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Been doing searches but I'm hoping you guys may have some hidden gems.

submitted by /u/BlueFreedom420
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Just as the title says, I trained with Adam Mizner everyday for a week about eight hours a day and I'm here to answer questions regarding my experiences there. For those wondering, "why?", my answer is simple; I saw some footage online and heard many people calling it fake but I also know someone I trained with that vouched for him as hard as he could, so I wanted to find out for myself. To be clear, I'm not interested in your opinions on Adam or his teachings nor will I entertain insincere questions such as, "why did you feel the need to waste your money lol". I will answer questions as honestly as I can and in my own time. If I feel too many people are asking insincere questions, I will just remove the thread.

Some background on me so you have some context: I've been training Uechi Ryu Karate for over 20 years alongside Okinawan Kobudo. Somewhere around 17 years ago I began training in Iaido and about 7 years ago I started practicing various forms of Tai Chi. Keep in mind when I say trained, I mean hard training involving competition, kumite, and traveling to meet instructors in Japan.

Keeping that in mind, ask away!

submitted by /u/Stabby_McStabbinz
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My instructor said something about trying this out. He said I can use a rolling pin, gave it a try. Not too sure how I feel about it. Already, I have a difficult time with my shoulders opening up, but it definitely isn't happening when holding a pin.

What's your guy's take on this?

submitted by /u/Micpyo
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I've been practicing tai'chi for a while, and have recently gained some interest in Chen style tai'chi chuan. I'm specifically curious about the jin of cannon fist. In the fajin of tai'chi styles that I'm used to, contact is made with the opponent, then chi travels through the body and out the point of contact to propel the opponent. But in cannon fist, it appears the attacking limb itself is fajinned and propelled into the opponent using concussive force. Is this correct? Is any muscular tension used to achieve this result, in a similar way to how many hybrid styles (internal+external) use muscular tension combined with chi to execute the strike with more power than purely muscular force, but still is done in a similar way to only using muscular force? If there are any Chen style practitioners that could explain the chi flow of cannon fist, or clarify any misconceptions I have about the jin of cannon fist, that would be much appreciated.

submitted by /u/SatoriInstigator
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I used to be one of those people that always said consistency was more important than how long you practise for. Consistency is still important, but now I think 3 hours of doing the form twice a week would produce better results than 30 minutes a day.

It seems to me that it takes time before you really get into the "zone" of being productive. And this goes for anything not just Taijiquan.

I used to give advice that it's better to do a little bit a day, but now I would say the complete opposite and say it's better to take a good chunk of time like 1.5 - 3 hours and do nothing but practise. Or work every day toward doing more and more, start with 10 minutes but then keep adding another 5 minutes every other day. Or do the form once a day, but keep adding more repetitions as you get better until you can do it 8 times in a row.

submitted by /u/202700000000
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"一日練一日功, 一日不練十日空" 1 day's training is 1 day's gain, 1 day's no train is 10 day's vain - Unofficial translation by yours truly

submitted by /u/raylltalk
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Hi all,

I’ve been a lurker for a while and a lurker in Taiji in general (just researching schools and places and not actually going).

My new job is right by the Chinese Gong Fu Institute in Chicago and is owned and lead by Master Hong-Chao Zhang.

Based on all the research I’ve done, he and the class seem legit, but I just wanted to see if there were any locals or mutual acquaintances of the school/Master Zhang I could ask about with the class, his form, his instruction, etc.

submitted by /u/samodeous
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