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Whether you’re fleeing the craze of Manhattan or transplanting to NYC, a move to Brooklyn is as exciting as moves come. However, in Brooklyn, the neighborhoods are as different as the people that live in them, with a huge range of prices. So which Brooklyn neighborhood is best for you?
 

Williamsburg

 
Arguably the birthplace of the hipster, Williamsburg promises rooftop views over the East River, a plethora of trendy restaurants and bars, and thrifting options galore. As one of the most developed places in Brooklyn, most of what you can find in Manhattan, you can find in Williamsburg. Lately, Williamsburg has begun to be divided into north and south sides, separated by Grand St. Find multi-million dollar condos in “North Williamsburg” and co-op walk-ups in “South Williamsburg.”

Downsides: While the latest news is that the L train isn’t fully shutting down, renovations to the tunnel may still affect riders on nights and weekends.

Good for: Techies and freelancers who don’t have to commute to the city–take advantage of some of the coolest coffee shops, cafes, and co-working spaces in the city.

Bushwick

 
In Bushwick, you can still find some real Brooklyn grit and inspired street art. Residents enjoy a new coffee shop every week, edgy bars and warehouse parties, and lots of quirky dining options. If you’re lucky, you can snatch a coveted warehouse apartment for a reasonable price. Bushwick Food Co-Op and Bushwick Farmer’s Market provide the neighborhood with fresh grocery shopping options.

Downsides: Also situated on the L, Bushwick is likely to be affected by the partial shutdown as well. If you need to commute to the city at odd hours, look into living on the J or M lines.

Good for: Young people who want to be near nightlife and those commuting to the lower east side–the J and M will get you there in roughly 20 minutes.

Carroll Garden

 
Carroll Gardens is one of the cleanest and quietest of the Brooklyn neighborhoods. Think beautiful tree-lined streets, gardens that give it the latter half of its name, and turn of the century brownstones. In Carroll Gardens, you’ll find a mix of younger transplants, a new French population, and Italians-Americans that have lived there for generations. Around the neighborhood, you can enjoy upscale dining, private label fashion, and locally-owned grocers. The F and G trains run out of Carroll St. Station and provide good connectivity to the rest of Brooklyn.

Downsides: Not well-connected to the city via public transit.

Good for: Families looking for a safe neighborhood that’s walkable.

DUMBO

 
DUMBO (Down Under the Manhattan Bridge Overpass), has some of the best rooftop views of the Brooklyn Bridge and the Manhattan skyline. Despite its new developments, it still maintains some of its old Brooklyn charm with its cobblestone streets and older brick buildings. Lucky for DUMBO residents, three parks on the waterfront–Main Street Park, Hillside Dog Park, and Brooklyn Bridge Park–are all within walking distance. It’s a quick, one-stop train ride to Manhattan on the A, C, or F lines.

Downsides: Because of its well-connectedness, proximity to the city, and luxury highrises, DUMBO is the most expensive place to rent in Brooklyn, with average rent at $5,400.

Good for: Those who aren’t worried about costs and want great connectivity.

Kensington

 
Kensington is a super diverse neighborhood comprising mostly of residential housing. Here you can find detached houses, Victorian-era row houses, and brick apartment buildings. It’s located relatively close to Prospect Park and is connected to the city by the F, G, and Q, and will take you 20 minutes on the train to lower Manhattan. The best part about this quiet residential area is the prices for homebuyers. The median home cost is $515,000, with the median rent price at $2,100.

Downsides: Not one of the most beautiful, charming, or trendy neighborhoods in Brooklyn.

Good for: Those looking for a great price, more space, and fewer crowds.

Bay Ridge

 
This unpretentious neighborhood is often described as feeling like ‘a small town in a big city.’ With a melting pot of cultures, Bay Ridge has a great food scene where you can find almost any type of cuisine you want (check out Elia Restaurant’s Greek food and Shobu Sushi). Community involvement is big here, while nightlife is not. It also tends to be one of the cheaper housing options in Brooklyn, with the average rent price at $2,200 for a two-bedroom.

Downsides: Expect a long commute to the city (1 hour to midtown) with the R train being the only line that goes to Bay Ridge.

Good for: Those looking for an oasis away from the city, a community feel, and cheaper rent.

Prospect Lefferts Gardens

 
Located to the east of Prospect Park, this neighborhood has a good blend of accessibility (B, Q, S, 2 trains), shopping and dining options on Flatbush Avenue, and great connectivity to the parks, museums, and Botanic Gardens in Brooklyn. The area is known for its Caribbean Community and cuisine, so if jerk chicken is your thing, this might be the place for you. Rental prices are pretty affordable here still ($2,725 for a 2-bedroom) and you can find some beautiful Romanesque Revival, neo-Georgian and neo-Tudor style architecture.

Downsides: Not a lot of nightlife options in these parts.

