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This review is written by Dante Mathis.

Mega Man X was one of my earliest experiences in video gaming, even more so than Mario or Banjo Kazooie, and it’s for that reason I’ll likely never be able to produce an unbiased review of the game. However, my love for the Mega Man series expands well beyond one simple game which I am too fond of. A recent game which I began to step into was Mega Man X2, which I was sadly never introduced to as a child.

The Mega Man X series, while detested by many at the time of its release, is a series I will always look back on in hindsight, as the first game to be released by the time I was born was X4, considered by many to be the overall decline of the franchise, when they made the transition to compact discs, and introduced cut scenes which snowballed into full fledged animated episodes by the later games. Yet, if I were to give my solid impression of the initial release which kicked off the revitalized series, I would give it only the highest praise, something I can safely vest into the sequel, which took every expanse that the original made upon the prior Mega Man games, and added to it.

Mega Man X2 continues the habit of having more animal based robot masters, as opposed to the much more classic robot masters who are all for the most part android in nature. This game takes the standard mech suit given to the player in X, and introduces the hovercraft, as well as a variety of armor upgrades giving the player new abilities, such as the mid-air dash, and the all elusive one hit KO Shoryuken of Street Fighter fame. The story continues the saga of Maverick Overlord Sigma, one of my most remembered child-hood villains. In spite of a weak development when compared to the other games, his all imposing danger reminded me of Gigyas, but without the intangibility aspect.

The story has a split depending on if you gather a number of parts of your old ally Zero, however the fork returns back to a single linear story following, so there’s no fear of alternate endings requiring a second, more tediously monitored play through, however it also invites enough entertainment for multiple runs on its own, without the need of collecting every little thing, if that’s not your particular interest. The game is filled with creative enemies suited to the environment of each level, and the bosses are all unique, and enthralling to fight.

They keep in touch with the classic chain of logical weaknesses, but if you screw up like myself and forget to check the walk through until halfway through the game, I’ve found that the heavy powered mega-buster works fairly well for a strong portion of the bosses, and the enemies won’t be too much of a hassle working with the bare basics.

All in all, if you go in headstrong, with nothing but confidence and have a fantastic experience, and on the far side, if you play it safe and use the bosses weaknesses to your advantage, you’ll still have an experience which is equally, and in some senses more fulfilling, especially if you’re a hardcore completionist.

The post Mega Man X2 appeared first on Retro Garden.

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We’ve covered Dr. Ludos’ game Sheep It Up! before, and they contacted us about their new game – 30 Years of Nintendon’t. This game is quite a quick game, that requires you to convert Super Nintendo and Nintendo players to Sega Megadrive.

In it, you ask a Nintendo gamer to pick their favourite game, and then try and match them up with a game they may like. If they like it, you convert the user to Sega, otherwise they are Nintendo. You get 30 seconds to convert as many people as possible.

It’s quite a quick and tricky game to play, as you need a knowledge of both Sega Megadrive and Nintendo games, and what games are close to each other, and you need to think on your feet to win the game.

As of right now, you can only play the game online at the above link, or download a ROM to put onto a flash drive. Alternatively you will be able to purchase it as a cartridge soon from Catskull Games.

The post 30 Years of Nintendon’t – A New Sega Megadrive Game from Dr. Ludos appeared first on Retro Garden.

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This review is written by Jake “The Voice” Parr. You can follow him on Twitter @JakeTheVoice123

Tossing bananas out of go-karts, going off-road in rally cars, zipping along tracks in hovercraft – these kinds of games are fun. However, SingleTrac’s Twisted Metal series was a vehicular deathmatch frag-a-thon that proved to the world that blowing one another up in buggies, trucks, and even a demonic ice cream van can be just as enjoyable, if not moreso. Twisted stuff, indeed.

989 Studios stepped into the equation to create the third and fourth entries in the series. Despite high-expectations, Twisted Metal III disappointed many fans after its North American-exclusive release in 1998.

