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When should you explain to your kids about the hazards of fire and how to prevent it? Explain what the biggest fire dangers are? Discuss how to protect your family and friends from a fire?

When most people think about fire emergencies, they don’t think it is something they will need to deal with in their lifetime. However in reality, if fire protection is not taken seriously, the consequences can be very painful. Fire not only takes property, it takes lives.

Fire safety is important for everyone, particularly those with kids and the majority of fire accidents are preventable. Here, we share tips on how to prevent this growing danger to protect your family and loved ones.  

 1.What are the biggest fire dangers? The most common household fire accidents result from an unattended fire source. Take note of the following in order to avoid a household fire:

  • Don’t leave cooking unattended
  • Matches and lighters should be stored in a secure place away from small hands
  • Don’t use extension cords for heaters – this will help prevent high voltage incidents
  • Keep cables clear of any debris. Don’t hide them under carpets or rugs
  • Get your gas and electric appliances serviced annually
  • Don’t use tea lights on plastic surfaces – use an appropriate candle holder
  • Never leave candles unattended. Make sure they are completely out when leaving the house or before going to bed 
  • Ensure doors close properly within the door frame
  • Keep fabrics and furniture at least one metre away from heaters
  • Use a fire guard when children are around
  • Never dry clothing on top of a fire guard
  1. Kids think fire is fun

For a child, fire is appealing because it is mysterious and fun. Children associate fire with excitement such as the thrill of candles on a birthday cake, fireworks and sparklers on New Years Eve, barbeques, etc. They tend to try to replicate what they have seen either when alone or with other children, which can result in fatal accidents.

Explain the risks of fire to your child. Even if they are not completely capable of understanding everything you say, if part of the message gets through, it could play a part in saving your child’s life from as young as 6 years old.

To make it appealing to your child, turn the message of fire safety into a game. For example, if your child finds an unattended lighter or matches and brings it to the attention of a parent, reward him or her for doing so.

  1. Explain the dangers of fire – give examples

It’s very important to speak to your child about fire safety. Explain how fast fire can spread throughout the house and how difficult it is to stop. Offer real life examples and explain the potential life-threatening consequences.

Outline exactly how to act in a fire emergency. For example, if there is something burning in a room and smoke is present, advise your child that it’s dangerous to hide under a bed or in a wardrobe. Adults should teach children to call the emergency services, escape from the room and call an adult for help in this situation. It is imperative that children are able to recognise potential fire dangers and how to prevent them under the guidance of an adult.

Remember to lead by example as kids are constantly observing and imitating their parents. Before you leave your house, double check if the stove is off, the door of the fireplace is closed and the iron is cold and put away safely, etc while your child is present. Eventually, all of these lessons will form part of your child’s good habits.

Again, the learning process can be turned into a fun game or activity. Practice stop, drop and roll with your child. Role play a scenario where someone is caught in a  fire, then immediately do the stop, drop and roll to demonstrate how your child should react in a similar situation. Drop a blanket to indicate that fire is trapped. An activity like this can be really fun if you involve other family members and will make it easy to remember in a similar real-life scenario  

  1.  Rehearse an evacuation plan with your children

Plan an evacuation route from your house in case of a fire and practice it with your family. Turn it into a family game and explore the best escape route from every room. Ask your child: What would you do in a fire emergency?” “ Which door or window would you use?” “Where is the family meeting point?” Plan it and do it!

Teach your child how to crawl on the floor and explain that it is better not to open a door if it is hot. Ensure your child knows how to open the nearest window in case of fire and knows how to dial 999.

  1. Check smoke alarms

Test your smoke alarms at least once every two months. Identify dead batteries and replace them. Smoke detectors should be placed 10 feet from the kitchen and an alarm system should be inside every bedroom. Usually smoke alarms last a decade – it is highly recommended to replace them it after 10 years.

If you want to learn more about fire safety please visit Siren Training website.

The post 5 Tips for Children’s Fire Safety appeared first on Siren Training.

