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will share via email - I have a hard time writing about myself so as much constructive criticism as possible would be great :)

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Chronic disease and poor health citations: https://old.reddit.com/r/California_Politics/comments/bsp4gr/why_californias_efforts_to_limit_soda_keep/eop3dmb/

What is being done about this?

I wrote up this document for my US legislators that lists the problems, suggested solutions, background information, similar legislation, financial impacts, etc.: https://old.reddit.com/r/California_Politics/comments/b7o7yh/follow_up_to_recent_thread_about_new_appointment/

It seems that people's who's job it is to increase public health are failing. Fewer people may be dying from infectious disease, but the vast majority of the population is now extremely unhealthy, poorly developed, and poorly functioning.

The data supports it. Your eyes should support it unless you're living in a bubble or your perception has been warped due to unhealthy becoming the new norm.

How to get guidelines and practice updated based on the latest research?

Completing antibiotic courses: There seems to be significantly more evidence against than for https://archive.fo/qikfW#selection-789.0-789.1. Yet it seems like this hasn't disseminated through the medical system nor the public.

Time to consider the risks of caesarean delivery for long term child health (2015): https://www.bmj.com/content/350/bmj.h2410 - I could not find any evidence that this recommended review took place.

Antibiotics for dental work: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/did-his-artificial-hips-put-him-at-risk-of-infection-when-he-saw-the-dentist/2016/10/07/1a0d4b54-60a5-11e6-9d2f-b1a3564181a1_story.html - no evidence they help yet dentists are randomly giving them out. Another in 2019.

Antibiotics for GBS is not evidence-based [1][2].

Damage to our host-native microbiome is likely a major contributor to the drastic increases in chronic disease and general poor health; plus recommended actions: https://old.reddit.com/r/collapse/comments/bat7ml/while_antibiotic_resistance_gets_all_the/

Previously someone said "people who's job it is are doing it". Well, I don't see any evidence they are. Where are the reassessments of caesarean as was called for 4 years ago? Where are the reassessments of antibiotics for GBS?

Moreover, where is the systematic review of the literature and updating of doctors and changes in practice? Where are the systematic reductions in procedures and prescriptions deemed unnecessary with potential harm? [1][2][3][4][5]

None of these things seem to exist. Specifically in the US, but in a number of other countries as well. Eg:

A staggering 36,000 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are published each year, on average, and it typically takes about 17 years for findings to reach clinical practice (2017): https://catalyst.nejm.org/implementing-evidence-based-practices-quickly

We don't have 17 years to fix these systemic microbiome and chronic disease problems. They are spiraling out of control, and if we lose our host-native microbiome that's been evolving alongside us for thousands/millions of years we may never get it back.

Other examples here, including:

"As a doctor for 17 years I have slowly and reluctantly come to the conclusion that as it stands now we have a complete healthcare system failure and an epidemic of misinformed doctors and misinformed and harmed patients" - Aseem Malhotra

There's been a ton of new microbiome research in the past 4 years. It doesn't seem like guidelines and practices are keeping up with it.

Most of the guidelines seem to only take into account the threat of resistance. Up to date guidelines would take into account the known damage of antibiotics that extend far beyond resistance.

Patients can't be expected to read and interpret the literature themselves. My experience with this is that it is not effective to try and spread info to patients in a non-systematic way. Patients can't be expected to be well informed on these issues, and seem to often make emotional decisions contrary to the evidence, even on the rare occasions when they do review it. Though I know even some doctors who work close to these patients do the same.

It's incredibly important for there to be a body of experts who's primary job it is to review the latest literature and update guidelines accordingly (and those guidelines need to be readily enacted), but there seems to be severe deficits, if not a complete absence of such. Eg: c-section rates that vary drastically from hospital to hospital within the same country/state [1][2].

Previously I was arguing something related (informed consent, and reducing unnecessary procedures where antibiotics are required), and at least one person misconstrued my argument to mean I was advocating against antibiotics during surgery. They mentioned BMJ's GRADE system to me so I went ahead and checked what I could find.