The titular Twisted Metal tournament invites drivers to battle one another in a series of gauntlets around the world for a grand prize: a single wish, no matter how outlandish it may be. Say goodbye to those fantastic comic book-style cutscenes from the previous game. Instead, this one has fully-3D cutscenes to tell the story, which are cursed with stiff animation and lazy writing. Hey, at least the opening looks cool.

Compared to the previous game, Twisted Metal III has some good visuals. It’s no major improvement, but the vehicles and environment look smoother, and the heads-up display is a lot more compact and informative compared to the clutter of green text smeared across the screen. It runs at a better framerate, too, and supports 4-player split-screen. However, the new physics engine is a bit iffy – you can drive up steep walls if you try hard enough, but can’t seem to steer without swinging around wildly while you’re accelerating. Though it’s only a video game, so there’s no need for any semblance of logic here… right?

Gameplay has not changed all that much, naturally. All you need to do is eliminate the competition, including the mini-bosses on tournament mode. Weapons like homing missiles and bouncy bombs are available to collect, but you can always rely on your machine guns or vehicle-exclusive special moves to dish out damage. Secret button combos will activate things like invisibility or a freeze ray, of which the AI will use a lot.

Health power-ups are available, but they reappear a bit too quickly, and the AI will automatically hone towards them. As a result, some matches will drag on at times. Worst of all, there are no other game modes outside of the story mode and deathmatch.

You can tell 989 Studios lost all interest in creating a likeable cast of characters to go with the line-up of vehicles. Instead, you’ve got a hotrod-driving pyromaniac who looks like a mix-up of Krusty the Clown and Keith Flint from The Prodigy. Even recurring characters look laughable; the soul-reaping biker Mr. Grimm resembles that of a decaying tramp. To top it all off, with exception of Mel McMurrin as Calypso, the voice acting is utter bum. Even the ending cutscenes are dull, and often contradict what the characters are fighting for in the first place.

While nostalgic fans will praise the second game for its great levels, in honesty, it did have a few rubbish maps (‘Field of Screams’, anyone?). Twisted Metal III’s level design is not that different: areas like Hangar 18 and Calypso’s zeppelin are symmetrical snorefests. The better picks include the icy, bumpy North Pole, and the twisty streets of London, all of which have destroyable secret areas with weapon stockpiles hidden inside.  

Big points go to the soundtrack of the game. Rob Zombie’s horror movie-inspired tracks like “Meet The Creeper” and “Superbeast” go hand-in-hand with the anarchic gameplay (there’s even a Xmas-themed remix of “More Human Than Human” in the North Pole!). The same can be said about the blend of guitars and fast-tempo drum ‘n’ bass beats by Pitchshifter. Plus, the instrumental, in-house rock tracks are a decent listen, too. Plenty of head-bangers await in this one.

Truthfully, Twisted Metal III is not a bad game, though it lacks a lot of polish. Plus points include its smooth framerate, decent visuals and Metal-centric soundtrack. While the gameplay is what you would expect from a Twisted Metal game, some of the levels are far too boring, and a lack of extra game modes severely hampers its replay-value. On top of that, while there are a decent selection of vehicles, the drivers are ridiculous and their endings are a lackluster watch, too. There are nuggets of fun to be had in this one, yet, alas, it pales in comparison to its predecessor – it’s a soulless sequel.

The post Twisted Metal III appeared first on Retro Garden.

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Retro Garden has teamed with esteemed video game composer Lee Jackson to give away a copy of his brand new album – Calibrations!

Lee Jackson was born in the early 60s in Austin, Texas. He wanted to take Spanish in Junior High School, but his parents forced him to take Band instead, unwittingly unleashing a holy terror upon the musical world. He was the Music and Sound Director for the video game developer 3D Realms from 1994 through 2002. He is most well known for his work on Duke Nukem 3D and Rise of the Triad, specifically for creating Duke Nukem 3D’s main theme titled “Grabbag”.

He recently released “Calibrations”, which is the soundtrack from Episode Five of Gearbox Software’s Duke Nukem 3D, also known as the 20th Anniversary World Tour episode (“Alien World Order”).

“Calibrations,” Jackson’s debut solo album, includes all eight songs used in the game, along with one song that was released with the game but not used. In addition, it includes three brand new songs and an interview with Lee Jackson.