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The First Aid course was a good mix of practical and more knowledge-based learning.
Siren training is really good at what we do. There is no denying our high review links on both Facebook and Google. Usually, we would refer all feedback to these platforms but this was a particular case where the individual attendee booked a 3 day First Aid at Work course for the sole purpose of upskilling himself to better his own qualifications and the lives of others in his life. 
“I did the 3-day First Aid at Work course at 18. The younger it is done, the earlier you will have the knowledge needed to save lives, which is a huge plus. First Aid training is, in my opinion, a necessary life skill that everyone should have. Sadly, here in the UK, it does not get the attention it needs.  
The First Aid course was a good mix of practical and more knowledge-based learning. I was not expecting such a comprehensive course, but I was pleasantly surprised by the comprehensiveness of this First Aid course and the practical elements in particular. 
For someone who never liked school and did not go on to further study, I really enjoyed the course. All the scenarios that we practised and all the hands-on learning made it easy to understand. As in-depth as it was, it most certainly was not boring. Not to mention this is probably one of the best qualifications to have on my CV. Additionally, the First Aid course was also a huge confidence booster for me! With this course under my belt, I feel far more employable in any industry.
Siren is a great First Aid training company and both of my trainers were very knowledgeable teachers, and very friendly. I never felt pressured and they were happy to answer any questions I had. 
Now that I have done the course I feel a lot more confident and comfortable knowing the variety of situations I can now deal with. First Aid isn’t as complex as you may think. Anyone could learn it and it is definitely something I think everybody should know. Thank you to everyone who made this great course happen!”

The post Recent 18 year old attendee feedback from a First Aid course appeared first on Siren Training.

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It’s that time of year!! Coughs, colds, high temperatures seem to be part of winter…

A high temperature also called a fever, is very common in children. The little one will:

  •            feel hotter than usual on their forehead, back or stomach
  •            feel sweaty and clammy
  •            have flushed ( red) cheeks

The First Aid first step is to take their temperature using a thermometer. Currently, the forehead ones are not recommended as that can be inaccurate.

Use under the arm as seen below.

In the under 5’s, if their temperature is 38C ( 100.4F) then there is a high likelihood they have a fever.

When children have a fever, they will need to drink plenty of water, DO offer drinks regularly. If you are breastfeeding, DO offer plenty of feeds.  They may be off their food, in the same way, we as adults go off food if we are not feeling well. This is ok, offer food if they want some but there is no need to force them. Just keep encouraging them to drink.

  • DO NOT send them to school if they have a fever, and at night DO be sure to check on them. You are checking they have not got any worse in any way, and you may find they need more painkiller as long as they have not exceeded the dose.
  • DO NOT SPONGE THAM WITH COLD OR TEPID WATER. It doesn’t help.
  • DO NOT WRAP THEM IN EXTRA CLOTHES OR BLANKETS. They are too hot already and wrapping them makes them hotter which could be dangerous.
  • DO keep them in some clothes but dress them to help them keep cool, a baby who is hot may be comfortable in their vest for example.
  • DO give paracetamol or ibuprofen – but NOT together at the same time. If you find the little one is distressed before the next dose is due, you can try the other medicine but if neither help, you MUST seek medical advice.
  • DO NOT keep switching between medicines unless a medical professional advises you too. ALWAYS READ THE LEAFLET THAT COMES WITH MEDICINE AND FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS.

When should you call a doctor? 

  • If you are worried – YES. Trust your instinct and do not be afraid to insist on a second opinion- you know the child best.
  • If they are less than 6 months old and have a temperature of 38C ( 101F) or higher
  • If you see a red rash that you can still see through a glass that you press on the rash
  • If they have a seizure ( also called a convulsion or fit)
  • If they cry and cry and you cannot distract them or comfort them
  • If the cry sounds unusual to you- it may high pitch for example
  • If they have had the fever for more than 3 days
  • If they are becoming more unwell- getting worse
  • If they show signs that they are dehydrated – Dehydration can come on very quickly with the under 5’s, it could become serious. If you notice any of the above, YOU MUST GO TO YOUR GP URGENTLY.
    • very drowsy
    • Fast breathing
    • The soft spot ( fontanelle)on the babies head has sunk in
    • Dry nappies – or dark yellow pee
    • Dry mouth and lips
    • Cold and blotchy hands and feet
    • No tears

Children can be playing in the morning and be very unwell by the evening. Their health can change very quickly. In the next blog, we will discuss more signs of serious illness and the First Aid actions to follow to ensure their health.

Siren Training offer paediatric first aid courses that give confidence to parents, aunties, uncles, grandparents, professional child carers, babysitters- everyone! Please contact us to arrange a course for you, your family or staff.

The post Baby Temperature – Do’s and do not’s – When to take action appeared first on Siren Training.

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Siren Training by Duray Pretorius - 5M ago

It’s the moment everyone dreads. That pavement that looked wet turned out to be black ice. And so now it’s a battle against gravity. Your limbs move in different directions, making you look like a poor Bruce Lee tribute and suddenly become aware that your feet are level with your eyes and it’s as if time stands still. There’s that moment when you seem to hang in mid air and then like Wiley Coyote your eyes stay in mid air as the body falls towards the ground. But, of course rather than lie still you bounce up like you hit an invisible trampoline and pretend you meant to do it and everything’s fine. The trouble is the next day you are black and blue! And worse still your kids have posted the video on social media and you are an internet sensation!

That’s the problem with falls, the adrenaline kicks in, fake push ups begin  and combined with embarrassment you don’t perhaps think of the damage you could have done falling or sometimes getting up afterwards.

So, here’s a quick guide to help you to work out how bad a fall is and whether someone needs hospital treatment after a fall. A First Aiders guide to a fall.

  1. First, don’t be too quick to help someone up or get up yourself. That’s sounds cruel but you need a moment to work out if you are hurt. Keep still and just get yourself together. Can you feel you fingers and toes? Do you have tingling in them? This could be a sign of serious back injury.

If you are helping some one after a fall here’s a quick check you can do.

  1. Ask them if they have pain anywhere. As you talk to them check their face for bruising. A serious head injury can often be seen by bruising under the eyes or behind the ears. It doesn’t just mean a blow to the face.
  2. Ask if it hurts when they breathe, before they get up ask them to take a couple of deep breaths. Pain whilst breathing might be a bruise but could be damage to the ribs.
  3. Now be discreet about this one, if someone has wet themselves after a fall this could indicate a potential spinal injury. If they have it is also worth looking to see if one leg is longer than the other. This is a way we can tell if the pelvis is damaged.
  4. If limbs are at unusual and normally impossible angle then we will assume a fracture. You can learn more on how to deal with fractures on any of our First Aid courses in London.

If the answer is yes to any of these checks, according to one of our best London First Aid course instructors, encourage the patient to keep in the position they landed and call 999 for assistance.

After the fall, here’s a little thing to keep an eye on, bruises usually heal and change colour after two weeks. If a bruise after a fall hasn’t started to change colour or shrink after a couple of weeks its usually best to seek professional advice.

Fortunately, most falls are not so serious, it’s a brush down and afternoon of watching CBeebies to put us back together. But hopefully this quick guide can help you to look after yourself and others this winter when the bad weather comes. Oh and one more thing, check the kids phones so you don’t go viral!

The post A First Aiders guide to a fall appeared first on Siren Training.

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Here is an expert advice choosing the first aid course or if you just want to know something more about life saving skills. Mat Walters is the founder of Siren Training here is his thoughts about first aid courses. 

What are first aid courses like?

A first aid course is not only very interesting and relevant to everyone, it’s also very enjoyable. Although the subject is a serious one, the course itself can be a great team-bonding day. It’s certainly not a ‘death by powerpoint’ kind of day.

People get to work together on common practical first aid scenarios that will empower individuals to step in to help in real-life, if needed.

Are first aid courses hard?

As long as learners participate and get fully involved in the course, there is no reason why anyone would find it too hard. Yes, people have different abilities and strengths, but a good first aid instructor can use many different methods of assessing competency.

Verbal questioning, written questioning, group work, manuals, videos and practical elements mean that most people get the opportunity to gain the skills required. Some people do fail the course but most companies offer a free re-sit course.

Who must have first aid certification?

A first aid course is an invaluable life-skill that everyone would benefit from. Most people sit on a first aid course as part of a workplace requirement, but most of us spend time with family and friends each day. Learning life-saving skills and gaining important knowledge of first aid is open to everyone.


The Health & Safety Executive (HSE) highly recommends that every workplace has provisions in place to be able to deal with an emergency.

Most common workplaces that require first aid trained staff:

  • Sports Industry
  • Hotels and Hospitality
  • Office Environments
  • Construction
  • Manufacturing
  • School Teachers
  • Nannies / Childcarers

What age is the best to start your first aid courses?

Technically, you cannot gain a first aid qualification until you’re 16. However, there is no reason why young adults and children can’t sit on shorter, introductory courses and gain a basic understanding of first aid.

Many schools run bespoke courses from year 7 and upwards. Not only do they gain the knowledge, but it also encourages youngsters to enrol on a full first aid course in the future.

