacing formerly rejected candidates as well as finding new connections. With the right system in place, recruiters become recruitment marketers thanks to features like branded landing pages, targeted email campaigns, messaging templates, and custom reporting and analytics.

Learn the difference between ATS and CRM here!

Back to our original question: when it comes to CRM, is it better to bundle your CRM with an ATS for an all-in-one solution,  or to specialize with a third-party CRM?

The argument in favor of native CRM solutions is rooted in data quality and ease of use while specialization makes sense if the solution will significantly increase the quality of experience and work produced.

The deciding factor between native and non-native CRM is whether the candidate journey should be split up into pre and post application or not. Which makes for a better experience?

A non-native CRM breaks the candidate flow into two distinct parts— pre-application and post-application while the non-native CRM covers the pre-application phase through a nurturing system. Once the candidate has applied, their data is transferred to the ATS and funneled through the recruiting process.

This workflow would make sense if the candidate journey was linear. Unfortunately, that typically isn’t the case. Let’s say a sourcer nurtures a candidate in the CRM, processes them through the ATS, but doesn’t make the candidate an offer. Does the relationship end there? It shouldn’t. At this point, the candidate’s information must be transferred back to the third-party CRM.

Anytime there is more than one software solution as part of a recruiting workflow there must be an exchange of data, which can lead to data duplication or misplacement. This effort is worthwhile if you are siloing distinct workflows while providing a better candidate experience, but in this case, the cost outweighs the benefits.

In a general context, when and where a company decides to split the systems has to reflect the workflow or the candidate journey. This is where non-native CRM becomes problematic. The reality is that separating the nurturing process from the application process is a huge headache for recruiters and sourcers, not to mention for candidates as well.

Larger companies may have sourcers working with a CRM and recruiters/hiring managers working with an  ATS, which means sourcers may not know what has happened with candidates that pass into the ATS, causing them to neglect rejected applicants when the demand for future hires arises. For smaller companies, sourcers and recruiters are required to constantly toggle between systems,  and be unable to provide a consistent flow for the candidates as they move through the hiring process.

With native CRM is fully integrated with the applicant tracking system so there is one data flow. That means candidates have a universal profile as they move through the candidate lifecycle, which makes for consistent, updated candidate data for all parties. In addition, sourcers and recruiters can use the marketing tools of the CRM like branded landing pages in the latter half of the hiring process, for great brand consistency.

For recruiters, a quality CRM solution balances effective functionality with strong design that delivers impactful communication and consistent employer branding. While there are multiple third-party CRM solutions available on the market, a native CRM offers seamless integration with your existing workflows that doesn’t compromise candidate experience.

Learn more about SmartCRM with our VP of Product, Rebecca Carr.

SmartRecruiters Hiring Success 18: Product Vision - YouTube

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Today’s job seekers are strongly motivated by autonomy, mastery, and purpose, and recruiters who make these ideas tangible to top candidates stand to win.

Talent acquisition professionals who understand how top talent thinks are in the best possible position to recruit them to their organization. Today’s job candidates have more opportunities than ever before, and while the majority of them are passive, 90 percent are open to discussing new work opportunities.

With the war for talent at a fever pitch, how can recruiters distinguish their company from competitors? Exceptional hiring teams are beginning to think like marketers, and treating candidates like their customers. To that end, TA professionals are packing job opportunities in a way that puts more focus on candidates’ wants and needs.

Once the money is off the table, candidates are mainly interested in the type of work they will do, the impact it will have, and how it fits into the company’s overall mission. Keeping these factors in mind, recruiters must then frame discussions about new work opportunities around them.

Here’s how to discuss three selling points recruiters often miss in a way that resonates with today’s high-quality talent.

1. The Position

Sure, outlining the role’s responsibilities and expectations feels like a given, but positioning the role in a larger context than the day-to-day grind will help make any position become more attractive to candidates. Explain how the job makes an impact on the company, or potentially the industry as a whole, choosing to focus on purpose rather than compensation or benefits during the first few conversations.

Salary is often the single most deciding factor for candidates to switch jobs, but research suggests greater income brings more happiness only up to about $75,000 per year before it runs out. We quickly acclimatize to greater income, causing it to lose value, which is why intrinsic motivators like company fit and career growth opportunities are crucial.

2. The Company

Candidates want to see culture in action. Think about all the ways your Employer Branding is showcased across different channels. Does your company career page still have stock photos? Over half of all candidates look at company websites for their first line of research before applying, so including photos and video of actual employees sharing their experiences are powerful content. Does your organization’s social media presence and email messaging align with the values that you want to promote? How is the work-life balance among employees? Do the candidate’s interests align with the company’s values?

