Loading...

Follow Reddit » Bicycle Touring on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Reddit » Bicycle Touring by /u/djdjejdndjejdnx - 11h ago
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I have been touring for 12 years and am considering adding a mirrorless camera, maybe Olympus OMD-EM1 mkii, to my touring gear. (The appeal of this camera is the amazing image stabilization, ultrafast auto focus and dustproof/splashproof body.) Through touring, I discovered a love of photography and making short Youtube videos. My current cameras are GoPro Hero 7 Black and S8+ smart phone which, for the most part, do surprisingly well. Where I'm struggling for decent photos are street shots/video in low light and anytime I need to zoom in - especially getting wildlife pics. My concern is the fiddlyness of using lenses. I'm thinking to get a prime and another lens with moderate zoom. What is your experience about using a mirrorless on the road? How often do you use a tripod? Deciding on camera gear for touring is very difficult. Many, many thanks!

submitted by /u/sylviahalpern
[visit reddit] [comments]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

How good/bad is the cycling equipment from decathlon( I am posting here for sole reason because we are going to use it on tour)? I am not trying to risk buying high importance stuff like Mat or cycling shorts but other stuff price range looks very very attractive given I am living in small economy which has prices inflated on stuff like that to the moon and back (basically I saw some bikeshops already closed that were open last year and were open for 5-10 years upon decathlon opening). Sooo glasses(1set of clear glass with UV protection) for 4.6euro, windshield(not waterproof) for 13. Stuff like that is fine buy from decathlon if they fit person or I am missing something?

submitted by /u/Vidmantasb
[visit reddit] [comments]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For those who have a Tout Terrain bicycle or a bicycle with integrated rack, how do they behave on heavy usage? In a review (German) I read that they can became ugly:

!["However, the painted stainless steel luggage carrier looks only unused good."](https://www.stahl-rad.de/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2016/05/Tout_Terrain_Tanami_Xplore_Gepaecktraeger.jpg)

That makes sense, probably these are the same bike painting damages those the bikepacking bikes have because of the bags? I don't know how that affects the lifetime of the frame. You can replace an external rack, but you are bound to the integrated one.

submitted by /u/Gabor-Meszaros
[visit reddit] [comments]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Reddit » Bicycle Touring by /u/takeshita_kenji - 2d ago

Food while out on the bike has always been difficult for me, and I'm looking for some new ideas. While I have books like Feed Zone Portables, a lot of the options don't really speeak to me. I'm looking for things for both 12-20 hour day rides and multi-day tours, though the choices for both can definitely be different. I'm also trying to avoid heavily processed things like energy gels, but I'm open to the suggestion. Lastly, I'd rather not have to pick stuff up daily, as rural general store wares tend to be pretty expensive.

Things I've tried in the past were:

  1. Toasted sandwiches: While they were generally satisfying, they were pretty hard to chew, didn't digest very easily as the day went on—I'd end up "stopped up" eventually—and they were dehydrating. They also involved a lot of different ingredients to keep track of. I can't eat cheese anymore, so the choices here aren't so appealing anymore.
  2. Muffins: Also very satisfying, but ended up not digesting very well eventually and I always ended up craving salt. They weren't as dehydrating as #1, but they were along the way.
  3. Trail mix and granola: While adapting to my first 2+ week-long tour, I ate a lot of these. They were somewhat satisfying, but very hard to chew and very dehydrating. The trail mix made me sick more readily than anything else.
  4. Burritos: I got the idea from watching Dustin Klein's videos. Generally, I'd fill them with black beans cooked with kombu, and rice. They were only somewhat satisfying, but didn't carry the dehydration issues as much as the above options. Even with the kombu, I'd eventually have bad indigestion and gas. I also am very bad at folding burritos and they ended up being too small to keep me full for very long. I guess I could try packing more of them for a ride.
  5. Fruit: I mainly pack this as snacks, and they are generally satisfying. Things like apples, oranges, and bananas keep pretty well at room temperature for a few days.
  6. Pickles: Very satisfying on a hard day, but also merely snacks.
  7. Jerky: Very expensive, but satisfying in a pinch.

Aside from granola, I can't really think of any meals that'd last for a few days.

What have you guys tried, and what's worked?

submitted by /u/takeshita_kenji
[visit reddit] [comments]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

On our way back home my family and I are looking at going from Northern India into Southern Pakistan and to Iran.

While I already know we will have to get our paki Visas in our home towns I was wondering if anyone else had any experiences on a route like this. How rough is northern India, are the roads to Nepal worth popping in up there? Is Kashmir worth it and safe? Same with the Pakistani coastline towards Iran. What should we go out of our way to see or places to be? Would it be better to enter near Lahore or Karachi?

submitted by /u/Mixedstereotype
[visit reddit] [comments]
Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hi Guys,

I'm planning to cycle from Amsterdam to Berlin on a vintage road bike late April.
I was planning on following the Eurovelo 2 and I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice regarding the following:

Where in Amsterdam can I buy a map?

Will the weather be ok?

And were can I sleep along the way (I was planning on camping but last time I cycled through Holland I had a problem finding suitable campsites).

I'm in fairly good shape and plan on finishing the ride in about 4-5 days (though depending on the weather and assuming I don't get lost I could do it in less time)

In addition if anyone wants to come with me... I plan on leaving Amsterdam on April 22

submitted by /u/mokerler
[visit reddit] [comments]
Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview