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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films, art, and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
Horror movies in their purest form are meant to illicit fear, but many modern films have begun to blend genres. Horror-Comedy movies are a wonderful example of a genre fusion, but it is also one of the strangest. Unlike horror, comedy many times brings out happiness, although their are dark comedy films that bring out a touch of anxiety as well. The point is, can horror and comedy truly mix in a way that elevates the horror genre, and doesn't just water it down? 
The best way to analyze this question is to examine example films. When we are talking about horror-comedies, we are talking about movies that intentionally infuse comedy into the movie. Unintentional humor generated from horrible acting or poor SFX is not going to be considered for this argument. There is a fluid spectrum when thinking of movies that fit the bill. Films like Zombieland are much more entrenched on the comedy side of the equation. An American Werewolf in London is rooted more on the horror side. The question is, does Zombieland help elevate and publicize the horror genre in a good way. Basically, when people watch Zombieland, do they have a higher level of appreciation or interest in the horror movie genre? 
The most scientific way to analyze this question would be to provide a survey to every single person that watched Zombieland, but unfortunately, we can't accomplish this. What we can state is our opinion, if that means anything. Many people that watched Zombieland were individuals that loved horror films, but also people that find horror movies scary, but were convinced to go because their friends told them it wasn't scary whatsoever. These people may have been enticed to then watch creepier horror films after, but more than likely they got into the depth of the pool they wanted to. It seems to us, that hardcore horror fans will enjoy Zombieland for what it is, but non-horror fans aren't going to suddenly be enticed to become massive horror fans, just because they watched that movie. 
So does Zombieland hurt horror as a whole? Not at all, it just doesn't provide a gateway for new fans to enter. What about a film that is on the scarier side, like An American Werewolf in London? Non-horror fans would definitely be scared of the movie, and hardcore fans will enjoy the film immensely. Does the comedy aspect of the film water down the scares enough to allow non-horror fans to enjoy it? No, simply because the laughs are rooted in the terror itself. Zombieland, Tucker and Dale vs. Evil, and Shaun of the Dead all have comedy that isn't rooted in true terror, instead the fear itself is lightly placed within the comedy. An American Werewolf in London, on the other hand, has dashes of comedy that provide a unique experience for horror fans, rather than providing a film that people scared of horror movies can watch. 
So what does this all mean? It means that the perfect mix between horror and comedy, according to our humble opinion, is impossible. No matter what, it is either fear or comedy that reigns, and which one is on top determines the type of population that watches the movie. The closest film we can find to a perfect mix? The Cabin in the Woods would be a great pick, but that movie was slammed by hardcore horror fans for not being scary enough, and deemed too freaky for non-horror fans.  Does horror-comedy film hurt the horror industry? No, because horror films still generate revenue and have a strong fan base. If ever we approach the day when executives and directors solely create fusions, in order to capture a larger audience, then the horror movie genre is in serious trouble. 
So what do you think? Do you enjoy horror-comedy films? Do you think there can be a perfect mixture of the two? Comment below or shoot us an . 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films, art, and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
If you have investigated our website or know anything about our mission statement, then you know that we love analyzing the horror movie genre with statistics and linear regressions. When we watch a horror film, we don't only review it, but we also check the scores provided by websites such as Rotten Tomatoes and IMDB. We can then analyze a particular film and determine how it is viewed by critics and the generic audience. Furthermore, with these metrics, we can analyze different decades. With this in mind, which decade or time period had the greatest horror films? 
In order to keep the statistics as pure as possible, we are going to eliminate any time periods that do not have enough films reviewed. This will make sure that outliers aren't taken into account, which could result in a decade receiving skewed praise or hate. When we do investigate our ratings and the ratings of other critics and movie-goers, we find that the 70's consists of the best horror films overall. Before 1970, the average rating is higher, but we have also taken into account fewer films. When we weight that variable, we find that the 70's is the best horror film decade. 
What makes the 70's so amazing? Just check out the top 5 movies from that time period...
1. Jaws
2. The Exorcist
3. Alien
4. Halloween
5. Invasion of the Body Snatchers
That is a seriously powerful set of films. Of course, every decade has amazing films, even the weakest decades. What really makes the 70's so amazing is not how top heavy it is, but rather how balanced it is throughout. The 9th best horror movie we have in the 70's is Suspiria. How about the 90's? Scream 2. This isn't to say that Scream 2 is a bad movie because it isn't, but it shows just how strong the 70's were.
