Loading...

Follow Robert Joyner on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
  Why Connecting Shapes Will Improve Your Paintings

In this tutorial I will share ideas on connecting shapes for a better design. Beginners often never consider design and only focus on copying what they see which usually ends with bad art. One way to avoid this is to use some basic design skills and a little imagination.

In the example I will demonstrate how to connect shapes through value and some imagination. The end result is a composition and overall design unity that will increase my chances of making a successful painting.

Want More Free Tutorials Like This One?

Join the freepainthog community where you will discover why Robert has over four thousand followers that are loving his approach to teaching artists how to paint loose with watercolors and acrylics.

No Brainer, Sign Me Up!

Demo Image

Why Connecting Shapes Will Improve Your Paintings

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  Smart Strategies To Improve Your Paintings - Looking For The Big Shapes

Successful painters understand how to see like an artist and typically avoid the common trap of getting caught up in the obvious. This tutorial will shape some smart strategies to improve your paintings by simply focusing on one very important idea - look for big shapes. 

In the video tutorial you will learn how to tackle a complex scene by simplifying it into large shapes. Learning to develop good drawings, and more importantly stable compositions, is all about seeing the big shapes first. To do this it means reducing the scene into four, or five major shapes working big to small. 

The goal here is to teach you to see like an artist. Experienced painters know how to avoid getting caught up in the details, or the obvious. It takes some practice to see subjects this way but once you do it will have an incredible impact on your drawings.

A Few Reminders From The Video
  • Establish your layout lines (the four main edges)
  • Add the horizon, or ground level near one of the thirds
  • Now locate the biggest shape and loosely add it
  • Continue to add the next shapes in a larger to smaller
  • Don't get caught up in details

Demo Images

Smart startegies to improve your paintings

Inspiration image

Want More Free Tutorials Like This One?

Join the free painthog community where you will discover why Robert has over four thousand followers that are loving his approach to teaching artists how to paint loose with watercolors and acrylics.

No Brainer, Sign Me Up
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  Should you Mix Acrylics With Charcoal?

Should you mix acrylics with charcoal? This lesson will answer that question by giving you some tips on when to add charcoal to your acrylic art. 

Keep in mind there are no absolutes in art and this is just one opinion. If you are new to mixing mediums this should be helpful by answering some common questions. Use it as a springboard to begin your creative mixed media journey.

Demo One - Left Side

This demo will illustrate how adding charcoal in the beginning will present a set of problems. When you apply charcoal to start a painting you present a few potential problems right away. That’s because when you apply acrylics over charcoal you will taint the brush. So the charcoal will blend or flake into the tip and belly of the brush.

The problem here is most artists don’t clean their brush properly when this happens. You have to understand that each time you drag your brush into charcoal it’s best to clean your brush before adding another stroke to your art. The charcoal that’s left on your brush when you paint over it will taint the layers you add after that until you clean your brush thoroughly.

The other problem that not washing your brush presents is it will invade the other colors on your palette when you start reaching into it for more paint. This happens because when you dip your tainted brush that’s covered in charcoal into fresh paint and start mixing on the palette it now ruins the freshness of all the colors. Now your entire palette becomes a big problem if you are trying to avoid muddy art.

The Solution

Clean your brush when you apply a layer of paint over charcoal. This needs to be done each time it happens.

You also need to keep clean reservoirs of water handy because eventually the water becomes muddy and will eventually become a problem as you clean your brushes.

Demo Two - Right Side

This demo illustrates how adding a layer, or two, of acrylics to your art before you introduce charcoal can help you avoid creating muddy work. By working the acrylics only and bringing the painting to a middle stage of completion eliminates the risk of mud – simple :)

Once you have some ‘meat on the bone’ then you can introduce charcoal. This gives you a better chance in creating crisp colors and allowing the charcoal to become more prominent in your artwork.

But you still have to respect charcoal for what it is. Even when you apply charcoal at later stages you have to clean your brush each time you apply a layer over it.

Conclusion

Combining charcoal into your work is a great way to add interest and movement to your art. But you have to respect the medium for what it is – messy. This lesson should help you get more control over using charcoal so that you gain more success when using it.

Your Goal

Take a simple composition and build it up with a few layers of acrylics. Once you have it in the middle stages then add the charcoal. Be sure that you clean your brush each time you mix your paint with the charcoal and this will give you fresh and vibrant colors. A little gray is okay – so long as that’s your intention and not the result of losing control over your mediums.

When To Add Charcoal to Acrylics

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
How To Develop Awesome Brushwork Skills

To become a successful artists means knowing how to develop awesome brushwork skills. Well that and many other fundamentals. However, brushwork is what typically defines one's style and ability to express themselves.