You haven’t taken a first aid course, your friend is not breathing, you’ve called 999 but responders are 10 minutes away. What should you do?What are some useful things to know for first-aid situations that you’re not taught at a first-aid course?

If you’ve never sat on a first aid course and you find yourself in this situation, it’s important to realise that doing something is better than nothing.

If a casualty has stopped breathing, the cells of their body start to die after only 3 mins. Therefore, waiting around doing nothing isn’t going to help. After checking that it’s safe to do so, the first thing to do (after calling 999) is to shout for help. If you’re in a populated area, the chances are someone in the vicinity will know how to do basic CPR.

Stay on the phone to the operator- they are trained to guide and help in this situation. Place your phone on loud speaker to free up your hands.

Whilst shouting and waiting for help, start doing compression only CPR. Place both hands on the centre of the chest and compress 5-6 cm. Get into a rhythm and aim for 2 per second. Try to keep doing this and shouting for help until the Ambulance arrives.

It could make a huge difference.

Should I take a CPR and first aid certification course online or in person?

First aid is a hands-0n, practical subject, therefore it’s much more beneficial to attend in person for at least 1 day. You will gain far more from demonstrations and practical exercises than you would from an online course. However, there is plenty to be gained in terms of knowledge from an online course.

Where can I find good course about first aid?

There are plenty of options for first aid courses when looking through search engines online.

What is reasonable price for a first aid course?

Anything around £100 for a 1 day course and £200 for a 3 day course is reasonable. Group courses for up to 12 people can be the best option for companies’ and organisations. Group prices can range from £400-£600, which works out much cheaper per person.

How do you choose a first aid training provider?

Make sure that a certificate is issued for 3 years on completion of the course and ask who their awarding body is.

I.e First Aid Industry Body (FAIB), Qualsafe or Highfield. This isn’t essential but first aid training companies’ that have awarding bodies will be getting audited and checked for their performance, so you should get a better quality course.

Siren Training is a dedicated training company that was set up by a group of Firefighters in 2013. Our team have a wealth of knowledge and experience in First Aid Training Courses and Fire Safety. We deliver interesting, enjoyable, lifesaving skills to all sectors and industries. You can choose a course which suits to your needs. We provide paediatric first aid coursesemergency first aid at work course, which includes CPR training. 

Try to find a reputable company that uses real-life emergency service staff as their instructors. They will have far more knowledge and experience and deliver a more interesting course.

The post All you need to know about first aid courses appeared first on Siren Training.

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Here is a short 5 min video of two top tips where our Senior First Aid Trainer, Ash Webber irons out some of the myths around First Aid training and helps you get in the right mindset before sitting on one of our courses.

He offers his two top tips to ensure your get the most from your next first aid course.

Two tips before taking a First Aid course - YouTube

The post Two tips before sitting on your next First Aid course appeared first on Siren Training.

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Siren Training by Duray Pretorius - 5M ago

Well, it’s looking like that barbecue summer has finally arrived after all those years of promise! Along with the barbecues comes the traditional baring of the white legs that haven’t seen daylight in the winter months!

But the dash to turn the white flesh into a rosy pink means often we don’t take the precautions to protect ourselves from the heat of summer. Here are a few things to look out for in the heat of summer and keep safe.

A lot of people get heat stroke and heat exhaustion mixed up. Here’s the difference. When the body core temperature goes up by a couple of degrees, we start to sweat, that’s the way the body attempts to cool us down. So, the very first thing is to take on water to support the loss.

This first stage is what is known as heat exhaustion. It’s when you get very sweaty, but you also feel shivery, often getting stomach cramps and feeling sick.

The first step is to bring the core temperature down, lots of water sipped to rehydrate but also soak towels and drape them over the head of the person to cool them down. Don’t go for fizzy drinks or alcohol. The composition of these drinks, actually makes it is harder for the body to intake the valuable water, so keep it simple, and opt for tap water or a mixture of 50% water and 50% pure fruit juice.

Heat stroke that is the real concern here. A lot of people say they have had this but often it’s mistaken for heat exhaustion. The big difference is that with heat stroke you stop sweating.

Your body recognises that It is losing fluid so stops sweating. The problem is, now there is no way of natural cooling so as the core temperature increases, a severe headache develops and eventually fits, while in severe cases death.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency. If someone is overheating but not sweating call 999. As you wait for the emergency services to arrive follow the steps above for heat exhaustion but continually monitor the person breathing and keep the emergency services up to date.