Many people may be curious about the worst decade for horror films. If you guessed the 2010's, you are correct. The average for this decade is 5.32 out of 10. The 1970's has an average over 7 (7.32). What does this mean? Basically, if you randomly picked a horror movie to watch in this decade, you can expect it to be very average. In the 1970's, you could randomly pick a movie and you could expect it to be a 7 out of 10, which is very high. Are there other factors that could be influencing all of these statistics? Nostalgia plays a major part in all reviewing. While we attempt to find as many original review scores as possible, this can be a very difficult task. It is possible that people just look at older movies through a biased lens, but we do attempt to avoid this issue by weighing scores differently. What about these last couple of years? It is true, we are currently experiencing a renaissance of sorts when it comes to horror movies. In order for that to change the path of the horror genre, there needs to be sustained success, not just a flash in the pan. 
So what do you think? Do you believe that the 70's is the best decade for horror movies? Do you think modern horror films are just as great as they were back in the day? Let us know
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films, art, and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
There are many horror movies out there that are loved and adored by the population, for reasons we aren't sure of. Here is a list of horror films that we feel are completely overrated. With that being said, this is a personal list that compares aggregated scores from websites (Rotten Tomatoes, IMDB, etc.) and our own scores for the movie. Don't agree with a particular film or the entire list? Make sure to hit us up on social media, , or comment below. 
1. Child's Play
Is Child's Play a "fun" movie? Yes, it is...but is it scary whatsoever? No. The 80's was rife with amazing horror movies that were both exciting and scary, yet Child's Play completely lacked the scare factor. For us, the ridiculous storyline really hampered the level of scares the movie could have. We understand Chucky himself is a cult icon, but if you think back on the movie...was it really that good? 
2. [REC]
Was [REC] a bad POV movie? No, but it had such a muddled storyline, and a lack of emotional attachment, that we couldn't really enjoy this movie. It is tough to be scared for individuals that you don't have any concern for, and that is the issue we ran into with [REC]. It is adored by many for its whirlwind feeling. In fact, it is a bit like Blair Witch Project, but on crack. The issue really harks back to the fact that we couldn't feel grounded in the storyline, ergo resulting in a lack of sympathy for any of the characters. 
3. The Return of the Living Dead
We get why people love this movie, but we really didn't enjoy it. There is a lack of scares, with an emphasis on humor and commentary on the zombie sub-genre. The issue is, the humor isn't funny, which results in a pretty boring genre-bending film. This movie does create a great discussion about the importance, or lack of importance, of horror-comedy films. Do they help the genre? Or do they just water it down? 
4. Halloween (2007)
Was Halloween (2007) universally adored? No, in fact, it received pretty average reviews. The problem is, we don't think this movie was slammed hard enough. Rob Zombie attempted to add his own spin to the franchise, but we think that the creation of a lengthy backstory was a huge mistake. What makes Michael Myers so terrifying is the vague history, not sentiment and emotion. Furthermore, the addition of copious amounts of rock music and a lot of sexually charged moments resulted in a film that was neither completely unique nor an homage to the original. 
5. Halloween II (2009)
Excessive raunchiness, an unlikable protagonist, and strange dream plots don't bode well for a good movie. Halloween II turned a really bad Halloween (2007) into something even worse. If you liked the first remake, it's possible you liked the second, but we have a hard time understanding why people would enjoy either of Zombie's remakes unless they just have a strong love for the man in general. 
6. Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters
Believe it or not, this movie was really marketed as a horror-action blend. The result was a horrible film that wasn't scary whatsoever and had moments of unintentional humor. With all that is wrong with this film, it still was received decently well by the audience, which is just mind-blowing. You can argue that Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters is everything that is wrong with the horror genre today. A quick cash grab that relies on SFX. 
7. Saw III
We aren't in love with the Saw franchise to begin with, but Saw III represents the glutinous nature of Hollywood. This movie is the perfect example of drawing water from the well one too many times. Yet, despite the fact that this movie really isn't good and is exactly like the previous films, the audience seemed to enjoy it. This movie is a great example of the discrepancy between critic and audience scores that happen with many horror films. With a 10 million dollar budget, Saw III generated over $150,000,000 in revenue. Sad times we live in...sad times...
8. Event Horizon 
We get the allure of Event Horizon. Great actors, cool gore, and an overall fun premise. We just feel like this movie pokes fun at what horror really should be. Event Horizon is a cult classic for a reason, and that reason isn't for the fear factor, but rather for the special effects and humor. Maybe we are acting too stuffy, but we prefer our horror movies to generate real fear that makes us scared for weeks after watching it, not ones that are famous for all the wrong reasons.
9. The Eye (2002)
We love Asian horror movies, but The Eye falls flat for us. Painfully slow and many times boring, The Eye doesn't hold a candle to great horror movies such as Audition, Ju-On, or Ringu. This movie isn't as well known in the western world, so if you are a huge fan of Asian horror films, then we still recommend you check this one out. Try to lower your expectation when watching this movie though, which naturally is a bad sign for a film. 
