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Two-time world champion Antony Smyth from Cape Town won the Build for Better Adaptive South African Surfing Championship held at New Pier in Durban.

This adaptive surfing event came after a difficult time for Durban. Flooding caused widespread damage in recent weeks, followed by a sewage pump failure that led to millions of litres of sewage gushing into the Port of Durban. Fortunately, improving E. coli test results at New Pier in the days leading to the championship resulted in a green light for the contest.

Six champions were crowned in various classifications ranging from Prone Assist (AS5), Prone (AS4), Sit (AS3), Kneel (AS2) and Stand (AS1) to Visually Impaired (ASVI) divisions.

In the final, Smyth, who had won gold at the ISA World Adaptive Surfing Championship in 2016 and 2018, took on long-time rival and friend Jean-Paul Veaudry from East London in two-to-four-foot surf and freshening onshores.

Julia van Zyl, organiser and founder of the non-profit organisation Made for More, says they received 36 entries who had travelled to Durban from around South Africa.

An emotional Darian Haynes, 19, winner of the Women’s AS2 division, defeated Cape Town’s Grace Anderson, who had won a silver medal at the world championship in San Diego last year. “Haynes came all the way from Hawaii to be with us,” Van Zyl says.

“It’s an incredible privilege for us to run this event. So much goes into preparing for an adaptive surfing event of this magnitude, from beach and vehicle permits to contest infrastructure, coordinating volunteers and personnel, and then there are the logistics around acquiring the specialised equipment.

“The atmosphere and support on the beach was the best, biggest and warmest we’ve ever had. We are so proud and in awe of the bravery, courage, commitment and talent of all the surfers and competitors in both the contest and the expression session,” she concludes.

Contest results:

ASVI Men (Blind and Visually Impaired)

  1. Jared Sacks (Kommetjie, Western Cape)
  2. Danito Mondlane (Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)
  3. Sabelo Ngema (Glenwood, KwaZulu-Natal)
  4. Erynn Geddie (Glenwood, KwaZulu-Natal)

AS5 Men (Prone Assist)

  1. Albert Rust (Middelburg, Mpumalanga)
  2. Lwazi Matanga (Delft, Cape Town, Western Cape)

AS5 Women (Prone Assist)

  1. Noluthando Makalima (Khayelitsha, Cape Town, Western Cape)

AS4 Men (Prone)

  1. Daniel Nel (Cape Town, Western Cape)

AS4 Women (Prone)

  1. Tracy Mckay (Bluff, KwaZulu-Natal)
  2. Alulutho “Lulu” Tshoba (Clernaville, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

AS3 Men (Sit)

  1. Douglas Hendrikz (Kloof, KwaZulu-Natal)

AS2 Men (Kneel)

  1. Anton Wiersma (Port Alfred, Eastern Cape)
  2. Donovan Kanes (Simon’s Town, Western Cape)
  3. Tyler Pike (Cape Town, Western Cape)
  4. Derick Sigwebela (Chatsworth, KwaZulu-Natal)

AS1 Women (Stand)

  1. Darian Haynes (Hawaii, United States)
  2. Grace Anderson (Somerset West, Western Cape)

AS1 Men (Stand)

  1. Antony Smyth (Cape Town, Western Cape)
  2. Jean-Paul Veaudry (East London, Eastern Cape)
Expression session results:

Derrick Mboyisa (Muizenberg, Cape Town) – Best Wave

Thandi Muir (Durban, KwaZulu-Natal) – Most Waves

Hayley Raman (New Germany, KwaZulu-Natal) – Longest Ride

Amuri Mwanza (Durban, KwaZulu-Natal) – Biggest Wipeout

Mfundo Blose (New Germany, KwaZulu-Natal) – Most Stoked

Peter Glass (Amamzintoti, KwaZulu-Natal)

David Nhlapo (Pretoria, Gauteng)

Kayden Eksteen (Newlands East, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

Dean Hart (Durban North, KwaZulu-Natal)

Rayaan Moodley (Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

Guy “Oliver” Sinclair (Winston Park, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

Krishiv Katuwaro (Howick, KwaZulu-Natal)

James Sinclair (Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

Nelisiwe Sibiya (Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal)

Daniel Deghaye (Glenwood, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

Sibongile Shosha (Khayelitsha, Cape Town, Western Cape)

Chloe Malcomess (Durban, KwaZulu-Natal)

The post Adaptive surfing event a hit! appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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Thanks to the special vote system, quite a few voters were able to cast their ballot in comfort during the 2019 elections. CEO of the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) Ari Seirlis and QASA chairperson Norman Wright answer a few questions about this process.

How did you learn about the special vote?

Seirlis: Information about the special voting process was distributed widely, but only by QASA, the Department of Social Development and the Electoral Commission of South Africa (IEC). I also personally attended a workshop in Durban by the IEC arranged for the disability sector, where the process was explained.

Wright: Information about the special voting process was distributed by the WhatsApp group in the area where I reside.

How was the registration process?

Seirlis: Registration was very simple and done in a couple of minutes.

Wright: It was easy and done within minutes via the SMS number provided by the IEC.

How did you find the process on the day?

Seirlis: Election officers arrived at my office on the said date, which was the day before the elections. They were very friendly and the process was over in the couple of minutes. I was suitably impressed.

Wright: Election officers and an observer arrived at my home. They were very friendly and the process was handled in a professional manner, with explanations of the different ballot papers. Then I voted privately and each ballot was placed in an envelope. It was over in a matter of minutes.

What are some of the benefits to this process, in your view? Where there any negatives?

Seirlis: Voting took only a couple of minutes in the comfort of my office, so I didn’t have to endure any possible accessibility issues at the polling stations.

Wright: It was quick and in the comfort of my home, so I didn’t have to worry about accessibility problems. I felt that my vote was secure, but did miss out on the interaction with my fellow South Africans on election day.

Would you recommend this to others? If so, why?

Seirlis: There is no doubt that this is the way to go for people with mobility impairments when it comes to voting. It also gives you lots of free time on the official election day.

Wright: Absolutely. This is perfect for people with disabilities because it safe and there is no chance of being embarrassed by the lack of accessibility at a voting station.

Did you register for a special vote? Share your experience with us!

Also, read about the opportunity for a disability party in the next elections here.

The post Casting a vote in comfort appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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Road accidents in South Africa are common and result in severe consequences for those involved. Some people even face a permanent disability like amputation or paraplegia. Luckily there are some people passionate about making South African roads safer.

Occupational therapist Lee Randall has founded Road Heroes, a small group for like-minded people to fight along side her in improving road safety. She shares the real dire situation of South African roads.

“South Africa is one of the most dangerous countries in the world, from a road safety perspective,” Randall says. “We have a lot more road deaths per 100 000 people than the world average, which sits at about 17 people. We lose about 26 people out of every 100 000.”

Lee Randall at the 2019 Wings for Life World Run.

Statistics like these places South Africa at the bottom of the Brics countries when it comes to road safety and also among the worst when compared with some of its African neighbours, despite having better developed road infrastructure and traffic legislation.

“We can’t even begin to compete with the very safest nations of the world, like the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand and the Scandinavian countries, where fewer than five out of every 100 000 people die on the roads,” Randall adds.

The high number of accidents also directly impacts on gross domestic product (GDP). An estimated five to ten percent of the South African GDP is lost when taking into account the total cost of road accidents, including productivity lost by the injured and their families – not to mention the many people who are unable to re-enter the job market or suffer permanent disabilities.

“For every two people who die on the roads, another one survives with a permanent disability and many more survive with serious injuries,” Randall says. While the situation is dire, the causes vary. A combination of political, economic and sociocultural factors is to blame.

Randall argues that everyone should take responsibility for road conditions, but that government plays the biggest part. “Government in particular, as the system designer and the law enforcer, has a very high level of responsibility to address the situation. Not to do so deprives people of our constitutional rights to life, safety and personal wellbeing,” she says.

Want to learn how you can help make roads safer? Look out for our next newsletter. You can join the Road Heroes movement by emailing lee@therapyteam.co.za. You can also sign her petition to help make South African road safer. Simply click here.

The post Safer roads, Part I: The true cost of road carnage appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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Rolling Inspiration Magazine by Rolling Inspiration - 1w ago

The various challenges associated with cerebral palsy (CP) and ways to manage them were highlighted at the 2019 National Cerebral Palsy Conference hosted by Forest Town School and the National Association for People with Cerebral Palsy (NAPCP).

Ruby Grusin shares her knowledge of teaching reading to children with disabilities.

The conference took place from Monday, May 27 to Wednesday, May 29 at the Wanderers Stadium in Johannesburg.

Delegates had the opportunity to listen to and engage with experts on a number of issues concerning individuals with CP and their families, including teaching children with disabilities to read, living independently with CP, ageing with CP, behaviour management in children with CP, and mental health in disabilities.

All the presentations were delivered by authorities in their respective fields, with physiotherapists, educators, psychologists, social workers and occupational therapists sharing their knowledge to improve the lives of people, including children, with CP.

There were a number of exhibitors at the conference including SA Toy Trade, which has a toys suited to children with disabilities

Some students were given the opportunity to display posters that showcase their research and give the delegates a brief explanation of their work.

A key theme in many of the student works was the importance of including the caregiver or parent in therapy sessions.

There was also an opportunity for delegates to engage with a handful of exhibitors at the conference. SA Toy Trade exhibited its range of unique toys for children with disabilities, while Ability Assist had various adapted devices, such as cutlery, on display.

Keep an eye on future newsletters for more information about presentations that were offered at the conference.

The post Focus on cerebral palsy appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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Rolling Inspiration Magazine by Rolling Inspiration - 3w ago

Issue 3 2019 is available to view as an Ebook or to download in pdf format. Click here to download in pdf format….

This content is for Silver and Gold members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.

The post Issue 3 2019 appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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QASA recently hosted a Victor Daitz Capacity Building event attended by a group of dynamic and motivated individuals. The QASA CEO noticed that one of the candidates was not seated properly and knew that QASA would have to assist. The CEO immediately did some research and issued the candidate with…

This content is for Silver and Gold members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.

The post New wheelchair for QASA member appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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The Disability Summit and Career Expo returned with a new location, more exhibitors and very excited students. MARISKA MORRIS reports The 2019 Disability Summit and Career Expo, sponsored by SABC, was held for the first time at the Nasrec Expo Centre in Johannesburg across two days, April 11 and 12….

This content is for Silver and Gold members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.

The post Another successful Disability Summit appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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Most of us have enjoyed shorter work weeks lately because of the Easter weekend and public holidays like Workers’ Day and election day, which was on May 8. I trust you have gone out in your numbers and made your mark. The canvassing by political parties has stopped. The radio…

This content is for Gold and Silver members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.

The post Time to work together appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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After her injury, Jodie Kroone was sure that she would never practise yoga again, but through adaptive yoga and instructors who understood her body’s limitations she was able to return to a former love. She shares her experience When I think about my disability, caused by a spinal cord injury,…

This content is for Silver and Gold members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.

The post Finding inner peace with the warrior pose appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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Rowan Martell was involved in a freak accident in 2015. While he was standing at a robot waiting to cross the road, a glass frame fell from the 22nd storey of a building nearby and landed between his shoulder blades, severing his spinal cord. He was rushed to hospital, where doctors soon gave him the news that he had sustained a T4 spinal cord injury.

Martell did not let this get him down and immediately launched himself into rehabilitation. He was integrated back into mainstream employment and soon realised that his mobility was restricted without personal transport. He made a decision to join the innovative QASA Driving Ambitions programme to regain his independence.

Martell already had his licence, so he only had to be reassessed to drive an adapted vehicle. He passed his reassessment on the first attempt and was extremely excited about this achievement. QASA caught up with Martell, who says he’s feeling empowered after obtaining his adapted driver’s licence.

“I would like to thank QASA for allowing me the use of the car to prepare for and do my test. And thank you to Shaun Kanayee for his guidance on the lessons, his tips and tricks,” Martell says. “With his methods, you won’t forget the training.”

QASA is very proud of Martell for achieving his goals and wishes him well on all his ventures. Happy motoring, and remember to Buckle Up!

Ari Seirlis is the CEO of the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) and managing editor of Rolling Inspiration. email: ceo@qasa.co.za

The post Empowered after passing driver’s test appeared first on Rolling Inspiration.

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