“Calibrations” is available in CD, MP3, and streaming form, and can be found on Amazon, Apple Music, iTunes, Spotify, Pandora, and other services. Links are available on https://leejackson.hearnow.com.

Calibrations 1 Paragraph Review

So I’ve been listening to the album on Spotify today whilst carrying on my work. I wouldn’t call myself a music journalist but it’s incredibly listenable! It has that definite Duke Nukem vibe with the heavy riffs that were a signature of Grabbag, along with musical elements that you can just imagine the level style (“Desert Maze”, “Dukelinka”). This is a well worth get if you’re a fan of Duke Nukem.

Win a Autograph CD Copy of Calibrations!

Lee has offered an Autograph CD copy of Calibrations! To be in with a chance of winning a copy of the album, you can enter in one of three methods:-

a Rafflecopter giveaway

The more tweets you have, the more entries you have! Competition closes on 14th November 2018, and the winner will be notified soon after that. Good luck!

The post WIN a Autographed CD of Video Game Composer Lee Jackson’s New Album – Calibrations! appeared first on Retro Garden.

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This review is written by Dante Mathis.

I’ve recently taken a break from my beloved Nintendo 64 platform to cover a more classic, timeless, and more well known game, which I’ve had my fair share of experiences in the past with. The Legend of Zelda, for lack of a better word, is Nintendo’s Lord of the Rings, a story of epic scale hinged on the betterment of a world we will never understand.

When I was thirteen, I first encountered the golden cartridge that had shaped a million childhoods at a flea market, unknowing that the dungeons in the game can be accessed randomly, in nearly any order you choose. While I, young as I was and without as stable of an internet connection as I have now, managed the first two dungeons well enough, and in the proper order, my lack of  experience quickly pulled me to dungeon five, without warning. So difficult was my trial, and so little my youthful patience, I abandoned the game after half a dozen attempts, and made a self aware tape to myself in the future. While I never found the tape, the memory of it set fire in my stomach, and I was compelled to finally beat that which had hardened my young fingertips to calluses.

So, with a better walk through in hand, and beyond half a decade of conquered video games under the belt, I recently decided to crack open the golden seal one final time, with the express intend of adding it to the collection. What followed was the unmitigated redemption of my young soul, and one of the ultimate separations from my childhood self.

I highly doubt I need to explain the game play therein, but for those who, for one reason or another aren’t familiar, the basic rundown is a hodgepodge of elements within the action, adventure, and role-playing genres of games, played on a flipped-screen overhead perspective which relies on grid like movement when traveling from area to area. You control Link, on a powerful and harrowing journey to defeat Ganon, the Prince of Darkness, and save the land of Hyrule. Though you begin your quest with little equipment, and a basic three hearts, through the exploration of the land you’ll quickly be presented with your first arsenal: A wooden sword, bombs, and a lantern for all your arson based desires. Yet, this is not all: This first phase of game play is nominally refereed to by some as “The Gathering.” Which, by the end of our fruitful journey, will yield us: Three additional hearts for our health bar, bombs, a fresh and improved sword, a magic shield, arrows and medicine, and a blue ring to reduce the damage we take, along with giving Link a grayish tint to his dressings. Now, with our starting arsenal, we are ready to plunge headstrong into our first trilogy of dungeons, and ready to bring our path closer to Ganon.

A borderline necessity, various secret areas can lead to money pits which greatly reduce the need to grind for Rupees in the wilderness.

Link, under our own guidance, will find himself braving the Dungeons of the Eagle, Moon, and Manji. Our hero braves his first foes, which would be cemented as future goblins in the Hyrule underbelly. His bow wrestled from the claws of Aquamentis the Dragon, and his magical boomerang yielded up from the irate yet ignorant Dadongos, and the raft from the fierce some and carnivorous Manhandla plant. When the dust settles, our hero finds himself better equipped for his journey, and with an additional three hearts to boast. Yet, these treasures almost all are necessities, not luxuries, and only allow you complete dungeons, rather than make them easier. Though things certainly won’t be as hard had we not committed our start to gathering provisions rather than plunge forward in haste.