10. The Changeling (1980)
Our number 10 pick may be one of the most controversial on this list. The Changeling is a classic that is great for people being introduced to the genre, but it has a serious lack of fear. When watching this movie, we were regularly bored and when we were in tune to what was going on, it was more due to the sleuth nature of the film, not its horror tendencies. As time has passed, this movie has just become slower and has turned into a "classic" in all the wrong ways. If you are a fan of horror movie history and want to watch a popular movie, then this is one to watch. Still, this movie plays like something that was created in the 1920's, rather than in 1980. 
Well, there you have it. Do you agree with our list of overrated horror movies? Naturally, lists like these are going to create discussion. Can we be convinced that some of the movies on this list are better than we first thought? Of course! State your case on social media or hit us up on . We love an open conversation that results in long lasting horror friendships.
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films, art, and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
Art is such a powerful medium, that it is no wonder it has been used in an attempt to understand difficult philosophical topics such as religion and death. Photography, specifically, can add a layer of realism that forces the mind to truly see the image in front of them, not just the poses and figures, but rather the message that is being sent. The work of Joel-Peter Witkin beautifully, and morbidly, analyzes death, religion, and the discriminated, many times in one piece of art. 
What makes his work so powerful? Joel-Peter Witkin lived a unique life that involved a mix of religion (Judaism and Catholicism) and death. His parents regularly argued about faith and Joel-Peter witnessed death as a small kid, when he saw a horrible car accident result in the decapitation of a small girl. Could this one incident, along with constant discussion about religion, result in the rise of an amazing artist? That question is difficult to answer, but there is no denying that the artist's desire to show and express death as something more than just decay, and as something strangely beautiful, can be rooted to his memories as a child. 
Woman With Severed Head (1982), is a wonderful example of the artist's mixture of death, religion, and even the marginalized. The woman is front and center, with both the decapitated head and her breasts as focal points. The eyes are also drawn to the face, which has a veil covering it. Joel-Peter Witkin would manipulate his photographs heavily, and this can be seen both on the face and the background of the photograph. The female appears sullen in nature, and the black adds to the emotion of sadness or mourning. The decapitated head looks peaceful as if being held by his mother, almost a return to birth or being a baby. The image appears religious in nature, with the female figure regally positioned such as Madonna or the Virgin Mary would be. The bare breasts, along with the older head, juxtaposes birth and breast-feeding with death. The female lead also appears to have two cone-shaped hands/arms for appendages. The artist regularly depicted the marginalized and "different". People with unique body types, that many times are discriminated against, were the highlight of his work, which made a statement not just about the power of the marginalized, but also the power of an individual willing to have what many people view as their negatives, photographed and highlighted. 
Daphne and Apollo (1990) is another example of mixing religion, death, and the discriminated against. Joel-Peter Witkin will play off famous artwork or themes by replacing figures with either dead body parts or atypical individuals. While his use of nudes, body parts, and his themes of death and religion, are intriguing, is it beautiful? Can you look at this artwork and not only appreciate the work, but also love it? I think what is lost when viewing the artist's work is his painstaking technique. Not just the scratching and manipulating of the negatives and photographs, but also the positioning of the figures. The artwork looks out of this world thanks to the distortion. If you want to connect his art to horror movies, than it wouldn't be far-fetched to hark back to films such as Freaks or even Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Remember the dinner scene in TCM? The grainy camera work and Texas setting made the entire film seem like something that wasn't necessarily on Earth. Yet, there was something so beautiful about the family all eating together. Joel-Peter Witkin's artwork is similar. It is so foreign and so strange, that you can appreciate the beauty of it as a tourist. Of course, if you actually lived in these worlds, where dead body parts are the focal points of beauty, then fear my overwhelm and conquer. 
Las Meninas (1987) is perhaps Joel-Peter Witkin's most famous work. A play off of Diego Velázquez's famous artwork, Las Meninas (1656). Royalty from the 17th century is replaced with marginalized individuals. Your eyes are drawn to the central figure, her eyes blurred with a dark strip of color, along with the figure in the back, one foot in the room, one foot out. I personally like to imagine that I am that person, stepping into this world I know nothing about, a world that is both terrifying and beautiful. A place that scares me not because of a sense of danger, but rather a sense of the unknown, a place where I wouldn't feel safe not because of the people around me, but rather the distorted poses they are forming. Imagine the amount of work it took to determine the positioning of everything in this room. In a way, Witkin is playing god, like many artists due, in order to share his message with the world. 