Good for: Those wanting to live near Prospect Park but not wanting to pay Park Slope prices.

Bedford-Stuyvesant

 
More commonly known as Bed-Stuy, this up-and-coming neighborhood touts street after street of beautiful, old brownstones and some of the best rental prices in Brooklyn ($2,460 on average for a 2-bedroom). Scattered hot-spot bars and coffee shops spring up in the middle of city blocks here and it has its own vibey music venue (C’mon Everybody). It’s connected to the city by the A/C and also has a G train for easy connections in Brooklyn.

Downsides: Commuting to uptown Manhattan from Bed-Stuy can be pretty brutal, especially if you’re heading to the Upper East Side, expect a travel time of more than 1 hour.

Good for: Those looking for a good mix of old-Brooklyn feel, cool nightlife, and trendy eating options.

Boerum Hill

 
One of the most expensive spots to rent in Brooklyn, at an average of $4,000 for a 2-bedroom, you’ll find mostly brownstones and large brick buildings in this neighborhood. Located nearby Downtown Brooklyn, this well-connected spot can have you to the city in 10 minutes via Atlantic Terminal (2, 3, 4, 5, B, D, N, Q, R, W) and you can find anything you want on Atlantic Avenue (Target!). On Smith St, you’ll also have high-end shopping and dining options, along with Trader Joe’s on Boerum Hill’s North East Corner.

Downsides: Not so close to any parks and it’s expensive.

Good for: Families and young people looking to get the best of everything in Brooklyn who don’t mind paying for it.

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Finding an apartment is tough. Finding an apartment you can actually afford is even harder. That is why we, here at RentHop wants to give a little insight on what’s on the market right now, in different price ranges.

Chelsea is a popular neighborhood in New York City for many reasons and some of those reasons being the mixture of housing the neighborhood has to offer in terms of a mix between townhouses and apartment buildings, the neighborhood’s restaurants and art galleries and let’s not forget the bars! There is a lot the neighborhood can offer its residents. So if you’re thinking of moving to Chelsea, check out these five places under $2,500 for inspiration!

1. W 29th st & 8th ave

 
1. W 29th st & 8th ave
Price: $2,000
Size: Studio, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Unsure

If you are looking for a spacious studio apartment that can offer you features such as exposed brick and a fireplace look no further as this studio apartment might be just the one for you. For exactly $2,000 you can live in the trendy neighborhood of Chelsea in a charming and spacious studio apartment that is two blocks from Penn Station and pretty much close to anything you need in terms of grocery stores, shopping, restaurants, and more.

2. 213 Seventh Avenue

2. 213 Seventh Avenue
Price: $2,400
Size: Studio, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Here is yet another studio apartment located in Chelsea. If you are looking to go up a bit in price, specifically $400 a month, you could get your hands on this spacious studio apartment for $2,400. The place comes with an open kitchen that has a dishwasher and microwave, floor to ceiling windows, hardwood floors throughout the place, a newly renovated marble bathroom, and tons of natural sunlight.

3. 246 West 21st Street

3. 246 West 21st Street
Price: $2,475
Size: Studio, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Unsure

Here is a no fee apartment listed on our site, for $2,475 by broker. The unit is a studio apartment, 1 bath, located in Chelsea. The place stays under the budget of $2,500 and with the price you can get your hands on a spacious studio apartment that is fully gut renovated, it has high ceilings, comes with a brand new kitchen with stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors throughout, and a fully renovated bathroom. Definitely worth checking out if you are looking for a studio apartment under $2,500.

4. 209 West 21st Street

4. 209 West 21st Street
Price: $2,375
Size: 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Always wanted to live in a townhouse but thought it was out of your budget? Well, think again. Not only is this place located in a townhouse but it is also a 1 bedroom apartment (!) and under $2,500 (!!). If you are looking for more space for your money, you want to check this place out. While it comes with space and is located in a well maintained pre war building, it is also pet friendly so bring your furry friends to check it out!

5. W 15th Street

5. W 15th Street
Price: $2,395
Size: 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

And we end the list with yet another 1 bedroom apartment in Chelsea, under $2,500, that is pet-friendly! The place is sunny and bright, it has hardwood floors throughout, it’s located in a quiet area, but still super close to all you are looking for in a neighborhood and its surrounding area! Add this to your list of apartments you want to check out today.

***

Looking for a new place to call home in New York City? Check our blog for more posts like this, aimed to give you an idea of what’s out there, and in what price range.

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Apartment searching can be stressful. Even after spending all that time and energy searching for the perfect apartment, there is still the question of if the landlord will choose you out of all the other applicants. This brings us to the topic of the rental application process. What it is and what screening criteria are required for a rental application.

The application process is a landlord’s way of screening for the most-qualified and least-risky future tenant. As a landlord, the last thing they want is for a tenant to miss payments on rent, mess up the apartment, and/or cause a disruption in the community that they would then have to deal with. By looking at your background and finances, a landlord can have a better idea of what kind of tenant you’ll be and also if you’ll be able to pay rent on time each month. Often, landlords may have a management company or real estate agent work on the screening process for them.