The only thing I was able to find was a 1990 article saying antibiotics aren't always necessary during c-sections https://www.bmj.com/content/300/6716/2. Yet as far as I know, they are given out 100% of the time in the US. Also, the article ignores collateral damage done to the human microbiome, but that's not surprising considering it was written in 1990. But I cannot find one written in the past 10 years.

I also found: Antibiotics are the main cause of life threatening allergic reactions during surgery (2018): https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k2124

submitted by /u/MaximilianKohler
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Study finds significant use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines in Sub-Saharan Africa not just because of a lack of resources or access to conventional medicine news-medical.net/news/2...

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181218092957.htm

submitted by /u/peboo7
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Close to half of survivors are using traditional and complementary medicine (product and practitioners) since their discharge from an Ebola treatment centre. Ebola survivors who are traditional and complementary medicine users value safety, personal experience of effectiveness, patient autonomy and the need to boost the body’s immunity when using traditional and complementary medicine.

https://www.mdpi.com/1010-660X/55/7/387/htm

submitted by /u/peboo7
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Close to half of survivors are using traditional and complementary medicine (product and practitioners) since their discharge from an Ebola treatment centre. Ebola survivors who are traditional and complementary medicine users value safety, personal experience of effectiveness, patient autonomy and the need to boost the body’s immunity when using traditional and complementary medicine.

https://www.mdpi.com/1010-660X/55/7/387/htm

submitted by /u/peboo7
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Hey all! I’m transferring in this fall to an online bs in Health Studies. Previously I was going to get a Spanish minor but only because I clep’d out of 12 credits, so it would be easy. But I’ve been reading a lot on this sub and elsewhere about how in demand data skills are so I’m looking into changing my minor to community informatics.

This will set my grad date back by at least one semester (if not more, I’m not sure I can manage full time course work with my full time job, I’m going to see how I handle this semester at 9 credits) because I would have to take 18 credits instead of the 6 I’m missing for Spanish.

Its worth it right? I’d learn about database management, big data + high powered computing (nosql, MapReduce, and Hadoop would be covered) and have an entire class on SAS programming fundamentals.

My bachelors will set me up for the CHES exam, but I think really I want to angle my career away from direct patient/client education and more into big picture stuff. I’m currently working at a nonprofit clinic as a testing coordinator (i think some places might call my position risk reduction specialist), and I find I enjoy the patient interaction/ education least out of everything (but I do still enjoy it).

I’m currently thinking I’ll go on for an MPH in biostatistics or informatics, and I figure that these classes will be a good test run to make sure I’d enjoy that sort of work at least!

TLDR: changing my minor to community informatics should provide enough of a benefit in my career to justify the extra time and effort, right?

submitted by /u/Thequeerestkidyoukno
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I'm applying to MPH programs for the Fall of 2020 and I was wondering if anyone had any input on the "appropriate" number of programs to apply to. I essentially don't want to kill myself applying to too many schools, since I'll be in my last year of college, but I also do want to improve my chances of getting into some program.

submitted by /u/cep204
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Hey guys, its me, Robab. :) I'm an undergrad at JHU.

I'm going to be doing a public health research project of my choosing next year, and depending on certain factors, I might get a couple thousand to do it but no more than $10k or I might get $0 and not do it at all :'( lmfao.

I'm interested in several public health research areas, particularly refugee/migrant health, political determinants of health, and pharmaceutical cover-ups/ghost-writing (although thats not really a "research area" is it..?). I'm not sure which of these areas are most feasible for conducting research, and if so, how to go about it. For instance, in the case of researching refugee/migrant health, is my only means of researching that area by going to a refugee-concentrated location and conducting surveys? What kinds of research have you guys done in these areas and how did you get started?

Thanks a lot for your help, 'appreciate it.

submitted by /u/cuteraspberries
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