Art can be more about asking questions and creating conversation, than giving the viewer a particular emotion. Joel-Peter Witkin's work asks questions that are difficult to answer. The body parts that are used are real, given to him by hospitals and medical professionals. The use of real body parts adds a layer of morbidity, but it also adds a layer of realism that contradicts the setting the artist creates. Again, the images are so manipulated that they not only seem "old-timey", but also foreign in nature. Once you realize that those are real body parts, real people, real animals...does it change your view of the world he has created? Personally, if you don't find his work beautiful, I think you need to ask yourself why. Why should we not find people without all the typical body parts beautiful? While finding body parts creepy is a typical human trait, why can't we also appreciate the fight against death, the representation of something dead, as living or as something that is useful to us, rather than decaying in the ground or burned. It may seem like a battle against nature, but it is a depiction that should be photographed and depicted, if only for creating conversations like these. Of course, not everyone is going to like his work, but just remember to not only view the image, but also revel in the themes that are begging to be talked about. 
What do you think of Joel-Peter Witkin's work? Do you find it beautiful? What do you think about his depiction and commentary on religion and death? Make sure to comment below or us. 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films, art, and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
There are tons of horror films out there that don't receive the credit they deserve. Maybe they were seen by less people due to little money going into production and marketing. Maybe they were slammed by critics, but are actually quite fun for the horror fan. We decided to analyze horror films that should be seen, no matter what ratings they got on sites like Rotten Tomatoes and IMDB. In fact, we generated this list by analyzing scores from review sites (critic and audience scores). Are you ready? Here is a list of ten horror movies that you should watch, no matter what people say. 
1. Friday the 13th: Part 3
Was the 3D overused? Sure, but this movie received way too many negative reviews. It is exactly what a campy horror film should be...fun. Watching Jason on his morality crusade, murdering any teen that steps out of line, is exciting, nostalgic, and exactly what made us fall in love with Friday the 13th in the first place. 
2. Friday the 13th: Part 4
Are you sensing a trend? The Friday the 13th series has been slammed for decades...but why? Is it the most socially conscious or intelligent horror series? No, but you can't underestimate how fun or "campy" these movies are. Will they win any Oscars? No, but they will put a smile on your face, while keeping you scared throughout. Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter should especially be praised for sticking to it's campy roots 4 films into the franchise. If you despise slashers, then this serious isn't for you, but if you just want to have a good time, then these movies are your kind of jam. 
3. Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers
Halloween 4 is the first Halloween film to have no involvement from John Carpenter. Usually, this would result in a horrible horror movie, but this movie is a solid addition to the Halloween franchise. Michael steps outside his box a little bit in this movie, many times killing townspeople with brute force, rather than his famed knife. The top 3 films on this list have proved that while we are really harsh on sequels, they can be solid films if there is already a great formula in place. 
4. Friday the 13th (1980)
Friday the 13th, or the series as a whole, isn't perfect. Campy and slasher style horror movies can get old, but why are they so frowned upon by critics and many audience members? Not every horror film needs to be "deep" or intelligent, especially when they are as enjoyable as the Friday the 13th franchise is. The point being, don't let people turn you off to this series, watch it and then judge it for yourself. Even though Friday the 13th is famous, it is still slammed by critics. A discrepancy between horror fans and critics is the theme of this list, and it shouldn't turn you off from watching certain horror films. 
5. Silent House
Silent House proves that a great horror film can be created simply by the talent of the actors. Elizabeth Olsen is breath taking in her role, and her emotions keep the viewers teetering throughout the movie. Silent House isn't perfect, but it is a solid horror film that not enough people have watched. We really can't express how well acted this movie is, so make sure to check it out. 
6. The Babadook
Not every horror film on this list was slammed by critics and audience scores. The Babadook was acclaimed by critics around the world, but still doesn't get the praise it deserves. While The Babadook is a little highbrow, it still has the scares, themes, and villain you expect from a world class horror film. Don't get us wrong, many people love The Babadook, but why it isn't on everyone's top ten list since 2010 is beyond us. If you love horror movies that are psychological, but still grounded enough to provide real scares, then The Babadook is your kind of movie. 
7. Arachnophobia
We are not in love with a lot of horror movies that came out in the 90's, but like every decade, there are gems that should be appreciated. Arachnophobia was loved by critics, and us, but it was given average scores by the audience. Amazing actors and a well crafted narrative make Arachnophobia a wonderful movie. We really aren't sure why it isn't appreciated more, but it does a wonderful job making spiders seem scarier than they already are. 
8. You're Next
There are multiple films on this list that are well received, but they aren't loved as much as we think they should be. You're Next is a great horror film and it should be respected more for the level of fun and inclusion it brings to the horror genre. The protagonist, Erin, is one of the great female leads in horror movie history. Her ability to knock stereotypes out of the park is reason alone to love this movie. There are also amazing kills in this film, resulting in gorgeous dashes of blood and excitement. This is a perfect Friday night movie to watch with your friends. 