Below are some examples of brushwork types and how to get good results. If you want to view the premium video tutorials that go along with the images be sure to become a painthog member. It's free to sign up and you can check it out here.

Splatter

This is a commonly used technique but often misused by many artists. It can be very messy if you take the wrong approach. However, you can achieve some fantastic results once you tame it and know how to apply the splatters without decorating your walls and floors.

What you need to know;

  • Avoid mixtures that are too wet - this will only make a bigger mess.
  • Try not to back flip - this will usually result in paint on your face, floors and walls.
  • Work from the elbow - this will help you gain better control.
  • Stop abruptly about an inch, or so, from the surface - this will minimize the range of splatter.
  • Test your accuracy by drawing four inch circles - test your skills by drawing a four inch circle and keep splatters within the line.

Demo Images

Whoa! Too much water.

Just right!

Stabbing

Another fantastic stroke for adding texture to various subjects such as tree foliage, shrubs, grass and whatever your imagination can handle.

What you need to know;

  • Use an older brush - don't damage your good brushes since this technique tends to ruin the tips.
  • This isn't a violent stoke - You don't need to press hard into the surface.
  • Once the brush starts to fan you can let off - This will help minimize damage to the brush.
  • Experiment with different size brushes - You can achieve large and small strokes depending on your intent.

Try stabbing to create tree foliage, shrubs and more.

Line

Believe it or not, lines are in just about every painting and subject. They come up often so you need to handle them with skill.

  • How to hold the brush - light grip about three inches from tip.
  • Why diluting the medium is important - thinner, or more diluted, paint comes off the brush much easier and creates a fluid line. Too thick and it becomes chunky.
  • Where the movement comes from - It comes from the shoulder.
  • A few ideas on developing lines - Try adjusting pressure into your surface to create different thicknesses.

This is a quick way to test your basic skills. Use a small sheet of paper to create a series of lines. Be sure to dilute your medium thin enough to create fluid strokes. Hold your brush three to four inches from the tip and avoid using a tight grip. Work from the shoulder and not the wrist, or elbow. Try to adjust the pressure into the surface to create thick and thin lines.

Line Study

develop good lines

Spirals & Squares

Now it's time expand your line range by introducing spirals and squares. Everything remains the same as with the line study. Try to work clockwise and counterclockwise with both shapes. Can you work quicker as you become more comfortable?

try spirals and squares

Sailboat Study

Now you can test your line skills by creating a simple sailboat sketch. To do this make a quick sketch of the boat. Add a layer of color that only includes the main shapes being sure to omit all lines. Add the second layer once the first is dry. This layer will include all lines. Start with thicker lines and move to thinnest. Be sure to dilute with water as you move to thinner lines.

try a quick sketch of an old sailboat

Flicking

Flicking is very useful for creating textures such as grass, branches, trees and more. It's really up to you to determine how to apply this brushwork technique but first you need a few pointers on how to apply it. In the tutorial watercolor is uses but it works the same with any medium.

What you need to know;

  • The movement can be from the fingers, or wrist.
  • Start with medium pressure and fade it as you flick upwards.
  • Experiment with different brushes to explore the range of strokes.
  • As you become comfortable try some tree branches and trunks.

flicking to create branches and trees

flicking brushwork skills

Dragging

This is a fantastic stroke for adding subtle textures and layers. I've used it to add sparkle to water, texture to building, and much more. Again, it's up to you to first try it out and then use it according to your vision.

What you need to know;

  • Load the brush with pigment - this will help you cover more area.
  • The wetter the paint the less texture you get - wet paint tends to come off the brush smoothly versus having a chunky look.
  • The dryer the paint the more texture as the paint appears more chunky - dry paint will have more texture.
  • Experiment with different brush types and sizes - try large flats and other brushes depending on your intent.

Demo Image

dragging to create texture

What you need to know

Practice! That's what separates the good from the struggling painters. Successful artists understand investing time into their technique is more important than creating finished art so they can try to impress everyone on social media. So, roll your sleeves up and develop your brushwork so that when you start creating finished art you have improved skills that will make an impact.

Want The Free Video Tutorials For These Tips?

It's easy to sign up as a painthog member. Use the button below and discover why over 4000 artists love the free tutorials.

Sign Me Up
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Two Tips For Using Charcoal With Acrylics

Two Tips For Using Charcoal With Acrylics - Overview

Here are two simple tips for those that love to use charcoal with acrylics but end up with a muddy mess. It's easy to do and we have all been there. There are a few solutions that will help you get started with mastering your charcoal skills.

The Mistake

The common mistake for most beginners is to add charcoal too early in a painting. Some even use it to layout the composition which can easily become a mess. This problem escalates as the painting progresses with each layer. If you think about it a painting is a series of layers, one on top of the other. So if you add the charcoal too early you can see how the proceeding layers will be tainted by the charcoal.

Here's Why

Each time you stroke your acrylics over charcoal it leaves some charcoal on the brush. Typically artists will go straight to the palette without cleaning the brush for more paint. Now you have another issue, the acrylics on the palette become tainted with ashy, flakey charcoal. In no time at all the entire palette becomes invaded with charcoal and your art is left gray and colorless.

The image below illustrates what one stroke over charcoal can do to your art. This presents problems as you move forward with more layers.

Charcoal Tips Detail 1 Here Are A Few Easy Tips To Help You Out

1. First and foremost you must clean your brush when you apply acrylics over charcoal. This should be done every time and not just once in a while. If you apply a layer of paint over charcoal clean your brush. And don't forget to change your water constantly because the murky water will eventually become a problem. Hey, it's a messy medium so that's part of the deal.

2. Apply the charcoal when the painting has several layers on it. Easy right? Get a little meat on the bone and then add the charcoal. This way there's less chance in creating mud since you only have a layer or two to apply to finish the piece. Much better chances than adding the charcoal in layer one, or two.

As I mentioned before a painting is a series of layers, one over the other. Think about adding charcoal in the mid to late stages. This will keep you from having to add multiple layers over it.

A few examples of acrylics and charcoal playing nicely.

Notice how the drawing, or charcoal, is a key component of the subject. So it has a role to play and not just applied for the sake of using it.

Also note the charcoal seems to be on top of the painting but not 100%. This is because it was carefully added in the later stages and I was mindful to clean my brushes when painting over the charcoal.

Conclusion

While there are no absolutes in art there are certainly situation we can avoid when combining mediums with charcoal. It's takes a lot of experience to create successful mixed media art and you have to know what you are using at all times. Once you have some good experiences using charcoal you can start to experiment applying it at different stages, or layers of a painting.

By adding charcoal in the mid to later stages your can avoid some of the risk you run of graying your art. Start here if you are new or are having ongoing issues with using charcoal. This will help you create a positive connection to the medium and you will be on your way to mastering the medium.

BTW, I use Generals Compressed Charcoal and you can purchase them here.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
 

abstract charcoal cow drawing #2

abstract charcoal cow drawing

How To Paint Abstract Cow Using Acrylic & Mixed Media

A fantastic tutorial on how to paint abstract cow using acrylics & mixed media. The process is what makes the difference and where I find my freedom to paint cows expressively.

The complete course (available on painthog.com) will walk you through one approach where two cows are painted at once. Keep in mind Robert has a lot of experience painting cows. Plus he doodles and plays with keeping them expressive all the time. Below are a few suggestions that will get your juices flowing.

Many beginner, and experienced artists simply want the final result - a finished painting. But I can tell you from experience there's little chance to create an abstract anything unless you spend quality time discovering how and where to find the looseness.

Tip One: Try Some Charcoal Sketches

This is probably the most important step and the most often overlooked. I find artists are either simply too lazy to do this, or only focused on the end product. But to paint expressively you have to develop a sensitive connection to the subject and it's key features.

Here are some key points about this stage. Be sure to read over these and plant them in your mind next time you want to paint loosely.
  • This is not a composition sketch
  • Only focusing on details & shapes (see examples below)
  • Try to spot & address potential problems
  • Make creative & artistic connection
  • Try to add energy to the drawing - some emotion as to how the shape makes me feel as opposed to drawing exactly what I see
  • If you experiment with details and what interested you about a subject it will develop over time - you will discover what you want to include and what you can leave out

abstract acrylic cow sketch

abstract acrylic cow sketch #2

Step Two - Acrylic Sketching, or Doodling

Very similar to step one but this time with color using acrylics. Color presents potential problems and changes everything since now we are dealing with value, tone, shapes, brushwork and so on.

Here are some key points to keep in mind when doodling with acrylics.
  • Look at the palette for inspiration - not the image. Choose arbitrary colors that excite you
  • At this stage it’s important to explore with color and brushwork
  • This is where you discover the unpredictable side of art thus finding your freedom
  • Load up the brush with plenty of paint - don’t be stingy
  • It’s important to under-paint the sketches, don't create finished art
  • It’s nice to have these sketches for reference later on, hang them up in your studio
  • Sketching can expand your creativity is ways you never knew existed. This is where artists are born - don’t underestimate this exercise.
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
How To Paint Abstract Cows Using Acrylics & Mixed Media - YouTube
How To Paint Abstract Cow Using Acrylic & Mixed Media

A fantastic video tutorial on how to paint abstract cow using acrylics & mixed media. The process is what makes the difference and where I find my freedom to paint cows expressively.

The demonstration will walk you through one approach where two cows are painted at once. Keep in mind Robert has a lot of experience painting cows. Plus he doodles and plays with keeping them expressive all the time. Below are a few suggestions that will get your juices flowing.

Many beginner, and experienced artists simply want the final result - a finished painting. But I can tell you from experience there's little chance to create an abstract anything unless you spend quality time discovering how and where to find the looseness.

Tip One: Try Some Charcoal Sketches

This is probably the most important step and the most often overlooked. I find artists are either simply too lazy to do this, or only focused on the end product. But to paint expressively you have to develop a sensitive connection to the subject and it's key features.

Here are some key points about this stage. Be sure to read over these and plant them in your mind next time you want to paint loosely.
  • This is not a composition sketch
  • Only focusing on details & shapes (see examples below)
  • Try to spot & address potential problems
  • Make creative & artistic connection
  • Try to add energy to the drawing - some emotion as to how the shape makes me feel as opposed to drawing exactly what I see
  • If you experiment with details and what interested you about a subject it will develop over time - you will discover what you want to include and what you can leave out

Charcoal Examples

abstract charcoal cow drawing

abstract charcoal cow drawing #2

Step Two - Acrylic Sketching, or Doodling

Very similar to step one but this time with color using acrylics. Color presents potential problems and changes everything since now we are dealing with value, tone, shapes, brushwork and so on.

Here are some key points to keep in mind when doodling with acrylics.
  • Look at the palette for inspiration - not the image. Choose arbitrary colors that excite you
  • At this stage it’s important to explore with color and brushwork
  • This is where you discover the unpredictable side of art thus finding your freedom
  • Load up the brush with plenty of paint - don’t be stingy
  • It’s important to under-paint the sketches, don't create finished art
  • It’s nice to have these sketches for reference later on, hang them up in your studio
  • Sketching can expand your creativity is ways you never knew existed. This is where artists are born - don’t underestimate this exercise.

Acrylic Sketching Examples

abstract acrylic cow sketch

abstract acrylic cow sketch #2

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

 
How To Paint Abstract Seascape Painting; Painthog Style! - YouTube
 How To Paint Abstract Seascape Painting Using Acrylics

How to paint an abstract seascape painting using acrylics & crayon. This fabulous video demonstration will inspire you to think differently while using solid time-tested painting techniques. 

The seascape is inspired from a photo reference but as you will see Robert uses his artistic license to make some changes to satisfy his creative vision. 

I know many of you will ask which type of crayon is used and the answer is Caran d'Ache. You can buy them at Black art.

I hope the demo inspires you to paint loose and take risks at the easel. Life is too short to make boring art, so go for it. 

Want to learn more?

Visit Painthog where you will find plenty of tutorials that will push your art to new heights.

Learn More
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Robert Joyner by Robert Joyner - 5M ago










Expressive Portrait Drawings

Enjoy some expressive portrait drawings created with graphite on paper. Various sizes from 14x11 to 10x6 and all on archival paper. Subjects range from past Presidents, Founding Fathers, Trump, Elvis & the Statue of Liberty. 

Sometimes I get a little frustrated with portraits especially when my palette & colors just don't work out well. I typically abandon them and return months later to see if I can pull it off. That's pretty much the scenario here but instead of walking away I decided to simplify the process by drawing/sketching. Glad I made that decision since I'm very pleased with the results. I still haven't tried painting, or color, yet but feel better about my chances once I get back to it.

Hope you enjoyed the new works.

How To Purchase

Visit the online shop to purchase available original paintings.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  Preferred Acrylic And Mixed Media Material Lesson

This is an overview of all the mixed media materials I use and why I prefer them. So no assignment for you but there will be plenty of those later on. This is an important lesson to understand in order to follow along with the workshops and to create expressive, dynamic artwork. Having knowledge of the materials and how they work will help you become a much better mixed media artist.

I will also cover why painting on paper has allowed me to explore mixed media in a more relaxed state of mind. Paper is an inexpensive surface and far less intimidating to paint on than canvas, plus it’s very inexpensive. This little tip is more of an opinion but can certainly help you as well.

Here’s What I Will Cover
  • Compressed charcoal
  • Water soluble crayon
  • Heavy body acrylics
  • Acrylic and shellac inks
  • Paper options
  • Canvas options
  • Brushes
Demonstration Images




INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE?

Get immediate access to over 30 premium acrylic painting classes (and counting) that are currently available by Robert via SkillShare. In addition to Robert's classes you can access all premium SkillShare classes by other amazing creatives.

Join over 3200 artists that are loving Robert's advanced painting series on SkillShare. Hope to see you there!

Learn More
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview