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So I am currently a customer service rep for an outbound call center that deals with proxy voting for various funds and companies. I am not really satisfied with this entry level mindless job, especially because when I started the position I was put in as an admin, never touched a phone, and had much more responsibility workload than now. I also have a bachelor's degree (in Psychology) and the customer service rep position only requires a high school degree. I started applying for other jobs like crazy when my hours were reduced to 16 hours a week (I'm a temp so they don't guarantee any amount of hours). I am really trying to get my career path on track to become a project manager or in a project management role.

My current department's managers really love me since I was such a huge asset to them when I was an admin and when they caught wind that I was applying to other positions they immediately offered me a Business Analyst position. I'd work pretty independently and have a lot of say in the department's projects, and would be put in a position dealing with creating, managing and analyzing those projects.

However, I've also been offered, within the same company but a different department, a Project Administrator position. I'd work with managing class action settlement projects underneath the supervision of a Project Manager. I don't know much about the role beyond that which was what the job description says and what the interviewer explained to me.

I have yet to know either of the salaries but my department said they'd be pretty competitive with whatever the Project Administrator position promises to pay me.

My question is, which job should I go for if I really want my career to be in project managment? I know it seems that choosing the Project Administrator would be a no brainer but from what I've been told by others is that being a Business Analyst lets me be much more independent and much more involved in the decision making in the projects I'd work on as opposed to working underneath a Project Manager. I've also been told a Business Analyst position looks way better on a resume than a Project Administrator. The people who told me that don't really know much about that career field, though, and might just be speculating.

I don't want pay to be a deciding factor because they'll probably be super close. I just want to know what other companies might look more favorably towards if I plan to apply in the future for project management roles.

Which job should I go for?

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Hi Reddit,

I was wondering whether anyone would care to lend any advice in regards to my current situation. A little bit of background first: I'm currently 24, I graduated with a first class degree in History (whoops) from a redbrick University in 2016. After graduating I moved home for a year to try and figure out where to go next. I spent the year doing various temp jobs and eventually got a job as a personal assistant/academic support worker for disabled University and College students (I also did this during the final year of my undergrad). I'm currently studying for an MA in International Relations and Mid-East Politics at the same University and still working as a PA/ASW. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy the line of work i'm currently in, but at the same time don't really want it to become a long-term career. So, i'm sort of in the same boat as I was at the end of my undergrad degree, still trying to figure out where to go/how to get there. I'm keeping my options open as I did before, applying for PHD studies and a few graduate schemes etc. The difference this time is that I think I've found something I kind of actually definitely want to do. On my year off I got involved in running a small music night in my hometown, and have been helping it grow ever since. I took on a few roles as part of this, I run the Instagram account and I've recently started trying to increase our online presence with a blog with regular features and content. The blog decision came around after I wrote a few articles for an online publication which is fairly big in our music scene. Off the back of this I've had a guy reach out to me and ask if I would be interested in writing some press packs for his firm on a freelance basis, I know the guy from the music stuff but he works for an engineering firm. The thing I've been figuring out recently is that I actually quite enjoy writing (about music especially, but also in general), I'm actually pretty good at it (going to look a right dick if there's any spelling/grammar errors in this post now) and I can do it pretty quickly and effectively. From here I've been thinking about the viability of becoming a freelance writer. I'm usually a bit unorganised but I've been collating everything into a little writing portfolio.

Well it took a while, but we got to a question finally:

Do you think it would be feasible for me to pursue a career as a free-lance pr writer, surviving off paychecks from writing for clients such as the engineering firm while still putting in a lot of work on the music side with a view to eventually writing solely within the music industry?

This is something I only started considering fairly recently so there's still a lot of research I need to do. I get to name my price for this engineering firm so need to figure out a reasonable rate and all that side of it. I'm basically just looking for a fairly broad answer as to the feasibility of my idea. If you did want to get into the nitty gritty details it would definitely be valuable, but no sweat if not :)

If you read this far I salute you

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Six years at my current workplace. (Counting part time, this was my first job out of high school) Recently went full time. My "position" is entry level, but many of the tasks I've learned over the past six and half years are not. I'm making 12$/hr, every person I tell this to is shocked that I'm making so little for what I do.

I'm just not sure how to start this conversation with them. My workplace is very casual (too casual for my liking which has lended itself to this situation), so I feel very comfortable telling my managers exactly how I feel and how much I hate this feeling. It manly consists of my "seniors" shirking their duties and letting me take care of everything.

But the discussion just feels like a one way street into saying I deserve a raise, and I'm not sure if I should just start with that?

I've read in so many articles that when speaking to your managers you should keep things strictly logistical, but I can't help but feel I need to get this feeling off my chest to them.

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Currently my job title is "Operations Analyst" my daily work consists of:

-monitoring systems -investigating production issues; performing root cause analysis and opening Dev issues if there are bugs or improvement/enhancements needed. -Desktop support (company is about 200 employees and NO active directory) -As well as working on side projects to improve productive, procedures etc.

There is a few more things involved, but that is the bulk of it.

I've been offered an Operations Manager position with another company, it would be a salary increase of about 20k maybe a bit more. I'm fine with the role and what it entails, I demonstrate leadership at my current position - however I don't know that management is something I want to do long-term right now.

When I first got into this field, I wanted to be an IT project manager, but over the past few years my mindset has shifted a bit and I want to be in a role that incorporates DevOps, typical job title would be "DevOps engineer".

My current manager knows I want to be involved in the DevOps side of the business, and it's my 2nd year with the company, and each year I feel I make minimal progress, but still some - towards this goal. I've been studying on my own but finding it hard to demonstrate any of it here and I'm not yet confident to apply for a position just yet, maybe in another year.

So my question is; should I take this job to make more money for the time being (I have a 1 yo daughter, so the money would help)? But it being a management role - will it hinder me going into an even more technical role in the near future? Or will companies see it as a plus?

I find this to be a sort of "rude" (maybe not the right word for it) approach, but should I speak with my current employer first and let them know and see if there is anything they can do?

It's a long post but hopefully I can get some honest and good feedback, thank you!

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I’m a sophomore in college and I don’t really have any idea what i want to do with my life. Right now I’m a dual bio/psych major because I really like both of those fields, but sometimes I wonder if I want a career with that. I love nature and the outdoors and traveling, and I want a career that at least gives me time to enjoy the outdoors and travel some. I was originally going to med school but now I’ve tossed that idea out the window. I feel too burnt out to go that route. I don’t have a problem with picking the wrong thing and then going back to school, but my problem is that I don’t even know what to pick right now. How do I get over this lack of motivation? How do I figure out what I want to do for the rest of my life?

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Long story short, I graduated with Marketing degree at 2010 and I failed getting a marketing job. I applied like crazy and networked like crazy.

In 2013, many people told me not give up but I gave up looking for a job. I was wondering what should I do next.

2015-2017, I completed MS in Statistics to become Data Analyst which is my next goal.

Now, I’m struggling getting a job as a data analyst. Ok. It’s just a half year since I graduated. Not that long time. But again, I’m afraid that same thing happens to me. Should I stop following my passion again? But even I stop following my passion, what’s next? When should I realize the reality and should stop following a dream job?

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Hey all!

I'm not necessarily looking for advice. I just wanted to express some of my thoughts from the day and this seemed like a good outlet. Sorry if I'm breaching this subreddit's guidelines.

I work in the IT/security field and I have grown a lot recently. I've gained a lot of skills/certifications and I generally am able to get a lot done. It hasn't always been peachy, but overall not bad.

Today was rough. I am the team lead on a project and we have a very small window of time to set up this system. I was hammered with technical questions and requests of things that I did not the answer to. At all. I didn't even know some of the things that certain groups of people were asking for existed. It was embarrassing. I felt the my face heat up and my brain spin into overdrive. But I have gotten to the point in my career where I don't like to bullshit people. I straight up told them I didn't understand and moved on from there. It sucked. I did research later and kept on moving.

I didn't feel great during and at the end of the day. But I made it to the end. We still have work to do on the project, and I learned a lot of things today. I didn't know what I didn't know, and I gained a lot of experience from that. It's pretty cool. Not knowing things can be embarrassing, but they will happen and they are huge learning experiences. We can't be expected to know everything. I think it is how we respond to those situations and learn from them that is important.

I'm not really seeking advice, but if you have anything to contribute, please do! Maybe I could have handled the situation better? I just wanted to share this because I felt like writing it somewhere, and maybe it will encourage someone.

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Reddit | Career Advice by /u/melbell518 - 1d ago

I have a masters in Industrial/Organizational Psych. Im currently not using it. A lot of the jobs i want also want project management experience, which i dont have. I don’t even have basic knowledge of it. My mentor suggested taking some courses. I can take some courses through my alum which would run about 8-13k depending on my path. I see that Groupon also has some courses that are offered. Which would be the better route?

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Reddit | Career Advice by /u/embervayne - 1d ago

I’m 25 and after years of struggling with depression and health I’m finally getting my life together and pursuing my dreams.

I’ve wanted to be a veterinarian since I was a child but didn’t have any self confidence.

With the passing of my father and only brother I’ve kicked myself into gear and have started looking into my options and building my confidence.

It’s a lot of schooling and I’ll be in my mid 30’s by the time I finish. Is it too late to pursue my dream career? I know it will be long and hard but I think it will be worth it.

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Company X has offered me a job. Company Y interviewed me twice and most recently said “we’ll be reaching out with a decision soon. Company X would like a decision on my end ASAP, but knows I am waiting on a decision from company Y before I make a decision.

With that said, should I reach out to company Y and ask when they’ll have a decision / should I mention my offer from company X?

Thank you.

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