Top talent often has more than one offer to consider, so recruiters need to demonstrate what makes their company unique from competitors. As brand ambassadors, recruiters are tasked with explaining the company’s mission and vision in a compelling way, so they need to not only have a thorough understanding of what makes the organization’s core product or service it’s strongest selling point, but also how the candidate can directly impact it.

3. Career Growth

Flat hierarchies, project-based work, and the constant demand for new skills have caused many to rethink the traditional career ladder concept, but career growth remains one of the top three reasons why candidates accept offers. What’s more, over 56 percent of candidates choose to stay with their current employers because of opportunities to challenge or improve their skills.

For candidates, a job offer might be a huge life decision, so it’s crucial that they understand the the company structure, and know how to locate the services and resources available to them for advancement. Giving new hires the opportunity for growth demonstrates that you want them to succeed in your organization.

Recruiters are increasingly turning to technology solutions to automate certain steps of the hiring process, freeing them up to spend more time on “human” functions like understanding what motivates candidates. When approaching candidates with work opportunities, it’s important that recruiters frame their discussions about the role, its responsibilities, the company, and the candidate’s future around their wants and needs. Not only does this give candidates the best possible experience, but it is the best way to set them up for success.

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Three HR experts from global organizations dispel 4 common career pathing myths that will allow you to attract—and more importantly—retain new talent.

With unemployment at a 17-year low of 4.1 percent, and baby-boomers retiring at a rate of one every nine seconds, the US faces a potential worker shortage of 8.2 million from 2017-2027. It comes as no surprise, then, that 27 percent of organizations in North America spent more on learning and development (L&D) in 2017  than in the year previous. These businesses recognize that upskilling and developing employees will hold them over in times of talent scarcity, and create a culture of continuous learning that wards off stagnation.

However, it’s not just companies who benefits, as workers increasingly desire clear paths to success. CNBC recently reported the top five things millennials (now the majority of the workforce) desire when they start a new job are

  1. Sufficient training — 40 percent
  2. Clear goals and expectations — 31 percent
  3. Given all the information needed to do the job — 30 percent
  4. Reasonable goals and timelines — 26 percent
  5. Leaders are invested in employee success — 23 percent

This means having an internal structure for career development isn’t just a retention tactic, but a recruiting selling point for attracting top candidates.

Career development is different for everyone, especially in the modern age of work-experimentation. Flat hierarchies, project-based work, and the constant demand for new skills have caused us to rethink the traditional career ladder concept, but that doesn’t mean we’re throwing it all out the window.

To better understand what has changed, and what hasn’t, we take a trip back to Hiring Success 18 EU, to the session Internal Career Pathing, where HR experts Hillary Klassen of Career Ari, Laura Moreno Salinas of Zattoo (formerly Native Instruments), and Sanam Moayedi-Stummer of Coca-Cola European Partners share their experiences with employee advancement programs to identify four misconceptions about advancement at your company to get them on board and keep them onboard.

  1. Career development doesn’t need to be discussed right away.

Many people wouldn’t think to detail advancement strategy with a new hire, but Hillary says “career pathing conversations need to happen within the first week, that way you know what you need to achieve to get to where you want to go.” Giving new hires the opportunity for growth immediately lets them know there’s room to explore at your organization, and that you want them to succeed.

  1. Advancement is all the employee – you want it? Go get it.

“On your first day, you don’t even know where the fire exits are, let alone what career pathing should look like at this new company.” Says Laura. “You need to be grown into making these development decisions.” Employee advancement is a shared endeavor. Companies bear most of the responsibility towards the beginning of a new employee’s career by making opportunities and resources available to them, and highlighting which department leaders are readily accessible. In time, employees should start to gradually take on more ownership as they gain experience at the organization.

  1. You have to be able to manage people in order to advance.

In highly technical jobs like engineering, the idea that a person must be good at managing people in order to advance is falling by the wayside. Now, companies are offering an alternative to the traditional track of “people development” in the form of “expert development”, which puts the focus on advancing in a particular discipline as opposed to climbing the company ladder. “Engineers especially need opportunities to grow where they don’t have to become people leaders.” Says Laura. “Not everyone is good at that, or even wants to be good at that and they need to have an equal opportunity to advance.”

  1. The career ladder is dead.

The career ladder isn’t dead according to Sanam, it just looks different than it once did. “I like to think of the career ladder as more of a house.” She says, “you climb up to one floor, explore there, learn new things, then maybe you see a door and that’s the next step for you.” The system of advancement isn’t strictly vertical anymore, people explore laterally as well. This freedom of movement is crucial to business agility and should be viewed as valuable.