9. Cold Creek Manor
Cold Creek Manor isn't a great horror movie, but it is above average. Unfortunately, this movie was slammed and has resulted in a lot of people never seeing it. If you are a die hard fan of horror movies, then you should try to watch as many movies as you can. We think you will be surprised by how decent this movie is, even though it did leave us wanting more. When we say underrated, in this case we mean it in a strict sense. Cold Creek Manor isn't great, but it shouldn't be slammed the way it has been. 
10. A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy's Revenge
Is Freddy's Revenge as good as the original? No, but it is a really good horror movie that is again underappreciated by critics and the audience alike. If there is anything you take away from this list, it is that there is a disconnect between devoted horror fans and critics / movie fans. Naturally, if you love horror movies, you are going to rate them higher than a lot of people, but that doesn't explain the many horror films that are completely overrated. Freddy's Revenge takes the original, tweaks it a little bit, and puts out a product that is scary and allows Freddy Krueger to take our breath away. 
What do you think about our list? Do you think these movies are underrated, or are they really not that good to begin with? Let us know below or shoot us an . 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films, art, and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
The art of Francis Bacon, famous for his biomorphic surrealist work, has long haunted the mind of art and horror fans. Bacon, an Irish/British artist, worked mainly during the aftermath of both World War I and II. The art community as a whole saw radical shifts in style post both wars, but Bacon's work exhibited a raw energy that is not matched by many. 
Post World War I and II, society as a whole, especially Europe, questioned the role of religion not just within their own personal lives, but within society as a whole. How could God allow such horrible things to happen on Earth? This was and still is a common sentiment amongst many, but fresh off the grotesque deaths founded in both World Wars, people were particularly struck by how cruel humanity could be. Of course, art, as a spokesman for society, showcased the pain of the people through new artistic movements. Abstract Expressionism attempted to embody human emotion as a whole through powerful artwork led by individuals such as Jackson Pollack. While this work had the energy to match the sentiment, it many times didn't have the raw imagery that an artist like Bacon had. 
So what made Bacon's work so terrifying? And why is it so soaked in religion? Crucifixion (1933), depicts an interpretation of Jesus being crucified. This imagery has been a part of the art world for a very long time, but Bacon morphs Jesus into a wispy shape, fragile, ghost-like, and irregular. The arms and legs are two of the body parts that still take shape thanks to the strong marks and end points for hands and feet. You can also see the rib shapes on the right side, which further adds the semblance of a human, but not the human we are use to seeing. Bacon has morphed a common image into something the general public was feeling at the time. People were afraid that there really wasn't a God. The ghost features make it seem as if Jesus was maybe there, but not anymore. It is religion lost, but it is also religion flipped on it's head. The strong white spaces on the upper region of the body add more shape to the image, but not a shape that we are use to seeing. Instead of a human body, this body image begins to look more like livestock, something broken down, butchered, and bled. The lack of bright colors creates a sense of dread and atmospheric horror. Where is the shining light in this image? Where is the beacon of hope? 
Crucifixion (1933) was reeling from the effects of World War I, but once World War II struck, Bacon's work became even more energized and raw. Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944), again focuses on the breaking down of religious imagery. While Crucifixion (1933) focused on the blurring of white within a dark background, this painting takes on brighter colors that resemble the fire and anger that society was feeling. Much like a triptych, this artwork breaks down a religious story into parts, rather than depicting it as a whole. These figures are vaguely human, but at this point resemble something we would see in our nightmares. Silent Hill fans will appreciate this painting, along with much of Bacon's work, thanks to the distorted body forms. Viewers should place particular emphasis on the mouths. If you view the mouths from left to right, you see a gradual scream take place. The dirty grey pops against the dirty orange, creating a grunge effect that is raw and "creepy".
Painting (1946) appears to almost be the natural progression of Crucifixion (1933). While we do have shape, we also have severe distortion that again harks back to a butcher shop or killing floor. The animal carcass on the background sets up the setting, while a being in all black is covered by a black umbrella. What exactly does this mean? I am not even sure Bacon knows, but we can all agree that it is horrifying and macabre. The image almost looks God or king like, but he also appears trapped and potentially in pain. The colors are unique in that they are all similar tones. The shades of purple mix beautifully with the carpet on the ground and even the black of the figure. Painting (1946) is much more complicated due to the layers of imagery, but it again embodies the spirit of society. Confused, angry, trapped, scared, and hurt were all feelings that the world was expressing in 1946. 