In our second cycle of three dungeons to plunder, among the lairs of Snake, Lizard, and Dragon, we’re introduced to the villain which struck me down in my youth, and hindered my progress until I took up the game nearly a decade later: Wizzrobes. These bewitching devils have only a small window to attack before they teleport elsewhere in the room, which is coupled with their straight forward projectile attacks which span the length of the chamber. When many exist in one space, it demands an incessant amount of attention to assure Link isn’t in the line of fire by any of the mythical creatures. Yet, pressing forward beyond a visibly more difficult portion of dungeons, we’ll be rewarded with new provisions: the stepladder, whistle, and magic wand yielded up from another fierce Dragon, a dangerous floating eyeball, and Gohma the spider Queen. With our journey in the homestretch, Link gathers bait for his future venture, before plunging into the dungeon of The Demon, ominous as it may seem, this is the Paradiso of our Divine Comedy, the ultimate ascension to our journey’s conclusion.

The Fairy ponds: Where my thirteen year old self found the fortitude time and time again to press onward.

Beyond the Demon’s Dungeon, Link will battle once more with Aquamentis, before recovering a magic book from within the Dungeon of Lion, and if you have a good walk through, the Magic Key, an ever present and nearly vital instrument for the storming and inevitable destruction of Ganon. Finally, we lead Link into the entrance of Death Mountain, where we still have several treasures to gather in the destruction of such a dark foe. The silver arrow, the vital weapon to pierce Ganon’s darkened heart, and the Red Ring, which will defend Link even further than the blue ring previously garnered. With your Magic Key, not even the bolted barricades within Death Mountain will impede your vengeance upon Ganon.

The battle is brief, yet with a challenge unexpected as Ganon pitches himself back and forwards across his lair, leaving the player a limited number of arrows to hinder him for further attacks. Though anticlimactic in some regards, it’s inevitably exhilarating when turning the Prince of Darkness to ash, only to bring Zelda out of her bonds, and liberate Hyrule from the Tyranny they very nearly were bound to for generations.

So what’s the verdict? The game is an utter masterpiece, certainly regarded as one of the absolute best ever made. It spawned a franchise which clung to some more thoroughly in their childhoods than Mario or Sonic ever could, and this is one I have every intention of passing on to whoever I’m able. The title is apt; The Legend of Zelda is a legendary epic which unfolds before your eyes, even with walk through in hand, and the most minimal of thought process involved while playing, the sheer action of fighting enemies and collecting rubies supplements those who find the often cryptic over world too much of a challenge, though I still found enjoyment in putting down the walk through for the dungeons and trying my own mind at the puzzles presented, which are often easier than I’ve made it out to be. I doubt I need to tell anyone this by this point in time, but if you’ve yet to complete the original Legend of Zelda, then I would recommend it highly, and even consider it a necessary addition to any gamers resume.

The post The Legend of Zelda appeared first on Retro Garden.

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I’ve covered some of Mega Cat Studios games before, well they recently got in touch about their latest game – Log Jammers. This is a Windjammers vibe game with two versions being produced, a NES version and a PC version, each with it’s own features. The PC version features online multiplayer & Twitch Interactives allowing chatters to choose how the game is effective.

The NES version, however, has one of the best backing rewards: A Wooden NES cartridge! Yes for $150 you get the NES version on a unique NES cartridge. It is quite a backer reward!

This is a competitive, arcade  sports game featuring ax-throwing, blade-catching action with a retro vibe in the vein of Windjammers. Unique character abilities, funky arenas, and trash-talking timber beasts will keep you chopping!  NES & PC are ready for play!

Features
  • Slam your axe into your opponent’s goal in fast-paced blade tossing carnage!
  • Activate power-ups to set your blade ablaze or cover your opponent in slippery oil!
  • Grab the star to unleash each character’s unique special throw!
  • Choose a timber beast with a level of speed, technique, and swoleness that suits your play style!
  • Jam out in funky arenas like a mayonnaise factory spill, 80s hell, and a peaceful beaver pond!
  • Get to know colorful characters, like Bruiser Bogardus, the strong man who makes exercise equipment out of wood, or the Mayonnaise Monsoon, a bloated corpse who died in an industrial condiment accident
  • Revel in victory as your lumberjack trash talks your vanquished opponent!
  • A physical cartridge NES version for hardcore fans and retro enthusiasts is also available!
  • Amp up the body count in cheerleader mode!