Watch the full session now!

Internal Career Pathing - YouTube

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Employee onboarding has come a long way from watching DVDs in the company break room. Here are five ways to use learning management systems to provide a more positive, engaging, and fun experience for recent hires. 

New hire onboarding is a make-or-break moment in the employment cycle. This process helps employees develop their first impressions of their new workplace, their resources, and even their advancement opportunities.

And if it seems like their needs will not be met, they have no problem leaving. In fact, 17 percent of new hires quit within their first three months on the job. Considering the importance of successful new hire orientation, it’s surprising that only 32.6 percent of US employees say they are satisfied with their employers’ training programs.

The solution is pretty obvious: We need to find ways to improve our onboarding eLearning. An onboarding learning management system brings new employees up to speed while immersing them in your corporate culture. An LMS can handle the heavy lifting of orientation because it’s easier to deploy—it can also simplify employee development and monitoring.

These platforms enable companies to stay ahead of the competition and retain top talent. More importantly, new hires develop skills and fill gaps on their own terms, improving their satisfaction and productivity.

Good Training Gets Better

A well-built LMS definitely makes an impression with new hires. One HR manager I worked closely with heard rave reviews regarding her company’s LMS from a new hire. This new team member praised the system’s personalized resources and accessibility, noting it was a far cry from DVDs in the break room.

This speaks volumes about the role that an LMS can play in online onboarding. And the process only gets better when you enhance it with a gamified learning platform. Learning management system gamification provides training that truly motivates employees to keep going. It can transform otherwise boring company policy and compliance protocols into an engaging experience.

Additionally, game-based learning allows employees to gather the skills and knowledge they need to complete job-related tasks while having some fun along the way. They might be so eager to earn the next badge in their virtual display case that they actually go out of their way to learn more about a subject relevant to their job.

Not only is gamified learning more appealing, but it also makes it a breeze to track individual performance and participation. This real-time tracking enables managers to easily identify employees’ strengths and opportunities for growth, which makes annual reviews a more productive conversation. In short, new team members gain more knowledge during online onboarding, and your organization gets better production from its fresh talent.

5 Keys to Successfully Gamify Onboarding

Given the numerous benefits, a gamified learning platform seems like a smart move for companies in any industry. But before you pull the trigger and launch your new platform, follow these five LMS best practices to get the most bang for your buck:

1. Focus on behaviors and practical benefits. New hires are at a crucial stage of the employment cycle, so LMS games should guide learners to the information they need while reinforcing favorable behaviors. New employees should only advance to the next level after they have shown they have the necessary skills. Meanwhile, your game strategy and eLearning course design should demonstrate how learners can translate talents and knowledge gained from online training into the workplace.

2. Choose the right rewards for each task. Your onboarding game mechanics and rewards must suit employee preferences and needs, but they should also address your objectives and desired outcomes. For instance, badges are best for more involved accomplishments or working toward long-term goals. Alternatively, leaderboards tap into our competitive nature and fuel social interactivity. Use each feature accordingly. Consider how companies like Spotify and LivingSocial used constant performance feedback to entice 90 percent of employees to embrace a gamified review process.

3. Tap into intrinsic motivation. The goal of LMS gamification is to encourage the professional growth of your team members. A desire for public recognition might get employees engaged initially, but intrinsic motivation will keep them going. When employees notice that your gamified courses are improving their skills, it increases their confidence and their investment in your eLearning program. For example, LiveOps saw 23 percent better performance from employees who used its training app, which garnered 80 percent participation.

4. Keep competition light and productive. Competition can be a great motivator, but things quickly go downhill if it creates a hostile environment. New employees already feel apprehensive during their first days on the job, so keep the competition friendly and focused. In fact, your game narrative should support your company’s goals and help each employee see his or her role in the bigger picture. This makes the competition and your onboarding process more productive; team members experience a supportive community instead of feeling pitted against their peers.

5. Set clear ground rules. Be as clear as possible about your expectations. Let new hires know how they can earn points or badges, as well as what’s in it for them. Do they get a ticket to an exclusive training webinar? Do they unlock an online resource library? Be sure to emphasize intrinsic motivators: Explain how earning a sales skills badge demonstrates their mastery of the fine art of persuasion. Get early buy-in with your gamified online training program to ensure sustained employee participation.

Make no mistake: Using gamification for new employee training requires a robust LMS. It should have a strong focus on social learning and reporting. Most importantly, it should support your unique goals. Determine your desired outcomes ahead of time, and use that insight to find a gamified learning platform that keeps employees engaged and fosters professional growth.

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