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Or a seminal text / "bible" on technical writing?

I'd like to learn the basics in a structured way.

submitted by /u/outbackdude
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I'm new to Reddit as well as to this board and I made an account on Reddit just for my concern. I am currently taking a Technical Writing Certificate online from a community college and It seems underwhelming. I spent close to $1,500 on the course and I was expecting it to teach you like Adobe Framemaker, Dita, or some other daily tools utilized by tech. writers. My Uni wanted $3,200 for a nine month program and it wasn’t online. The final capstone project is to make a manual or document. Also, I glanced over what I am doing each week it just seems to just talk about the surface of technical writing. I don’t even think I learn a little about HTML or Java. I guess I thought of this program too highly. I mean what do I need. Should I go to Udemy or other “cheaper” online websites to help supplement my technical writing course? I’m sort of lost on what I should learn more to help my chances of landing a job. I did some scouring and research on what Technical writing is and how portfolios are important before I took on the course. I know portfolios are more important than some certificate, but I feel this course will help me start correctly hopefully.

My other dilemma. I majored in English at the University of Washington and I left to teach English in Korea for a couple years and I came back this past summer. I absolutely hate teaching now, especially middle school students who are just a pain sometimes. I tried to teach to my fullest extent and with happiness. I learned the hard way that it wasn’t really satisfying. Now at the age of 30 it has been hard to get even retail jobs. I applied to Costco like 5 times, Gamestop, even my Uni for temporary positions. Not a single call or e-mail. Maybe it’s because of my Korean ethnicity even though I am an American citizen. I have no idea. I’m getting desperate in my life and I feel I need some advice and some encouragement. I'm hoping I made the right decision to venture into Technical Writing. I always wanted to write about technology whether it’s for gaming, or user manuals, for a software program, or app. I just need guidance on what I should do. For those reading this I thank you from the deepest of my heart. Life has been tough ever since I got back to states.

submitted by /u/Fourwude87
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I have two job offers as a technical writer from Apple and Facebook. This is my first job in the US as a tech writer. I am having a hard time picking a company. Can anyone give me an advice, cons and pros, may be, to help make a decision. Thanks!

submitted by /u/j2010k
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Technical Writing | Reddit by /u/lundrimlluga - 2d ago

Hi guys, I'll try to keep this short, I recently graduated from college, my major was computer sciences, I am currently working as a digital marketing strategist, but I do want to take on technical writing and really start doing my research and understanding it, I see it as a really stable career and have been wanting to eventually make a career out of it ever since high school. My question would be: are there any good books and materials to start with that any of you have used when you started technical writing. All help is deeply appreciated. Thanks.

submitted by /u/lundrimlluga
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I've heard abbreviations like SME, pronounced "smee," for subject matter expert.

What are some other common acronyms, abbreviations, and terms used in technical writing?

submitted by /u/salebote
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Hey, I’m kind of curious to what the Tech writing salary world is like out there. I was kind of thrown into this field a few years back and other than me, I don’t know many others or what the going price per location is. I can start off though, 90K, NYC.

submitted by /u/jk-white
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Hey folks, I’ve been doing bad some digging and was having a hard time finding answers to my question, so I thought I’d try and gather some thoughts on this. For context, I currently work at a software company providing SaaS cloud solutions to medium and large-scale enterprises.

I recently had a phone interview for another software company (in a different industry) where they asked if I could provide writing samples of my previous or current work. My concern however, is that a lot of my previous and current work is only available as online help files for customers with registered accounts. Users must authenticate before they can access the content.

The content is available to any customer that has purchased a license. Under standard NDA practices, would the files be considered proprietary, restricting me from sharing copies of these online help files? Or can they be considered fair game since they’re already available to any customer?

Would it be safer to share these files if I edited them first to remove branding and strike out references to the product itself? Are there any other steps I should take to ensure I don’t violate my employer’s NDA?

submitted by /u/Pandaman246
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Hello! I’m currently getting my Bachelor of Science in Technical Writing and Editing, which is an extended major at my school. It includes the writing aspect, but also video production courses, graphic design and mobile/social media courses.

As to the title of my post, I’m considering doing a minor in something tech related, but I honestly don’t want to write for software and hardware. But would you all recommend getting a minor for more marketability after college?

I honestly want to go into different industries as a technical writer. I’d love to do medical tech writing and writer for heavy machinery and chemistry industries. Is this that hard to do? How much do SME’s and research help vs. already having ample industry knowledge going in?

Thank you!

submitted by /u/SnarkyMalarcky
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So as the title says, what are the odds of getting a job without a university degree, but a college certificate specifically in Technical Writing?

submitted by /u/galleria_suit
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