As a renter, there are a lot of different documents to prepare, forms to fill out, and fees to pay, so it’s best to begin collecting necessary documents and putting aside enough money in a bank account prior to the start of your apartment search.

To get you better prepared, here are some of the most common questions on an application form:

  • Your annual salary/ income
  • Social security number
  • Employment history

Some of the more common and supporting documents are:

  • Photo ID (password or driver’s license)
  • Letter of employment with your job title, length of employment, and annual salary – this should be printed on a company letterhead
  • Copies of last two-three pay stubs
  • Copies of the last two tax returns
  • Letters of reference from past landlords/employers/guarantors – please include their contact information*
  • Personal letters of reference*

*These can be optional (though submitting these will provide you with a stronger application)

Along with the application form and supporting documents are application fees and deposits that the landlord may expect you to pay. Here are the three most common ones:

  • Application fee: The landlord may require each person on the application to pay this fee. This fee covers the processing of the application.
  • Credit Check Authorization Fee: Landlords will commonly run a credit check on each person on the application. This fee covers fee that landlords will have to pay in order to run a credit check.
  • “Good-Faith deposit”: Some landlords will ask applicants to submit a deposit to temporarily take the apartment you are interested off the market. You should be able to receive your deposit back if your application is denied by the landlord.

Beware: Never hand over your personal information or submit any fees to the landlord or agent until you have seen the apartment you want in person. This is the best way to protect yourself against scammers.

So what are some important criteria’s a landlord may consider?

  • A high enough credit score: A credit score is a good representation of your financial responsibility. The better your ability to pay off your loans and pay your bills on time, the higher your credit score. A credit score is generally a number between 300 and 850. As implied, the higher your score, the better. If your credit score is lower, your landlord may require that you pay a few months rent upfront or a larger security deposit so they can minimize the chances of you not paying rent on time. Federal law stipulates that you are allowed to get a free copy of your credit report every year from each credit reporting company. You should be checking this yearly to ensure that your information is correct and up-to-date. A great resource is http://annualcreditreport.com.
  • Sufficient income: Outside of your credit score, landlords will also need to be sure that you are making sufficient income so that you can afford rent on a monthly basis. If you do not make enough to cover rent, you should consider getting a guarantor.
  • Stable employment history: This kind of goes hand-in-hand with having sufficient income, but having a stable employment history, implies that there is a less likely chance that you will run out of income to pay rent.
  • Clean eviction record: Landlords will often check for your eviction record. A clean record implies that other landlords haven’t had issues with you and the more you will be viewed as a good potential tenant.
  • Reference letters: Outside of your finances, landlords will also view applicants with great reference letters in a favorable light. So if you can attain great reference letters from your employee, past landlord, or guarantor, that should add some extra oomph to your application!

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With total evictions in 2018 clocking in at around 21,000, it would be unfair to characterize evictions in NYC as a problem affecting a large portion of the population. That said, the Data Science team at RentHop looked into some of the more interesting data around evictions in an attempt to better understand the landscape of evictions and to better inform renters about the mysterious process.

We looked into the evictions in the 2019 year-to-date, and compared them to the same period last year in 2018.

Key Findings:

  • In 2019, evictions have fallen in every single borough in NYC, with an overall drop of 9.6%.
  • The largest drop in evictions is in the Bronx – from 1,558 in 2018 to 1,225 in 2019 year-to-date (a 21.4% drop).
  • For the most part, evictions tend to be concentrated in the same neighborhoods year over year with Claremont-Bathgate in the Bronx having the highest number of evictions in 2019.
  • There appears to be little to no correlation between 1-bedroom median rents and the number of evictions in a given neighborhood.
    • In other words, it doesn’t appear as if more affordable neighborhoods have higher number of evictions.
  • The Manhattan addresses with the most evictions in 2019 are 555 Tenth Avenue and 605 West 42nd Street – both fairly new buildings.

Eviction Map:

The below map shows 2018 and 2019 evictions* side-by-side, color coated based on the number of evictions present in a given neighborhood. As one can see, the reddest sections (with the most evictions) are concentrated mostly in the Bronx and in Brooklyn, whereas evictions in Manhattan and Queens tend to be less frequent.


*Note that the above data was taken from NYC Open Data for evictions in the 2018-2019 year from Jan 1st to March 11th. Median rent data is taken from RentHop’s proprietary databases. Instances where there is no coloring for evictions means that we had insufficient data on evictions and/or median rental prices.

Boroughs – Year over Year

The above table shows the drop in evictions by borough, year over year. We took the year-to-date data for 2019 and looked at the comparable period for 2018. Granted, 2019 is only just beginning, but the data shows a clear downward trend.

  • In the Bronx, evictions for the period fell from 1,588 to 1,225, a 21.4% decrease.
  • Brooklyn evictions decreased from 1,170 to 994, a 15% decrease.
  • In Manhattan, there was a smaller decrease but a decrease nonetheless – from 518 to 486; a 6.2% decrease.
  • Queens had the smallest decrease – from 733 to 716, a 2.3% decrease.
  • Lastly, Staten Island went from 127 to 97, a 23.6% decrease.

Rent vs. Evictions

As part of our data analysis, the Data Science team at RentHop was curious to see whether we could find any correlation between median rent prices and the number of evictions in a given neighborhood. This was especially important to us given the economic incentives for the marshals that serve these evictions, who earn what’s called a poundage fee — a percentage of whatever they collect.

However, we did not find any convincing correlation between median rents and evictions, only finding an R squared of .078, which suggests that the economic incentives of poundage fees don’t necessarily push marshals to solely evict people in either high-rent or low-rent places.

Full Data

See below the full table of all the addresses evicted and the marshals who evicted them – you can type in your zip code and see all the relevant evictions from 2018 and 2019. Note that the table is unique based on docket number, (the number assigned by the city marshal during case intake) so there may be multiple entries for the same address for a given eviction date.

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In 2019 Residents Are Still Lacking Heat in the Same Neighborhoods

While the beginning of 2019 hasn’t been as cold as 2018’s bomb cyclone, the 2019 Heat Season has continued to show that certain parts of the city just aren’t getting the heat they need- despite peoples’ complaints to 311. And, despite the 120,780 complaints (83,161 unique) in 2018, this year’s Heat Season is shaping up to be very similar to last year, with the same areas cropping up once more. And, as the frigid cold cropped up this past weekend (single digit degrees in many parts of the city!), this is all the more concerning.

We can’t highlight enough how important this distinction is, as some outlier addresses keep popping up every year. 89-21 Elmhurst Ave tops the list this year once more, having received 1,078 complaints this season, spread across 50 days. This continues last year’s trend, where they clinched the spot with 1,298 complaints– while there are fewer complaints this year, the fact that the same address continues to have spotty heat is incredibly concerning. Surely someone there is really cold, but they’re fuming as they make over 25 complaints per day. That said, it’s not all bad – 1025 Boynton Avenue, which had 574 complaints across 75 days last year (and 430 complaints over 70 days in 2017) has dropped to fewer than 20 complaints this Heat Season. The top complaint list is below (fig. 4 below).

De-duping helps minimize the effect of potentially malicious or very angry residents. By grouping together same-day calls from the same address that is reduced. We further normalize the data when looking at neighborhoods, by dividing by the number of rental units in a neighborhood (people that own their home and are cold should settle that dispute with their significant other). The number used when ranking neighborhoods and comparing to Median rents represent unique complaints per 1,000 rental units in a neighborhood.

With all this in mind, RentHop has analyzed which neighborhoods have the coldest New Yorkers and why. Here are the key findings from the study:

  • A strong correlation was found between rent prices and complaints about lack of heat. The ‘Normalized Heat Complaints vs Median Rent’ chart demonstrates this (fig. 1)
  • Erasmus, Brooklyn; Mount Hope, Bronx; and Norwood, Bronx were the top 3 complaint neighborhoods, and both Erasmus and Norwood appeared in the top 3 last year as well (fig. 2)
  • The Erasmus Neighborhood in Brooklyn again clinches the top spot for the most normalized heat complaints in the 2019 Heat Season.
  • A side-by-side geographic comparison shows that the same NYC neighborhoods that were problematic for complaints last year are having issues again this year (fig. 3)
  • Nearly half of the addresses receiving the most unique heat complaints this season ranked high last year as well (fig. 4)
  • Heat Complaints for the first week of 2019 are down significantly from 2018 although this is likely due to the “bomb cyclone” having occurred in the first week of 2018 (fig. 5)
  • 2019 has bucked the trend of increasing heat complaints, suggesting that overall there are fewer heating complaints this season (or that people have given up on calling 311) (fig. 6)
Figure 1

When looking at the graph of heat complaints versus median rent, with median rent as the independent variable, we can see clustering of high numbers of complaints where rents are lower. Complaints are less common as rents rise. While we also see some neighborhoods with both low rents and low complaints, but we don’t see any neighborhoods with high rents and high complaints. Median rent data is for all of 2017 via RentHop’s listing database; heat complaints are unique complaints normalized by the number of rental units in a particular neighborhood, via ACS data.

Figure 2

The above table contains the full list of NYC neighborhoods, 2019 one-bedroom median rents, the number of NYC heat complaints (unique, raw, and normalized 2018 & 2019). It’s currently sorted by the normalized number of complaints received through 1/7/2019, but can be re-sorted on any column. When re-sorting by normalized complaints for this period last year, the top 3 names – Erasmus, Mount Hope, and Norwood – stay in the top 5.