Ultimately, the mixture of war and religion set up beautifully for artwork that was horrifying yet fascinating to view. In fact, the differences between war and religion are not that far apart. War is horrific and violent and by no means is it ever beautiful. On the other hand, while religion can be beautiful for many, it is also raw and brutal. Francis Bacon understood the emotions of many and put those feelings into art. Fear lives in the unknown, and many of his paintings have an enigmatic quality to it that pushes nightmare concepts. It feels human, it feels like Earth, but there are things off that doesn't make sense. Ribs where they shouldn't be, mouths opened just a little too wide, and figures trapped and weighted down inside a world that we don't want to be in. When an individual feels like the world is crumbling around them, they may turn to religion for hope. What Bacon shows us in his art is that religion may not be as safe or pure as many people hoped it would be. 
What do you think of Francis Bacon as an artist? Do you find his work to be horrifying? Would you put it up in your bedroom? Comment below or us. 
Figure 1. Crucifixion (1933), The Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts
Figure 2. Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion (1944), Tate
Figure 3. Painting (1946), MoMA 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
If you haven't heard, the "nurse scene" from Exorcist III is considered one of the scariest in horror film history. While the film itself isn't going to win any awards (although it is worth watching), this particular scene is bound to freak you out. So what makes it so special? Watch the clip below and then read further down for a breakdown of the scene. 
 Freaky right? So let's analyze this creepy and nightmarish moment. 
At the beginning of the scene, we are presented with a long shot, meaning that we can see a wide range of space. While this wide shot does offer us the ability to see a lot of the hospital space, we are limited in the fact that it is a hallway, and there are doors on our left. Basically, there are blind spots, which naturally creates anxiety within the viewer. On top of this, the atmosphere of this particular hospital is dark and dreary. We could assume that it is very late at night, since the only people there is the nurse and a couple of security guards. One interesting note is the color of the nurses sweater. Red, which is a theme throughout the film, is commonly linked with the Virgin Mary (along with purple). We are asked to view the nurse as innocent, and pure. 
During this particular moment, the security guard clocks out, and leaves the hospital. Why is this important? The individual and his superior were the only people staying with the nurse. Their removal foreshadows danger, which the viewer would more than likely not consciously pick up on. The shot continues to remain wide, which makes the viewer feel distanced from the actors. There is a sense that we are viewing something that we aren't suppose to be seeing, which again creates anxiety and fear.
A seemingly safe moment for the viewer (unless you pick up on the foreshadowing) immediately turns into a terrifying moment thanks to the zooming in of the camera and the clash of sound. Try watching this scene on mute, and it simply isn't the same thing. The drastic sound, compared to the silence before, will literally make you jolt. This alone makes you feel unsafe, but it is the lack of awareness that really drives home the fear. The nurse has absolutely no idea of the danger she is in, yet we do. This goes back to this icky feeling of viewing something we aren't suppose to see, like a fly on the wall. The killers weapon, trimming shears, isn't a weapon that is overplayed in horror films. A dagger or gun wouldn't have the same effect. It is the robotic walk and holding of the weapon that makes you realize how "inhuman" or "robotic" the killer is. This isn't a crime of passion, it is methodic and terrifying. 
 At the end of the scene, we see a decapitated Jesus statue. This film is highly religious, so this particular motif plays well with the themes of the movie. You can also connect this with the depiction of the nurse as the Virgin Mary. Many of the individuals killed in this movie are innocent, pure individuals. Just like any Exorcist film, Satan is at work, and in this particular scene, the Devil puts together a terrifying minute that is one for the record books. Before you go to bed tonight, make sure you watch it one last time, just for the hell of it. 
Do you think the "nurse scene" is one of the scariest moments in horror film history? What other scenes would you like to see broken down? Make sure to comment below or us. 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
The representation of transgender individuals within the horror film industry is appalling at best. We all know that the evolution of women in horror, while improving, is still feeble due to an emphasis on sexuality, frailty, and codependence. The Black population is also misrepresented. Jokes are still being made about how the black individual always dies first. So how is the transgender community seen in horror films? In real life, The transgender population is one of the most misrepresented. Instead of shedding light and educating people about this population in a healthy manner, horror movies fall flat. If the genre we love is going to represent the atrocities of life, then it should also represent the crimes against a population in an illuminating manner. A manner that highlights the struggles of a population that is severely discriminated against, instead of exploiting their struggles in order to create shock endings and horror movie premises.
When we think of the representation of trans* women in horror, we hark back to Angela Baker in Sleepaway Camp. How is she represented? First of all, she was forced to identify as female, it is only in the sequels that we learn she continues to identify that way. However, even though she may be comfortable, she continues to murder and kill. While the original film may have viewed the "shock" ending (depicting Angela's sex) as great theater, it in fact had major repercussions on the population for years to come. 