The main thing is to remember is to keep up the fluids and avoid the heat of the day. And enjoy those barbecues!

If you would like to learn more about heat exhaustion and heat stroke and how to help, attend one of our First Aid courses in London.

The post Heat stroke vs heat exhaustion appeared first on Siren Training.

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On the 18th November 1987 a fire broke out at around 7.30pm in London. Nothing unusual about that you might think, except this was at king’s cross tube station. 100 people were injured, and 31 people lost their lives that night in a fire that may well have been able to be prevented if fire safety measures had been put in place. And it was from that event that we developed the role of the fire marshal. This meant someone was assigned to check and monitor the escape routes and assist in the fire safety evacuation of a building.

The first problem is most don’t respond to a single stimulus. We’ve all done it. You sit there, you discuss it with the person at the next desk, you might even stand up to see if anyone else is moving. Then you settle back down until a fire marshal comes in and tells you to leave. Studies have shown that people need at least a couple of methods of warning. Not just to confirm that’s it’s genuine but also because the next thing that happens is people always leave a building by the route they entered. Which may not be the safest way and often they will pass a fire exit to go the route they know!

Understanding this can help your company to plan a quick safe Fire Evacuation plan. In addition to this regular fire evacuation drills are vital. These should be done every six months. Every employee should have one every 12 months according to the Fire Safety in the Workforce page on the GOV.UK page.  If you have a high staff turnover, you may need to carry them out more often. Whether you tell them about the upcoming Fire Drill is dependent on your Fire Risk assessment. A large majority of Fire injuries result from the evacuation so we would advise telling (at least) the dedicated Fire Marshals of the drill so they can assure the safety of staff.

This drill is the chance to see if you can keep everyone safe. Run it and get someone to time it and observe it. Then review it. If you are not completely happy and are still concerned about your fire safety compliance speak to Siren about how we can help.

But in real evacuation things get more complicated. The lifts are off limits, so we have the problem of how to evacuate someone that can’t get down the stairs. This is when we go for a piece of kit called the Evacuation chair. This chair is like a wheelchair except that it will go downstairs. Now you’re thinking any wheelchair would go down stairs but that’s a terrifying experience for the occupant. Well, these ones different. Using tracks that look like caterpillar tracks on a digger they grip the staircase nosing’s and allow you to control the speed of the descent. It’s an easy bit of kit to use. But very necessary if you have individuals who would pose a risk to others in a regular evacuation drill (ie, have mobility issues).

First, decide who goes in it. Consider not just people who can’t walk easily but those who may struggle in an emergency. Like asthmatics, people with heart conditions, those prone to panic attacks. Then show them the chair, let them see it assembled and demonstrate it.

Allow them to decide if they want to use it. Then consider visitors to the building. Are there regular visitors onsite that may need help in an emergency? How can you let them know? A sign at reception advising them to make any conditions that may require assistance in an emergency is a good idea.

The chair itself is very straightforward, simply pull the seat down, pull up the handles and put the person into the chair in wheelchair mode. You can then push them to the staircase and with a quick change to the position of your hands on the handles the chair will easily descend the flight of stairs.

It is a little scary the first time. Every instinct is reminding you and the person about to trust you with their lives that wheelchairs don’t go downstairs very well, so get a person to talk and reassure the occupant the whole time. It’s the moment you go over the first step, it does take a lot of trust, but remember this chair has been designed to do this job. There are a few models on the market but the chairs all basically do the same. But if you wanted advice contact us for helping to choose the right chair, then let us come and train you in how to use it. Or if you’ve already got one make sure the staff have been shown how to use it. Our courses not only demonstrate the chair but we can also advise and or develop on your evacuation plans and fire safety drills.

The post Fire Safety – Drills, Evacuation plan and Training appeared first on Siren Training.

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Siren Training have partnered up with The Wellness Movement as such you are entitled to 50% off your first mental health talk for your organisation when you book any other activity.

Click here to access a recent talk on Positivity and Self-Belief they carried out at ITV Television Studios for their workforce.

The Wellness Movement are an organisation set up to enhance the corporate lifestyle, environment and culture through fitness, mental health and nutrition services.