For the most part, the 10 neighborhoods with the most freezing New Yorkers are the same as last year but in a slightly different order. Rent in these neighborhoods is also well below the NYC median, which hovers around $3,000 for a one-bedroom. The top 10 neighborhoods all have rents near or below $2,000, save for Erasmus. We can see that these issues are repeated and prevalent over time. Shown geographically next, it is even more clear how things are unfortunately not changing.

Figure 3

Taking a look at the above maps, it’s hard to discern one from another, which at first prompts a “so-what” or a kind of bored response. This means, however, that same people are suffering that were cold last year. The same landlords in the same areas still aren’t adequately heating their buildings, and the same Department of Housing isn’t doing enough to make sure these people aren’t cold. One can only imagine how the person or persons at these addresses making hundreds of calls must feel. Year-after-year, cold and seemingly screaming into the wind for help.

Figure 4

The table above lists the most complained about addresses, ranked by unique complaint count, with raw counts as well. If the address received complaints last year as well, the number of complaints from this same period last year (October 1 – January 7th) as well as their rank last year is displayed. Any address that also ranked in the top 50 last year is highlighted in red. A significant portion of the list appeared in the top 50 last year too.

The prevalence of repeat offenders is quite disconcerting. It’s certainly possible that there are people that have it out for their landlords, but this many repeat names likely means that things aren’t being fixed and the same people that suffered last year are again this year.

Figure 5

The chart above shows how bad last week really was, compared to other first weeks in the last 9 years. And, by all accounts, the first week of 2019 was quite mild compared to last year’s “bomb cyclone.”

How does the NYC “Heat Season” work?

From October 1st through May 31 landlords are required to provide heat for all tenants. The requirements are pretty low:

  • Between 6:00 AM and 10:00 PM, if the outside temperature falls below 55 degrees, the inside temperature is required to be at least 68 degrees F
  • Between 10:00 PM and 6:00 AM, if the temperature outside falls below 40 degrees, the inside temperature is required to be at least 55 degrees F
Figure 6

Looking back at the past 4 years of complaints grouped by week, we can see that, with the exception last year, complaints have been fairly evenly distributed across the heat season, with a distinct ramp-up and ramp-down at the beginning and the end of the season.

What can I do if I think my apartment isn’t being adequately heated?

If you find that your heat isn’t meeting the low minimum requirements, you should first reach out to your landlord. Certified Mail is recommended if it’s an ongoing issue, but I’ve found that text also helps keep a record of the issue and sometimes false promises. If this doesn’t work, calling 311 or visiting the online portal for creating complaints, allows you to make complaints, anonymously if you wish. An inspector from the NYC HPD will come to check the building for violations, usually within a few days, but from the looks of things, they may be backed up.

Regardless, be diligent. Repeated calls and texts to my own landlord has helped me get a little warmer. Usually just one call to 311 gets the message to a scroogey landlord that you know your rights.

Moving into a new place?

Use the NYC Housing Preservation & Developments’s tool to check the address of the building for past and open violations.

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Finding an apartment is tough. Finding an apartment you can actually afford is even harder. That is why we, here at RentHop wants to give a little insight on what’s on the market right now, in different price ranges.

Astoria is hip and trendy, and it’s a neighborhood for everyone really. It is a good match if you’re students looking, families, young professionals, everyone. And especially if you are a foodie looking for great food, as Astoria has no lack of amazing restaurants in every cuisine (but maybe slightly more Greek places, but who doesn’t love Greek food?) Interested in making Astoria your new neighborhood? Check out what the area can offer right now, for $1,800 and under!

1. 42-13 23 Avenue

1. 42-13 23 Avenue
Price: $1,750
Size: 1 Bedroom
Pet Friendly: Pets on Approval

One other thing that’s great about Astoria, other than a variety of great restaurants around, is the fact that you get some space for your money! It is not hard to find a 1 bedroom apartment for under $1,800 for example, just check this one out! This 1 bedroom apartment is centrally located and spacious, worth checking out.

2. 33rd St.

2. 33rd St.
Price: $1,788
Size: 1 Bedroom
Pet Friendly: Cats Allowed

Here is another 1 bedroom you should check out. The rent is $1,788 net effecting, which is based on a gross rent of $1,950 and 1 month free rent. This apartment is also centrally located, and it is located in a well maintained elevator building. It also has a open kitchen, which makes the apartment even more charming.

 
 

3. 33rd Street

3. 33rd Street
Price: $1,800
Size: 1 Bedroom
Pet Friendly: No Pets Allowed

Located on 33rd street as well, this 1 bedroom apartment is just stunning. Get this spacious 1 bedroom apartment, located in a prewar elevator building, with hardwood floors throughout, a stunning bathroom, big size rooms, and tons of natural lights and high ceilings for $1,800! What else could you ask for?

