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In these days of constant media presence and social hype it sometimes can be quite difficult to remember that the main purpose of a writer is to.. well, write. Some do this by producing quantity, maintaining presence and popularity through continuous product. Others do it a different way. Ted Chiang is one of those following…
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The apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic novel…one of the mainstays of Science Fiction for almost as long as the genre has been around and before, with some consideration given to the Epic of Gilgamesh as an apocalyptic epic. Going forward several centuries, Mary Shelley’s The Last Man (1826) specifies a plague as the cause of humanity’s downfall. Coming up…
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As readers have seen in the previous two books of The Song of the Shattered Sand epic, (Twelve Kings of Sharakai and With Blood Upon the Sand) Çeda’s quest to bring down Kings of Sharakai shows no signs of stopping. Bradley Beaulieu picks up the saga with little break in the timeline in the third…
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What the Wind Brings by Matthew Hughes is a stand-alone, historical novel set in South America during the eighteen century. This story has ships, slaves, arquebuses, swords, jungles, and monks. It also has a good dose of indeginous magic that plays an integral part of the story. This is a story Matthew Hughes has said…
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And so, I get to the last in the Cities in Flight series, an imaginatively written but so far uneven set of novels created by fixing up stories first published between 1950 and 1962. A Clash of Cymbals was published as The Triumph of Time in the US in 1959 and then in an omnibus…
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Waking up after two centuries of cold sleep on a starship with little memory of your last hours, finding the starship devoid of life, and the fact that the starship is an enemy vessel can be disconcerting, especially if you are missing part of your leg. Well that’s the situation in which Sanda Greeve finds…
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Some have noticed (about time too!) that Adrian Tchaikovsky, once mostly recognised for his Fantasy novels such as his Shadows of the Apt series, has been making his presence known in other areas of the genre as well. His winning of a Clarke Award (for Children of Time in 2016, reviewed HERE) has helped. This…
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One of my favourite old movies is When Worlds Collide (1951), directed by George Pal, a movie about Earth being destroyed by a collision with another planet. Reading this novella by Greg Egan reminded me of that movie,* for here Greg gives that old world-in-peril idea a sharp makeover for the 21st century. At first,…
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Time travel, when portrayed effectively, illustrates the drastic consequences of changing a time line or interfering with history. In Time’s Demon, the second installment of D.B Jackson’s Islevale Cycle, the consequence of Tobias Doljan’s jaunt through a dozen plus years have significantly transformed the world. History is not what it was, Tobias will never become…
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As we roll around towards another Summer here at Hobbit Towers, it’s time to pick the now-traditional “Stephen King Summer Read”. I wasn’t exactly sure what I fancied, until Titan Books came to my rescue and sent me a copy of The Colorado Kid for review. To be honest, it grabbed me from the off…
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