Core Services:

Well-being programmes are seen to play an important role in creating a healthy working culture and environment, some of the benefits of a good well-being programme include fewer accidents at work, reduced absenteeism and presenteeism as well as healthier, happier and more productive staff. Saving your organisation time, money and resources.

The Wellness Movement can help you to plan and shape your wellness strategy/events according to your organisation’s goals and objectives and assist in creating a sustainable plan moving forwards.

Their client list includes Santander, British Fashion Council, European Commission and Stella McCartney.

Click here to make an enquiry and one of their representatives will get back to you soon.

The post Siren and The Wellness Movement partner up to provide more for our customers appeared first on Siren Training.

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Dr Frank Pantridge is probably not someone you have heard of, but there’s a strong chance he has changed the course of your family or friends or maybe even yourself. You see this is the cardiologist that is credited with inventing the portable Defibrillator, an AED as it is also known, a device that can save someone whose heart has gone into cardiac arrest. The theory had been tried before this in the 1950s, but it was in 1965 that the very first prehospital Defibrillator was produced, I say portable, but it weighed 70kg, that’s about the weight of a person! Eventually, the team brought the design down in size and now we have the machines we see around our towns and shopping centres. People aren’t sure whether they can use them, whether they will get a shock themselves and the one I hear all the time is what if the casualty doesn’t need a defibrillator. Many fears and concerns about the machines are put aside with a little knowledge, and the results are massive, recent First Aid studies show that simply doing CPR alone gives the patient less than 6% chance of survival, using an AED within three minutes increases the chance of survival dramatically, around 70% chance of success. So why don’t people go for them?

Usually its fear of the unknown. The AED is a powerful piece of kit, it will deliver a shock powerful enough to light a football stadium. It’s around 200 joules of energy. It’s like being punched in the chest by 40 men at the same time. And it stops the heart. Which sounds scary. But the idea is by stopping the heart the pacemakers inside your heart can get control again. It’s kind of like a reset button for the heart, it stops it and allows it to get its regular rhythm again.

But anyone can use them. They are designed for someone that has no knowledge of first aid. We, at Siren First Aid Training, train kids to use them and they find so easy to do! You can find them in public places, supermarkets, railway stations and on walls outside buildings. Don’t smash the box, put your shoe back on and call 999 and they will give you the code to type into the keypad and send a crew out to you as well.

It’s always good to practice, and recent changes has meant that use of AED is included on the 1-day Emergency First Aid at Work course, which is always recommended with an experienced provider like Siren Training but here’s what happens.

  1. Prepare the patient by removing clothing form the upper body. Its bare-chested whether it’s a male or female casualty. If the guy is hairy there’s a razor in the pack, quickly clean the area of hair where the pad fits. A little safety advice here, don’t put the pad over anything metallic such as jewellery, or medical patches, etc. as it can cause burns which is why any clothing and things like bras should be removed before applying pads and is not a good idea to use them in standing water, but I think you kind of knew that already!
  2. Use them for all ages, just follow the directions on the machine and pads. There are pictures on the pads, but its upper right chest and lower left chest, a little to the side. But don’t worry, if you get it wrong the machine will pick it up and advise you to replace the pads in the correct position.

This is where you might worry, what if the casualty doesn’t need that shock, what if the heart isn’t in cardiac arrest? The machine will tell you. You can’t give a shock to a person whose heart is beating normally. The machine won’t fail, it checks itself every 24 hours for faults, the batteries in these things last for a few years and beep to warn you they are getting low. So, what you are using is a machine that’s ultra-safe, ultra-reliable and the one thing that can save this person if their heart is in a crazy rhythm.

So, when the machine says stand clear it’s so it doesn’t read the first aiders heartbeat if they are touching. Then just listen. The AED will direct you from here on. It will keep shocking every two minutes until the heart gets control again. Most machines can deliver around 30 shocks, so you’ll have a crew with you by then to take over the First Aid.

Dr Pantridge had a vision that these machines would be available in public places for people to go to in the event of a cardiac arrest.  Its happening. And its saving lives, lots of lives. If you think your business or setting could benefit staff or your community get in touch and ask for advice on the best unit for you.

So, if someone collapses with a suspected cardiac arrest, get the machine on, it means you don’t have to make difficult medical decisions, this amazing piece of equipment takes control and if you missed something it will tell you, it’s like having your own personal paramedic alongside you.

The post Automatic External Defibrillation (AED) – all you need to know appeared first on Siren Training.

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