4. 46-10 30th Ave

4. 46-10 30th Ave
Price: $1,800
Size: 1 Bedroom
Pet Friendly: No Pets Allowed

Another charming 1 bedroom apartment in Astoria is this one right here. It’s a bright apartment with a separate kitchen, big living room and a big bedroom. The kitchen is also very spacious, which will be attractive for those who love cooking!

5. 49 Street

5. 49 Street
Price: $1,800
Size: 1 Bedroom
Pet Friendly: No Pets Allowed

If you thought you couldn’t get a space with a private balcony, think again! Because here it is, a 1 bedroom apartment with a private balcony and a fireplace for just $1,800 a month. Making this place a steal just for the amenities alone.

6. 25th Ave and 44th St

6. 25th Ave and 44th St
Price: $1,750
Size: 1 Bedroom
Pet Friendly: Yes

Another 1 bedroom apartment for rent in Astoria, is this one going for $1,750 right now. It is located in the heart of Astoria, it is close to everything in terms of activities and restaurants, and the place is newly renovated. The apartment also has a eat-in kitchen, which opens up the apartment a bit more.
 

 
 

7. 31st Street

7. 31st Street
Price: $1,800
Size: Studio
Pet Friendly: No Pets Allowed

Yes, Astoria has studio apartments to offer as well, not just 1 bedroom apartments. And this studio apartment is sleek. It’s located in a well-maintained luxury condo building, with an updated kitchen, stainless steel appliances, new hardwood floors throughout the apartment, and it has a balcony. All for just $1,800 a month!
 

***
Looking for a new place to call home in New York City? Check our blog for more posts like this, aimed to give you an idea of what’s out there, and in what price range.

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Finding an apartment is tough. Finding an apartment you can actually afford is even harder. That is why we, here at RentHop wants to give a little insight on what’s on the market right now, in different price ranges.

Williamsburg is one of New York City’s most hip and trendy neighborhoods. The neighborhood is vibrant and attracts a lot of different residents due to its long list of offered restaurants, bars, parks, and great views of Manhattan. If you’re thinking about moving to Williamsburg, check out these spots for $2,800 and under.

1. 325 Kent Avenue

1. 325 Kent Avenue
Price: $2,795
Size: Studio, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Let’s start with this one, located at 325 Kent Avenue. This studio apartment has a traditional layout, it comes with white oak hardwood floors, washer and dryer, stainless steel appliances in the kitchen, and a lot more. It is definitely worth checking out if you are looking for a sleek, modern studio apartment located in a full-service building in the heart of Williamsburg.

2. Berry Street

2. Berry Street
Price: $2,725
Size: Studio, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Another great studio apartment at a great location in Williamsburg is this one on Berry Street. The place is located in a high standard full-service building and the apartment itself features a gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, a washer and dryer, and a private patio or a terrace.

3. Graham Avenue

3. Graham Avenue
Price: $2,600
Size: 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Unknown

If you are looking for space for your money, take a look at this one. Here we have a 2 bedroom apartment on Graham Avenue for $2,600! Now that’s a steal, especially considering the location. The apartment was recently renovated, it has a eat-in kitchen, two queen-sized bedrooms, and more. Perfect for a roommate situation, a small family, or just an individual who likes space.

4. 58 Stagg St

4. 58 Stagg St
Price: $2,700
Size: 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Another spacious apartment on this list is this 1 bedroom apartment at 58 Stagg St. The place comes with a big living room, high ceilings, hardwood floors, and a balcony. And the apartment is pet friendly and has a rooftop. What more could you want?

5. 247 N 7th Street

5. 247 N 7th Street
Price: $2,784
Size: Studio, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Located on N 7th Street, this studio apartment is also a great attender for those looking for a studio apartment in Williamsburg under $2,800 or under. Apartment features include a washer and dryer in-unit, 9 ft. ceilings, an open kitchen, and more. And it is pet-friendly!

6. 60 Monitor St

6. 60 Monitor St
Price: $2,495
Size: 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes

Those looking for a great new apartment for both you and your furry friend, look no further. The listing description on this apartment even say the apartment is very pet friendly. Other building amenities include a gym, parking, roof deck, hardwood floors, etc.
 

7. 41 S 5th St

7. 41 S 5th St
Price: $2,800
Size: 1 Bedroom, 1 Bath
Pet Friendly: Yes, on approval.

This one is a little different, because of its great layout. The space has a loft layout, which makes this place seems huge. The open layout provides the space with a lot of sunlight, large windows, and a lot of space to get creative with the decorations. Other features that you get with the $2,800 price tag is a shared courtyard and a roof deck.
 

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Looking for a new place to call home in New York City? Check our blog for more posts like this, aimed to give you an idea of what’s out there, and in what price range.

