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Did no one tell Panelo that the “Reed Bank” has no shoreline since it is completely under water???? By Raïssa Robles On national TV and radio, presidential spokesman Sal Panelo tried to belittle the story of the 22 Filipino fishermen whose boat was rammed and sunk without warning by a Chinese ship, which then fled the scene. Panelo told Ted Failon during a live interview over DZMM and Channel 26 that certain “facts” on the ramming incident had to be straightened out. One “fact” that Panelo claimed needed correction was the statement of the fishermen that they were anchored near the Reed Bank. He said this was an argument being used by those who say the ramming was intentional, because the boat was anchored “sa may shoreline” of the Reed Bank. The lawyer Panelo in effect told Failon that was not true. [READ MORE...]
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By Raïssa Robles Senate President Vicente Sotto III changed two crucial details of his story questioning the credibility of whistle blower “Bikoy” in the two press conferences he staged just two days apart. Because of Sotto’s revelations, Senator Panfilo Lacson canceled the appearance of Peter Joemel Advincula alias "Bikoy" at the Senate. As a senator and Senate President, the public accords Sotto’s statements with the presumption of regularity—that what he says is what is true. But what if he changes certain crucial details of his story in two press conferences made two days apart?[READ MORE...]
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Resibo By Raïssa Robles When Imee Marcos, the dictator’s daughter, was asked about Martial Law and the excesses of her family, she dismissed the question with a bald-faced lie. She did not know much about it, she said, because she was too young. What she didn’t know was that in the family's eagerness to escape the mob, they scurried  out of the presidential palace that fateful day of February 1986, leaving behind incriminating documents on their ill-gotten wealth. One of the documents showed that Imee tried to make singil from her dad’s dummies the shares they held in trust in many companies for Ferdinand Marcos. [READ MORE...]
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By Raïssa Robles When the police or National Bureau of Investigation agents armed with a search warrant, knock at your gate in dead of night to seize your digital devices, and then “invite” you to go with them, would you go? And should you go? The case of Rodel Jayme is a test case of how far our rights are being bent and twisted by authorities. Burly men from the NBI came knocking at Rodel Jayme’s gate at 4 AM of May 2, Thursday, armed only with a “search warrant”, to search and seize his digital devices. He and the entire household must have been scared out of their wits. [READ MORE...]
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Marcos-style arrest for blogger who shared “Ang Totoong Narcolist” video links Or why Rodel Jayme’s arrest is repressive and could happen to anyone By Raïssa Robles The arrest today of blogger Rodel Jayme was appalling and repressive.
NEWS FLASH as of 5:50 PM, May 2, 2019: As I was writing this, I wanted to look up the YouTube channel of Ang Totoong Narco List and found that it no longer existed. It had been deleted. It was deleted HOURS AFTER THE ARREST OF RODEL JAYME. So if RODEL JAYME owns the channel, how could he have deleted it while under the custody of the National Bureau of Investigation? Or if indeed he owned the channel, did someone from the National Bureau of Investigation or the government delete it, using Jayme's computer which NBI had seized? Or did YouTube, on its own delete, the channel after receiving a request or order from the Philippine government?
[READ MORE...]
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By Raïssa Robles In recent weeks, the kiss-kiss, hug-hug relations between Manila and Beijing officials have ever so slightly cooled. The reason - summer has brought several hundred Chinese fishing boats around Pag-Asa island, just as the Philippine military is about to do a major facelift of its facilities there, including the air strip and airport. The summer winds blowing through Malacañang Palace seem to have also inspired officials to sing a different tune  about the South China Sea. This afternoon, presidential spokesman Salvador Panelo held for the first time a "virtual presser" for reporters from the foreign media. I would not have known about it had not not my editors assigned me to it. Do you know that nearly three years after assuming the presidency, President Rodrigo Duterte has yet to deliver a major policy speech before the foreign media, including the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines? Neither has his foreign secretaries ever met FOCAP. [READ MORE...]
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By Raïssa Robles At 7 in the evening of Thursday, I am sitting in the dark being stung by mosquitoes. There is no electricity and no water. This reminds me so much of the dying days of dictator Ferdinand Marcos' Martial Law, when electric power went on and off and the trickle in the taps went dry for most of the day. I actually had to go to a deep well in the neighborhood to haul water. Nowadays, there is no deep well near my home from which to draw water. I just have to rely on the very upredictable water service interruptions of Manila Water. The water comes on around 6 AM or 7 AM, or not. If it does, the taps suddenly go dry mid-morning, then resume around lunchtime, or sometimes not. Then around 3 or 4 PM, the taps only make gurgling sounds. [READ MORE...
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Ranks up there with—the dog ate my homework Just My Opinion By Raïssa Robles President Rodrigo Duterte claims the International Criminal Court cannot prosecute him mainly because the Rome Statute which created the ICC never took effect in the Philippines. He argues that although the Senate did ratify it,  the Rome Statute was never published in the Official Gazette nor in any Philippine newspaper of general circulation. Thus, he concludes in his nine-page “Statement” issued on March 13, 2018: “There being no jurisdiction of the said law, it stands to reason that the Rome Statute cannot be enforceable in the Philippines hence the International Criminal Court has not acquired jurisdiction nor can it acquire jurisdiction over my person.” This lame excuse is similar to a student telling his teacher that the dog ate his homework. [READ MORE...]
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Dean Froilan Bacungan explained why he allowed Imee to enroll but not graduate See for yourself: Imee Marcos is NOT in UP’s 1983 official yearbook of graduates My thanks to all those who leaked the documents to me By Raïssa Robles I always knew that Imee Marcos, daughter of dictator Ferdinand Marcos, never graduated from the University of the Philippines College of Law. I heard this directly from the UP law professors who had her as a student or were teaching there at that time. I heard this directly from my father, the late Prof. Jose F. Espinosa, who became UP Law evening dean and who was one of Imee Marcos’ professors and, briefly, her tutor. I heard this directly from Professors Ed Labitag, Carmelo Sison, Myrna Feliciano, Haydee Yorac, and even from UP law dean Irene Cortes (my godmother in my confirmation). I was told that because Imee did not fulfill all the requirements for graduating from UP Law, they held graduation ceremonies just for her and her parents. At that time, though, I had attributed her not finishing and graduating to her pregnancy. [READ MORE...]
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EXCLUSIVE By Raïssa Robles

Even when the Philippines was a colony under Spain and the US, the prescription period—or length of time within which a libel case has to be filed—never ran beyond two years.

So why and when did the prescription period for libel suddenly become twelve years?

[READ MORE...]

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