So how should trans* women be represented? Should they be seen as mass murdering psychopaths? Should all evolutions of gender be seen as widespread confusion that further results in death and murder sprees? Even though Angela has moments of happiness as a female, she continues to kill the people around her. Overall, the Sleepaway Camp series drills into the viewer that Angela is a mass murderer who was forced to become a female, is insanely confused about her gender identity, and copes with stress by killing. How damaging is this to a population of viewers? 
Angela, having an abusive childhood, attends copious amounts of therapy and has surgery to further identify with the gender we can only hope she willfully wants to align with. Does she become stable and lead a happy life? No, she continues to fall into violent episodes. So can trans* women ever feel happy enough with their gender identity to live successful and emotionally rewarding lives? It may seem inappropriate to analyze a film and then extrapolate its narrative to parts of our everyday lives, but I don't think people realized the repercussions of representing Angela Baker the way they did. 
As a teenager, child, or adult watching Sleepaway Camp in 1983, there was very little understanding or acceptance of the trans* community. Instead of educating individuals on this population, Sleepaway Camp told the masses that individuals who are transgender are confused, enslaved, violent, and unstable. Angela was forced to become transgender, so I bet all transgender individuals are forced as well. Forced is such a violent word. Are transgender individuals confused about their identity, and then force their way of life on others? Angela attempts therapy and has surgery, yet she continues to kill people, so I guess no matter what you do as a trans* woman, you are going to be emotionally unstable. These are all things that this film teaches us, we can only hope that people didn't buy into it. 
Has the horror industry evolved and have they begun to represent transgender individuals in a healthy manner? No, they haven't. Buffalo Bill, from The Silence of the Lambs, can be viewed as MTF (male to female), although you could also argue that Bill identifies as a male, but cross dresses. Ze is depicted as unstable and violent, further perpetuating an unfounded link between gender identity and violence. Films like Sleepaway Camp and The Silence of the Lambs view gender in such a binary way. You are either male or female, and apparently if you align with a gender contrary to your sex, you are misguided and evil. Gender fluidity may be a more modern concept, but it is high time that horror films begin to view concepts like gender in a way that isn't black and white. This may be too much to ask, since we continue to see transgender characters represented as violent, evil, and overtly emotional. 
Ultimately, art has an effect on society. If we as a group of people are going to push the horror genre to grow and begin to accept all humans, then directors need to create films that appropriately represent populations. As of this date, 10 transgender people were killed just for attempting to be who they wanted to be. Yet we still see films going the opposite direction, depicting the population that is discriminated against as the aggressor, attempting to murder everything in sight. This is a topic we need to talk more about, and we need to aggressively push anyone within the horror film industry to make woke choices, not ignorant ones. 
How do you feel about this topic? Can you name horror films that do a wonderful job of representing the transgender community? Comment below or us. 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
It pains us to say this, but we strongly feel that everyone should be excited for the It remake. Since our entire mission is to promote unique, creative horror films, it seems surprising to support a movie that isn't wholly original. With that being said, there are many reasons to go against our usual philosophy and rejoice in a new and fresh iteration of Pennywise and the topic. Check out below for reasons to get excited, and not drown yourself in tears and sorrow. 
The Original Wasn't That Great to Begin With
It (1990) wasn't a film in the normal sense. In fact, it was a miniseries that consisted of two parts, at four hours each. Many people today view the series in it's entirety (roughly 3 hours without commercials), and what that results in is a lot of dull or boring moments. The remake is also planned as a duology, but we have to believe that it will erase a lot of the boredom by eliminating the need to watch both parts in one sitting. Basically, the two movies will be more like It 1 and It 2, rather than a miniseries format. It may sound like we are hating on the original, but we do respect the things it did well. For one, it was terrifying, but mostly due to the brilliance of Pennywise and Tim Curry. We remember It for it's insane moments of horror, not for the intelligence of the filmmakers or special effects team. 
There are many moments where Pennywise shines. It isn't just his general creepiness that gets to the viewer, but also the omnipotence of the character himself. No one is ever protected and clear of Pennywise, which makes the viewer feel as if they aren't guarded either. Pennywise can also break screen walls and utilize supernatural abilities. As a viewer, I wouldn't be shocked if he came through the TV screen and beat me down. That is what makes the original great, but isn't that something that can be achieved in the remake? The original's lackluster special effects didn't age well whatsoever (looking at you weird spider creature), which created some silly moments. We can only hope that the new film will have great graphics that amplifies the scares and progresses the story.
