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Nicki and Amy have designed this really easy T-shape Sukura Kimono Pattern that was just begging to be made in their gorgeous Japanese Red Poppies cotton lawn.

It is a traditional style kimono with dropped shoulders and bell bottom sleeves and is made using just 5 mostly straight fabric pieces!

Now I’m not great at the mathematical side of sewing so I read over the instructions out loud a few times purely to get the steps into my head as there is a bit of measuring to do at first. But honestly I needn’t have worried, it is SO straightforward. Not daunting at all to just cut by measuring rather than rely on pattern pieces.

The instructions are laid out in clear step by step stages and have pictures too! Other than the neck facing pattern piece (which comes with it) you literally just measure the lengths you need and cut.

Once the main pieces are cut you need 3 pieces of interfacing- for the neckband facing and 2 front panel bands

Iron them on as per instructions to the neckband facing and front edges of panels then snip along the interfacing strips to cut off the front facings

Sew together the 3 interfaced pieces - front panels to the neckband facing. The instructions suggest overlocking the raw edge but my overlocker sometimes doesn’t want to play and this was one of those times! So I pressed under about 5mm and straight stitched it for a neat finish .

Because there are just a few basic pieces once you start sewing the kimono together it comes together so fast! So fast in fact that I forgot to take pictures!

Before I knew it it was almost ready for hemming!

The pictures and really clear instructions definitely make it a nice easy sew! Perfect for beginners right through to confident sewists who can then put their own modifications on it too if desired.

The Sukura kimono comes with instructions for a belt. Nice to make and then you have different options of how you wear it. Great tied as a belt but I used it for a headband too!

A really fab little pattern, everso simple to construct. So happy with the fabric too, gorgeous to sew with! How about adding pom pom trims to make it properly beach worthy! I’m already planning what else I can make- although this is a perfect light cover up in this amazing summer we are having in the UK- I’m already wondering about a velvet version for winter!

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Wedding season is here! And whilst there’s nothing better than watching two people you love get hitched [or drinking champagne all day] finding an outfit that makes you feel like a million bucks and isn’t identical to another guest can be a bit of a pain in the bum!

So here’s some inspiration should you want to take the plunge and make your own outfit! Which I highly recommend because this way you won’t be dressed in the same frock as anyone else.

Style type – Bold

Nothing works better together than a dress with clean lines and a bold print. The long sleeves of the Lexi dress means that it’s suitable if you’re at a church wedding but the bright pink scuba fabric covered with hydrangeas keeps it looking fun and summery! I’d wear it with a bold hat, shoes and bag in black. Another plus is that scuba fabric travels really well so if you’re having to pack a suitcase you know your dress won’t wrinkle!

Style Type – Boho

Okay so it’s a bit of a wild one but hear me out. It’s a casual wedding maybe even on the beach? The bride has flowers in her hair, none of the groomsmen are wearing ties and the whole vibe is just free and easy! You can keep it casual by wearing the Asaka Kimono with a big belt, big shoes and lot of bracelets. The Summer Stork cotton lawn with be nice and light and as a bonus it is definitely something that you can wear again and again! Plus if it’s a destination wedding you can use it as a swim suit cover up later on in the holiday. To look effortlessly cool don’t forget to wear sunglasses though not only will they keep your eyes from straining but they’ll hide any mascara disasters if you start crying during the “I dos”!

Style Type – Semi Formal

This is the typical dress code of weddings in the UK right now and this dress can cover anything from a beach wedding to one in a castle! The Marie dress is such a sweet style that would work with so many different prints but I love this Pastel Roses by Sevenberry because of the gorgeous shades of pink. You could even wear it more than once just by pairing it with different hats, shoes and bags.