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Moving to a new apartment is an exciting time in a person’s life, but isn’t free from its own set of stressors. Perhaps the largest stressor of them all is the actual move itself. While this move is always a bit painstaking, that goes double for when you have to move to a new apartment in the winter. The cold, the ice, and the unpredictability all add to an experience that has the potential to be quite difficult.

Thankfully, there are some things that you can do to make your winter move into a new apartment a little bit smoother. This article is going to take a look at some of the best tips to help you move into a new apartment in the winter.

1. Watch your step

When moving furniture up and down stairs and loading it in and out of vehicles, you will be making a large number of trips. While this is likely tiring and might take a while, in the winter, there is also the added risk of ice. Sidewalks, front steps and even the streets themselves could be covered in ice, which makes it very hard to walk without slipping.

Not only can falling on the ice or snow lead to painful injuries but if you fall while carrying some of your belongings, they could be damaged. Either way, be sure to be extra careful, watch your step and even consider salting or chipping away the ice before you start your move in or out of an apartment. Also, look into wearing shoes with a lot of grip to prevent slippage.

2. Dress warm

In addition to the ice being something you need to worry about in the winter, so is the cold. While it won’t cause you to fall, it can cause you a whole lot of pain and discomfort during your move. Being out in the cold is not advised, but when you have to move, you have no choice but to spend potentially hours and hours moving in and out of the cold.

As a result, be sure to dress warm if the weather will be cold during your move. This means gloves (preferably ones that still allow you to carry or hold things without issue), a jacket, and potentially even a beanie. Of course, how warm you dress will depend on what the conditions call for in your area. While dressing warm might inhibit your movement a little and you might get hot while loading stuff inside your old apartment, it is worth it to ensure you stay warm and comfortable when outside.

3. Take frequent breaks

When moving, especially in the winter, you need to be sure to take frequent breaks. Not only to give your body a rest from the heavy lifting, but also to prevent yourself from getting too cold. These breaks don’t have to be long, but just give yourself a few minutes every hour or so to relax and warm up.

If not, you run the risk of your fingers, toes or other body parts potentially going numb, which can make carrying and transporting things more difficult. Also, who doesn’t love a little hot chocolate on a cold day in the middle of a long move?

4. Allow extra time for the move

One thing that everyone should know about winter by now is just how unpredictable the weather can be. It can be clear one moment, only to have the next be full of wind and snow. Because of this unpredictability, it is very important to be flexible and allow yourself some extra time for the move if you need it, or have a backup plan.

The last thing you want to do is be forced to move during a snowstorm, so you should be sure to be flexible and have a couple of other days that you could move. Also, things like road closures, car accidents, and other weather-related issues could arise that you need to be aware of.

5. Protect your belongings from the conditions

When most of us move, we put most of our belongings into boxes and carry out the boxes to load up in a vehicle. While this is fine in the spring and summer months, it might not be enough for the winter. This is because some items might need some extra protection against the cold.

Things like dishes and things that are made of glass are particularly at risk, as they can crack or break if a rapid change of temperature occurs. Also, electronics of many kinds can be affected by the cold and should be protected. These susceptible items can be protected by being wrapped in blankets or other things to keep them insulated.

We hope that this post has been able to help you discover some new and useful tips for moving into a new apartment in the winter.

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One of the best parts about living in an apartment during the winter is not having to worry about shoveling your driveway or yard. However, things aren’t always peaches and cream when it comes to living in an apartment during the winter. One of the most common concerns is high heating costs during the cold winter months.

While this will, of course, vary from unit to unit, heating costs are generally a lot higher in the winter. While some people get heating included in their rent, others must spend a pretty penny to keep their apartments warm.

If you are sick of high heating costs in your apartment, you have come to the right place. This blog post is going to look at a few tips to help you keep your apartment heating costs down this winter, without freezing to death.

1. Keep the thermostat under control

When someone is cold in their apartment, the first thing they will often do is reach for the thermostat and turn it up. While that will make your apartment warmer, it can also be quite expensive. The costs will differ, but if you keep the thermostat cranked, you could be looking at an expensive bill at the end of the month. As a result, keep your thermostat at a fairly stagnant temperature, normally anywhere from 60-70 degrees.

Another way to save money when it comes to the thermostat is to keep it a bit lower than usual at night. Your blankets should keep you warmer at night. This same thing could be applied to during the daytime if you are gone. So if you work from 8-4, keep it a bit cooler during those hours since no one is home.

2. Invest in warm blankets and clothing

If you are one of those people who love to turn up the heat when you get a little chilly, it might make sense to put on some extra clothes or grab a blanket instead. Most people already have warm clothes and blankets lying around, so they won’t even have to go buy any.

Not only do they keep you warm, but most warm clothing and blankets can also even make you more comfortable. If you find yourself being too lazy to go grab a sweater or a blanket from your room or closet, you should keep some nearby in your living room or office in case you need to use them.