Enough Time Has Passed
The original, released in 1990, shook the world thanks to Pennywise. Have the times changed so much that clowns aren't frightening anymore? Honestly, we think clowns are just as bloodcurldling and haven't suffered from saturation like Vampires. 17 years may not seem like a lot, but since the content could still be scary, and since the original was a slightly different format, we really don't feel that bad about it being remade. Another aspect of the original was the concept of youth, neighborhood, and childhood friends. Now that many viewers of the original are older, the nostalgia of being a kid, and the fear that goes along with being one, will only heighten with this fresh film being released. We all know that nostalgia is insanely powerful, so don't be surprised if you feel even more attached to the kids in the latest film, than you did in the original. 
There is a Great Team Involved
For any horror movie project, it takes a village to create something truly special. The Director, Andres Muschietti, should be able to create a great movie. While we weren't obsessed with Mama, which he created, it did show off his abilities as a Director and leader of a film. We are even more excited that Cary Fukunaga is involved. We at Savehorror are huge fans of Sin Nombre and the first season of True Detective, which was pretty much perfection. Can Bill Skarsgård rock out as Pennywise? We will have to wait and see, but if the trailers are any indication, he looks like he can hold his own. Speaking of trailers...
The Trailers are Terrifying
Have you seen a trailer for It (2017)? It is incredibly creepy and clearly keeps many of the scares from the original film. Is Pennywise's new outfit a little weird? Of course, but we don't want this new imagining of It to be exactly like the original. We just want it to give off the same feeling of dread and creepiness. If you haven't seen one of the trailers, make sure to check out the one below. Ultimately, are we insanely excited that another remake is coming out? No, but honestly if there was ever a movie that deserved a reboot and had the scares and content that translated to modern times well, it would be IT.
Are you excited to see this movie? Do you think it will be any good? Make sure to comment below or us with your opinion. 
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Welcome to the Horror Island Gazette. Here we will investigate and answer important questions regarding horror films and the state of the genre we love. Want us to analyze a particular topic?  us or comment below.
Being a horror movie fanatic can be isolating at times. While there are definitely people out there that love your scary treats just as much as you, it can be difficult to find those individuals. Alas, you can take to the internet to find like-minded people. We have done just this thing, and here are our favorite websites for locating and engaging with individuals who truly love the horror film genre. These websites are not your run of the mill news pages, instead they are creative, intelligent, and engaging. 
The Horror Honeys
The Horror Honeys are an amazing website when it comes to not only reading about horror movies, but also listening and discussing. They make a point to live-tweet during many horror movie or television events, which is a perfect time for you to talk about your favorite horror things. What also adds to their website is their mission on "Female Fronted Horror." Basically, a woman's role in horror is not to be the victim, but to be strong minded and thought leaders. If you have any interest not only in horror films, but also women in horror and why the genre we love really needs growth in that area, then this website is definitely one you should visit.
Graveyard Shift Sisters
Remember how we talked about being a fan of horror films can be isolating? Imagine being a female POC. The Graveyard Shift Sisters is all about "highlighting and celebrating the experiences, representations, achievements, and creative works of Black women and women of color in the horror (and science fiction) genres." We are true believers in the education that comes along with being a horror movie fan, so we can't think of any site better when it comes to educating yourself on diversity, discrimination, and Black history within the horror movie industry. Along with all of this education and awareness, the Graveyard Shift Sisters hold a monthly #FridayNightHorror live-tweet. This is the perfect time to engage and get your horror juices flowing. 
Bleeding Critic
Do you feel happiest when you are with friends and cherished ones, talking about the horror movies you love? Bleeding Critic is the perfect site for interaction and engagement. You can submit short films and videos of your own personal feelings regarding horror movies. Along with all of this interaction, you can also read film reviews. If you are a lover of multimedia and creativity, then there really isn't a better site than Bleeding Critic. Very few sites engage the audience with words, videos, and sound like this website. 
The Rants Macabre
Text and written words are great, but Podcasts are also an amazing way to get your horror movie fill. The Rants Macabre not only creates podcasts about the genre we love, but they do it in a very intellectual and educational way. It isn't odd for this podcast to go insanely in-depth on particular horror topics, without losing the attention of the audience. Unlike many podcasts, The Rants Macabre does a great job of making themselves accessible. When you listen to them or go to their website, you feel like you could ask them anything you wanted. Furthermore, if you are into horror soundtracks or music, then this website / podcast is for you. 
Conclusion
While there are tons of horror movie websites that will give you the news, there aren't as many that will actually push you to discuss and engage in conversation. Many horror fans don't just want to see the trending topics of the day, they would rather find people that love horror movies just as much as them. The websites listed are a great place to start, but there are naturally many more that we haven't discovered yet. Do you have a website or know of a site that we should check out? Make sure to us or comment below. 
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