Style Type – Shabby Chic/ Garden Party

A lot of brides are opting for the vintage style/tea party weddings now which means you need the perfect tea dress! I love the butterfly sleeves on the Ansa dress and the simple style. The sleeves and the gentle gathers can hide a multitude of sins for the more self-conscious of us and because of the simple lines it’s a great opportunity to showcase a really lovely fabric print! Like this Red and Orange Palm Sunset Crepe. I personally would pick out one of the bolder colours in the print like the purple and match my accessories to that.

Style Type - Casual

Chances are for a casual wedding the couple already knows that they love each other but aren't particularly bothered about actually being “married” They might have a ceremony followed by a dinner at a restaurant or a night in the pub. Or they might just have a really chilled out wedding surrounded by friends and laughter. Either way you’ve got an opportunity to add something to your wardrobe that you’ll get lots of wear from! I think the Kielo wrap dress is such a wardrobe staple, you can dress it up or down and it would even be perfect for a beach wedding! And this animal print jersey knit just screams fun!!!! Plus you can totally party the night away in this dress and if you have too much to drink it’s comfy enough to sleep in too…..Not that we would ever hit the champagne too hard…………

Style Type – Evening Guest Only!

Being an evening guest is actually a bit of a blessing in disguise. For starters you don’t have to get up stupidly early to make sure your hair and make-up are ready for the ceremony, you don’t need to worry about being late to the ceremony [nobody wants to turn up after the bride!]. Plus you can schedule yourself a disco nap in the afternoon so you’re as fresh as a daisy to party the night away! But the main blessing is that you can just wear your party clothes and you don’t need to worry about being covered up for the church/registry office. The Ailakki cross front jump suit can be made up in lots of different fabrics but to stand out from the crowd I’d make it in this bold pink and orange satin stretch crepe and team it with a solid coloured jacket and bag. Sewalicious have a great selection of solid fabrics! Plus in a jumpsuit you can dance the night away without worrying about flashing your pants!

I hope you enjoyed my wedding guest outfits top picks!

Much Love

Frankie

xx

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The Rose Dress is a free pattern the lovely ladies of Sewalicious have designed themselves, it's a great addition to any summer wardrobe and can be made as a top, tunic or dress to suit your personal style. It's also super easy to sew together, looks great and did I mention - it's completely FREE?!

I chose this gorgeous bright and colourful cream viscose jersey called Carnival from their site, it’s got a bold, dark stripe running vertically and is covered in spots and dots making it a really interesting print. It’s really soft too and feels lovely against my skin. The pattern is designed for light to medium weight jersey fabrics so that it can drape well, you could use a thicker jersey but it might not work quite as well in the dress style. It's so simple to cut the pieces out as it's all done to your own measurements and due to the loose style, fitting is easy!

The instructions are very clearly laid out and the steps are super easy to follow. A beginner who has sewn a jersey garment before would be able to tackle this pattern easily, you don't need to be able to sew in a neckband for this, just a few gathering stitches and some straight seams to attach the neckband and side seams is all that's required. I decided to have a go at sewing up a maxi length version, I thought this would look great on holiday for an evening dinner where you might want to cover up a bit more. I held up the fabric to me to roughly gauge the length it needed to be and 140cm was plenty. I cut all the pieces this length and with the neckband piece this took the total amount of fabric required to just over 1.5m. You could easily make it in less if you made the neckband thinner or depending on the length you wanted the dress to be. Initially, I made the dress far too big for me. I shouldn't have used the entire width of the fabric for all the pieces (150cm) - oops! Instead I would recommend measuring around your bust and just doubling this for the front piece and then halve that for each back piece. For example, my fullest bust measurement is 32cm, doubling this gives 64cm so I used this as the width of the front piece and both back pieces together (32cm each). Then gathered the front piece fabric up to the width that I wanted it across my front and I did the same with the back pieces. I would strongly recommend tacking the neckband to the fabric pieces first too! You will then really get a feel for how it is going to fit you and how you want to wear it. So here it is...

You can either have the neckband sitting quite high around your neck like this...

 

and then have the back draping down...

Or, if you allow enough fabric at the straps you could wear it off the shoulder.

The pattern recommends leaving a 15cm length gap for the shoulder straps but I found this too long on me, I ended up using a 10cm length gap. But if you know you want to go for the off the shoulder look, it would be worth measuring around the outside of your shoulder to get this right. Alternatively, if you know you want to wear it higher round your neck, you can make the straps a bit shorter. I also wore a tan waist belt with mine to cinch it in at the waist, but you could easily cut a length of fabric to use as a waist belt in the same fabric too.

The pattern is carefully constructed and cleverly put together to be super-flattering on most body shapes, so why not give it a go?

Overall I am really pleased with this make, I love that it looks kind of Grecian and it's the perfect holiday dress - I can't wait to wear it on a warm summer's evening!

Happy summer sewing,

Holly x

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Today we’re going to try out a summer dress hack with a tried and true pattern – the Deer and Doe Plantain Shirt. If you haven’t sewn up this shirt before you can access it for free on the Deer and Doe website.

Plantain one of my favorite everyday shirts – the cut is really flattering and I love the neckline so why not hack it into a dress?

Well I did just that with this drapey Carnival Viscose Jersey from Sewalicious! This is a bold print but I think is perfect for summertime – it’s fun, festive and bright!

Here’s what you need to do:

  • Get your free copy of the Deer and Doe Plantain Shirt.
  • Measure yourself based on their directions to find the right fit.
  • Once you have cut out your pattern take out your tracing paper (I used medical paper), your drafting rulers, pencil/marker and your measuring tape.
  • Lay the finished front side of the pattern against you in the same position it would be worn.
  • Take note of where the hem lies on the centerfront of your body.
  • Set the pattern aside and using your measuring tape, measure from the hemline point on the centerfront of your body to the length you would like the dress to be – keep the hem allowance in mind as well (you can add 1” to 2” for this depending on your preference). Record this measurement.
  • Next, cut two pieces of tracing paper a little longer than the skirt portion of your dress.
  • Tape the paper to the back of the pattern.
  • Starting with the front piece- from the centerfront hemline of the front pattern measure down in a straight line the measurement you just recorded then measure across at the hem past the side seam of the original pattern.
  • Use your curve form ruler to match the original hip line with the new hemline at the side seam. You can make this as wide as you would like.
  • Repeat for the back pattern then cut out your new pattern.

The end result should look like this:

All that is left is to cut out your fabric, sew, and wear!!

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The beauty and versatility of this pattern and fabric combination really speaks for itself. Annabel chose this lovely blue chambray with aptly named ‘prancing ponies,’ and paired it with the Ikatee Marieke sleeveless playsuit with shoulder ruffles.

This is a new to me pattern company: The French pattern brand Ikatee which have some wonderfully stylish options for kids and adults alike. Sewalicious stock a vast range of the children’s patterns. The Marieke comes with a whopping 15 variations on this single pattern as standard. This is before you begin to imagine the endless possibilities for customization. Combine this with the amount of options available, and the fact that it is for 3-12 years old; it really represents excellent value for money.

I used buttons from one of my sons old school shirts that was beyond repair or donation. (Extra points for sewstainability?!) On the waistband I added a large daisy button from my stash, which really makes this a garment to suit Annabel’s personality. This is in place of the optional drawstring, which is purely decorative, and not functional.

The chambray is lovely and soft for childrens clothes. It has a nice balance between being stable enough to be a dream to cut and sew (therefore ideal for beginners to use) and has enough drape and movement for summer garments. It will lend itself well to tops, skirts, dresses and jumpsuits.

This pattern cannot be faulted for its drafting and sheer style. However, I feel that this was a stretch too far for someone at my sewing level. I have been sewing for nearly 18 months and would put myself at an advanced beginner (early intermediate if I’m being generous). I have a good knowledge of the basics, which are now more intuitive, and need less in the way of handholding from instructions. However, I have never sewn a ‘big 4’ pattern, therefore I am used to quite extensive instructions/diagrams especially when learning new techniques.

This pattern (which I didn’t notice at the time) is categorised as intermediate-difficult which I would definitely agree with! Someone with more advanced sewing skills probably wouldn’t struggle as much as I did.

Some of the wording was confusing for me, and the illustrations quite difficult to interpret. All things considered though, it was nice to have a real ‘go slow’ project, which pushed me to learn new skills.

Was it worth it? Absolutely! Annabel loves the playsuit and I think she looks lovely in it. We just need some more sun now!

I am thinking the Ikatee Corfou pattern in the gorgeous star jersey or fun unicorn print Jersey may well be on the agenda for some essential summer basics.

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My blog post this time coincides with an Instagram sewing challenge that myself and @sarahcsewing have just launched called the Nellie Sewing Challenge.

In my opinion this blush pink Morning Glory cotton lawn is the perfect summery match for this cute pattern! Just calling out to be worn with jeans, or dare I say it, shorts if the sun ever comes out!

I love Republique du Chiffon patterns (as you might have noticed!) and the ruffles of the Nellie are so on trend for 2018.

RdC patterns are admittedly a bit sparse when it comes to instructions but as long as you accept that occasionally you may need to stop and think for a minute you'll be fine!! I think they are so stylish and fun (and actually pretty straightforward when you know what you're doing) that they are well worth the limited instructions!

I’ll try and go through any areas that might benefit from extra hints and tips along the way!

I do also find them quite generous on size. I strongly recommend for you to at least check sizes by measuring the actual pattern pieces against your measurements. Even better, make a quick toile of the main body to make sure it will fit well.

So. The first thing to remember is that seam allowances are NOT included. But for this pattern not all pieces need them. The cutting layout does show which pieces require you to add seam allowances and which don’t. When I trace RdC patterns I always use 2 different colours to show the seam allowances (excuse my messy tracing!)

Start by sewing shoulders together - I used French seams for neatness.

Then you go straight onto preparing the ruffle, sewing the 2 sets of ruffle together at short sides before joining as the pattern instructs. Once trimmed and turned through and pressed, sew 2 rows of gathering stitches along the length of the raw edge. The pattern suggests 0.5cm and 1.5cm but you can easily adjust this if you prefer a narrower ruffle. I used 1cm and 2cm (i.e. sewing between them at 1.5cm seam allowance)

We then attach the facing pieces together and at this point I also turn what will be the raw edge under by 0.5cm, press and stitch to finish the edge rather than later in the process as I found it easier.

Gather the ruffle up as evenly as possible – it’s hard to know how much the first time you make one so all I can suggest is trial and error unfortunately. The only guide I can give you if it is any help that my ruffle measured approx 115cm once gathered before I attached it. Then pin to the front edge of the shirt right sides together starting 2cm up from the bottom of the right front hem and going up and around the neck and back round stopping about 1cm from the shaped corner at the middle of the left front. It doesn't go all the way down both sides like I tried!!!

Sew between the basting lines.

Pin the facing right sides against the ruffle and sew along the same stitching line. Remove basting stitches, then trim and press facing to the back.

Look how neat that already looks!

The pattern suggests top stitching around the outside edge of facing on the seam allowances but personally I thought it neater to finish nearer the ruffle. The facing won't kick out. But this is optional to you.

I used French seams again to sew up the sides.

Pattern pieces are included to make your own bias binding but of course you can always use shop bought if you are short on fabric. (I have since made a Nellie for my daughter and didn't have enough patterned fabric so used a plain white fabric for the facings and bias binding- but with this in mind I did manage to get a size 34 out of just 90cm of fabric!!)

Fold the armhole pieces in half, press and attach to armhole. Turn back, press again, stitch again et voila!

After sewing the hem, I used my fantastic buttonhole spacer to work out the position of the buttonholes- I do love this wee gadget!

All in all, especially after making a second Nellie, I think it’s a really fun summer shirt that is cleverly put together to make a simple quick sew yet looks so effective.

I should add that as with the RdC Suzon there is also a free sleeve add on download if you fancy short, ¾ or even full length sleeves.

I definitely urge you to have a go at this cute summer pattern and I’m so happy with my floral, ruffly, pink, girlie shirt- even more so when the sun finally shines!

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Spring is coming! After months of hiding ourselves away in layers of sweat shirting and boiled wool it’s time to grab some lighter fabrics and explore some clothes that don’t require a layer of thermals underneath!

Let’s start with the big one! Pantone have already said that Ultra Violet is going to be THE colour of 2018! Why not ease yourself into the trend with the Autumn Leaves Jersey Fabric, a combination of purple, navy and white. It would make a perfect transitional piece if you made it up as a Named Clothing Olivia Wrap Dress. Wear it with tights and a cami top on cold rainy days and bare legged for when the sun comes out!

And speaking of rainy days. Summer might be coming but you can guarantee we’ll see a few awful days in between! I suggest making yourself a light jacket to see you through the spring and summer.

The Named clothing Esme maxi cardigan is a hybrid between a coat and a jacket and would look gorgeous in this Ocean Crest Knit fabric. Perfect for snuggling up in during those barbecues that always end up being a lot cooler than you think they’ll be!

Whilst 2017 was all about the midi skirt it’s looking like 2018 will be about the pencil skirt with Net-a-Porter suggesting that it will be a huge trend! Why not put your own spin on the trend by making the Polly Straight Skirt in this bold and beautiful Colour Splash Stretch Cotton fabric. Not only will the skirt make a statement but it will go from day to night beautifully depending on what accessories you wear.

As well as bold florals, it looks like Vintage florals will be making a comeback! Think dreamy and luxurious like Dolce and Gabbana and try the Morning Glory Fabric as a sweet Bettine dress by Tilly and the Buttons. The easy to follow instructions make this a perfect make for sewing beginners or those who want a quick project before their holiday!

If you are worried less about posing on the beach and more about having to start shaving your legs again then have no fear - the tailored trouser is here! They were all over the catwalks but they all had one thing in common, beautiful tailoring and a style that won’t date just like in the Nina Lee Portobello Trouser pattern. The concealed back zip makes this a perfect first trouser pattern as it avoids the tricky fly front insertion!

Use this white and grey herringbone fabric for work trousers or stork surprise for a more fun trouser that you can wear out on the town! Maybe to stroll along the Portobello Road??!

The last trend that’s looking big for this spring is polka dots! To avoid looking like a desperate housewife, keep it simple with monochrome dots and a clean silhouette, something like the Helmi Tunic dress or the Carnaby dress.

Sewalicious has a HUGE collection of polka dots but these are my personal favourites! The white spots on black crepe de chine and the colour spots by seven berry. Okay so technically the coloured spots aren’t monochrome but you’ve got to have a bit of fun haven’t you!!!!

And last but not least why not top off your fabulous handmade outfit with a statement necklace that proudly states “I made this!” Or at least hints heavily at it!

The pin badge would look fantastic on a handmade jacket and the little sewing machine necklace is just too cute to ignore!

But if you’re a fan of a big and bold necklace look no further than the large scissor necklace! It’s a definite talking point and you never know you may find yourself finding some seamstress friends because of it!

Happy Sewing

Frankie
www.knitwits-owls.blogspot.co.uk

xxx

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Being the mum of a tween girl, it isn’t an easy when it comes to choosing clothes. With a girl who has ever increasing opinions on EVERYTHING, we have frequently been at an impasse of what is ok to wear. Bring back the days where the biggest sartorial battle of the day was her wanting to wear a garish princess dress and cat wellies to the supermarket! (Note to former self: choose your battles!)

A particular problem with the tween sect is that a lot of clothes available for age 9+ are designed with teenagers in mind, and therefore often uncomfortably grown up. This is magnified further when the man you have children with is 6’4” and your children are always fitting into clothes at least two years ahead of their age group!

As we all know, sewing our own clothes allows us to choose style and fit. However many pattern designers aimed towards children concentrate on the under 8 group. This often leaves those of us wanting to sew for children (especially boys) over the age of 9 with woefully slim pickings.

Enter indie pattern designer Liesl + co. Their Oliver & S range cater for boys and girls up to 12 years of age. What’s more, they still look like children’s clothes. With careful fabric choices we might just tread that ever thin line of what our children want to wear and what we as parents will allow!

The fabric I chose for the Jersey top is a plain black cotton spandex from Sewalicious. This fabric hits that sweet spot between being thick enough to be stable for easy cutting and sewing, without being so thick that it will be bulky and hot. It has a good amount of stretch and excellent recovery. I used a tracing wheel and carbon paper to preserve the pattern as I plan to make some in other sizes.

For the culottes, I chose the stunning mustard colour medium weight cotton from Dashwood Studios. (Just look at those sausage dogs!) I was pleasantly surprised at how soft and drapey this fabric is while giving perfect structure for the pleats in the culottes. It would also make lovely skirts and dresses. It is an ideal fabric for a beginner to use, as it’s so stable, and behaves itself beautifully under the sewing machine.

I did have to shave some volume from the width at the hem of the culottes as the fabric is only 112cm and the pattern piece doesn’t fully fit. However, the bottoms are so wide that this in no way compromised the look of the garment.

The verdict: A lovely outfit which is playful enough to be suitable for a child, but in choosing black jersey, it instantly gives the style a more grown up feel. The Top would look great with jeans and the pockets would look ace with some of the embroidered patches.

I would definitely recommend the pattern from Liesl & Co, a wide range of which is available from Sewalicious.

Happy sewing! Marie x

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My very good friend and I were given two tickets for the Fashion Week Festival and Catwalk Show by my generous daughter Amy and her business partner Nicki.

We attended on Thursday 22 February and what a fabulous day we had!

The catwalk was set out well and the seating enabled us to have an excellent view of all the fashions and models.

There were three sections:

  • Vintage Vacation
  • New Wave
  • Cyber Sports
Vintage Vacation

This collection featured many fine pleats both in the fabrics and in the design. Patterns, spots and stripes were prominent as were bright colours, some florals and plenty of blue, white and peachy shades. Accessories were large sun hats and bags worn with ankle socks, block heel shoes and sandals. A lot of the garments were feminine and floaty.

New Wave

In this section we saw designs that were more structured, some softened with flounces and others much more angular. Black, white and red was very prominent. Fabrics were often glossy or metallic with some sheers, whilst others were matt and dark. Stripes and spots still featured on some of the garments or the accessories. Shapes varied from very fitted and structured to full, oversized and flouncy. What was very evident was an asymmetrical look on both skirts and trousers, featuring frills and uneven hemlines. Again hats, ankle socks and large sunglasses seemed to be the order for this coming season. I even spotted a 50’s headscarf just like my mum used to wear. A lot of black and white brightened up with red.

Cyber Sports

Neon colours and loose-fitting casual style designs were the order of the day for the Cyber Sports section. Definitely designs based on tracky bottoms and hoodies but with a very visual take. Fabrics varied from soft and drapey to structured and metallic. Lots of ruching, flounces, logos and fastenings used as part of the design. Again, we saw several asymmetrical garments. Plenty of layering too in this section added to the casual look.

Overall it was an exciting peek into tomorrow’s fashions for the new season. It will be very interesting to see how the high street diffuses these initiatives. My take on it I think will be spots and stripes, flounces, large hats, bags and sunglasses. The look I feel will be 50s/50s vintage for a feminine look but still with the casual option of loose-fitting soft sports-style clothes. I guess we’ll just have to wait and see!

GET THE LOOK!

