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I'm not sure if this is the place to ask, but I'm having real difficulty squeezing out a perfect grade as a physics undergraduate. I feel I know the material in most of my courses very well, and most would say my grades reflect that, being mostly in the 92-98 range. Thing is, I have never gotten a perfect grade on a final and it's bothering me as I'm a perfectionist by nature. I always make one careless mistake on every exam, regardless of how much time I have left to check it.

What do you think is the thing separating somebody who got a perfect grade on a physics exam and somebody who consistently makes one mistake?

submitted by /u/xjustwaitx
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Seeing as Falcon heavy can carry at least 35 Merlin 1d engines to the moon( max payload to Mars is 16,800, and engine weight is 470) and it takes 9 of these engines, and also seeing as a gravity assist would be necessary to facilitate travel to Mars, could we send these engines to the moon prior, and then have them link up with The Falcon Heavy rocket during the gravity assist as a method of refueling without losing momentum

submitted by /u/rodent_relations
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I'm not sure how to start this post, but I'll try...

I got accepted to a scholarship from a university in my country to study my bachelor's in the US, then come back to continue my master's in the university. I just finished high school and plan to study physics in bachelor's and hopefully continue in a research career. For my fortune, they just started an Applied Physics master's and Ph.D program in the university I'll be forced to take my master's from (not saying it's bad). They don't have a Physics program because the university focuses on applied research.

The problem now is that they want anyone who chose "Physics" as his/her major in bachelor's to change it to "Applied Physics". I can negotiate with them to allow me to major in "Physics", but it's not guaranteed. The problem is that I almost know nothing about "Applied Physics" as a bachelor's major. I'm afraid that if I study Applied Physics from the beginning I'll miss out on a lot of the knowledge and the deep understanding of the theories of physics, but I'm not sure if that's the case.

Can someone with experience explain to me the differences between majoring in "Applied Physics" and "Physics" in my bachelor's with details?

Am I really gonna miss out on important knowledge? Will I be able to understand the theories and concepts of physics as deep as a regular physics major does?

If "no" for the former question, what's the recommended solution for that? Double major in Applied Physics and Physics? Or am I gonna be able to get the wanted knowledge in theories by taking elective courses (I don't know the american education system well)? If "yes" will this be enough to graduate with the same level of knowledge and understanding of theories as if I was a "Physics" major? Or is the best solution simply trying to major in "Physics" and taking electives in "Applied Physics" to prepare for my master's?

Thanks for reading. I need as detailed answers and as many opinions as possible to help me decide.

submitted by /u/HappyMask20022
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Would the existence of exotic matter imply an entire periodic table of elements with negative mass numbers? How would the discovery of the existence of such matter change the field of physics and how could it be synthesized if it does exist? Is an atom with a negative mass number even legal in our universe? I know that it would alter if not break causality, however, (warning stupid speculation based on zero evidence) I don’t think it would be impossible for it to exist, I think that the wormhole gravity time dilation loops it would allow for would not allow for you to change matter in the past, just observe, preserving causality in some form. The mechanics of this I cannot explain.

What are your thoughts on the status of exotic matter and negative mass? Do you believe it exists? If it does I do wonder how it could be synthesized, there are most likely smaller and even more basic particles that we do not know of that would have to be manipulated to achieve this.

Sorry for talking nonsense, just really intrigued and wanted to share.

submitted by /u/NakedCallWriter
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