Details on the kickstarter including levels and backing rewards are available on their kickstarter page. As of today there’s just over 20 days to go on the kickstarter. You can read further information about the NES game at the Mega Cat Studios’ website.

The post Log Jammers: Kickstarter Campaign is Live appeared first on Retro Garden.

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This review is written by Jake “The Voice” Parr. You can follow him on Twitter @JakeTheVoice123

Only one video game franchise was mad enough to let players fight robots and zombies with tommy guns and mines in a Chinese restaurant, if they so desired: TimeSplitters. In 1998, Free Radical Design rose from the ashes and, two years later, unleashed the first entry in what would be one of the most unique first-person shooter series ever created.

An evil race of aliens known as the TimeSplitters have travelled through time with one goal in mind: exterminate the human race. The plot is sparse from this point onward, as expected from late-nineties and early-millenium shooters, and merely serves as a backdrop for the real fun.

The game’s story mode takes place across different time zones, from a futuristic interplanetary travel station to an Egyptian tomb expedition from the 1920s. The objective is simple enough: fight through a linear level of enemies, grab a special item that they’re guarding, and rush to the exit. Some levels may require backtracking to the beginning with said item to win, while others have the goal in other parts of the map. To make matters worse, the TimeSplitters will appear once you’ve nabbed the goodies.

Altering the difficulty will affect the number of enemies, your starting location, and even expand the level. Admittedly, it’s a mindless run ‘n’ gun affair with a few cheap enemy placements at times, and after a while it may feel a bit repetitive. Still, it puts up a great challenge, especially for speedrunners. An unlockable challenge mode adds 27 challenges to the mix, some of which involve shooting heads off of zombies, escorting an ally, and so on, thus adding some much-needed variety.

Arcade mode lets you go bonkers with its plethora of maps (some being plucked from story mode, while others are exclusive to the multiplayer). Want to play a deathmatch in a haunted mansion with plasma weapons and revolvers, or horde as many bags as possible in a supermarket armed with bricks? Sure, why not? Nearly all of the weapons are equipped with alt-fire modes to add a bit of spice to any gunfight.

Over 50 playable characters are available. Gangsters, robots, mutated rednecks, an 6-foot tall gingerbread – you name it. It does have its fair share of generic, forgettable characters, like “green zombie” or “Female SWAT”. For some bizarre reason, unlocking characters as an opponent in the arcade mode does not make them a playable character just yet – the ability to actually play as them is a seperate unlock. Still, with the amount of characters on offer, from serious one to silly ones, there’s something for everyone.

If you don’t feel like playing up to 4-players on split-screen, you can still have lots of fun against the bots. While the AI is programmed to pop out of cover or roll into a fight in the story mode, the baddies in the arcade mode can have their skill altered between one to five-stars. Their rank will affect their accuracy, reaction time, and their agility. Fighting against the top brass will be a bit trickier, as they’ll sometimes duck, roll, and even spray their weapons wildly if they’re under fire. Each game can have up to ten bots, so that means more allies or opposition.

The game’s mapmaker mode was a very unique inclusion for a console game at the time. It’s surprisingly easy to get the hang of sticking pieces of level geometry together, and filling them with weapon and player spawn points. Considering how difficult game creation kits for the PC were at the time (and still are, to be fair), the team were thoughtful enough to avoid over-complicating things. Levels can even be decorated with different themes and appearances, too.

Graeme Norgate’s TimeSplitters soundtrack is an eclectic blend of genres, ranging from industrial and orchestral to fast-paced electronic beats. Each and every last one of them are perfectly suited to each level, and will have you nodding your head and whistling along in no time. Fans agree that the Chinese Restaurant theme is a funky, oriental-themed gem. TimeSplitters may be showing its age after eighteen years, but, for the time, the amount of variety on offer was truly staggering. With its large line-up, wicked weapons and memorable maps, the game still has a lot on offer. While the later games in the series offer even more content and polish, the original entry in the series is still simple, barmy fun to this very day.

The post TimeSplitters appeared first on Retro Garden.

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This review is written by Dante Mathis.

Glover can neither drown, nor swim, simply residing at the bottom when he falls in, and depending on his ball to skid across watery surfaces.

Hasbro is a company best known for making the toys and board games of our childhoods. However, for a brief bubble in the nineties, Hasbro had an entire division dedicated to video game development, and it lasted five years afloat, and one year in struggle before an inevitable buyout. During their half decade in the gaming industry, they managed to publish over 160 games, many of which were video game ports of board games, or remakes of earlier arcade games such as Galaga, Pac-Man, and Frogger. However, in the list of games published by this obscure publisher, one of them echoes powerful memories for me, and still resonates to this day as one of the most creative titles not only by this publisher, but indeed on the Nintendo 64 platform as a whole. That game was Glover.

Glover first hit shelves on the Nintendo 64 in October of 1998, and received a PlayStation port around a year later in both North America, and Europe. The game received very mixed reviews, and I’ll be the first to admit it’s far from perfect. The controls are rather stiff, and certain worlds cartoonish themes can sometimes appear either over saturated, or at times even disturbing in their imagery.

The story is quite creative, if not very simple, and reminiscent of a fairy tale. In the Crystal Kingdom, a wizard rules from the Crystal Castle, in which the life force of the world is produced by seven crystals atop the Castle spires. The Wizard is accompanied by two conscious, sentient gloves who aid him in the creation of his magical potions. When he mixes a lethal concoction, the resulting blast turns him to stone, and sends his gloves flying. One lands safely out the window, while the other lands into the cauldron and is warped into the evil Cross-Stitch. With the explosion rocking the crystals from their spires, the recovering and unaffected glove casts a spell on the crystals, turning them into rubber balls to prevent them from shattering. Six of them wander into the various worlds, where they are quickly possessed by the Boss character of said world.

The quest is over, and the evil has been defeated, now we look upon what once was, and remember the world we’ve taken part in.

The final of the seven crystals becomes Glover’s ball, which is his greatest tool. With it, he can roll atop it, cross bodies of water, roll, bounce, dribble, slap, and use it as a trampoline. Without the ball he moves slower, yet can still jump, double jump, ground pound, and cartwheel. Along with this, if you ever dread the slow paced game play of being without the ball, Glover has an instant ability to locate the ball regardless of where it’s wandered to. The ball also has the capability of shifting its very matter, from a rubber ball to a bowling ball, to a marble, and back to it’s normal crystalline state.

With six playable worlds, and three levels, a boss and bonus level in each world, the game manages to fit a decent amount of variety, even if many of the levels follow a particular theme established by the World it takes place in. The levels move in a fluid structure, after beating one you move onto the next without returning to the main hub, which reduces time and repetitive trips through the over world. From Atlantis to the Circus, and the Haunted Mansion to the Treasure Island, the game fits an array of puzzle solving mechanics into what seems like a relatively small experience. Not quite the scope of Super Mario 64, and not quite the collect-a-thon of Banjo Kazooie stature.

The game will have the player aiming, throwing, smacking, and bouncing around to land on different styled buttons and targets, guiding yourself through a world which is strangely unique, and an interesting stand-out in the Nintendo 64 library.

The game saw a release on Sony’s PlayStation, however it was unable to achieve such a fan base as many other notable franchises, and thus the Glover series begins and ends with this one installment, a simple, fairy-tale styled story, forever enclosed within the pages of its own narrative. It begins droll, red-skied, and with a post apocalyptic theme, yet by the end of the game, the grass has regrown, and life has returned to the magical world you’ve dug yourself through. The ending truly makes you feel as though something has changed, literally the entire hub world has become lively, and beautiful. It may not be the most popular Nintendo 64 game on the market, but I’d highly recommend it, and I still pop this faithful creature in to this very day, if not just to show friends and loved ones how ridiculous the late nineties were in the video game world.

The post Glover appeared first on Retro Garden.

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Recently, I attended the Power UP Exhibition in MOSI, Manchester. This exhibition, covered a bit in the preview here is a showcase of the greatest games, all neatly arranged into an exhibition. I must admit, I’ve been a few years before, but this is the first time I attended an afternoon session at the weekend, so I could spend a bit of time looking around and covering this event for this here blog. No distractions!

I was greeted at MOSI Manchester (one of the best museums in Manchester, if you must know) with the smiley happy faces of the staff. They guided me to where the exhibition was. Although there was more branding on show this year (and the branding is awesome), the room is the same one as always – the one in the back of the museum, second floor. An exhibition space, of course, so perfect, but it could be easily missed.

Once in though, there’s no mistake, as games and games are laid out in an easy to notice format. You have sections dedicated to popular franchises such as Sonic, Pac-Man and Super Mario, but also you have areas dedicated to Disney games, beat-em-ups, movie tie-ins, multiplayer games, as well as areas for two showcase titles: Minecraft and Fortnite (the latter is obviously new this year).

One feature I did like was on one of the walls was dedicated to everything from the Binetone to the Nintendo Wii and it detailed each and every major console and computer between the two, each showcasing a very good game from each. It provided a history element and an education to each visitor, should they pull themselves away from the game.

When I arrived I was drawn to Pacmania – which was one of my favourite games from the Pacman franchise, but a game I never knew came out on the Master System. I also spent a lot of time in the area dedicated to football games – two games they had in the area were Striker for the Super Nintendo, and ISS Pro for the PS1: two games I had spent ages playing on in my youth. Dominating the room was 16 or so computers each running a massively long team game of Halo 3, which I played for a fair while.

I also mainly occupied my time in the beat-em-up section. I have a lot of love for Marvel vs Capcom 2, and I managed to play on the Dreamcast version for a decent length of time. I also rekindled my love for Tekken 2, as well as play the rather excellent Street Fighter V.

There was also a VR section, but unfortunately I didn’t manage to play on that.

So what of the exhibition. Well, if you are a seasoned gamer there’s nothing here that will surprise you. However it’s well worth visiting to play on some of the rarer systems. It’s also well worth attending if you have a friend or partner who may not be interested in gaming but you want to get a few games as every single game they showcase is a classic.

Power Up Manchester runs until the 19th August, tickets are available here.

The post Power UP Exhibition in Museum of Science & Industry, Manchester appeared first on Retro Garden.

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From August 3rd, Power Up, the retro gaming festival based in the Museum of Science and Industry in Manchester, will make it’s return for two weeks.

Iconic retro consoles including the SNES, SEGA Dreamcast and the original educational computer, the BBC Micro will be present at the event, as well as themed areas dedicated to some of gaming’s hottest franchises such as the Mario Brothers and Sonic the Hedgehog series.

There will also be a movie themed area where gamers can play games such as Batman, Robocop vs Terminator, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Lord of the Rings – Fellowship of the Ring. Fans of driving games can play games such as Road Rash & Destruction Derby, and visitors can tackle multiplayer classics of the retro and modern era like Goldeneye, Mario Kart 8 and Minecraft.

For the first time ever Power Up will play host to Fortnite, and gamers can immerse themselves in the world of virtual reality; play on the latest big releases, or tackle some arcade classics on special bartop arcade machines like Metal Slug, Frogger and the Street Fighter series.

Visitors to Power UP can see for themselves how far gaming technology has advanced in the four decades since early games like Pong carved out their place in pop culture. Modern innovations like PlayStation VR will provide a glimpse into what the future may hold.

Evening-only sessions will take place on Friday, August 10 and Friday, August 17, giving the opportunity to play 18-only games including DOOM, Resident Evil and Grand Theft Auto.

Ticket prices vary, visit msimanchester.org.uk/powerup for more information.

A full look up at the event will be published soon!

The post Retro gaming festival Power Up is set to return to Manchester from August 3rd appeared first on Retro Garden.

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