So here are a few suggestions of how we could all recreate the trends we saw on the catwalk using Sewalicious patterns and fabrics:

Named Clothing Ailakki Cross Front Jumpsuit In Cerise Pink Crepe Or Jet Black Double Crepe Fabric

Named Clothing Ansa Butterfly Sleeve Dress In Mediterranean Stripes

Named Clothing Sloane Sweatshirt In Daisy Bloom Cotton Jersey Named Clothing Astrid Wrap Pants In Chambray Dots

Named Clothing Helmi Blouse In Geo Gold By Sevenberry Peg Shorts In Turquoise Batik

Named Clothing Stella Shirt Dress In March Of The Lotus Or Pastel Roses

Nina Lee Bloomsbury Blouse…lengthen Into A Dress! In White Spots On Black Crepe De Chine Or Bubbles Viscose

Named Clothing Helmi Tunic Dress In Cerise Or Black Crepe

Named Clothing Stella Blouse Paired With Tilly & The Buttons Dominique Skirt In Polka Cerise Cotton By Sevenberry

Thanks!

Pauline and Cath xx

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No Pattern Vintage Wrap Blouse

When I first came across the Jiffy blouse DIY (on Pinterest, obviously!) I was beyond intrigued… It is the easiest premise for a blouse ever! And it looks beautiful on the model! The top is basically a rectangle, with a hole in the centre and ties at the hem, so you can wrap it and tie it round your body, easy peasy!

How To:

Step 1. Cut 3 rectangles. A large one at 70cm x 120cm, this will become the base of the top. I also cut two other rectangles at 20cm x 120cm and 5cm x 100cm, these will become the ties for the top. Note - When cutting I didn’t make my top 70cm wide. And ultimately it wasn’t wide enough and this caused problems in Step 10! So, make sure you make it wide enough to go around your body.

Step 2. Next you’re going to fold the large rectangle and along this fold is where you will be cutting the hole for your head. This is your shoulder line basically. I would suggest leaving the back portion slightly longer by about 10cm. You can see in my photos that I made my back and front equal length and it eventually ends up making the back look shorter.

Step 3. Fold this rectangle in half again long ways. If you can imagine it in relation to the garment you are making, it would be folding it along the CF or CB line.

Step 4. On this CF fold I then snipped 2.5cm from the top, and along the neckline fold I snipped 10cm along. I then cut out the area from the snip on the CF to this snip 10cm along the shoulder line, creating a hole for the neckline.

Step 5. Try it on, aka pull this hole over your head, to make sure you have made the neckline big enough. If not fold it again as I have said and cut it slightly bigger. I would suggest making small amendments each time until you get it to fit, as you don’t want to end up with a big gaping neckline.

Step 6. Double fold and hem all around this large rectangle to finish the edges. You can finish the neckline with facing like I have done, or with a double fold. Just whatever is appropriate depending on your fabric.

Step 7. Take one of the smaller rectangles you cut in step one. Fold it in half, right sides facing and stitch closed the ends and along the open edge.

Step 8. Then fold it in half lengthwise and cut.

Step 9. Pull the ends through on each so you have right sides out and press flat. Finish off the open end with a double fold, or by pressing your ends in and topstitching. Whatever you fancy. You will now have two identical strap pieces. Repeat steps 7-9 for the other smaller rectangle. Giving you two large straps and two thinner straps.

Step 10. Attach the thinner straps to the bottom on the front side of your large rectangle and the larger straps to the back side. And you’re done! Pull the hole over your head and tie up your top as I’m showing you above!

As you can see in my images I positioned my straps about halfway up my shirt to try and combat the issue of not cutting it wide enough as I mentioned in step one. I also had to gather my shoulders in to combat this error as it left me with some pointy, odd-looking sleeves!

I made my top up in a lovely 100% cotton fabric from Sewalicious called Sevenberry Spot. I love the fabric- very breathable and nothing better for a spring summer wardrobe!

Thanks for reading lovelies. And let me know if you give this DIY a go!

Lots of Love, Maria xx

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