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Hello all, I’m brand new to bookbinding and it is quickly becoming my new hobby (well, coupled with designing my own journals/planners).

My first attempt resulted in a trip to urgent care after I tried to cut off a finger. To my defense, I was working off of 2 hours of sleep. Because of sleep deprivation, I made the poor decision to switch from my giant plastic straight edge to a tiny metal sewing ruler.

Now that I have recovered, I’m apprehensive to correct my mistake by buying an appropriately sized metal ruler to trim future journals. Also, my journals will be thicker now (current version is 96 pages, but this is still fluctuating).

Should I just bite the bullet and buy a guillotine cutter now? If so, should I try to find an older, antique version, or buy a new one? Or should I get over my mistake and purchase an appropriate metal ruler that won’t risk my digits?

Thanks in advance!

submitted by /u/foxeylocks
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Here are some photos: https://imgur.com/a/dptE2wZ

Hello all! I started by watching Sea Lemon's videos and I got the materials necessary to make my own book.

I ended up using Tomoe River paper (10 envelopes, 10 pages each) which was a slight mistake because of the fact that it ripped super easily when threading with the curved needle and waxed thread I had.

My awl wasn't super sharp and I am not a precise person so making the text block was an exercise in my patience.

The gluing, I used way too much. Note to self for next time. Fortunately it hasn't stood in my way of writing in my precious book.

Overall, I loved the process! I am going to be doing it again soon. I just got some Mulberry paper to do so. If you have any questions, feel free to ask!

Edit: included info about pages per envelope.

submitted by /u/CatsandQuacks
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TL:DR - Best practices for making paper appear old while still being long-lasting?

Hi. I'm interested in making a couple of spellbooks. I'd like to give them a false sense of age. I've seen tea and coffee used, but also heard of the damage to paper from the acidity. Are there good ways to prevent the damage? Or are there better ways to artificially age the paper?

Presently I'm looking into using coffee with bakimg soda, tested with ph strips.

submitted by /u/DavidAudenNash
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I'm looking to buy the witcher books but I don't like soft covers. I could buy the hard-bound covers but they are out of print and cost more than I'm willing to pay.

submitted by /u/chicken_lipps
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Sorry if I’m posting this in the wrong place!

I bought this old first edition copy of a book from 1927. It’s in pretty good condition but the pages are quite delicate and most of them are stuck together at the bottom. Is there any explanation for this? It’s certainly isn’t from any apparent damage to the book, and looks by all means intentional?

submitted by /u/joeytwodart424
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