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Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have discovered that blocking a specific protein, may be a promising strategy to prevent the spread of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).
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Researchers propose a new druggable target that can put a damper on the spread of prostate cancer. Containing the threat at its origin organ greatly increases the survival rates of patients who suffer from the disease.
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Researchers have found that higher levels of aneuploidy lead to much greater lethality among prostate cancer patients. This suggest a mechanism for how some prostate cancers become lethal, and could be used to alert doctors which patients might need to be treated more aggressively.
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A study outlines findings from the largest-ever prospective genomic analysis of advanced prostate cancer tumors. Using comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) to analyze thousands of tumor samples from men with advanced prostate cancers, the researchers identified that 57% of the samples evaluated had genomic characteristics that suggested the tumors were candidates for targeted therapies.
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A single high dose of radiation that can be delivered directly to the tumor within a few minutes is a safe and effective technique for treating men with low-risk prostate cancer.
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Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are decreasing or stabilizing in most parts of the world, with the United States recording the biggest drop in incidence, according to new results.
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Prostate cancer cells change the behavior of other cells around them, including normal cells, by 'spitting out' a protein from their nucleus, new research has found.
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Researchers have shown that selectively destroying cancerous prostate tissue is as effective as complete prostate removal or radiation therapy while preserving more sexual and urinary function than the other treatments.
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Androgens stimulate prostate cancer cells to grow. Many drugs to target that cancer focus on stopping androgen biosynthesis or blocking the androgen receptor, or AR. Researchers have discovered a new function of the AR in prostate cells -- the AR is imported into and localizes to mitochondria of the cell, where it plays a novel role in regulating multiple mitochondrial processes.
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For the first time, scientists have identified compounds found in coffee which may inhibit the growth of prostate cancer. This is a pilot study, carried out on drug-resistant cancer cells in cell culture and in a mouse model; it has not yet been tested in humans.
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