3. Keep doors and windows closed

While getting fresh air in your apartment unit is a great feeling, opening windows or doors is a good way to let the hot air out and the cold air in. As a result, keeping your doors and windows closed will keep your unit warmer and stop you from having to turn up the heat all day.

In addition to keeping them closed, you need to ensure there are no drafts, leaks or gaps. If there is, the window or door will likely let cold air in, even when it is completely closed and locked. A large percentage of heat loss comes from these gaps in doors and windows, so get them repaired or closed if you have them.

If you need some fresh air, it is best to crack a window a little bit while you are at work or while you sleep, so you won’t be around to deal with the cold that comes from it.

4. Avoid blocking furnaces and keep them clean

In order to heat your unit, your furnace needs to push out hot air to fill the unit. However, if something is blocking the furnace, it won’t be able to heat your home as effectively as it should. You should make sure that no furniture is blocking your heat source directly.

If it is, there is a chance your furnace isn’t heating as much of your unit as it should. This could lead you to turn it up and waste more money on heating when simply rearranging furniture could do the trick. In addition to blockage of the furnace, you should make sure it stays clean as well as dirt and dust could hurt how much hot air it pushes out.

5. Use free solar heating

While most of us expect the heat to come into our units through the furnace, it can also come through the windows. That’s right, the rays of the sun can actually warm up your home if you keep blinds open during the day when the sun is low.

Of course, this will depend on how much sun your city or unit gets. But if the sun comes into your apartment during the day, keeping blinds or shades open can be a good way to warm it up a little bit. Of course, keeping them closed at night is a good way to insulate as well.

We hope that this article has been able to show you some creative and helpful ways to ensure heating your apartment can be done affordably.

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As the months of your apartment lease begin to tick away, it is normal to begin thinking about what is next. Over the next few months, you will need to decide whether to renew your lease or if it’s time to move on to a new one. Now, if you have ever gone through this yourself you know it isn’t always an easy choice to make.

With that in mind, this blog post is going to help you decide whether to stick around and sign a new lease or move on to another apartment.  
 
1. How was your experience?

Of course, the most important consideration to make here is to gauge how your experience was. If you had a great time and loved the landlord and the unit, you should at least be open to the idea of renewing the lease. Getting stuck with a bad landlord or a unit full of issues is common, so you should feel lucky that you were able to land a place you enjoy.

If you had a bad time or weren’t a fan of the landlord, neighbors or rules, this should make your choice to move out incredibly easy as you had a poor experience. Of course, be sure to consider other things like ample parking, access to a gym, the commute and other factors as well.
 
2. How much will they charge you?

During your initial one-year lease, there is a good chance that your landlord offered or attached some sort of deal to your lease. This could have been something like $50 off a month, free parking for a year, one-month free or anything in between.

However, while nice, most of those incentives offered will only last a year and when you renew your lease the deals will be gone. As a result, there is a good chance your rent will go up for your second lease (unless there has been a large change in the market). Is this new price fair for what you get? If so, it could be worthwhile to stay. However, if not, it might be in your best interest to move.  

While this rent increase isn’t always the case (and some landlords might even provide additional incentives or a decreased rent for a renewal), usually you should expect to pay a slightly increased rent when you renew, just to be safe.
 
3. Have you found somewhere better?

Even if you intend to stay at your apartment and renew your lease, it is a good idea to do a little bit of research and see what’s out there. New apartments are being posted daily, and many of them will likely have features you are interested in.

Who knows, if you simply sign a renewal without even looking at other options you might eventually discover you could have gotten a nicer or safer place for less money, but simply missed the opportunity.

If you find something better before the lease renewal cut-off date, you can take it, but if not, you can still sign the renewal without losing anything.
 
4. What’s the market like?

Before you agree to a renewal or decide to leave, you should evaluate what the market is like. Is there a lot of demand for apartments and are rent prices high? Or are there many vacancies which are leading landlords to drop their prices? Either way, knowing the market in your city can help you make an informed decision.

You should compare the rent you will be paying if you renew against rents in similar locations in your area. Each city is different and many will even be different depending on the time of the year, so timing your research correctly is also important.
 
5. Are you able to afford or handle moving out?

One thing that will often get lost in the excitement of moving out into a new apartment is actually the moving process. Moving all of your belongings from one apartment to another can get expensive once you factor in moving trucks, boxes, possible missed days of work and hiring labor assistance can often cost hundreds (or thousands) of dollars.

In addition to moving out being expensive, it can also be incredibly stressful, especially if you are on a higher floor. Depending on how much stuff you have, moving could take dozens of trips with your vehicle and moving things like bookcases, bed frames, and couches down flights of stairs or trying to fit them in elevators isn’t easy. If you are very busy at the time of your renewal date and simply can’t handle or don’t have time for a move, it might make sense to renew, as long as the terms are acceptable.
 
Hopefully, this blog post has been able to help you make the right choice, whether it be to move out and find a new apartment or home, or renew your lease for another year.

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